Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Jackson, MS"

Metropolitan Youth Commission of St. Louis

Missouri (MO)

The following document recounts a three-year survey conducted by the Metropolitan Youth Commission in regards to the "Distribution of juvenile apprehensions by age, sex, and from the year 1960 to July 25, 1963."

Statement Upon Return to Montgomery

New York, NY, Montgomery, AL

Dr. King reflects on his near death experience after Izola Ware Curry stabbed him with a letter opener at a book signing in New York City on September 20, 1958. Although Dr. King refers to Curry as a "deranged woman," he has "no bitterness towards her" and sees her actions only as a "reflection on the moral climate." Dr. King further states what he will remember most is the "vast outpouring of sympathy" that was received from all races and creeds.

Letter from MLK to Beatrice Rosselll

Wednesday, September 23, 1964
Arizona (AZ), Georgia (GA), Louisiana (LA)

Dr. King takes an opportunity to express gratitude for Beatrice Rossell's support to the civil rights movement. He addresses her inquiry regarding his activities with the Highlander Folk School and possible Communist ties. Rossell received a picture of Dr. King at Highlander and the caption addressed him as a Communist.

Letter From Don Slaiman

Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

Don Slaiman of the AFL-CIO encloses a brochure titled "The Right to Strike and General Welfare." This brochure, which was developed by the Committee on the Church and Economic Life of the National Council of Churches, address problems and proposes solution to the Labor Movement.

Confessions - Prayer

Dr. King documents a passage from St. Augustine's autobiographical work regarding confessions and prayer.

September 1964, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s secretary writes Joan Daves to inform her of his absence.

Friday, September 11, 1964
GERMANY

Dora McDonald, secretary to Dr. King, wrote Joan Daves to inform her that Dr. King will look into the request from Philip Unwin upon his return from Berlin.

Hungry Club Speech

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King speaks on "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He contends that the dilemma in the world is the result of three major evils: racism, poverty, and war. Dr. King encourages the audience to work toward making America a moral example for the rest of the world.

Letter from Edward Gulick to MLK

Monday, March 12, 1962
Massachusetts (MA)

Edward Gulick of Wellesley College writes Dr. King, expressing his appreciation and admiration for the work Dr. King has done in Massachusetts and elsewhere.

Letter from MLK to Frank Carlson

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Kansas Senator Frank Carlson to applaud his vote for the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Forgiveness

Dr. King writes on the topic of "forgiveness," as mentioned in Nehemiah 9:17.

Letter to Mrs. King from Hon. C.P. Carter and James H. Beverly

Sunday, April 7, 1968
New Jersey (NJ)

This document was sent from the St. John Grand Lodge Masons of New Jersey, expressing their condolences for Mrs. King's tragic loss following Dr. King's assassination. The letter asks that God grant the King family peace, during their time of bereavement.

Letter from Chauncey Eskridge to Reverend Allen L. Johnson

Monday, April 12, 1965
Jackson, MS, Chicago, IL

Chauncey Eskridge informs Reverend Johnson that he has sought information from Jack H. Young and R. Jess Brown regarding the posting of bond money.

Guidelines for a Constructive Church

Sunday, June 5, 1966
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

In this sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Dr. King spells out guidelines for the church: healing the broken-hearted, preaching deliverance to the captive (freeing people from everything that enslaves), and preaching the acceptable year of the Lord. The acceptable year of the Lord, he says, is every year the time is right to do right, stop lying and cheating, do justice, learn to live as brothers and beat swords into plowshares.

Letter from MLK to William Proxmire

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks William Proxmire for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Kierkegaard (Paradox)

Dr. King quotes Kierkegaard and comments on his view of paradox.

Detroit Council for Human Rights: Walk To Freedom

Sunday, June 23, 1963
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

The Detroit Council of Human Rights adopted a declaration for Detroit, Michigan on May 17, 1963. In the declaration, the Council decided to stand in solidarity against the injustices that plague the city's African American population. This program is from the yearly demonstration that the Council holds to commemorate their pledge to combat the "inequality of this country."

A Christian Movement in a Revolutionary Age

Tuesday, September 28, 1965
New York (NY), Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Mississippi (MS), Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Los Angeles, CA, Los Angeles, California, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, VIETNAM, CONGO / ZAIRE

In this address, Dr. King fuses the philosophies in the Old and New Testament regarding revolutionary social change. He argues that the most creative and constructive revolutionary force for change is one that combines the Old Testament’s “righteousness and justice that flow down like a mighty stream” with the New Testament’s call to love one’s enemies and bless those who persecute you. He asserts that God has been working actively since the time of Moses for the freedom and perfection of people and society. Dr.

Levels of Love

Dr. King outlines several levels of love, such as Christian love, utilitarianism love and romantic love.

SCLC Flyer: Going Out of Business

Texas (TX)

The Fort Worth chapter of the SCLC issued this flyer advising its fellow Negro residents to boycott Bill Sodd's Meat Store because of discrimination.

God (His Love)

Dr. King writes notes regarding God and his love for humanity. King states, "God is a God who takes initiative... [He] seeks His creatures before they seek him."

Letter from Joan Daves to Mrs. Dora McDonald about expenses from trip to New York

Tuesday, June 9, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. and Mrs. King extended their stay in New York City to launch his latest book. Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, wrote to Dora McDonald requesting lodging receipts in an effort to expedite the expense reporting process with Harper Publishing. Handwritten notes on the document suggest that the launch was very successful.

Letter from Samuel G. Jackson

New York (NY)

Mr. Jackson requests assistance with the Minority Youth in a Higher Education project. This particular project is aimed at increasing the number of black and Puerto Rican students at predominantly white institutions.

Telegram from Mathew Ahmann to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Mathew Ahmann, on behalf of the National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice, congratulates the Southern Christian Leadership Conference for a decade of leadership.

Letter from Sheldon L. Gutman to MLK

Tuesday, June 20, 1967
United Nations, Columbia Broadcasting System, inc., Southern Christian Leadership Conference, CHINA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CONGO / ZAIRE, Arizona (AZ), FRANCE, AUSTRALIA, CANADA, United Nations, Columbia Broadcasting System, inc., Southern Christian Leadership Conference, CHINA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CONGO / ZAIRE, Arizona (AZ), FRANCE, AUSTRALIA, CANADA, THAILAND, SOUTH KOREA, NORTH KOREA, JAPAN, GREECE, SOUTH AFRICA, Washington, D.C., CYPRUS

Sheldon L. Gutman writes Dr. King urging him to utilize his prominence by consistently speaking out about the issues of the world. Gutman also expresses concern regarding America's potential retaliation to China detonating a hydrogen bomb.

Letter from MLK to Sarah Harvey

Tuesday, November 28, 1961
UNITED KINGDOM

Dr. King thanks Miss Harvey of Oxford, England for her contribution to his cause. He suggests that she inquire about any regulations governing money coming from England to the US. He also expresses his hope to meet her in his travels.

Southern Rural Action Project

Saturday, April 1, 1967
Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), New York, NY, New York (NY), Boston, MA, Dallas, TX

The Southern Rural Action Project, an initiative of the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty, seeks to finance and support community development in low-income areas. This progress report highlights current field projects and objectives.

Facing Life's Inescapables

Brooklyn, NY

Dr. King uses an allegory regarding life to express that if an individual follows God's plan they will live an abundantly happy life.

Letter from Edwin Fenton to MLK about permission to use Marchi on Washington speech

Tuesday, June 13, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

Edward Fenton, Co-Director, Social Studies Curriculum Development Center at Carnegie Institute of Technology writes to request permission to duplicate some excerpts from Dr.King's speech in Washington during the summer of 1963 without fee. Operating under a grant from the United States Office of Education, the Center is developing new courses of study and writing materials to teach social studies inductively to able students in grades nine through twelve.

Letter from Smithsonian Institution to MLK

Friday, April 2, 1965
Washington, D.C.

S. Dillon Ripley, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, invites Dr. King to attend the bicentennial birthday celebration of the organization's founder, James Smithson.

Letter from Melis Nicolaides to MLK

Friday, April 30, 1965
GREECE, Montgomery, AL

Melis Nicolaides invites Dr. King to participate in the Third Marathon Peace March in Athens, Greece. At the first Peace March, only one person completed the march and that person was killed the following year. The next year "thousands of Greek people marched in the footsteps" of the murdered individual. Nicolaides explains that Dr. King's participation will be "an important contribution to the cause of peace."