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MLK's Address to Addison Junior High

Thursday, October 22, 1964
Cleveland, OH, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King explains the importance of education and encourages the students to exercise their abilities to the fullest and strive for excellence. Dr. King further describes the duties each student must fulfill to make an impact on their community and the world.

Letter from Donald W. Morgan to MLK

Thursday, December 31, 1964
Vermont (VT), Atlanta, GA

Donald Morgan informs Dr. King that northern locations such as New England and Vermont experience racial issues. Mr. Morgan serves as the chairman of the program committee for the 1964 Annual Meeting of the Vermont Congregational Conference. Dr. King is extended an invitation to speak at this conference which is located at the Rutland Congregational Church.

International Brotherhood of Teamsters Flyer

This flyer from the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, which includes a quotation from Dr. King, encourages membership in the organization.

Letter from Max Goldberg to MLK

Wednesday, May 29, 1963
Denver, CO

Max Goldberg asserts that the interview conducted with Dr. King a year ago serves relevance for the current progression attempts for the American Negro. Mr. Goldberg is attempting to produce copies of the interview and distribute them to various cities.

Letter from Annalee Stewart to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, June 1, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Washington, D.C.

Annalee Stewart confirms with Dora McDonald that Dr. King will be the keynote speaker for the 50th Anniversary of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom.

Letter from Carolyn Martinelli to Ralph Abernathy After the Death of MLK

Saturday, April 13, 1968
California (CA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Mrs. Martinelli writes Rev. Abernathy in the month following Dr. King's death, encouraging him to continue promoting a philosophy of love and equality. Martinelli identifies herself as a white housewife, teacher and mother of two, who has only known three Negroes in her whole life. . Although she has never known poverty, her desire is for all Americans to know the truth and work to resolve these problems in society.

Schleiermacher (The Essence of Christianity)

Dr. King writes that Friedrich Schleiermacher describes the essence of Christianity as a belief in Jesus as the origin of the Christian faith and his work as that of redemption.

Letter from Vice President Johnson to MLK

Friday, June 15, 1962
Washington, D.C.

Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson writes to express his regrets that Dr. King could not attend the White House's Community Leaders Conference. Johnson continues that he and the Equal Employment Opportunity Committee were thrilled with the support Dr. King provided to the conference despite his absence.

Telegram from Al C. Hastings to MLK

Tuesday, October 31, 1967
Alabama (AL), Florida (FL)

Al Hastings expresses his concern during Dr. King's incarceration in the Jefferson County Jail.

Letter from University of King's College to MLK

Monday, February 3, 1964
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

The University of King's College sends a follow up letter to Dr. King inquiring if he will accept their offer to receive an Honorary Doctorate of Civil Law.

On Being a Good Neighbor

Dr. King tells the Biblical story of the "Good Samaritan on the Road to Jericho," in which a traveler has been robbed, beaten and left for dead. Dr. King connects this story to the Declaration of Independence and offers an analysis of the modern era. Following the example of the "Good Samaritan," he encourages looking beyond "race, religion and nationality" to help those wounded by injustices.

Letter from Joseph Clark to MLK

Sunday, June 25, 1967
Brooklyn, NY, VIETNAM

In this letter, Joseph Clark shows appreciation for the work Dr. King has done.

MLK Statement on Church Groundbreaking

Monday, February 4, 1963
Georgia (GA)

Dr. King speaks on the burning of churches in Dawson, Georgia, stating that this act is a symbol of the "tragic depth to which men and women can sink when they are guided by prejudice and when they are filled with hatred."

Letter from Alice B. Bye to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968
New York (NY)

Alice B. Bye requests that Dr. King send information and a picture for her school report.

Letter from Al Shabazz to MLK

Friday, August 25, 1967
New York, NY

Al Shabazz requests Dr. King review his proposal for Black Independence.

Political Cartoon: The FBI Adds

VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This satirical cartoon in the Nashville Banner equates protests in the U.S. with the Communist buildup in Vietnam.

Letter from Bernard LaFayette, Jr. to MLK

Friday, March 24, 1967
Chicago, IL, New York (NY), VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA

Before Mr. LaFayette leaves for New York to join the Spring Mobilization to end the war in Vietnam, he offer suggestions towards the housing problems that have occurred in Chicago. He states that there should be an urban renewal project that could possibly help low-income citizens afford respectable housing.

Letters Between MLK and Max Dean

Thursday, June 1, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Chicago, IL, Kentucky (KY), Louisville, KY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, Illinois (IL)

Dr. King sends a letter out to supporters, updating them on the progress made through the Civil Rights Movement. Dr. King also informs supporters that the work is far from done and asks for support. Writing on the back of Dr. King's letter, Max Dean informs Dr. King that his most important priority is an immediate and unconditional withdrawal from Vietnam. This is despite that Dean has "great respect" for Dr. King and the SCLC.

Kierkegaard

Dr. King quotes Soren Kierkegaard's "Einübung im Christentum" ["Practice in Christianity"].

Letter from Raphael Gould to Coretta Scott King

VIETNAM

Mr. Gould of the Fellowship of Reconciliation sends Mrs. King a compilation of writings about and by Phan Thi Mai, a Vietnamese student who self-immolated on May 16, 1967 in an appeal to end the war in Vietnam. Mai "decided to burn herself to make her voice heard by the war."

The Desegregated Heart

Sunday, July 1, 1962

Dr. King praises Sarah-Patton Boyle for her creation of the book, "The Desegregated Heart." Dr. King recommends that everyone reads the book, for it expresses the power of Christian love operating in the human heart.

Itinerary for MLK

Pennsylvania (PA), Maine (ME), Ohio (OH), Washington, D.C., Texas (TX), New York, NY, Connecticut (CT), Massachusetts (MA)

In this correspondence, a list of "appearances" for Dr. King is listed.

Letter from Marilyn Coulter to MLK

Saturday, October 26, 1963
Minnesota (MN), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Marilyn Coulter asks Dr. King to provide information for her research paper entitled "Segregation."

Metaphysic[s]

Dr. King quotes William James’ “The Sentiment of Rationality” on Arthur Schopenhauer’s view of metaphysics.

Letter from Derrick Cameron to MLK

Thursday, January 20, 1966
Chicago, IL

Derrick Cameron, a seventh grade student, writes Dr. King expressing thanks for his fight in Civil Rights. In addition, Cameron offers to make copies on his ditto machine; a low-volume printing method used mainly by schools and churches.

Interview with MLK for Radio Norway

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, NORWAY

Dr. King shares the way that Americans celebrate Christmas.

Letter From Benjamin E. Mays to MLK Regarding Annual Report

Friday, April 21, 1967

In this letter, Mays informs Dr. King that an Annual Report will arrive soon.

Letter to MLK from Moynihan about Invitation to Conference

Monday, March 27, 1967
Cambridge, MA, Atlanta, GA

A formal letter from the Joint Center for Urban Studies of MIT and Harvard University invites Dr. King to a Conference on Social Statistics and the City at Executive House in Washington, DC, June 22 and 23, 1967. Signed by Director Daniel P. Moynihan, the correspondence cites the inadequacy of the 1960 US census in enumerating the Negro, Puerto Rican, and Mexican populations, a concern about the impact on voting rights, and the need for better enumeration in the 1970 census.

Christianity

Through quoting an unknown Christian, Dr. King calls for modern Christians to accept a personal challenge that will one day enable historians to declare that it was Christianity that held the world together.

Letter from Eileen Coyne to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Second grader Eileen Coyne sends condolences to the King family. She and her classmates were instructed to write letters to Mrs. King to express their feelings following Dr. King's assassination. This document is a part of a collection of sixteen letters from this Bronx, New York classroom.