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A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart

"A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart" by Dr. King discusses the importance of creating a synthesis of opposites and characteristics of one engaged in shrewd thinking with a loving spirit.

Man

Dr. King quotes Jeremiah 17:5 and suggests that “those of us who oppose humanism” might speak against it like Jeremiah did and provide a rational defense of theism.

Letter from Leon Martin to MLK

Educator Leon Martin expresses his dissatisfaction with individuals that are silent about civil rights for Negroes. He states that a lot of people do not care about civil right until it affects them personally. He also discusses the Christian church's continual support of the "status quo". He encloses a contribution on behalf of he and his wife and sends Dr. King his prayers and support.

Letter from MLK to James K. Shipman

Friday, November 17, 1967

Dr. King thanks James Shipman, Chairman of the Organization Committee of the Ohio Association of Community-Junior Colleges, for an invitation to speak at Cuyahog Community College. Dr. King regretfully declines the invitation due to schedule demands related to planning for the first four months of 1968.

Letter from Doris Everett to MLK

Ms. Everett expresses appreciation to Dr. King for leading a successful boycott in Montgomery, Alabama and for his contributions to help Negros obtain equality.

Reports of the Stockholm World Conference on Vietnam

Thursday, July 6, 1967

The International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace issues a report of the Stockholm World Conference on Vietnam. Within the report, an appeal to the world is made on behalf of Vietnam and a resolution is offered to outline the ways in which a settlement can be reached between the United States and Vietnam.

Telegram from W. L. Bentley to MLK

W. L. Bentley expresses to Dr. King that his ill health prevents him from being present. He also requests to enroll and would like to be forwarded the cost.

Letter from Robert Bondy to MLK

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

Though a long time supporter of Dr. King, Robert Bondy, criticizes for Dr. King for mixing the issues of civil rights and Vietnam. He argues that speaking out against Vietnam has only further inflamed opponents of the Civil Rights Movement, and Dr. King has thrown back the movment "for a long time to come."

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King notes Herbert Spencer’s definition of religion.

The Denver Post Reprint "Boy, 13, Ashamed of Shaby Clothes"

Thursday, January 25, 1962

In this reprint, of the Denver Post article, entitled "Boy, 13, Ashamed of Shabby Clothes", the reader learns that a 13 year old boy did not go to school because he was ashamed by his clothes. The Colorado judge responded with an attempt to get the boy new clothes and reinstated in school.

Letter from Celeste Buches to MLK

Friday, March 29, 1968

Celeste Buches writes to Dr. King requesting campaign information for the Choice 68' mock presidential elections at Mt. St. Scholastica and St. Benedict's College in Kansas.

Letter from Joan Daves to Andrew Young

Friday, April 21, 1967

In this letter, Ms. Daves focuses on Dr. King's speeches and discusses copyrighting issues.

Letter from the Legislative Director to Senator Gaylord Nelson to MLK

Friday, January 28, 1966

William J. Springs writes Dr. King to send him the enclosed document entitled, "A Brief Account of Historic Connections Between Negro Americans and African in South Africa" by Mary Benson. The material is to be used in correlation with the hearing on American policy toward South Africa that will be held by Congressman Barratt O' Harra, Chairman of the Africa subcommittee.

Letter from The Canadian Council of Christians and Jews to MLK

Tuesday, November 22, 1966

National Executive Director Richard Jones invites Dr. King to speak in Toronto during the celebration of Canada's centennial birthday. Jones describes current racial relations and acknowledges that the centennial events could be used to spur "advances toward complete equality."

Albany Justice Draft for Amsterdam News

Dr. King expounds upon the city of Albany and the adversities it faced that brought about the focus of international scrutiny. Dr. King notes two prominent international occasions that occurred in Albany, the peace walk to Cuba and the Guantanamo Peace March. He cites quotations from Chief Laurie Prichett and Bradford Lyttle. Dr. King further elaborates on the injustices of Albany, segregation, discriminatory practices and more.

Letter from MLK to Frank B. Lowell

Monday, October 14, 1963

Dr. King acknowledges the receipt of Frank Lowell's letter regarding the SCLC's current mission. Dr. King briefly explains the nonviolent philosophy, the beliefs of the SCLC, and race relations in America.

MLK's Address to Syracuse University

Thursday, July 15, 1965

Dr. King, in a public speech at Howard University, talks about numerous factors that affect education in America.

Letter from Beryl Arensberg to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967

Beryl Arensberg writes Dr. King asking him to consider a strategy that emphasizes a collective mourning for all those impacted by the Vietnam War. He believes such a course of action will inspire direct impact in several admirable ways.

Telegram from Walter Friedrich to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Walter Friedrich, on behalf of the Peace Council of the German Democratic Republic, congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Financial Report of the SCLC

Monday, July 25, 1966

This document outlines the financial statements of the Atlanta home office of the SCLC. The figures are from July 25, 1966 through July 28, 1966.

Letter from Myron A. Hoyt to MLK about Financial and Moral Support

Thursday, August 11, 1966

In this letter Myron A. Hoyt, of the Synod of South Dakota, sends a financial contribution to the SCLC and comments on Dr. King's reaction to the Black Power Movement.

Letter from Wilford Tallie to Dr. King

Friday, January 28, 1966

Wilford Tallie, a Veteran at the West Side Veteran's Hospital, expresses his support for Dr. King's efforts in the SCLC Chicago Campaign.

Newspaper Article about Refresher Training and Employment for Teachers Displaced by Integration

This newspaper article frames the dilemma of teachers displaced by integration. Secretary of Labor W. Willard Wirtz urged state employment agencies to make a maximum effort to provide employment assistance and refresher training opportunities for these teachers.

Letter from J. Edgar Hoover to MLK

Monday, March 29, 1965

J. Edgar Hoover, Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, sends his thanks for Dr. King's telegram concerning the recent work of FBI agents in Alabama.

Letter From Bessie Burrett to MLK

Bessie Burrett, a NAACP member, writes Dr. King asking for help and explaining the multiple incidences of racial injustice she and her husband have personally witnessed. Burrett describes her husband's injuries, which he obtained as a result of police brutality, and their struggles with unfair treatment in the court system. As a result, her husband is unable to work and they have mounting hospital and court fees to pay, creating a financial hardship for their family.

Revolt Without Violence - The Negroes' New Strategy

Monday, March 21, 1960

In this 1960 U.S. News & World Report article, Dr. King discusses the lunch counter sit-in movement spurring across the American South, the nonviolent approach to civil rights demonstrations, and the evolving status of the Negro.

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Thursday, July 30, 1964

A. Philip Randolph asks Dr. King to make a tribute for Norman Thomas' eightieth birthday celebration.

Letter from Gitta Badeker to Dora McDonald

Thursday, June 8, 1967

In this letter, Gitta Badeker, from the office of Joan Daves, informs Dr. King that enclosed are copies of the contract for a Norwegian-language edition of "Where Do We Go from Here. The contract requested for Dr. King to sign and initial.

Greeks

Dr. King shares his personal insight on Greek and African "ability," relative to African-Americans.

SCLC Newsletter: April 1962

Sunday, April 1, 1962

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference announces five new members will join the staff. The five men are: John H. Calhoun, Herbert V. Coulton, James L. Bevel, Fred C. Bennette, and Bernard S. Lee. These men derive from different locations across America and add different levels of education and commitment to the Civil Rights Movement.