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Letter from MLK to Naomi Thomas

Monday, January 8, 1968

Dr. King explains to Naomi Thomas his reasons for supporting athletes who plan to boycott the Olympics.

More State Funds Urged for Negro Banks

Monday, January 23, 1967

This article reports about Operation Breadbasket's request for more funding from the State of Illinois to further its economic development efforts in the African American community.

Nature

Dr. King writes notes regarding the topic of nature.

Letter from Wilma Fondel to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967

Wilma Fondel expresses interest in attending Dr. King's pilgrimage to Israel.

Telegram from the SCLC to Rev. John Golden

Tuesday, August 17, 1965

Staff from the SCLC and Citizenship Education Program telegram Reverend John Golden informing him that all expenses will be paid for the trip to Georgia.

Truth

Dr. King quotes Thomas Aquinas' "The Summa Theologica."

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

Dr. King uses a statement by Mahalia Jackson and the philanthropy of Sir Alfred Nobel to encapsulate the purpose of the Civil Rights Movement. Jackson refers to the racial problems in America as "family business," but Dr. King believes that in order for man to become a brotherhood, society has to search for truth like Alfred Nobel.

Letter from Sam Jones to MLK

Thursday, January 11, 1968

In this letter, dated January 11, 1968, Sam Jones expresses his disappointment in Dr. King for not acknowledging his letters. Jones wrote several letters to King asking for assistance in the struggle to restrain the Florida State Legislature's "Lily White" body from writing a new State Constitution.

Susan Julien Offers Service to MLK

Susan Julien responds to a SCLC circulation letter sent by Dr. King. As a student with no income, Susan offers her service to help further the cause for "democratic change." She has dedicated Saturdays to contribute to the movement and asks if there is a SCLC branch near her home in New York.

God (Isaiah)

Dr. King provides text from the Old Testament book of Isaiah highlighting the "ethical nature of God."

Sin

Dr. King highlights a definition of sin according to Reinhold Niebuhr.

Newspaper Article on MLK

Sunday, August 9, 1964

In this article, written by Robert L. Powers, the author gives his assessment of the book "Why We Can't Wait." Powers provided poignant excerpts from the literature.

Americans Need Some Discipline

This Daily Californian editorial calls for "self-restraint" in civil rights demonstrations and a return to the "hard work, thrift, and adherence to the moral precepts that form the basis for this democracy." It continues to maintain that gratuitous demonstrations cause racial riots and violence, provoking the "wrath of whites who resent Negro intrusion in their neighborhoods" and thus undermine political support for Dr. King's cause. Dr.

The New Covenant

Dr. King writes about the New Covenant, according to Jeremiah 31:33.

Letter from Edwin Allaire to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

The writer, who identifies himself as a professor at the University of Michigan, encourages Dr. King to announce his candidacy for the Presidency.

Notecard Containing MLK's Handwriting Regarding Christianity

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Martin Luther's views on Christianity, accroding to the book, "Concerning Christian Liberty."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, November 11, 1963

Mrs. Joan Daves references an enclosure of two copies of the Swedish-language edition of "Strength to Love," along with an advanced payment for the return of a signed copy.

A Challenge to the Churches and Synagogues

Thursday, January 17, 1963

In this document, Dr. King addressed the Conference on Religion and Race in Chicago, Illinois. He reprimands the Church and Synagogue for being silent or being a "silent partner of the status quo." Dr. King tells them that they must recapture its focus on human rights or risk becoming irrelevant. In closing, Dr. King challenges himself along with these religious institutions to make a choice; either continue to follow the "status quo" or "give ourselves unreservedly to God and his kingdom."

Ritschl and Schleiermacher on Method

Dr. King sketches his view of methodologies employed by German theologians Friedrich Schleiermacher and Albrecht Ritschl.

Telegram from Lawrence MacGregor to MLK

Wednesday, November 15, 1967

In this telegram, Lawrence J. MacGregor informs Dr. King that there will no longer be a memorial service for Rufus E. Clement.

Letter from Congressman Edward R. Roybal to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

California Congressman Roybal responds to a message from Dr. King regarding the seating of the Mississippi delegation. Roybal reminds Dr. King of his record on matters related to civil rights.

Letter from Victor Sharrow to MLK

Monday, February 12, 1968

Victor Sharrow requests a meeting with Dr. King to discuss implementing state and federal plans purportedly suggested by President Johnson. Mr. Sparrow believes that decreasing the number of racist southern representatives will have a collateral affect on southern apportionment of presidential electors.

Importance of Negro History and Independence

Monday, May 1, 1967

Dr. King speaks to society's misunderstanding of Negro thought and the resulting tensions in race relations. He attributes this misunderstanding to the lack of Negro history authentically represented in books. Contrived myths created by "omission and commission in books" have reinforced prejudice and faulty sense of white supremacy. He observes that illusions cloud reality and render hostility. Society's unresolved problems are aggravated by racial misconceptions.

Justice in Mississippi

Dora McDonald records notes by Dr. King concerning an unjust ruling in Mississippi. He claims that more legislation is needed to enable the federal courts to prosecute these crimes.

Secrets of a Happy Marriage

Dr. King expounds upon the secrets of a happy marriage. His first point is that the husband and wife must comprehend the nature of sexes. He describes the dichotomy of a man and woman's perception of contentment. The second point Dr. King makes is that the married couple must have an understanding of the nature of marriage itself. He further asserts that a successful marriage must be built on a mutual compromise. The final contention by Dr. King is each individual must instill the sacredness of marriage.

The Tension Between Life's Palm Sunday and Life's Good Friday

Dr. King delivered this sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church in April of 1960. In this sermon he discussed two days of prime importance in the life of Jesus namely Palm Sunday, "the moment of fulfillment" and Good Friday, the day of his crucifixion.

Letter from Robert Stark to President Johnson

Wednesday, October 18, 1967

Mr. Stark sends the President his views on Liberty and Justice for All, calling programs designed to benefit Negroes a "farce," denouncing Negro lack of responsibility and claiming that it is civil rights not the Vietnam War that is expensive. He is upset that there is so much media focus on blacks and believes it is time to insist upon white rights.

Subsistance Pay for Voter Workers

Friday, December 31, 1965

Copy of a Crusade for Citizenship disbursement check paid to an Alabama worker in a Voter Registaion program. Reason for disbursement is subsistance pay.

Campaign for a World Constitution Leaflet

This pamphlet announces a World Constitutional Convention to be held in Switzerland. Dr. King, who was among the signers of a "Call for a Constitutional Convention," is quoted in the leaflet stating that a world government would lessen tensions.

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

Thursday, July 5, 1962

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."