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Essay Describing MLK as a Historical Leader

Montgomery, AL

Dr. King is highlighted for his admirable leadership in Montgomery, Alabama. Dr. King's deep spiritual convictions and charter traits allowed him to lead the people in Montgomery. He is described as a man of deep humility, showman and a highly intelligent leader.

Letter from G. P. Beckman to MLK

Thursday, November 3, 1960
Michigan (MI), ITALY

G. P. Beckman writes to Dr. King expressing his appreciation for people of similar faith. He asserts that he loves the black race as a whole and because of this love he does not want his children to grow up and experience similar persecutions.

Letter from Georgia Miller to MLK

Monday, November 20, 1967
Missouri (MO), Chicago, IL

Georgia Miller informs Reverend Abernathy and Reverend Young that she can no longer contribute funds to the SCLC due to their support of the New Politics group.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, writes to Dr. King regarding his "I Have A Dream" speech.

Let There Be Peace On Earth and Let It Begin With me

Monday, April 13, 1964
Atlanta, GA, New Jersey (NJ), Pennsylvania (PA)

The program chairman for the Bucks County World Peace Fair invites Mr. and Mrs. King to speak on behalf of the Civil Rights movement. The event will be held on September 12, 1964.

The Voter Registration Project of Winston-Salem Presents MLK

Monday, April 13, 1964
North Carolina (NC), Atlanta, GA

This program details the schedule and many sponsors of a Voter Registration Project event in North Carolina, in which Dr. King was the keynote speaker.

Telegram from Andrew Young to Harvey Cox

Monday, August 2, 1965
Massachusetts (MA), Alabama (AL)

Andrew Young requests a photograph and biographical sketch of Harvey Cox, a well known theologian. The materials will be used for publicity of a convention that Cox will be making an address.

Schleiermacher (The Religious Man)

Dr. King quotes Schleiermacher's views on man's identification with Religion.

Letter from Harold Bass to MLK

Tuesday, April 14, 1964
Washington (WA), Atlanta, GA

Tacoma, Washington native Harold Bass sends a contribution to aid in the work of the Civil Rights Movement. Bass, pastor of his own independent church, also forwards Dr. King a copy of their newsletter that promotes peace efforts all over the country.

Letter from Arthur L. Baney to the SCLC

Thursday, June 24, 1965
Baltimore, MD, Maryland (MD)

Arthur Baney writes the SCLC on behalf of Eastman Dillon, Union Securities & Company regarding five shares of General Electric Company stock that was gifted to the SCLC by Mary Cushing H. Niles.

Western Union Telegram from Barrington Dunbar to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967
Birmingham, AL, New York (NY)

In this telegram, Barrington Dunbar of the peace and social committee from New York, informs Dr. King of the support from his religious society.

Letter from Frank Van Leemput to MLK

Saturday, December 30, 1967
BELGIUM

Frank Ban Leemput, a high school student from Belgium, requests Dr. King provide signatures for the enclosed photos. Mr. Leemput is creating a biography of Dr. King and is in admiration of his political activism as well as achievements in the field of desegregation.

MLK Discusses Plans for the 1963 March on Washington

Wednesday, January 23, 1963
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C.

While in Detroit, Michigan, Dr. King discloses his intentions for the upcoming March on Washington.

Letter from Mrs. Robert King to MLK

Ohio (OH)

Mrs. Robert King thanks Dr. King for his work and gives him a "contribution to the cause of Peace."

Letter from Helen G. Frumin to Coretta Scott King

Monday, December 5, 1966
New York (NY)

Mrs. Frumin writes Mrs. King to request sponsorship for the Committee of Responsibility. She includes a list of others who have agreed to sponsor the organization among which is Dr. Benjamin Spock, affluent pediatrician and anti-war activist, and other prestigious figures.

Letter from Melis Nicolaides to MLK

Friday, April 30, 1965
GREECE, Montgomery, AL

Melis Nicolaides invites Dr. King to participate in the Third Marathon Peace March in Athens, Greece. At the first Peace March, only one person completed the march and that person was killed the following year. The next year "thousands of Greek people marched in the footsteps" of the murdered individual. Nicolaides explains that Dr. King's participation will be "an important contribution to the cause of peace."

Telegram from MLK and Wyatt T. Walker to Samual Weston

Monday, April 30, 1962
Georgia (GA)

Wyatt T. Walker and Dr. King sent this telegram to Samual Weston informing him that they were requesting an investigation of his complaint.

Registration Form for WCLC Assembly Session

Thursday, June 24, 1965
Los Angeles, CA

The Western Christian Leadership Conference sends this pamphlet to potential participants and encourages registration for the Assembly Session in July, 1965. Dr. King is featured as the Mass Meeting Speaker.

Letter from Rachelle Horowitz to Dora McDonald

Thursday, September 7, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), Georgia (GA), New York, NY

Administrative Secretary for the A. Phillip Randolph Institute, Rachelle Horowitz apologizes to Dora McDonald for an apparent misunderstanding regarding pamphlet pricing.

Jenner School Parents

Wednesday, April 20, 1966
Chicago, IL

Presented here is a rough draft of an address delivered by Dr. King to the parents of Jenner Elementary school located in Chicago, Ill. Dr. King advises a plan to counteract deplorable school conditions as well as the misappropriation of tax dollars.

MLK's handwritten notecard regarding Fact

On this notecard, Dr. King cites the definition of the word 'fact' from The Hibbert Journal, July 1933, according to Arthur Darby Nock.

Outline for Why Does History Move?

Dr. King's sermon outline references Hegel and Marx in relation to questions surrounding the concept of history.

Letter from Bond R. Faulwell to MLK

Friday, November 8, 1963
Iowa (IA)

Faulwell, a freshman at Grinnell College, is writing a term paper on civil rights for a political science course and requests advice from Dr. King as an "acknowledged leader" of the protest movement.

Letter from Barbara Austin to SCLC

Monday, June 26, 1967
New Jersey (NJ), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Mrs. Austin writes the SCLC concerning Dr. King's views on Vietnam. She encloses a contribution to the organization because of Dr. King's courage to speak out against the war.

Letter from MLK to A.S. Grant

Dr. King thanks Elder Grant for the kind remarks from his previous letter and lets him know that due to the business of his schedule as the President of the SCLC, he is unable to devote attention to Grant's proposal.

Tribute to Jimmy Lee Jackson

Friday, February 26, 1965
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King edits a draft of a eulogy he wrote in the wake of four girls killed in a bombing at the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King applauded these martyrs, for their brief yet powerful appearance on this Earth and their contribution to the "holy crusade for freedom and human dignity." Reiterating these sentiments, Dr. King edits the eulogy to fit the life story of Jimmy Lee Jackson.

Telegram from Norwegian Student Association to MLK

NORWAY

The Norwegian Student Association inquires if Dr. King will be available to give a lecture on Human Freedoms.

King Finds New Target

Tuesday, April 18, 1967
VIETNAM, New York (NY), Kansas (KS)

This article from The Topeka Daily Capital discusses Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. Dr. King verbalizes his stance after seeing anti-poverty funds being used for war. The article also mentions civil rights leaders who are against joining both causes for civil rights and world peace.

New Wine in Old Bottles

Sunday, January 2, 1966
Atlanta, GA

In a New Year's sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church, Dr. King addresses Matthew 9:17. His explains that new ideas or inspiration cannot thrive in closed minds or old structures, such as the idea of equality in a segregated society. While Victor Hugo's "idea whose time has come" may be here, Dr. King says, we need to "help time" and overcome the initial resistance to new ideas with persistence and a transformation of the old structures.

OEO Extends Contract with National Council of Negro Women

Wednesday, February 7, 1968
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Alabama (AL), GEORGIA

This press release from the Office of Economic Opportunity highlights a technical assistance program designed to stimulate home ownership among poor Negro women in the deep South.