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Letter from Paul Verghese to MLK

Friday, October 21, 1966
SWITZERLAND, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Texas (TX), Dallas, TX, Missouri (MO), Kansas (KS), SWEDEN, South Africa

Father Verghese requests Dr. King provide a written statement regarding what spiritual resources he draws upon, to cope with the constant threat from elements of American Society, and how he uses this as a basis for his position on nonviolence.

Letter from John C. Hall to MLK about a March

Thursday, February 8, 1968
Washington, D.C.

In this letter John C. Hall informs Dr. King of his desire to participate in the upcoming march to Washington D.C. and requests any information regarding such.

Letter to MLK from Rual Boles

Wednesday, March 8, 1967
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

Mr. Boles, a businessman in Chicago, thanks Dr. King, Rev. Jackson, and the SCLC staff for contributing to the success of his struggling business. He is also appreciative for the efforts of Operation Breadbasket in equipping Negro-owned small businesses to effectively compete in the American economy.

Letter from W. P. Ketterer to MLK

Monday, November 25, 1963

W. P. Ketterer sends Dr. King a contribution to honor the late President Kennedy. He expresses his hope for other Americans to support Dr. King in his efforts.

Letter from MLK to Katherine Gunning

Thursday, July 13, 1967
Georgia (GA), New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King thanks Katharine Gunning for sending him a copy of the letter she sent to President Johnson. He urges that "those of us who seek peaece through non-violence make our consciences and numbers known to the men who run our government."

Letter from MLK to W. David Angus

Monday, October 14, 1963
CANADA

This letter is in response to Mr. W. David Angus from Dr. King, referencing an invite to speak in Montreal. However, Dr. King acknowledged that he would be out of the country.

Letter from Annalee Stewart to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, June 1, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Washington, D.C.

Annalee Stewart confirms with Dora McDonald that Dr. King will be the keynote speaker for the 50th Anniversary of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom.

Letter from MLK to Peter S. Kliewer

Thursday, July 13, 1967
California (CA), VIETNAM

In response to a "letter to the editor" from the "Times-Advocate" sent in by a reader, Dr. King addresses America's role in Vietnam.

SCLC Constituent to Rev. Abernathy

Thursday, May 2, 1968
New York, NY

This letter, originating from New York City in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination, is from a supporter who is inquiring about the purchase of items relating to Dr. King's correspondence.

Letter from Dora McDonald to John Bolt Culbertson

Tuesday, January 7, 1964
South Carolina (SC), Birmingham, AL, New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dora McDonald informs Culbertson that Dr. King is grateful for the invitation to speak at a South Carolina fundraiser for the families of Medgar Evers and the children killed in the Birmingham church bombing, but will be unable to attend. Miss McDonald refers Culbertson to contact Roy Wilkins of the NAACP to be a possible keynote speaker.

Letter from John and Eva Fillion to MLK about Moral Support

Thursday, March 14, 1968
Michigan (MI)

This letter dated March 14, 1968 was written to Dr. King from John and Eva Fillion. In this letter they thank Dr. King for promoting the cause of freedom and tell him how grateful they are for all of his work in the fight for justice.

Letter from John Reevs Calloway III to the SCLC

Friday, April 5, 1968
GERMANY

Mr. Galloway sends his condolences to the SCLC for the untimely death of Dr. King.

Telegram from MLK to Reverend N. C. Burtenshaw

Wednesday, March 27, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King sends his condolences for the death of Archbishop Paul Hallinan.

SCLC's Dr. King Ranked by Negroes as Most Influential Leader

Tuesday, January 9, 1968
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

This 1968 SCLC news release relays that Dr. King has been identified "as the most influential Negro leader in America today." Dr. King had less than a hundred days before that influence would cost him his life.

Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech Draft

Thursday, December 10, 1964
Philadelphia, MS, Montgomery, AL, Oslo, Norway, Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL)

In 1964, Dr. King became the first African-American to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. At age 35, he was also the youngest recipient of the award to date. Emphasizing a philosophy of nonviolence, Dr. King writes this acceptance speech commemorating the courageous work of the Civil Rights Movement. He highlights the brutality faced throughout the United States and addresses the irony of accepting a peace prize on behalf of a movement that has yet to obtain peace.

Financial Statement for Dexter Avenue Baptist Church

Friday, April 8, 1955
Montgomery, AL

The Financial Committee at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church details the budget and contributions for October 1955 through March 1956.

Wellesley class of 1966 letter to Dr.King

Wednesday, January 26, 1966
Massachusetts (MA)

Wellesley College class of 1966 asks Dr.King to become an honorable member of their class.

Letter from Dr. D. F. Harris to MLK

Tuesday, May 16, 1967
Virginia (VA), Washington, D.C., Norfolk, VA, Richmond, VA

Dr. D. F. Harris asks Dr. King if he can participate in the upcoming pilgrimage to the Holy Land. He gives Dr. King the names of people who can be contacted for information about his background, including Dr. Milton Reid, pastor of the New Calvary Baptist Church in Norfolk, Virginia.

Letter from Erma Jewell Hughes to MLK

Wednesday, February 12, 1964
Texas (TX), Atlanta, GA

Erma Jewell Hughes writes Dr. King to congratulate him on the Nobel Peace Prize award and cover on Time Magazine as "Man of the Year." Hughes invites the Reverend to speak at the Business College's annual commencement and encloses traveling expenses for the event. Hughes also states that they are raising additional funds to go towards the "Freedom Fight."

SCLC Newsletter: June-July 1965

Thursday, July 1, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL, Cleveland, OH, New York, NY, Philadelphia, PA, Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Colorado (CO)

The cover story for this 1965 SCLC Newsletter features Dr. King leading a March in Chicago, and also includes the usual wide gamut of Civil Rights Movement issues. Editor Ed Clayton's column discusses the "loss of fear" among Negroes, who "never again will be systematically excluded from office, or driven back from the voting booth."

Voting Rights and Terrorism in the South

The author places the success of the Voting Rights Bill of 1965 in the hands of the Federal Government. It is stated that the only way the Negros will truly feel the effects of the bill is if the government does its part to enforce it.

Invitation for the Inauguration of Hugh Morris Gloster

Atlanta, GA

This is an invitation for the Inauguration of the seventh president of Morehouse College.

Letter from Homer Jack to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

Homer Jack, Director of the Unitarian Universalist Association's Department of Social Responsibility, communicates his support for Dr. King's stance against the Vietnam War. Jack, co-founder of CORE and active participant in the civil rights movement, encloses a report that includes a statement made to the US Inter-Religious Committee on Peace and discusses the courage of Buddhist monks in South Vietnam. He also congratulates Dr. King for his public address made at the United Nations regarding his opposition to the war.

Congratulations from Darien Public Schools Superintendent to MLK

Monday, January 4, 1965
Connecticut (CT)

Mr. Coffin congratulates Dr. King on his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize. Mr. Coffin also provides Dr. King with information on the initiatives of the Darien Public Schools to further progress the civil rights movement.

A Program of Education in the Philosophy of Non-Violence

California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The American Foundation on Non-Violence and the SCLC outline a proposal to the Stern Family Fund to educate America on the philosophy of non-violence. The proposed program includes a semi-annual leadership seminar, community leaders conferences, and youth and student workshops.

Southern Conference Educational Fund Endorsement of MLK Vietnam Stance

Wednesday, April 12, 1967
Tennessee (TN), Nashville, TN, VIETNAM, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Kentucky (KY), Louisville, KY, Virginia (VA), Norfolk, VA

The Southern Conference Educational Fund issues this article in the Patriot News Service. This statement supports Dr. King's sentiments regarding the Vietnam War and also details issues of race, injustice, and inequality in various places throughout the world.

Letter from Mrs. Fenner to MLK

New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Brooklyn, NY

Mrs. Fenner, on behalf of the Faculty of P. S. 155, sends a contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference for use in the fight for African American Civil Rights.

Telegram from Elizabeth J. Miller to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967
Birmingham, AL

Elizabeth Miller, the Executive Director of the Christian Social Concern division of the American Baptist Convention, extends support to Dr. King while he is in the Jefferson County Jail in 1967. She expresses gratitude for Dr. King's leadership and commends him for his non-violent action.

Religion

Dr. King quotes Albrecht Ritschl's "The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation."

Amsterdam News Article by MLK About European Tour

Thursday, September 17, 1964
Berlin, Germany, Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), New York, NY, GERMANY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King recalls an address he gave at the Berlin Arts Festival, where he witnessed an enthusiastic crowd. The crowd's interest confirmed his belief "that the Negro is now in a position to lead the world." He also mentions the Christians of East Berlin, who, though Communists, maintain their faith in God.