Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Jackson, MS"

King Made Tactical Error In Choosing Slums as Issue

Thursday, March 3, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This article addresses Mr. Jay McMullen's issue with Dr. King's "trusteeship" or "personal war" with Chicago slums serving as the focal point of his Chicago crusade. According to Mr. McMullen this approach showed not only the lack of diplomacy by Dr. King and his staff, but also proved that in fact their approach may be ten years too late.

Fifty-five Facts about Morehouse

Atlanta, GA

This pamphlet discusses fifty-five important facts about Morehouse College and its distinguished alumni.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rose R. Silvers

Tuesday, January 26, 1965
Selma, AL, New York (NY)

Dora McDonald informs Rose Silvers that Dr. King was concerned about an unknown speaking arrangement that he was scheduled to fulfill. Due to a congested schedule, Dr. King will notify Silvers about his availability to speak in the near future.

Letter from Joan Daves to Mrs. Dora McDonald about expenses from trip to New York

Tuesday, June 9, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. and Mrs. King extended their stay in New York City to launch his latest book. Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, wrote to Dora McDonald requesting lodging receipts in an effort to expedite the expense reporting process with Harper Publishing. Handwritten notes on the document suggest that the launch was very successful.

Letter from Lawrence Guyot to MLK

Monday, April 11, 1966
Jackson, MS, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Lawrence Guyot of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party seeks Dr. King's support for the Mississippi election campaign.

Letter from Freddie Mitchell to MLK

Friday, December 15, 1967
New York (NY)

Mr. Mitchell requests Dr. King's assistance in restoring the musical recording rights that have been denied to him.

Telegram from MLK to Derhanov Dinke

New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King informs Ambassador Derhanov Dinke that it is his pleasure to serve as Honorary President for the Gandhi Society for Human Rights. He invites Ambassador Dinke to attend a luncheon at the Sheraton Carlton Hotel in Washington, D. C.

Faith In The Heart

Dr. King uses the steadfast faith of biblical figures Abraham and Paul to express his desire to part from the traditionalism of religion and make it applicable to all aspects of a person's life. King also iterates this position by using excerpts from various philosophers such as Edgar Brightman and Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Letter from Berenice Wiggins to MLK

Monday, September 18, 1967
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

In this letter, Ms. Wiggins encloses a contribution to the SCLC. She also requests that Dr. King puts out an announcement so that listeners can tune into his radio broadcast on WLIB.

Invitation from J.E.L Graham to MLK

Wednesday, July 13, 1966
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), CANADA

J.E.L. Graham, President of the Hamilton Branch of the United Nations Association in Canada, invites Dr. King to speak on the theme of Human Rights during one of the organizations quarterly meetings.

Letter to Mrs. King from Hon. C.P. Carter and James H. Beverly

Sunday, April 7, 1968
New Jersey (NJ)

This document was sent from the St. John Grand Lodge Masons of New Jersey, expressing their condolences for Mrs. King's tragic loss following Dr. King's assassination. The letter asks that God grant the King family peace, during their time of bereavement.

Letter from Reverend Casper Glenn to MLK

Friday, August 30, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Arizona (AZ)

Rev. Casper Glenn, president of the NAACP chapter in Tucson, Arizona, writes to Dr. King regarding rights to a recording of the "I Have a Dream" speech.

Letter to the Montgomery Advertiser

Friday, January 11, 1957
Montgomery, AL

The Southern Negro Leaders Conference expresses their appreciation to the Montgomery Advertiser.

Letter from Dr. Joseph R. Swartwout to MLK

Friday, January 19, 1968
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

Dr. Joseph R. Swartwout invites Dr. King to eat lunch at the Chicago University faculty club.

Notecard regarding freedom

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines another thinker's views on freedom, according to the book, "Human Nature and Conduct." This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

H. Rap Brown Requests SNCC Support

New York, NY, SOUTH AFRICA, VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Mississippi (MS)

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee's New York office of International Affairs, requests support during the August 27, 1967 boycott of General Motors. After declaring itself a Human Rights organization, SNCC requests support in the worldwide struggle for human rights, especially black liberation schools in the United States.

Letter from James Huger to MLK Regarding Recent Visit

Monday, January 15, 1968
Florida (FL)

Mr. Huger, City Commissioner of Dayton Beach, Florida, informs Dr. King how much he enjoyed a recent visit to Ebenezer, and wishes Dr. King good health and success.

Letter from MLK to The Farmington Ministerial Association

Monday, January 30, 1967
Michigan (MI)

This letter, dated January 30, 1967, was sent from Dr. King to the Farming Ministerial Association. In this letter, he thanks them for their contribution and apologizes for responding late. Their letter was accidentally placed in a folder entitled "Letters to be filed". He further goes on to state how he wishes they, along with other loyal contributors could know more directly how important their support is to the SCLC and all that it stands for.

Chicago Tribune: Man's Struggle for Freedom

Sunday, June 25, 1967
Illinois (IL)

Clarence Seidenspinner writes this review for the Chicago Tribune regarding Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" His evaluation centers around Dr. King's progression from using nonviolence as strategy in Montgomery, to his focus on international affairs. He further explains Dr. King's first uneasy experience with the Black Power slogan and its effects.

Transcript of Press Conference on Hotel Restaurant Desegregation

Atlanta, GA

Dr. King states in this 1962 press conference that he sees integration of Atlanta hotels and restaurants as imminent. With the exception of Mississippi, Alabama, and South Carolina, civil rights are progressing throughout the South. The many groups working on the issue are working toward a common goal and using a variety of strategies, including direct action, litigation, legislation, and education.

Letter from Congressman John McCormack to MLK

Saturday, July 10, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Congressional House Speaker John McCormack writes that he is very glad the McCulloch Substitute Bill was rejected by the House of Representatives.

Desegregation and the Future

Saturday, December 15, 1956
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

This document contains the first eight pages of Dr. King's address at the annual luncheon of the National Committee for Rural Schools at New York's Commodore Hotel in 1956. In it, he condemns segregation as an evil which has been allowed to exist in American life for too many decades. Dr. King points out that many states now stand in opposition to desegregation, and the federal government and the Supreme Court must now face how to make this new legislation a reality.

Letter from MLK to Billy Fleming

Tuesday, April 24, 1962
South Carolina (SC)

Dr. King writes Mr. Billy Fleming expressing how lovely his visit was to the Fleming-Delaine Funeral Home. Dr. King also expresses how loving the people of Clarendon County were, which he will remember forever.

Chicago Schedule

Chicago, IL

Dr. King lists the flight numbers and times associated with his travel from Atlanta to Chicago.

The Eternality of God Verses The Temporality of Man

This document is an outline of the sermon titled "The Eternality of God Versus the Temporality of Man." In the first two sections, Dr. King contrasts the time-conditioned nature of man with God, who transcends time. The final portion highlights a significant fact that God is absolute and unchangeable.

Memorandum from MLK

Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Boston, MA

Dr. King regrets his absence at the Unity Council meeting and apologizes for his inability to sign a statement because it disagreed with his methods of civil disobedience.

Letter from Anonymous Critic to MLK

A critic sends Dr. King a series of newspaper clippings in order to communicate an adverse view about "negro people." The author brings special attention to an enclosed article about Stokely Carmichael and asks for his view. After accusing Dr. King of receiving money from the Communist Party, the writer states "I will never know why you was given the noble award."

U.S. News & World Report: New Negro Threat

Monday, August 28, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., New York, NY

U.S. News & World Report reports that Dr. King plans on using "civil disobedience on a massive scale," including marches, sit-ins and boycotts in "riot-torn" Northern cities.

Letter From Roberta S. Felton to Miss Dora McDonald

Thursday, March 1, 1962
Milwaukee, WI, Atlanta, GA

Roberta S. Felton writes to Dora McDonald in recognition and thanks for the letter she received.

Fight for Open City

Sunday, August 21, 1966
Chicago, IL

Included in The United Council Sentinel, is an excerpt featuring an initiative of Dr. King and various others: Operation Breadbasket. The author explores the details of this specific movement.