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Letter from Leslie A. Strikes to MLK

Wednesday, December 27, 1967
CANADA, Montgomery, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Leslie Strike, Canadian Vice President of the English-Speaking Union of the Commonwealth, invites Dr. King to speak on the US Civil Rights Movement.

MLK Statement Before the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders

Monday, October 23, 1967
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, INDIA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King makes a public statement before the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorder. He addresses five causes of the recent riots: hite backlash, unemployment, discriminatory practices, war, and features peculiar to big cities.

Nonviolence: The Only Road to Freedom

Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), New York (NY), New York, NY, GHANA, ZAMBIA, ZIMBABWE, SOUTH AFRICA, TANZANIA, NIGERIA, ANGOLA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, INDIA, Georgia (GA)

In this article, Dr. King argues that the American Negro's salvation will be reached by "rejecting the racism, materialism and violence that has characterized Western civilization" and working instead toward a world of brotherhood and cooperation. The civil rights leader denounces recent violent uprisings in urban ghettos, as they only contribute to the growing frustrations and issues perpetuating America's racial divide.

Letter from Juanita McKinly to MLK

Thursday, February 24, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Juanita McKinly requests Dr. King visit her home to evaluate the less than standard living conditions of the building. As a key figure for addressing social ills, many people sought the help of Dr. King in relation to individual concerns.

Telegram from L. M. McCoy to MLK

Friday, May 12, 1967
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, BRAZIL, New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

L. M. McCoy telegrams Dr. King expressing the urgency that the Methodist Church of Brazil receive a reply to their invitation for him to speak at their Centennial celebration in Brazil.

God

Dr. King cites the Old Testament book of Deuteronomy regarding the topic of monotheism.

Why We Cant Wait Sticker

This document is a New American Library window sticker advertising Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Conversion

Dr. King quotes Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy's book "What I Believe." Tolstoy asserts that when he came to believe in Christ's teachings his whole life and perception changed.

To the Gallant Black Man Now Dead

Tuesday, May 17, 1966
VIETNAM, Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY), Washington (WA), Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

This poem titled "To The Gallant Black Men Now Dead" was written by Vincent Harding in dedication to Jimmy L. Williams. Private First Class Williams was an heroic black man killed in Vietnam and was refused burial in his hometown of Wetumpka, Alabama.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William S. Thompson

Wednesday, March 27, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Dora McDonald responds to William Thompson's letter inviting Dr. King to address the National Bar Association. She explains that Dr. King's calendar shows that he will not be able to attend the event due to his travels.

Nomination Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to Dr. King

Tuesday, September 10, 1963
Atlanta, GA

In this letter, Benjamin E. Mays notifies Dr. King that he has nominated him for the Florina Lasker Civil Liberties Award.

Note card-Dr.King

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Herbet Spencer's views on religion. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from Edward Kirsch to Coretta Scott King

Tuesday, April 9, 1968
New York (NY)

Edward Kirsch, Executive Director of The Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center extends warmest sympathies to Mrs. King during her time of bereavement. He writes, "Dr. King was greatly admired by all of us as an inspiring leader, a true humanitarian and an advocate of peace and justice for all people."

Letter from MLK to T. C. Johnson

Monday, September 9, 1963
Iowa (IA)

Dr. King thanks Mrs. T. C. Johnson for her contribution to the SCLC and encloses an official receipt for her gift. King states, "Without your moral support we would be caught in a dungeon of despair."

Telegram from Congressman Don Edwards to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C.

California Democratic Congressman Don Edwards congratulates Dr. King on his April 4th, 1967 speech "Beyond Vietnam," and commends his courage in speaking "so clearly on this vital question."

Apostles' Creed

Dr. King outlines the history of the Apostles' Creed and states the creed in its Roman form.

Telegram from Carl and Anne Braden to MLK

Monday, October 24, 1960
Louisville, KY, Kentucky (KY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Carl and Anne Braden offer their support to Dr. King while he remains in the Fulton County Jail.

Letter from C. B. Olmstead to MLK

Tuesday, July 13, 1965
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Olmstead writes that he is unable to reconcile Dr. King's support of civil disobedience with his plans for peaceful demonstrations. He contends the purpose of King's sustained agitation is to provoke violence. He feels the Civil Rights Act of 1964 should become the mechanism for opposing discrimination, not further boycotts and sit-ins.

Humanism (15th Century)

Dr. King reflects on a classical approach to learning.

Telegram from Thomas Gedeon to MLK

Sunday, June 4, 1967
Cleveland, OH, New York, NY, New York (NY), Pittsburgh, PA

Reverend Gedeon, director of the Jesuit Retreat House in Cleveland, Ohio, writes to Dr. King concerning a proposed retreat program geared towards uniting religious and Negro leaders. Due to the lack of responses on Dr. King behalf, Gedeon terminates any further plans for the aimed program until further notice.

Letter from Reverend Durstan R. McDonald to MLK Regarding an Invitation

Friday, March 15, 1968
New York (NY)

The Hobart and William Smith Colleges have brought influential leaders to their campus from the civil rights and black power movements. Many students desire a further understanding of the Gospel and have requested to invite Dr. King to speak. The dates provided for this engagement are unfortunately subsequent to the assignation of Dr. King.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding an Offer from Protestant Publishing

Monday, April 13, 1964

In this Letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about an offer from Shinkyo Shuppansha (Protestant Publishing Co. Ltd.). A description of an advancement pay, royalty percentage and number of copies are included in this letter.

Letter from Andrew Hobart to MLK

Tuesday, November 29, 1966
Minnesota (MN)

In this letter, dated 11/29/66, Mr. Andrew Hobart, President of Ministers Life and Casualty Union informs Dr. King that his application for reinstatement has been accepted, and cautions a lapsed contract may result in a loss or reduction of benefits.

Final Plans for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

Washington, D.C., New York, NY

This final organizing manual for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom details all logistics of the march, including the purpose of the march and accommodations for arriving in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Walters to MLK

Tuesday, February 2, 1965
Georgia (GA)

Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Walters of Stone Mountain, Georgia congratulate Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Harry Stern Shanis

Tuesday, March 19, 1968
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dora McDonald acknowledges Harry Shanis' earlier letter. She sends a photograph of Dr. King along with a biographical sketch.

Letter from Weston E. Vivian to MLK

Monday, January 11, 1965
Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

Congressman Weston Vivian responds to Dr. King's letter regarding the seating of the Mississippi Congressman. He tells Dr. King that he not only supported the "Ryan fairness resolution" to prevent the seating, but also voted against the motion to swear in the Congressman. Although he mentions that he was in the minority regarding this matter, he assures Dr. King that he will continue to "work for the opening of the Mississippi registration and election procedures."

Telegram to MLK from 347 AFL-CIO Armours Lard Refinery Workers

Chicago, IL, New York, NY

The Local 347 of the AFL-CIO sent this Western Union Telegram to Dr. King as an expression of their hopes for his recovery, during his stay at Harlem Hospital.

Let's Be Human

Wednesday, March 1, 1967
New York, NY, CHINA, Colorado (CO), GERMANY, Maryland (MD), New Jersey (NJ), Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA

Long time civil rights agitator Harry Fleischman wrote this syndicated column for the American Jewish Committee's National Labor Service. Articles within the column took a humorous and often irreverent view of social and civil rights issues around the globe. Fleischman was also the national secretary of the Socialist Party USA from 1942-50.

Letter from Ella Jackson to MLK

Monday, February 5, 1968

Miss Ella Jackson, a 7th grader, writes to Dr. King concerning his leadership and involvement in civil disobedience. She advises Dr. King to speak to someone in power, otherwise his actions will lead to war.