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"Jackson, MS"

The 105th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation-Rev. C.L. Fullwood

Rev. C.L. Fullwood drafts a sermon to commemorate the "105th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclimation for the Black People of America.:

Letter from MLK to Nelson A. Rockefeller

Monday, November 1, 1965
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King thanks Governor Nelson Rockefeller for taking the pulpit at Ebenezer Baptist Church for their Men?s Day Observance. He appreciates the Governor?s contribution of $25,000 to their tax exempt Society to match his own donation from the Nobel Peace Award.

Post Card from Critic to MLK

This unstamped post card comes from a writer who identifies himself as "Ole Dorky" and targets Dr. King and the American Civil Liberties Union as "Communist skum." The writer disagrees with the work of civil rights and believes that efforts are "making matters worse for negroes."

Letter from Gail Lamb to MLK

Monday, April 1, 1968

Gail Lamb requests information from Dr. King for her research on prejudice, especially on "manifestations, kinds, and objects of prejudice."

Moment (Its Meaning)

Dr. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's "The Concept of Nature."

MLK's Sermon Notes

Dr. King drafted the intro of this sermon to place emphasis on the pros and cons of despair. The place and date of where this sermon was preached is not known.

Letter from Bryan Fulks to MLK

Tuesday, March 20, 1962
Arizona (AZ), London, England

Bryan Fulks writes Dr. King expressing appreciation for his diligent work during the fight for social justice and human dignity. Fulks also mentions how elated he was when the editor of the "London Humanist" chose to enrich his article including a pictorial illustration of Dr. King riding through the southern region of the United States.

The Negro Family: A Challenge to National Action

Thursday, January 27, 1966
Chicago, IL

Dr. King addresses the topic of the Negro family. He emphasizes the importance of discussing the Negro family in comparison to other races.

Letter from Christena Miscall to MLK

Monday, March 20, 1961
Maine (ME)

Christena Miscall, member of the Student Government Association at Saint Joseph's College, writes Dr. King requesting him to send a personal article for her college's famous persons' auction.

Letter from Clyde De L. Ryals to MLK

Friday, October 30, 1964
Georgia (GA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Clyde De L. Ryals shares the perspective of his white counterparts in Georgia in congratulating Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from MLK to Senator Howard Cannon

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Democratic Senator Howard Cannon of Nevada for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Telegram from Ralph Abernathy to John F. Kennedy

Thursday, June 13, 1963
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

Rev. Ralph Abernathy accepts President John F. Kennedy’s invitation to meet and discuss the civil rights problem.

Anonymous Adverse Letter to MLK

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

The author of this letter sends Dr. King a strong message to leave Chicago. According to the sender, Dr. King does nothing but "cause trouble from one place to another."

Anonymous Letter to President Johnson

The anonymous sender of this letter urges President Lyndon B. Johnson to take action to fund programs in order to get people in school or at work in order to quell rising tensions in cities filled with people dissatisfied with their social and economic positions.

MLK's Address to Syracuse University

Thursday, July 15, 1965
New York (NY)

Dr. King, in a public speech at Howard University, talks about numerous factors that affect education in America.

"The Drum Major Instinct" Ebenezer Baptist Church

Sunday, February 4, 1968
Atlanta, GA

The Drum Major Instinct, a sermon delivered by Dr. King at the Atlanta Ebenezer Baptist Church, frames the “instinct” as being responsible for the social ills of the world. Dr. King proclaims that racial inequality in America and the war in Vietnam are the result of nations engaging in a “bitter colossal contest for supremacy.” He suggests that the only way to end this “suicidal thrust” is to abide by an altered definition of the instinct – the definition of Jesus Christ.

Letter from Herbert J. Kramer to John W. Bloomer

Tuesday, February 13, 1968
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Herbert J. Kramer informs the managing editor of Birmingham News, about "America's New Commitment" and the "Plowshare Pledge."

Letter from American Friends Service Committee to MLK

Monday, March 14, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), VIETNAM

R. Ogden Hannaford and Kale A. Williams, representatives of the American Friends Service Committee, enclose a pre-publication edition of a book aimed at peacefully resolving the issues in Vietnam.

Brotherhood

Dr. King quotes Richard Henry Tawney's "Religion and the Rise of Capitalism."

Letter from K. Emmons to MLK

Michigan (MI), VIETNAM

K. Emmons proposes to Dr. King that Christians should put God and Jesus above "fumbling politicians." K. Emmons also comments on soldiers in Vietnam.

SCLC Direction

Thursday, November 17, 1966
California (CA)

The SCLC establishes a new direction in which they are seeking to promote nonviolence on an international level by creating a universal human rights movement. Ira Sandperl details this new direction of the SCLC which includes the improvement of current political and economic issues.

Letter from Charles S. Spivey, Jr. to the Racial Justice Committee

Wednesday, March 6, 1968
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Jackson, MS, Chicago, IL, Boston, MA

Charles S. Spivey, Jr. outlines the events to take place during the SCLC Poor Peoples Campaign under the leadership of Dr. King. The main events all transpired after Dr. King's assassination on April 4th, 1968.

OEO Moves to Aid Hungry Families in Seven States

Wednesday, May 3, 1967
Washington, D.C., Arkansas (AR), Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN)

The Office of Economic Opportunity initiates a new Food Stamp Loan program that will enable impoverished families to purchase "much needed" food.

Letter from Senator Jacob Javits to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Senator Javits writes Dr. King to thank him for reaching out to him in need of funds for the SCLC. Mr. Javits then encloses a small contribution and apologizes for not being able to contribute more.

Letter from Amelia P. Boynton to the SCLC

Wednesday, June 2, 1965
Selma, AL, Atlanta, GA, Maryland (MD), New York (NY)

Amelia Boynton writes the members of the SCLC seeking financial assistance to help purchase a particular piece of land to help start a new sewing machine factory and other projects in Selma, Alabama. Boynton provides details of the history of the struggle of people of color in Selma, and stresses that the land would be used to help teach the underprivileged in the area to help themselves.

Homeric Problem

Dr. King briefly outlines the problem surrounding the work of the Greek poet Homer. The note card references the view of German scholar and critic Friedrich August Wolf and documents two primary theories regarding Homeric literature.

Marcian

Dr. King highlights biographical information on Marcian, a second-century reformer.

Letter from MLK to Clifford Joesph

Tuesday, January 10, 1967
New York, NY

Dr. King extends gratitude to Mr. Joseph for donating Christmas cards to the SCLC.

Letter from Congressman William Ryan to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Congressman William Ryan gives Dr. King an update regarding the pending 1965 Voting Rights Act that is still under debate in Congress. Ryan, a staunch supporter of the bill, mentions his persistent efforts to keep the legislation from being blocked by adversaries.

Letter from Elmer Jordan Admonishing MLK

Monday, February 12, 1968
Chicago, IL

In this letter dated February 12, 1968, Elmer Jordan writes, "your ideas will cause your death because of your heart" as he advises Dr. King to refrain from his "threatening proposals.".