Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Jackson, MS"

Letter to MLK Requesting Information to Rebut Allegations of Communist Affiliation

Wednesday, February 16, 1966

Ernest O. Norquist, Director of the Commission on Religion and Race of the Illinois Synod of the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A., commends Dr. King for his recent speech at Illinois Wesleyan University. He alerts Dr. King of the Birch Society’s attempts to spread allegations of his communist’s affiliations, and recommends a booklet refuting the charges and offers to help prepare and print it. Norquist requests a meeting with Dr. King in Chicago for himself, and other executive members of the Illinois Council of Churches to discuss how they can support Dr. King’s work.

Letter from Otto Fuerbringer of Time Magazine to MLK

Tuesday, February 18, 1964

Time Magazine's Otto Fuerbringer informs Dora McDonald that Dr. King's picture is apart of a traveling Time cover exhibit. He pledges to forward copies of Dr. King's family portrait.

Letter from Otto Emil Geppert to MLK

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

In this letter, Otto Emil Geppert expresses his opposition to the Vietnam War and encloses a monetary contribution to Dr. King, in support of his nonviolent approach.

Letter from Harry H. Wachtel to General James M. Gavin

Friday, March 29, 1968

Harry H. Wachtel, confidant and legal counsel to Dr. King, writes to General James M. Gavin, regarding a previously postponed meeting with Dr. King. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss the necessity of Dr. King's Poor People's Campaign.

Letter from Paul Johnson to MLK regarding American Politics

Thursday, January 4, 1968

In this letter, Paul Johnson tells Dr. King about how there is a concern about the state of the 1968 elections before soliciting Dr. King's response to a series of questions.

Letter from William S. Stein to MLK

Friday, May 6, 1966

William Stein informs Dr. King that the Executive Council of the Episcopal Church will be contributing to SCLC.

Letter from Canary McKay to MLK

Friday, February 4, 1966

Canary McKay shows her appreciation to Dr. King for the progress made as a result of the Civil Rights Movement. She also extends an invitation for King to speak at her church.

Follow Me

Dr. King outlines a sermon. "Follow Me" and "The Call of Christ" are considered as possible titles.

Letter from Rev. E. C. Smith to MLK

Monday, November 26, 1962

Rev. Smith informs Dr. King that the Testimonial Committee has made the assumption that Dr. King is unable to accept their previous invitation, so they have made other arrangements.

Address by MLK at the 30th Anniversary of District 65

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

This document, an address given by Dr. King on the 30th anniversary of District 65, includes handwritten notes. In the address, Dr. King talks about the importance of the Declaration of Independence and the Emancipation Proclamation to human rights.

Letter Starlet Roberts to MLK

Thursday, February 15, 1968

In this letter, Starlet Roberts, a fifth grade student, asks Dr. King for a picture for her class book of Famous Negroes.

Letter from Carl Shipley to MLK

Friday, July 20, 1962

Carl Shipley, Head of the Republican State Committee for the District of Columbia, thanks Dr. King for his address at the National Press Club. Shipley expresses that despite the reservations of many individuals regarding Dr. King's emphasis on civil disobedience, the overall support of his speech was highly satisfactory.

Letter to Mrs. King from Hon. C.P. Carter and James H. Beverly

Sunday, April 7, 1968

This document was sent from the St. John Grand Lodge Masons of New Jersey, expressing their condolences for Mrs. King's tragic loss following Dr. King's assassination. The letter asks that God grant the King family peace, during their time of bereavement.

Statement of Royalty Account

Tuesday, June 29, 1965

This financial statement reflects SCLC's affiliation with Motown Record Corporation.

Lenin

The role of State in Society is described as Dr. King documents a quote from the book "The State and Revolution" written by Vladimir Lenin.

Telegram from Mrs. King to Mr. & Mrs. Silverboard

Thursday, January 9, 1969

Mrs. King forwarded this telegram to the Silverboard family of Atlanta, Georgia, in 1969. She wanted to convey sympathy for the death of their father and hoped that the family would find comfort. The spiritual bond of love, according to Mrs. King, is a mechanism that unites families during times of sorrow.

Letter from Ram Bagai to MLK

Thursday, March 18, 1965

Ram Bagai, President of Films of India, writes Dr. King to support him and his affiliation with the Civil Rights Movement. He also seeks to become a financial donor to assist Dr. King. Bagai discusses a film entitled "Two Eyes, Twelve Hands," which is set to premiere in New York, and offers the proceeds to Dr. King to assist in his endeavors.

Letter to Rev. Thomas Thrasher from MLK and Others

Friday, January 11, 1957

Dr. King and other civil rights leaders contact the President of the Montgomery Ministerial Association, Rev. Thomas Thrasher, to compliment him on his statement subsequent to the bombings in Alabama.

People in Action: Our New President

Saturday, February 1, 1964

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes optimistically about the prospects for civil rights in the transition from President Kennedy to President Johnson. He believes that Johnson's Southern-ness may disarm the likes of George Wallace and that the President's proven commitment to civil rights and skills as Majority Leader in the Senate will aid in passing legislation.

Invitation from the Government of Barbados to MLK

The Government of Barbados invite Dr. King and Coretta Scott King to the Celebrations to Mark the Independence of Barbados. This event held high historical importance due Barbados' inquiry for independence for many years.

Schleiermacher

Dr. King quotes theologian Schleiermacher regarding the universe.

Note from Mrs. Phyllis J. Sundquist to MLK

Mrs. Phyllis Sundquist encourages Dr. King to continue his stance against the Vietnam War for the betterment of the United States.

Response from MLK to Priscilla C. Spagne

Dr. King extends his appreciation to Priscilla C. Spagne for her supportive letter to the Boston Globe. He proclaims that it is important to, "Take every opportunity to make our consciences known to the public."

Letter from Iva Sturm to MLK

Thursday, August 10, 1967

The author requests Dr. King to answer questions to solidify the political practices in America before he is to vote democratically.The questions involve concerns surround military, political, and economic issues within the United States. The authors' primary contention is the Vietnam War.

Letter from Debby Hopper to MLK

Sunday, May 26, 1963

Debby Hopper, a 17-year-old from the Boston area, writes Dr. King to discuss prejudice in America and relates what she believes to be the hypocrisy of whites in her community. She also offers Dr. King words of encouragement in his fight for civil rights.

Oberlin College Commencement

This issue of the Oberlin Alumni Magazine features commencement articles and photos as well as Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution, Dr. King’s address to the graduating class.

Letter from MLK to Winifred Menehart

Monday, January 8, 1968

In this document, Dr. King is truly appreciative of the encouraging letter he received from Mrs. Winfred Menehart, a native of Minnesota. Dr. King emphasizes on the positivity that rests within her letter, as a facet of hope, amid the contrasting assaults and criticisms he receives daily.

Card From Marjorie Baker

Marjorie Baker sends a card expressing wishes to maintain courage until things are better.

Lette from Morton Sobell to a Friend

Tuesday, August 23, 1966

Mrs. Sobell requests that Dr. King attend the open hearing for Morton Sobell. She also asks for financial support to aid in his defense.

Letter from Mrs. J. T. Brent to MLK

Monday, May 6, 1963

Mrs. Brent states her support for Dr. King's cause, and asks him to encourage his people not to hate whites. She writes that "hate will destroy you."