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"Jackson, MS"

Letter from Massachusetts Mental Health Center to MLK

Tuesday, January 16, 1962

Drs. Myron Sharaf and Milton Greenblatt invite Dr. King to speak at the Commonwealth of Massachusetts' Department of Mental Health where the staff and researchers share an interest in ending "hate in social life."

I've Been To The Mountaintop

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Dr. King delivers the "I've Been to the Mountaintop" speech at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, TN.

Mass Mailing from the Model Inner city Community Organization

Thursday, February 23, 1967

This is a form letter from the Reverend Walter E. Fauntroy informing the Shaw neighborhood of Washington, D.C. about Dr. King's visit to help revitalize the area.

Telegram from A. G. Downing to MLK

Monday, October 19, 1964

A. G. Downing, executive secretary of the Southern California Baptist Convention, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

An Address by MLK at the 53rd Convention of the NAACP

Dr. King makes an address at the 53rd Convention of the National Association for the Advancement of Color People in Atlanta disputing the myths of the civil rights movement. In addition to expressing appreciation for the organization's work, Dr. King apologizes for the prejudice the NAACP had to endure in making accommodations for the conference in Atlanta.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Leon H. Sullivan

Wednesday, October 31, 1962

Dr. King thanks Rev. Leon Sullivan for visiting Atlanta and delivering a powerful message. Dr. King had asked Rev. Sullivan to come to Atlanta and meet with local ministers to discuss the selective patronage program Sullivan developed in Philadelphia. This program became the model for SCLC's Operation Breadbasket.

God

Dr. King writes about God, according to the first chapter of the Old Testament book, Nahum.

The Baccalaureate Service of Keuka College

Sunday, June 16, 1963

Dr. King gives the baccalaureate sermon for Keuka College on June 16, 1963.

Letter from Senora Springfied to MLK

Tuesday, September 6, 1966

Mrs. Senora Springfied requests that Dr. King send Leon Hall, an SCLC employee, back to Grenada, Mississippi. She praises Hall and mentions that the town needs leaders like him.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Monica Wilson

Saturday, April 3, 1965

Dora McDonald, on behalf of Dr. King, responds to Monica Wilson at the University of Cape Town in acceptance of her invitation to speak at the institution. McDonald closes requesting confirmation of a date for Dr. King, as well as accommodation information.

MLK Announces End of Montgomery Bus Boycott

Thursday, December 20, 1956

Dr. King, as President of the Montgomery Improvement Association, issued this statement following the US Supreme Court’s decision declaring laws requiring segregation on busses unconstitutional. He announces that the year-long bus boycott is officially over and urges Negroes to return to the buses the next morning on a non-segregated basis. Negroes need to adopt a spirit of understanding toward their white brothers, he says. It is time to move from protest to reconciliation.

Letter from Negro Non-Commissioned Officers to Civil Rights Leaders

Saturday, January 7, 1967

The non-commissioned officers of Fort Polk write major civil rights organizations and publications to share their story of segregation and discrimination in the town of Leesville. The authors hope that their letter will be published - exposing the injustices.

Letter from Constance A. Price to David J. Hahn

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Constance Price informs David Hahn, Colorado State Senator, of how she has suffered for the past twelve years due to the violation of her constitutional rights as guaranteed by the Workman's Compensation Act of Colorado.

Telegram from Rev. Loe Champion to MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968

Dr. King was the recipient of this Western Union telegram from Rev. Loe Champion of the Milwaukee Operation Breadbasket, an economic project of the SCLC. Rev. Champion sent this telegram to show support for Dr. King's struggles in the South. The correspondence was sent two days after a march Dr. King led in Memphis, Tennessee in support of striking sanitation workers.

Letter from Frederic M. Hudson to MLK Regarding an Invitation

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Hudson, a Chaplain at Colby College, extends Dr. King an invitation to speak at the college. Mr. Hudson also offers some of the students to be possible volunteers for Dr. King.

Letter from Katarina Ungdomsrad to MLK

Wednesday, November 25, 1964

Dr. King is invited to speak to the social democratic youth club "Katarina." The representatives of Katarina wish he would be able to speak "about peace in our time." The planned date of the event follows a day after Dr. King is awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Monday, February 27, 1967

Mr. Schaefer writes Dora McDonald seeking confirmation for Dr. King's scheduled appearance at Kennett Square.

A. Philip Randolph Institute Orientation Agenda

This document outlines the schedule of events during the A. Philip Randolph Institute orientation, an organization focused on racial equality and economic justice.

Christmas Gift List of Mrs. King

This list entails those in receipt of a Christmas gift from Coretta Scott King.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Adelman

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Mr. Adelman's letter, which included a Thomas Babington Macaulay quotation that Dr. King finds still applicable.

Letter from Robert J. McCracken to MLK

Tuesday, February 4, 1964

Rev. McCracken, of Riverside Church in New York, informs Dr. King that he is scheduled to speak at two identical church services. The Church has added the second service because the New York World?s Fair will be open.

Invitation from Saint Vincent College to MLK

Friday, March 8, 1963

Ralph J. Hils Jr., Director of Assemblies, invites Dr. King to address the student body at St. Vincent's College. He shares a local encounter with discrimination against their American and African Negro students. Mr. Hils outlines the history of the college and provides the names of other prominent visitors of the campus.

MLK's Statement on Church Destruction in Leesburg, Georgia

Thursday, August 16, 1962

In this statement following the destruction of a church in Leesburg, Georgia, Dr. King argues that it was the action of somebody with the "strange illusion" that it would somehow stop African-Americans from seeking freedom and justice.

Letter from Mrs. Eva Claytor to MLK

Wednesday, December 14, 1966

In this letter Mrs. Claytor of New York, NY, identifies herself as an "admirer" and is writing to inform Dr. King that his proposed book title "Where Do We Go From Here [sic]" conflicts with a previously published and copyrighted work of the same title in England.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Dr. and Mrs. Sullivan Jackson

Dr. and Mrs. King offer their condolences to Dr. and Mrs. Sullivan in the passing of Mrs. Portlock. The King's highlight Mrs. Portlock's positive attributes and her great inspirational influence.

MLK's Index Card Referencing Bertrand Russell

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Bertrand Russell's views on man.

Petition for Charter, the Filing of the Clerk and Certificate of the Secretary of State for Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Inc.

Thursday, March 24, 1966

The following is a copy of the cover for the petition for charter,the filing of the Clerk and certificate of the Secretary of State for "Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Inc.

Letter from Robert Markowitz to MLK

Tuesday, January 1, 1963

Robert Markowitz, general manager of the Hampton House, sends Dr. King a request for reservations during the week of a golf tournament. He also lists the occupancy rates for the rooms.

Letter from Diane McFadden to MLK

Saturday, February 3, 1968

Diana McFadden requests information from Dr. King regarding his most significant personal characteristic.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Friday, May 7, 1965

Dr. Mays informs Dr. King of his recommendation to confer an honorary degree from Morehouse College on Dr. J. Curtis Dixon. Mays includes a biographical sketch of Dr. Dixon and asks Dr. King to respond to the letter with his approval or disapproval.