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"Jackson, MS"

A Memorandum Regarding the Cooperative Housing and Rehabilitation Program

Chicago, IL

In this memorandum from James P. Twomey, executive director of the Community Renewal Foundation Inc., writes to Mr. Donald Jordan of the Federal Housing Administration in regards to the building of cooperative housing and rehabilitation centers. The memorandum address certain issues such as the mortgage for the homes as well as the architects and attorneys

Letter from Daniel Glantz to MLK

Friday, March 29, 1968
SWEDEN

This letter is from Daniel Glantz of Sweden. Glantz wrote the letter because he was ordered to do so by beings from outer space. According to Glantz the space beings look like angels and the angels would like to meet with Dr. King, whose mission they morally support. Glantz ends his letter by asking Dr. King if he recognizes the cosmic symbol, which is in the upper left-hand corner of the document and appears as a red circle with a white cross topped by a green triangle or pyramid.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, July 26, 1967
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Joan Daves urges Dora McDonald to provide notice of Dr. King's public appearances to Harper so that books can be sold at those events.

Man

Dr. King records a quote from Jeremiah 17:9, which discusses the evilness of man.

Committee to Adopt a Freedom Rider

Saturday, August 5, 1961
New York (NY)

This is a brochure to an event entitled the Card Party. This event is catered to raising funds to adopt a freedom rider.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Benjamin Brown

Thursday, October 14, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dora McDonald responds to Benjamin Brown of CORE on behalf of Dr. King. She tells Mr. Brown of Dr. King's travels and urges him to pick up a copy of "Why We Can't Wait" in order to find a fitting quote to publish in the "CORE Guide."

Letter from MLK to Fredrik Schjander

Wednesday, October 6, 1965
Oslo, Norway, CHINA, VIETNAM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, INDIA

Dr. King responds to a survey of five questions from Fredrik Schjander regarding the world's chances for peace. Dr. King believes the prospects for world peace have actually declined since he received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964, due to conflicts in areas such as Kashmir and Vietnam. Dr. King does write that the growing role of the United Nations as a global mediator is an encouraging sign.

Introduction to the Demands of the Freedom Movement

Chicago, IL

The Negros in Chicago are faced with numerous systematic societal restrictions as they are excluded from many aspects of an American life. The Negros are subjected to segregation and substandard housing that are identified as "crime-infested slums." The plight of the Negro in Chicago involves insufficient housing and education as well as economic and social exclusion.

Address by MLK to the Hungry Club

Wednesday, December 15, 1965
Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Virginia (VA), Alabama (AL), Philadelphia, PA, South Africa, Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King addresses the members of The Hungry Club on the dilemma of "Negroes" obtaining complete equality. He refers to several passages from his "I Have a Dream" speech.

The Practical Value of Religion

Dr. King writes about Albrecht Ritschl's views on the practical value of religion.

Whitehead's Doctrine of Freedom

Dr. King examines Alfred North Whitehead’s doctrine of freedom as described in “Science and the Modern World.”

Letter from Walter Mondale to MLK

Wednesday, July 26, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this letter Congressman Mondale writes to Dr. King asking for feedback on the bill he's trying to pass, which is intended to provide government assistance for home ownership.

The Domestic Impact of the War in America

Saturday, November 11, 1967
VIETNAM, CHINA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., San Francisco, CA

In his address to the National Labor Leadership Assembly for Peace, Dr. King parallels the war in Vietnam to the injustice and violence inflicted on urban dwelling American Negroes "goaded and infuriated by discrimination and neglect." King implores Congress and the Johnson Administration to reassess the nation's domestic priorities and institute anti-poverty programs, so that the Great Society does not deteriorate into a "troubled and confused society."

Letter from Charles C. Diggs Jr. to the General Motors Corporation

Tuesday, July 18, 1967
Washington, D.C., Detroit, MI

In this letter, Congressman Charles Diggs of Michigan asks Mr. Louis Seaton of General Motors for his comments in regards to automobile dealerships. The Congressman then points out that General Motors is the only one of the "Big 3" automobile companies that has not taken initiative in having a Negro franchise holder.

Letter from Frank J. Pastor to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from Frank Pastor was written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Index Card with Dr. King's Handwritten Theology Notes

This notecard seems to elucidate some of Dr. King's personal insights on the relationship between Christianity and society.This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses. Topics covered include theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches and sermons.

A Southern Point of View

Eliza Paschall writes this article to express her feelings toward the Georgia legislature's willingness to close down the schools rather than integrate them. Paschall states that "segregation is a disease that infects all parts of a being, human or political." The time for action is now, so that equality can be achieved by all.

Letter from Jack Krieger to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
Los Angeles, California, New York (NY)

Jack Krieger requests a reprint of Dr. King's speech delivered at the Riverdale Church in New York on the topics of peace and the Vietnam War.

Telegram from Planned Parenthood to MLK

Saturday, June 11, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Medora Bass, Planned Parenthood President, asks Dr. King for a response to an invitation to speak at the organization's upcoming annual luncheon.

Schedule for Oslo Trip

Oslo, Norway, Atlanta, GA, London, England, Stockholm, Sweden, KENYA, FRANCE

This itinerary outlines Dr. King's schedule leading up to the Nobel Peace Prize Award Ceremony. The itinerary includes flight arrangements, speaking engagements, interviews, sight seeing, press conferences and tourist activities.

Letter from William Eerdmans, Jr. to MLK

Saturday, June 15, 1963
Michigan (MI)

William. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company requests to reprint Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail" in a small booklet for wider circulation. Eerdmans, Jr. writes, "your words...are those of a Christian martyr and saint."

Unwise and Untimely?

Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, New Orleans, LA, New York (NY), Texas (TX), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

This pamphlet from the Fellowship of Reconciliation features a letter written from eight Alabama Clergymen to Dr. King. The Clergymen express their discontent with the movement and Dr. King brings forth a response. The response is later known as one of Dr. King's famous texts, "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." The pamphlet also includes Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech from the 1963 March on Washington.

Letter from J. Herbert May to Ralph Abernathy

Saturday, April 27, 1968
California (CA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Minnesota (MN), Wisconsin (WI)

Herbert May discusses several points in which he disagrees with Ralph Abernathy on how to best reach a fully integrated and equitable society.

Daniel B. Brewster Address before the Senate

Thursday, June 18, 1964
Washington, D.C., Maryland (MD), Illinois (IL), Montana (MT), Minnesota (MN), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Honorable Daniel B. Brewster, U. S. Senator from Maryland, addresses the President of the United States and the Second Session of the 88th Congress regarding the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

List of Messages to MLK

New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Baltimore, MD, Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, PA, VIETNAM, Cincinnati, OH, New Orleans, LA, Cleveland, OH

A list of messages including names, dates, and organizations intended for Dr. King, soliciting his response.

Material to Use Regarding Negro Leaders and Platform Committee

Missouri (MO), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Bayard Rustin sends Dr. King this pre-written answer to be used if the media ask why Dr. King and A. Philip Randolph are not together during the march before the 1960 Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles. The statement explains that Randolph will be in St. Louis to address the campaign to elect the first Negro Senator.

Letter from the International Convention of Christian Churches to MLK

Friday, October 7, 1966
Indiana (IN), Dallas, TX

The International Convention of Christian Churches communicates their appreciation for Dr. King's participation in the evening panel on "The Churches and the Struggle for Human Freedom, Dignity and Brotherhood." The executive secretary informs Dr. King of the enclosed honorarium for his contribution to this panel discussion.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Harry Wachtel

Wednesday, November 18, 1964
New York, NY, Oslo, Norway

Ms. McDonald sends Mr. Wachtel Dr. King's schedules for visiting Oslo, Norway. Dr. King is traveling to Norway to receive his Nobel Peace Prize.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Leslie Dixon Weatherhead’s “Why Do Men Suffer?”

The Dilemma of The Negro

Saturday, January 29, 1966
Tuskegee, AL, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King provides an outlook on the social and political plight of the contemporary Negro. He claims "The challenge is the fact that society expects, indeed demands, that the Negro be as productive, as resourceful, as skillful and as responsible as his white brother who is not handicapped by oppression". He urges Negro citizens to capitalize on current opportunities for advancement. "The negro must not wait until the dawn of absolute emancipation...".