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Telegram from Ralph Abernathy to John F. Kennedy

Thursday, June 13, 1963
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

Rev. Ralph Abernathy accepts President John F. Kennedy’s invitation to meet and discuss the civil rights problem.

Telegram from MLK to Robert L. Leggett

Washington, D.C.

In this telegram, King urges the House of Representatives to please vote passage demonstration cities for the sake of civil peace.

Letter from Dean George W. Jones to MLK

Tuesday, October 19, 1965
Birmingham, AL, Virginia (VA)

George Jones writes Dr. King on behalf of his brother-in-law, Captain Yancey Martin, who is subject to a trial based on previous accusations. Jones hopes that Dr. King is able to utilize his role with the S.C.L.C. to assist Captain Martin.

Letter from Dora McDonald and MLK to the United Federation of Teachers

Thursday, November 10, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King congrats the United Federation of Teachers AFL- CIO on their Fifteenth Anniversary of serving school children.

Fleeing From God

This sermon, delivered by Dr. King on April 4, 1956, discusses the human desire to escape God. Dr. King attributes this inclination to the fact that man wants to hide from God's immanent nature and harbors a general unwillingness to follow God's commandments.

Letter from "A Red Blooded American Who Is Opposed to Your Tactics of Un-Americanism"

Thursday, April 27, 1967
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Texas (TX)

This letter to Dr. King criticizes his presumed anti-American activities. The author, who signs as "A Red Blooded American who is opposed to your tactics of un-Americanism," describes herself as the mother and grandmother of men who have served in the armed forces.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous writer questions Dr. King about blacks committing brutal acts against whites.

Letter from W. B. Blix to MLK

Monday, February 26, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Wisconsin (WI)

W. B. Blix writes to Dr. King to express his support of the Civil Rights Movement. However, Blix also informs Dr. King that he has lost his support because of Dr. King's preemptive decision to commit civil disobedience if the Poor People's March on Washington is unsuccessful.

Letter from Theodore A. Hamilton to MLK

Saturday, February 12, 1966
Dallas, TX, Texas (TX)

In this letter, Theodore Hamilton challenges Dr. King to prove that he is not the son of Satan. To prove this Hamilton proposes that he and Dr. King tape open their eyes and look at the sun, claiming that the true Christian will walk away with sight.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Friday, March 20, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Roy Wilkins invites Dr. King to attend an urgent meeting of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights to discuss civil rights developments in the Senate. The 1964 Civil Rights Act was under debate at the time in the United States House of Representatives and Senate.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Jessie C. Treichler

Wednesday, April 14, 1965
Ohio (OH)

Dora McDonald writes Mrs. Treichler to inform her that she will provide Dr. and Mrs. King arrival time at a later date. She also explains that Dr. King's physician has highly recommended that he limits his amount of events during his travels, therefore she feels sure that he will not be able to commit to all of her suggestions.

SCLC Press Release: Civil Rights Leader Protests Antipoverty Cutbacks

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference issues a press release containing a telegram that Reverend Ralph David Abernathy sent to President Lyndon B. Johnson. Abernathy expresses his concern with President Johnson's proposed cuts to the Office of Economic Opportunity's funding.

Letter From Harry A. Ploski to MLK

Tuesday, September 13, 1966
New York, NY, Florida (FL), Mississippi (MS), Virginia (VA), Alabama (AL), Louisville, KY, Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Little Rock, AR, Selma, AL, Maryland (MD), Pennsylvania (PA), North Carolina (NC), New Orleans, LA, Memphis, TN, New York (NY), Philadelphia, PA, Los Angeles, CA

Harry A. Ploski writes Dr. King concerning a book he and Professor Roscoe Brown have written. Hoping to solicit endorsement, he encloses a copy of the table of contents and an outline of the topics addressed.

Telegram from Mary Gregory to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this telegram, Mary Gregory, President of the Frederick Douglass Association, informed Dr. King of their rededicated efforts to the movement, during his incarceration in the Birmingham Jail.

National Student Christian Federation Bulletin

Monday, February 29, 1960
New York, NY, Nashville, TN, Ohio (OH), New York (NY)

The National Student Christian Federation released several bulletins and informational letters regarding the student demonstrations in the 1960s. Herluf Jensen, General Secretary of the NSCF, provides readers with the progress of different trials related to the movement, arrest statistics and institutions involved. Obtaining strong civil rights legislation through Congress is discussed as well.

Letter from Viva O. Sloam to CORE Members

Tuesday, June 19, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY, Kentucky (KY), Michigan (MI), West Virginia (WV)

Viva O. Sloam, sends a letter to members of the Congress for Racial Equality regarding integration in a Kentucky neighborhood.

Letter from David Joel to MLK

Friday, January 12, 1968

In this letter, Joel writes Dr. King requesting assistance with a term paper on "Black Power". Joel is a sophomore at Briarcliff High School and is writing a term paper for his World History course. He hopes that King can offer a more clear explanation of the "Negro situation" and he also includes specific questions for King to answer.

Program - SCLC Presentation of Mahalia Jackson

Sunday, December 1, 1963
New Orleans, LA, Chicago, IL

This SCLC program is for Miss Mahalia Jackson's concert benefitting the organization.

Negroes Suffer From Riots, King Writes In New Book

Sunday, June 25, 1967
Oregon (OR)

The Oregonian newspaper published this brief review of Dr. King's last publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?". The article highlights Dr. King's perspective on the negative impact of riots. According to Dr. King, riots were menacing for both black and white communities.

Letter from Bruce A. King to MLK

Wednesday, October 28, 1964
AUSTRALIA, Washington, D.C.

Bruce King, Secretary of the Baptist Union of New South Wales, congratulates Dr. King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

People In Action: Birmingham, U.S.A.

Birmingham, AL, Johannesburg, South Africa, New York, NY

In this first of a two-part article for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes about the circumstances surrounding SCLC’s decision to develop Project C, a campaign confronting racial injustice in Birmingham. Three factors led to the decision. First, the city was the home of the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights, SCLC’s strongest affiliate. Second, Birmingham represented the hard-core segregationist South. And third, the South’s largest industrial center was suffering economically from the loss of vital industry and its poor image on race relations.

Letter from H. W. Brown to MLK

Wednesday, October 24, 1962
BAHAMAS, London, England

H. W. Brown, a pastor at Bethel Baptist Church and proponent of Bahamas' Progressive Liberal Party, writes to Dr. King, asking him to be their honored speaker at a pre-election rally. Brown asks if Dr. King would also deliver the sermon at his church the morning of the rally.

Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution

Sunday, August 1, 1965
INDIA, CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King delivers the commencement address at Oberlin College in Ohio on June 14, 1965. Nothing is more tragic, he says, than sleeping through a significant period of social change by failing to adopt the new mental attitudes that the new situation demands. He suggests that to remain awake through a great revolution one must embrace a global perspective and work for peace, racial justice, economic justice and brotherhood throughout the world.

Letter from Susan Altman to MLK

Saturday, April 1, 1967
New York, NY, Birmingham, AL

Susan Altman requests an autographed copy of Time magazine, in which Dr. King was featured.

Memorandum from MLK to SCLC

Saturday, February 8, 1958
Atlanta, GA

In this memorandum to the representatives of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Dr. King encloses two resolutions that the Executive Board approved. The resolutions state that a letter should be sent to Senator Thomas C. Hennings and Attorney General William P. Rogers. Dr. King suggests that the resolutions be adopted at all of the SCLC's mass meetings, scheduled for February 12th.

Letter from Charles R. Bell Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, November 23, 1966
California (CA)

Mr. Bell inquires about a prisoner who was beaten to death in his home state of Alabama.

SCLC Executive Board Approves Montgomery March

Alabama (AL), Virginia (VA), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King’s handwritten notes report on SCLC Executive Board approval of four of his recommendations: a March on the State Capitol in Montgomery, a nationwide economic withdrawal from Christmas shopping to commemorate the tragic deaths of children in Birmingham, a massive direct action program in Danville, Virginia, and selective buying campaign in the South to get better jobs for Negroes

Letter from MLK to Willard T. Carter

Friday, December 27, 1963
Connecticut (CT), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King thanks Mr. and Mrs. Willard Carter for their monetary contribution to the SCLC. King states that because of friends like them he can help end racial discrimination and segregation in the South.

Telegram from Harry Belafonte to Coretta Scott King

New York, NY

In this telegram, Mr. Belafonte sympathizes with Mrs. King as she is preparing for Dr. King's sentence of four months in prison.

Letter from MLK to Louise Andrews

Wednesday, January 3, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King regretfully declines a speaking invitation of the American Friends Service Committee. Mrs. Louis Andrews is informed Dr. King has already accepted the maximum allowable speaking engagements for the season.