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Astronomy

Dr. King writes about the smallness of the earth in the great expanse of the universe.

Education (Its Weakness in the Moral Realm)

Dr. King documents two quotes from St. Augustine's "Confessions." Both quotes address Augustine's view on education and how it affects one's relationship with God and other human beings.

Letter from Clare Stover to the SCLC

Monday, May 10, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA), Ohio (OH), Alabama (AL), Selma, AL

Mrs. Stover sends the SCLC a copy of a letter she sent to the Hammermill Paper Company following its decision to locate in Alabama. She condemns the company's decision because she feels economic development should be withheld from states that do not uphold federal law. She also questions whether the State of Alabama will be able to honor its promise of tax breaks, which it used to lure Hammermill Paper Company to the state.

MLK Speech at Nobel Peace Prize Recognition Dinner

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Los Angeles, CA, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King delivers this address after returning from his trip to Oslo, Norway. A recognition dinner is held in his hometown of Atlanta, Georgia as an honor for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. King thanks supporters, family, and friends, however, accepts the award on behalf of the many people struggling for justice and civil rights. He states that oppressed people can only stay oppressed for so long because "the yearning for freedom eventually manifests itself."

Last Page of Riverside Speech

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

This document is the last page of Dr. King's Riverside Speech, the only page of this version of the speech in the collection. The speech ends with a quotation from James Russell Lowell's "Once to Every Nation."

Letter from A. Philip Randolph Institue to MLK Regarding "Right to Work"

Monday, May 22, 1967
New York (NY)

In this letter, Bayard Rustin, the Executive Director of A. Philip Randolph Institute, expresses gratitude for Dr. King signing the introduction - "Right to Work" Laws --A Trap for America's Minorities".

God (Definition)

Dr. King references Schleiermacher as he attempts to define God.

Letter to MLK from Cydrisse Crafton

In this document, Mr. Crafton writes to Dr. King advising not to participate in another "March". He asserts that "Negro's" are marching because they desire to live in a white neighborhood.

Rules of Procedure

Tuesday, April 19, 1955
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The National Council of the Churches of Christ is a unified body of Christian faith groups. Presented here is an organized contract outlining the official rules of procedure for the Department of Racial and Cultural Relations.

Statement by Floyd McKissick

VIETNAM

This is information sheet is about the National Director of CORE, Floyd McKissick's statement on the Vietnam's War. In addition to other topics, he is scheduled to discuss the immorality of the conflict by drawing "parallels between self determination for the people of Vietnam and the quest for equality for Black Americans."

Letter from Peter A. Minthom to Ralph D. Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968
Oregon (OR), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Peter Minthom, an American Indian from Oregon, requests assistance in traveling to Washington D.C. for the Poor People’s March.

Statement by the President of the Montgomery Improvement Association

Wednesday, November 14, 1956
Montgomery, AL

Dr. King makes a public statement regarding the Montgomery Bus Boycotts. The Supreme Court rendered a decision making separate but equal unconstitutional. Dr. King states that the next course of action that should be taken is the implementation of this noble decision and the end of the long night of enforced segregation.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi Philip Hiat

Friday, February 8, 1963
New York, NY

Dr. King responds to Rabbi Hiat's suggestion to provide an "opportunity for dialogue between Jewish and Negro religious leadership." In addition to confirming his participation in the dialogue, Dr. King commits to sending an additional letter with the names of "men who have much to contribute" along with some potential subject headings for the agenda.

Letter from Cees van Gils to MLK

Friday, September 10, 1965
Atlanta, GA

Dr. King is congratulated for his receipt of an honorary degree from a university in Amsterdam. Cees van Gils requests Dr. King deliver a speech to the Tilburg University community during his tenure in Europe.

Highlander Folk School 25th Anniversary Seminar

Tennessee (TN)

The Highlander Folk School in Monteagle, Tennessee, hosts the 25th Anniversary Seminar entitled "The South Thinking Ahead." At the program, Dr. King is scheduled to deliver the keynote address and activities have been set up to entertain the children that may be in attendance.

Jesse Jackson and the Civil Rights Movement

Chicago, IL, North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC)

This article details Jesse Jackson's involvement with the Civil Rights Movement.

David Williams asks MLK to Visit Community Center

Friday, January 12, 1968
Kansas (KS)

David A. Williams writes to Dr.King asking him to visit the local community center while on his trip to speak at the college in Manhattan, Kansas. He explains some of the trouble the local community is facing, such as a proposed highway that would disrupt his neighborhood and community center, as well as housing discrimination.

The Future of Integration

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, EGYPT, SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. King discusses "The Future of Integration." King opens with background history of three distinct periods of race relations. The first period extends from 1619 to 1862, the era of slavery. The next period extends from 1863 to 1954 when blacks were emancipated, but still segregated. The third period started on May 17, 1954 when segregation was deemed unconstitutional and integration commenced. Furthermore, Dr. King explains the changes that occurred as a result of integration and how it will affect blacks and whites in the future.

Letter from the Japan Council Against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967
Tokyo, Japan, Atlanta, GA, NORTH KOREA, SOUTH KOREA, CHINA

Japanese Representatives write Dr. and Mrs. King inviting them to the 13th World Conference against atomic and hydrogen bombs.

1965 Human Rights Day Flyer

South Africa

This flyer advertises a rally to benefit South African victims of apartheid.

Laughable Comics Postcard from Johnny B.

The author Johnny B. provides his best wishes to the recipient of this post card, stating "God created everybody equal."

Invitation from Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority to MLK

Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

This is a program for Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority's Forty-First Boule in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The event features Dr. King as a guest speaker.

Letter From MLK to Ben Ari

Friday, September 22, 1967
GREECE, ISRAEL, New York (NY), New York, NY

This letter from Dr. King declines a request to go on a religious pilgrimage to the Holy Land due to turmoil in the Middle East.

Evil

Dr. King references the religious philosopher William Ernest Hocking regarding the topic of evil.

Letter from Luther Hodges to MLK Regarding the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Tuesday, June 30, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

The U.S. Secretary of Commerce, Luther Hodges, sent this letter to Dr. King on the eve of the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. He writes that he, King, and President Johnson share enthusiasm over the bill and are positive for the future of America. Hodges asks for Dr. King's continued aid in leading the nation to comply with the bill and, in the words of President Johnson, "eliminate the final strongholds of intolerance and hatred."

Mass Letter from Mr. Maurice A. Dawkins, OOEE

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Washington, D.C.

This letter from Maurice A. Dawkins, a representative from the Office of Economic Opportunity, accompanies materials that encourage the reader to take action "in pledging to beat swords into plowshares," namely transferring funds spent in the Vietnam conflict to domestic endeavors.

Letter from "A Red Blooded American Who Is Opposed to Your Tactics of Un-Americanism"

Thursday, April 27, 1967
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Texas (TX)

This letter to Dr. King criticizes his presumed anti-American activities. The author, who signs as "A Red Blooded American who is opposed to your tactics of un-Americanism," describes herself as the mother and grandmother of men who have served in the armed forces.

Charles L. "Chuck" Fielding

California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), South Carolina (SC), Arkansas (AR)

This document provides a detail description of Charles L. "Chuck" Fielding, a candidate for the Democratic primary in the 53rd assembly district.

Letter from Harris Schultz to MLK

Saturday, April 3, 1965
Nashville, TN, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Harris Schultz questions the decision to impose an economic boycott in Alabama. He lists several reasons not to boycott, including the voting rights bill currently under consideration in Congress, the bombing of a Negro citizen's home in Birmingham and the apathy of some people in Alabama.

Letter to Coretta Scott King from Diana Melendez

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York, NY

Diana Melendez, a student at New York City's M.E.S. 146, wrote this letter to Coretta Scott King following a school assembly that announced the death of Dr. King. Melendez offers her condolences and writes that Mrs. King was truly lucky, as she "married a brave man."