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Letter to Eugene Exman from MLK

Monday, December 4, 1961
New York, NY

Dr. King responds to a previous correspondence from Mr. Eugene Exman of Harper and Brothers Publishing. The content of the letter references Dr. King's discussion with Mr. Mel Arnold, regarding his sermons being transcribed into a manuscript. The sermons would eventually be compiled into what would be Dr. King's second book, "Strength to Love."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Celestine Fernando

Friday, May 5, 1967
SRI LANKA

Ms. McDonald grants Reverend Fernando permission to publish Dr. King's, "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

Remarks at the University of Wisconsin Law School

Tuesday, March 8, 1960
Wisconsin (WI), Indiana (IN), Ohio (OH), London, England, FRANCE, INDIA, ITALY, Minnesota (MN), INDONESIA, CHINA, POLAND, IRELAND, Massachusetts (MA)

Harris Wofford, Jr. gives these remarks at the University of Wisconsin Law School on March 8, 1960. Wofford has several ties with Dr. King in cases such as arranging a trip to India, helping to write "Stride Toward Freedom," and negotiating with Senator Kennedy and Vice-President Nixon during the 1960 presidential campaign. In addition, Wofford was the Special Assistant for Civil Rights under U. S. Attorney General Robert Kennedy.

The Negro Speaks

New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Several prominent African Americans describe the issues that plague the black community. Some of these issues include poverty, segregation, civil rights and race relations.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Pearl Goodwin

Monday, October 19, 1964
New York, NY, New York (NY)

In response to a previous request, Dora McDonald informs Pearl Goodwin that Dr. King will be unable to provide a commentary for her book "A Book of Commentary." She mentions that the request cannot be fulfilled due to Dr. King's chaotic speaking schedule.

A Decade of SCLC

Atlanta, GA

In this 10th Anniversary Journal for the SCLC, there are several topics covered to highlight the ten years of activity of the organization. Beginning with a story of the Civil Rights Movement's beginning, featuring Rosa Parks, to an article entitled "Where Do We Go From Here?"; this booklet summarizes many of the efforts made during the ten year existence of the SCLC.

Letter from Edward Boland to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965
Washington, D.C., Massachusetts (MA)

Representative Edward P. Boland informs Dr. King of his signing of the Discharge Petition for Home Rule in the District of Columbia.

Royalty Statement for "Strength To Love"

Wednesday, January 31, 1968
New York, NY

This royalty statement reference royalties from Dr. King's french-language edition book, "Strength To Love", published by Castermann s.a.

Letter from Joseph Derman to MLK

Tuesday, March 16, 1965
New Jersey (NJ)

Joseph Derman sends Dr. King a financial contribution to "the great cause." He sends the contribution in memory of the civil rights workers who have passed away.

MLK's Acceptance Sermon, Dexter Avenue Baptist Church

Montgomery, AL

Dr. King accepts his appointment as the new pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. His first time serving as head of a ministry, Dr. King admits that he has no pretense to being an extraordinary preacher and comes only with the claim of "being a servant of Christ."

Letter from John T. Walker to MLK

Wednesday, February 21, 1968
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Maryland (MD), Virginia (VA)

On behalf of the Washington Cathedral. John Walker extends an invitation for Dr. King to preach at the Cathedral and articulate the true premise of the Poor People's Campaign to their congregation. Walker believes that Dr. King's physical presence will help eliminate doubts that this civil disobedience campaign will turn to violence. Dr. King is would eventually preach the final sermon of his life on March 31 at the Washington Cathedral under the subject "Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution."

Action Among Nations: International Planned Parenthood Federation

INDIA, TAIWAN, HONG KONG, BARBADOS

This publication highlights collaborative efforts to support and expand the International Planned Parenthood Federation. The document highlights statistical data demonstrating the organization's successes in "voluntary fertility control," and references Planned Parenthood's conference scheduled in autumn 1966.

Black Power

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, Memphis, TN, Tennessee (TN)

This is a chapter sermon for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?" The civil rights leader traces the early development of Black Power and its eventual surge onto the national political scene. Though understood as a direct opposition to the nonviolent movement that organizations like SCLC, CORE, and SNCC originally supported, King describes Black Power as a "disappointment wrapped in despair."

Letter from William S. Minor to MLK

Friday, July 16, 1965
Illinois (IL)

William Minor, the Director of The Foundation for Creative Philosophy, invites Dr. King to speak at The Society for Creative Ethics meeting in New York.

Anxiety

Dr. King distinguishes anxiety from fear, noting that fear is directed toward things, while anxiety is directed toward nothingness.

Statement from MLK Returning from Receiving Nobel Prize

Friday, December 18, 1964
New York, NY

Upon returning from receiving the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King issued this statement on segregation, calling it "nothing but a new form of slavery."

Letter from the Poor People's Committee in Grenada, Mississippi

Friday, January 19, 1968
Mississippi (MS)

The Poor People's Committee of the Grenada Freedom Movement writes to Dr. King requesting help in securing jobs and adequate education.

Letter from Edwin Hoffman to MLK

Tuesday, December 15, 1964
West Virginia (WV), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

West Virginia State College invites Dr. King to address the American Affairs Forum and provides him with select dates to choose from. The college has extended an appreciation for various prime ministers, presidents, attorney generals, and other political figures for their support. Dr. King is congratulated from the college from the receipt of the Nobel Piece Prize.

Evil, Forgiveness, God

Dr. King references the Old Testament Book of Psalms regarding the topics of evil, forgiveness and God. He asserts that we must always treat the poor with love because God loves them.

Letter from Beryl Bugatch to MLK

Sunday, July 25, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Baltimore, MD

Beryl Bugatch of the University of Pennsylvania asks Dr. King to speak on "the governments role in enforcing racial morality."

Stanford University Faculty and Staff Pledge of Civil Disobedience

Friday, May 26, 1967
California (CA), VIETNAM

The Faculty and Staff members of Stanford University make a pledge of civil disobedience to protest the Vietnam conflict. The individuals signing the pledge request members of the clergy and academic community with like sentiments to join them in this demonstration.

Letter from Thelton Henderson to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966
California (CA)

Mr. Henderson, of the University of California-Berkeley, invites Dr. King to participate in a Civil Rights Symposium. Notable persons such as Robert Kennedy and Stokley Carmichael previously appeared at the symposium.

Dr. King's response to a letter from Mr. Joseph Beaver

Friday, October 24, 1958
MEXICO

Dr. King, in this letter, thanked Mr. Joseph Beaver for his kindness and for the enclosed booklet entitled "I Want You to Know Wendell Phillips Dabney" sent to him, during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. Dr. King took a moment to apologize for he and Mrs. King not being able to communicate with Mr. Beaver, while they vacationed in Mexico. He concluded the letter by acknowledging his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process was complete.

Letter from SNCC Communication Director Horace Julian Bond to MLK

Sunday, May 31, 1964
Atlanta, GA

Horace Bond, writing on behalf of the Council of Federated Organizations, asks Dr. King to join other civil rights organizations in writing a letter to President Johnson to support the organization's bid for a meeting with the President.

Letter from Gino David Dassatti to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), Montgomery, AL, VIETNAM

Gino David Dassatti expresses his concern that Dr. King's stand on the war in Vietnam may deem him a traitor. In Dassatti's words, "The blood of these Americans will rest forever on your soul and conscience."

A Minority of One

Thursday, June 1, 1967

In an attempt to enhance positive intergroup relations, Mrs. Porter was interviewed during "inservice education sessions" at a school of nursing. Because Mrs. Porter was "the first and only Negro who had been graduated from" the school, the faculty wanted insight into her experience of integration. Gloria M. Francis wrote this article covering the interview.

Mass Letter from Mr. Maurice A. Dawkins, OOEE

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Washington, D.C.

This letter from Maurice A. Dawkins, a representative from the Office of Economic Opportunity, accompanies materials that encourage the reader to take action "in pledging to beat swords into plowshares," namely transferring funds spent in the Vietnam conflict to domestic endeavors.

An Appeal from MLK to Negro and White Men of Goodwill

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King discusses the impact that segregated schooling has on Negro children. He urges Negro and "white men of goodwill" to join together in the fight for the integration of schools.

Spirit

Dr. King writes that there is no way of defining the essential nature of spirit because it is manifested only in the activities of intellect, sensibility and will.

Letter from Maurice N. Eisendrath to Dr. Bernard Lee

Wednesday, December 4, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Maurice N. Eisendrath request Dr. Bernard Lee to provide a list of the contributors from Dr. King's address to the Union of American Hebrew Congregations. The list is to facilitate Mr. Eisendrath in contacting other contributors to raise additional funds for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.