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The Power of Nonviolence

Thursday, May 1, 1958
Montgomery, AL, Berkeley, CA

Dr. King delivers this address to the YMCA and YWCA in the Bay Area of California. The power of nonviolence is discussed being intertwined with the knowledge of agape, love and maladjustment. Agape can be defined as an understanding of the redemptive good will of all men. In relation to maladjustment, Dr. King explains how he never intended to adjust himself to segregation and discrimination. Dr. King expounds on how justice strengthened the Montgomery movement. He further explains how the powerful influence of love is a significant factor in the practice of nonviolence.

Letter from 'Hardworking People' to MLK

A white American recommends a different approach to Civil Rights demonstrations. He believes that if celebrities are placed at the fore front of the marches that the black community would then be motivated to work.

Interview with MLK for Radio Norway

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, NORWAY

Dr. King shares the way that Americans celebrate Christmas.

Telegram from George W. Baber and John W. P. Collier to MLK

Thursday, September 25, 1958
New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), New York, NY

The African Methodist Episcopal Churches in New Jersey express their pleasure that Dr. King is making a "speedy recovery."

Letter from John A. McDermott to MLK

Monday, February 14, 1966
Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA

The Catholic Interracial Council of Chicago asks Dr. King, as a former John F. Kennedy award winner, to write a telegram of congratulations to the current nominee. This year's recipient, Reverend Richard Morrisroe, was shot and wounded in Alabama the previous summer while campaigning for civil rights.

Letter from Hubert H. Humphrey to MLK Regarding an Invitation

Wednesday, July 8, 1964
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL

In this letter Senator Hubert Humphrey urges Dr. King to accept an invitation to speak at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association.

Notes Regarding Civil Rights Act of 1965

This handwritten note describes the positive effects of the Civil Rights Act for Negroes. According to the notes, "What we have won in blood, toil and sacrifice we will not squander in apathetic complacency."

Transcendence and Immanence of God

Dr. King quotes Jeremiah 23:23, and he provides his interpretation of the biblical passage.

MLK Manuscript: Why We Can't Wait

This document reflects one page of the original manuscript of "Why We Can't Wait." "Why We Can't Wait" is a book by Martin Luther King, Jr. about the civil rights struggle against racial segregation in the United States, and specifically in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Laura Taylor to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967
California (CA), Montgomery, AL, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C.

A supporter writes Dr. King to commend his work in the anti-war movement. The author also tells Dr. King that she writes President Johnson and other legislators regularly on the topic, and references a series of letters she sent on the recent Mother's Day holiday.

Telegram from Joseph Lowery to Wyatt Walker

Friday, November 3, 1967
Birmingham, AL

Reverend Joseph E. Lowery writes to Reverend Wyatt Walker acknowledging his support of Walker's "sacrifice in behalf of freedom and justice for all."

Letter from Cornelius E. Gallagher to MLK

Tuesday, January 12, 1965
New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

Congressman Gallagher of New Jersey writes Dr. King to confirm reception of his telegram in which he urges House Representatives to vote against the seating of the Mississippi Delegation. The Mississippi Congress was seated despite Congressman Gallagher's vote against the action.

Letter from Helen White to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967
Virginia (VA)

Ms. White seeks the opinion of Dr. King for her research on American Aristocracy.

God

Dr. King uses a verse from the Book of Nehemiah to illustrate God's faithfulness.

SCLC Launches Chicago Political Drive

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS)

The SCLC releases a statement regarding the launching of a Chicago Political Drive, sponsored by the SCLC and the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations. SCLC Southern Project Director, Hosea Williams, will head the campaign. The focuses of this campaign are voter registration and education.

Letter from MLK to Richmond M. Rudden

Thursday, January 26, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King writes Richmond M. Rudden to decline an invitation to speak at Lafayette College due to upcoming non-violence workshops, voter registration drives and SCLC fundraising activities.

Telegram from Thomas Penna to MLK

Monday, November 6, 1967
New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Thomas A. Penna, the president of the Interracial Council of Buffalo, lists his concerns related to a poverty bill that will be debated the next day. Penna points out that the bill will harm impoverished Negroes, who are already being denied their right to vote. Penna urges Dr. King to address these issues during his upcoming speech in Buffalo, New York.

Note Cards on God

Dr. King's writes on the possibility of finding God from the First Book of Chronicles.

Letter from Annis Pratt to MLK

Saturday, January 13, 1968
Washington, D.C.

Professor Annis Pratt of Spelman College writes about her support for the proposed Poor People's Campaign. She suggests that the problems traditionally associated with race may be more economic in nature, and encloses a check from her husband and herself for the march.

An Open Letter to Free Americans

Memphis, TN, Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

In response to Dr. King's assassination, the author urges "Free Americans" to join the fight against racism.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rosa A. King

Thursday, July 12, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA), Pittsburgh, PA

Miss McDonald informs Rosa King that Dr. King will be unable to speak at Central Baptist Church.

The Suffering Servant

ISRAEL

Dr. King writes that Isaiah 53 presents a different view of the servant from chapters 42, 49 and 50. The concept of God's servant evolved from that of Israel as a nation, to the spiritual or inner Israel, to an individual who would take up the work that the others would not. King concludes that the prophecy was fulfilled in Jesus of Nazareth.

Note Regarding Boycotting Olympic Game

This is a brief handwritten note of appreciation for encouraging the boycott of the Olympic Games.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK

Thursday, July 26, 1962
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

In reply to Dr. King's telegram concerning the actions of a Mitchell County peace officer towards Mrs. Slater King, the wife of a civil rights activist and successful real estate broker, Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall writes that an investigation of this matter has been ordered.

SCLC Staff Salary Sheet

Thursday, March 9, 1967

This document is a 1967 suggested salary scale for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference staff.

The Commercial Appeal: But No Services

Sunday, January 7, 1968
Memphis, TN, Virginia (VA)

This photo and accompanying caption relate the story of Dr. King and an associate clerical organization conducting a silent vigil at Arlington National Cemetery after being blocked judicially from holding a memorial service in that venue.

Resurrection (Barth's View)

Dr. King quotes a passage from Hugh Mackintosh's "Types of Modern Theology" concerning Barth's views on resurrection.

Letter to MLK from New York University Professor Philip Zimbardo

Thursday, April 27, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

New York University Psychology Professor Philip Zimbardo sends his support to Dr. King.

Notes on Movies

Monday, October 9, 1967

The writer states that the movie industry needs more stories without the 'Playboy' touch. He argues that this should come from the "masses" and not "society."

Letter from Bernard Hollowood to MLK about Writing an Article

Thursday, July 28, 1966
London, England, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

"Punch" editor Bernard Hollowood asks Dr. King to write an article focusing on the following question: "Is America capable of solving its own race problems?" The article would be part of a series of articles focusing on whether the United States can be trusted as leader of the Western World.