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Address to AFL-CIO New York City District 65

New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

Dr. King speaks to the District 65 AFL-CIO to address the importance of job opportunities in the northern and southern regions of the United States. He explains that the labor movement must stay active in order to gain civil rights and equal pay for African American workers.

Prayer

Dr. King notes William James' description of prayer.

Telegram from MLK and Mrs. King to Dr. Benjamin E. Mays

Atlanta, GA, SWITZERLAND, Georgia (GA), Geneva, Switzerland

Dr. and Mrs. King commend Dr. Benjamin E. Mays for all he has accomplished during his twenty-seven years as President of Morehouse College.

Hruska Says Capital...

Washington, D.C.

Nebraska Senator Roman Hruska criticizes the Dr. King-led demonstrations and asserts that the government does not really know what the demonstrator's goals are.

Letter from Clifford L. Alexander to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, UNITED KINGDOM, Indiana (IN), New Jersey (NJ)

Clifford L. Alexander, Chairman for the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, wrote to Dr. King to encloses some clippings from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission News Digest, the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and the Washington Post regarding the EEOC's hearings on white collar discrimination in New York.

Letter from Ben-Zion Ilan to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964
ISRAEL, Atlanta, GA

The American Representative of the General Federation of Labor in Israel writes Dr. King to congratulate him on the Nobel Peace Prize. He also reiterates a request for Dr. King to visit Israel as the guest of Histadrut, the Executive Director of the organization.

Self

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich’s “Systematic Theology.”

Letter from Jefferson Poland to MLK

San Francisco, CA, Florida (FL)

Following the death of his grandfather, Jefferson Poland corresponds with Dr. King to share his belief in man's divinity. After a life of discrimination, Poland's grandfather, Ross Mullin, wrote a poem to Dr. King which criticized prejudice. This transformation after sixty years of hatred represents man's continuous growth.

SCLC Executive Board Approves Montgomery March

Alabama (AL), Virginia (VA), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King’s handwritten notes report on SCLC Executive Board approval of four of his recommendations: a March on the State Capitol in Montgomery, a nationwide economic withdrawal from Christmas shopping to commemorate the tragic deaths of children in Birmingham, a massive direct action program in Danville, Virginia, and selective buying campaign in the South to get better jobs for Negroes

Letter from Fred Roesti to MLK

Wednesday, December 21, 1966
Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Fred Roesti writes Dr. King to arrange a meeting between him and five pre-theological students, to get his perspective on "the contemporary social situation and the 'relevance' of the church."

Letter from a Lithuanian American to MLK

California (CA), LITHUANIA, VIETNAM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, HUNGARY

In this letter to Dr. King, a Lithuanian immigrant to the United States writes that he agrees with the campaign for Negro rights and believes that all U.S. citizens should be treated equally.

Letter from MLK to Corine Jenkins About Prayer

Tuesday, February 27, 1968
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

In this letter, Dr. King replies to Corine Jenkins regarding her missing daughter. He informs her that she and her daughter are in his prayers.

1963 World Day of Prayer

Friday, March 5, 1965
Atlanta, GA

This brochure from the United Church Women of Atlanta, sent to Ms. Coretta Scott King, outlines the agenda for 1965 World Day of Prayer. The brochure allso included is a schedule of the organization's calendar of events.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK about a Publication

Wednesday, February 15, 1967
Florida (FL), New York, NY

In this letter Joan Daves requests Dr. King's input on his chapter, "Black Power." Daves also inquires as to which magazine to send the manuscript first and suggests first sending it to "Life" magazine.

Letter from Al Shabazz to MLK

Friday, August 25, 1967
New York, NY

Al Shabazz requests Dr. King review his proposal for Black Independence.

Humanism (15th Century)

Dr. King reflects on a classical approach to learning.

Telegram from MLK to Dr. Gunnar Jahn

Monday, September 11, 1967
Oslo, Norway, VIETNAM

Dr. King authorizes Philip Noel-Baker and Pater George Dominique Pire to represent him in a delegation seeking Vietnam peace negotiations.

Telegram from MLK to Mr. Sylveter A. Okereke

Friday, August 6, 1965
New York (NY)

Dr. King regrettably informs Mr. Okereke that he will be unable to accept his invitation for an event held on August 18, 1965.

Letter from MLK to Ms. Susan Stauffer

Thursday, August 20, 1964
Berkeley, CA

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation to Susan Stauffer for her contribution to the SCLC. He states, "such moral and financial support are of inestimable value for the continuance of our humble efforts."

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

This outline to Dr. King's sermon "A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart" focuses on the premise that being a tough minded individual involves making critical decisions. The sermon emphasizes that those who possess a soft mind tend to be gullible and strictly follow the status quo. According to Dr. King, "We must come to the realization that life demands a tough mind."

Letter from W. David Angus to MLK

Friday, October 25, 1963
CANADA

W. David Angus extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak to the members of the Canadian Club of Montreal about the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to C.W. Greene

Thursday, August 10, 1967
Georgia (GA)

In this letter to C.W. Greene of the Atlanta Life Insurance Company, Dr. King requests supplies for an upcoming convention.

Letter from Peare E. Hardney to MLK

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C.

Peare E. Hardney, a postal employee in Chicago, reports to Dr. King that her supervisor assaulted her and that African-Americans do not get fair treatment in Chicago. Furthermore, she would like to share her story with someone on Dr. King's staff.

Letter from Dave Dellinger to MLK

Saturday, April 8, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dave Dellinger outlines the events and requirements for the rally, sponsored by the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, to be held in New York City, New York on April 15th, 1967.

Letter to Dr. Abernathy from Carl Andrew Moore

Friday, April 26, 1968
California (CA)

Carl Andrew Moore, from the University of the Pacific, in Stockton, California, expresses his support of Rev. Ralph Abernathy's leadership during these trying times.

Evil (The Problem of)

Dr. King records thoughts on the problem of evil with references to the British philosopher John Stuart Mill and Job.

Letter from Mr. Ossie Davis to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963
New York (NY)

Mr. Ossie Davis suggests to Dr. King that a tribute be prepared to honor the life of Dr. W. E. B. DuBois. Mr. Davis then asks Dr. King for his assistance in gaining sponsorship from "distinguished men and women."

Outline for Why Does History Move?

Dr. King's sermon outline references Hegel and Marx in relation to questions surrounding the concept of history.

Letter from MLK to Vance Hartke Regarding Passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Senator Vance Hartke's support in passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Black Americans Take the Lead in War Protest

New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, CHINA

In this press release, the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam has mustered a significant following of supporters who are in staunch opposition to United States involvement in Vietnam. Black community leaders such as Stokley Carmichael, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and Rev. James Bevel reflect the growing discontent of blacks who "view this war as a war against a colored people" merely serving the economic interests of America.