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Letter from Calvin Kimbro to MLK

Monday, March 12, 1962
Georgia (GA)

Calvin Kimbro expresses his interest in famous African Americans and asks for a summary of Dr. King's life. Kimbro also wishes Dr. King luck and success in the near future.

Post Card to MLK from Benjamin Mays, Morehouse College

Monday, September 12, 1966
Atlanta, GA

This 1966 post card from Benjamin Mays, Morehouse College, is a thank-you note to Dr. King and "the Morehouse men" who made alumni contributions.

Letter from William Caspe and Bruce Fleegler to MLK

Tuesday, December 3, 1963
Massachusetts (MA), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS)

William Caspe and Bruce Fleeger, representatives of the Northern Student Movement at Brandies University, inform Dr. King of their past civil rights efforts with Negroes in the south and their upcoming "Fast for Freedom" event. They request Dr. King's written endorsement of the program and ask that he encourage others to participate.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Peter White

Friday, September 10, 1965
London, England, CANADA

Dora McDonald notifies Peter White, of the University of Western Ontario, that Dr. King is unable to accept any additional speaking engagements for the "next seven or eight months."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Student Jacquelyn Gravely

Wednesday, March 18, 1964
North Carolina (NC)

Dora McDonald refers Allen High School student Jacquelyn Gravely to read "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Crusader Without Violence" for her school assignment. She conveys Dr. King's good wishes towards Gravely's academic career.

On Being A Good Neighbor

ISRAEL

In Dr. King's sermon "On Being A Good Neighbor," he explains variety of stories that aid him in defining a good samaritan as an altruistic human being. He uses the path to Jerusalem and Jericho as a walking path where people must help others to accomplish one goal equality.

"Dr. King Denounces Write-In Plot"

Monday, November 2, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Contrary to what radio announcements and newspapers advertise, Dr. King urges Negro voters to vote for a presidential candidate that is already on the ballot. He expresses that he is not a candidate and does not want voters to write his name on the ballot.

Letter from Robert Brandeis to MLK

Monday, June 12, 1967
San Francisco, CA

Robert Brandies expresses his support regarding the efforts of Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from G. Campbell-Westlind to MLK

Wednesday, July 21, 1965
SWEDEN, Atlanta, GA, Stockholm, Sweden, New York (NY)

G. Campbell-Westlind, Acting Consul General of the Royal Consulate General of Sweden, informs Dr. King that Simon & Schuster has asked the Nobel Foundation in Stockholm for permission to print his Nobel Award Acceptance Speech. The letter requests Dr. King's comments on the proposal.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes G. W. Knox on religion from the Harvard Theological Review.

Letter from Mrs. Sammie Adams to MLK

Monday, April 4, 1966
Georgia (GA)

Mrs. Sammie Adams, a 67-year-old widow, writes an emotional appeal to Dr. and Mrs. King in an effort to collect money for Easter clothes for her children. She acknowledges that she previously donated to Dr. King and the cause for civil rights and would benefit from some assistance.

MLK's Plans for Cleveland

Dr. King outlines programs and development that he will implement in Cleveland. King frequently went to Cleveland throughout his time as a leader in the Civil Rights Movement.

Certificate Honoring MLK

Friday, March 31, 1967

This certificate serves to honor MLK for his contributions "in the field of racial relations."

SCLC Annual Conference Registration

Monday, September 11, 1961
Nashville, TN

Wyatt Tee Walker, Executive Director of the SCLC, sent this letter to associates of the SCLC prior to the 1961 Annual Convention held in Nashville, Tennessee. The letter included registration cards for the event with a request to RSVP immediately.

Letter from S. Keith Graham to MLK

Thursday, January 13, 1966
Utah (UT)

Skyline High School invites Dr. King to attend their annual dance sponsored by the Associated Men of Skyline. The dance is entitled, "The Southern Queen," and may include additional prominent leaders such as President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Letter from John Maguire to MLK

Tuesday, October 12, 1965
Connecticut (CT)

Mr. John D. Maguire, on behalf of Wesleyan University's Department of Religion, writes to Dr. King inviting him to preach in their chapel.

Letter from Wesley Hotchkiss to Associates of the Citizen Education Project

Wednesday, September 7, 1966
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Mr. Hotchkiss, the General Secretary of the AMA and primary UCBHM representative for the CEP, writes employees to clear up confusion regarding the administrative structure of the CEP. He informs employees that the the CEP is administered by the UCBHM stating, "When staff are confused about their employer it usually means they are confused about their objectives." The organization's most important objective, Mr. Hotchkiss asserts, is to mobilize individuals who have been trained under the CEP to focus the skills they have acquired on community development.

Letter of Support from James Duren to MLK

Thursday, July 21, 1966
Wisconsin (WI)

James Duren informs Dr. King that he was impressed by his speech at the Chicago Rally and requests a copy. He closes the letter with an inquiry about SCLC activity in Milwaukee.

Letter from Eleanor A. Lofton of the Pittsburgh Courier to MLK

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
Pittsburgh, PA

Eleanor Lofton, Acting Publisher for the Pittsburgh Courier, asks Dr. King to include a message for the "Brotherhood" edition of their publication. Lofton explains that they are seeking "all men of goodwill" to be a part of the edition and that they will be anticipating his timely response.

Americans Need Some Discipline

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Chicago, IL, New York, NY, Los Angeles, CA

This Daily Californian editorial calls for "self-restraint" in civil rights demonstrations and a return to the "hard work, thrift, and adherence to the moral precepts that form the basis for this democracy." It continues to maintain that gratuitous demonstrations cause racial riots and violence, provoking the "wrath of whites who resent Negro intrusion in their neighborhoods" and thus undermine political support for Dr. King's cause. Dr.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Robert Kennedy

Monday, November 28, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary, informs Senator Robert F. Kennedy that Dr. King has accepted the invitation to appear before the subcommittee on Executive Reorganization.

Plans for Progress: Atlanta Survey

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Florida (FL), Ohio (OH), Alabama (AL)

The Southern Regional Council releases a special report regarding Atlanta's "Plans for Progress," a program that gives the President's Committee on Equal Employment Opportunity power to require contractors to eliminate discrimination in the workplace. According to a study, only three of the twenty-four firms appeared to be interested in abiding by the "Plans for Progress." These were Lockheed, Western Electric Company, and Goodyear.

History and Human Nature

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man: A Christian Interpretation" on the rebellion against rationalism's interpretation of human nature.

Letter from Senator Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1966
Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, ISRAEL, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Chicago, IL, Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL

Senator Robert Kennedy thanks Dr. King for a previous correspondence and expresses his aligned views regarding nonviolent reconciliation. Senator Kennedy believes in the preservation of dignity and freedom internationally without imposing "incessant military conflict" upon those with unaligned views. He references Dr. King's statement regarding the precedence of progress in America to that of other countries. He also wishes to hear Dr. King's reaction to a series of his speeches on "A Program for the Urban Crisis" that he has attached.

Letter from Roland Gammon to MLK

Friday, December 20, 1963
New York, NY

Roland Gammon requests an interview with Dr. King for a sequel to Faith Is A Star, a book about the role faith has played in the lives of prominent Americans. The sequel will focus on world leaders.

Letter from Rosemary O'Neill to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968
New York (NY)

Rosemary O'Neill of the College of Saint Rose in Albany, New York writes Dr. King regarding Choice '68, the National Collegiate Presidential Primary. O'Neill, Choice '68 Campus Coordinator, requests campaign materials such as fliers, pamphlets and fact sheets to inform students on various candidates.

Political Cartoon: The FBI Adds

VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This satirical cartoon in the Nashville Banner equates protests in the U.S. with the Communist buildup in Vietnam.

Letter from Ed Clayton to Martin Gal

Wednesday, October 16, 1963
Michigan (MI), Birmingham, AL

Ed Clayton, Public Relations Director for SCLC, writes Martin Gal, Producer of WMSB TV, to inform him that Dr. King will not be able to make an appearance on his television production because of his focus on the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Rev. Allen Clark to MLK

Texas (TX)

Rev. Allen Clark sends Dr. King words of encouragement and requests a copy of a book regarding Dr. King's faith.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, NIGERIA, Texas (TX)

The American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa writes an uplifting message to General Yakubu Gowon of Lagos, Nigeria. They extend a "hand in friendship" to bring the war in Nigeria to an end.