Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Iowa (IA)"

Urban Strategy Conference and Demonstration Participants

This document lists attendees of the Urban Strategy Conference who also went to a demonstration in Washington, D. C.

Letter from John W. McCormack to MLK

Wednesday, February 19, 1964

John McCormack writes Dr. King expressing thanks for his telegram of commendation "in relation to the passage of the Civil Rights Bill in the House of Representatives." McCormack expresses that he hopes he will have the pleasure of seeing Dr. King again.

Letter from J. S. Beckington to MLK

Friday, June 10, 1966

J. S. Beckington, Secretary Treasurer at the Groton School in Massachusetts, encloses a financial contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from Maria A. Mochulski to MLK

Duquesne University requests that Dr. King provide information for the candidate he is supporting for the presidential elections of 1968. The universities Choice '68 committee is interested in having Dr. King speak to the student body.

Letter of Appreciation from MLK to Carolyn W. Ferriday

Wednesday, July 20, 1966

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Carolyn Ferriday for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Telegram from Dover Beale and Theodore Patterson to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958

Dover Beale and Theodore Patterson send well wishes and hopes for a full recovery to Dr. King.

Letter from Thein Wah to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967

Thein Wah expresses appreciation to Dr. King for his efforts in leading peace marches in New York, New York and San Francisco, California.

Addition to "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence"

This augmentation was intended to be included in Dr. King's "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence" essay published in the Christian Century on April 13, 1960. In the appendage, Dr. King discusses the personal afflictions he has endured as a result of his civil rights work including death threats, bombings of his home, and a near fatal stabbing. He states that suffering has a "redemptive quality" and discusses how he transformed his personal suffering into a "creative force" instead of reacting with bitterness.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Friday, May 7, 1965

Dr. Mays informs Dr. King of his recommendation to confer an honorary degree from Morehouse College on Dr. J. Curtis Dixon. Mays includes a biographical sketch of Dr. Dixon and asks Dr. King to respond to the letter with his approval or disapproval.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora MacDonald

Tuesday, May 12, 1964

Joan Daves informs Dora MacDonald of the details for Dr. King's appearances on the Today Show, the Martha Dean Show, a Press Conference and a Channel 13 interview.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Sadye Brooks

Friday, April 28, 1967

Dr. and Mrs. King offer their condolences to the Brooks family on the recent loss of their beloved husband and father.

Letter from Genevieve Young to Joan Daves

Wednesday, January 4, 1967

Genevieve Young expresses her opinion about the outline for Dr. King's upcoming book "Where Do We Go From Here?" She offers some suggestions and strategies to Joan Daves to help narrow the scope of the manuscript.

Handwritten Notecard Regarding Universalism

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines some fundamental principles of "Universalism".

Letter from Alfred A. Haesler to MLK

Wednesday, September 6, 1967

Alfred A. Haesler of Die Tat or "the fact," a publication in Switzerland, asks Dr. King a series of questions that revolve around the role of hatred in American politics.

Letter from Jagdish Bhatt to MLK

Tuesday, November 9, 1965

South African resident Jagdish Bhatt writes Dr. King requesting an autograph picture of Dr. King. Bhatt notes that he has also collected other forms of memorabilia of Dr. King such as speeches and various recordings.

SCLC 10th Anniversary Flyer

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

The flyer highlights the 10th anniversary of the SCLC and outlines the speakers and events which will take place.

Letter from New York City Mayor to MLK

Tuesday, March 28, 1967

The Mayor of New York, John V. Lindsay, invites Dr. King to a conference entitled "Puerto Ricans Confront the Problems of the Complex Urban Society: A Design for Change." Panel meetings will expound on twelve subjects ranging from "Education" to the "Administration of Justice."

Letter from MLK to George Bass

Friday, June 17, 1966

Dr. King responds to Mrs. George Bass' recent letter inviting him to speak at the annual convention of the Planned Parenthood Association. Dr. King regretfully declines the invitation because his schedule is booked for the entire month of January.

Letter from Jeanne Whitaker to MLK

Jeanne Whitaker does not oppose the slogan "Black Power", however she identifies the distinction between power and violence. Mrs. Whitaker elaborates on the influence of non-violence that was rooted from Mahatma Gandhi's methodology and practice.

Letter from John A.McDermott to MLK

Thursday, January 27, 1966

John A. McDermott, Executive Director of the Catholic Interracial Council, invites Dr. King to be a special guest of honor at the annual John F. Kennedy Award Dinner. Theodore C. Sorenson, former Special Counsel to the late President Kennedy, will be the principal speaker at this event. Dr. King received the award two years earlier.

Letter from W. J. Murphy to Deton Brooks

Monday, July 11, 1966

Congressman W. J. Murphy writes this letter to Dr. Deton Brooks, Executive Director of the Commission on Urban Opportunity. After listening to a radio show, of which Dr. Brooks and Dr. King posed commentary, Murphy was prompted with a response towards solving America's racial issues. Murphy states he initially opposed the executively ordered Fair Employment Practices Commission for the reason that brotherly love could not be legislated. FEPC requires that companies in governmental contract could not discriminate on the basis of race or religion.

Public Statement at the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party

Wednesday, July 22, 1964

Dr. King speaks at a rally held for the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. Dr. King stresses the importance of government assistance in protecting African Americans citizens from violent actions when registering and voting during elections. In areas such as Mississippi where harassment and murders took place frequently, African Americans were in dire need of a political party that was free of racism so that they could fairly be represented in a prejudice society.

Letter from Nathan P. Feisinger to MLK - 3/21/1968

Thursday, March 21, 1968

Dr. King sent this letter to Professor Nathan P. Feinsinger to recommend Miss Barbara Jean Williams for the Russell Bull Scholarship.

Letter from Gunnar Magnus to MLK Requesting Interview

Tuesday, October 18, 1966

Mr. Magnus, a Norwegian journalists and student at Davidson College in North Carolina, requests Dr. King grant an interview for his paper, the "Morgenbladet".

Letter from Finley Drewery to NAACP

Saturday, June 17, 1967

Finley Drewery writes to the NAACP seeking aid for his upcoming criminal trial. He asserts that the state has no hard evidence against him and that his court appointed attorney is trying to make him pay $3,000 to mount a defense in court.

Letter from Rev. O. L. Westley to Local Board

In this undated letter, Rev. Westley writes to the "Local Board" on the behalf of Mr. Stanley Howard, who is claiming status as a conscientious objector after being called to serve "in the Armed Service" [sic].

Telegram from Robert L. Lucas to MLK

Wednesday, August 11, 1965

Robert L. Lucas, the Chairman of the Chicago branch for the Congress On Racial Equality, invites Dr. King and his staff to return to Chicago, Illinois to assist in the struggle for quality integrated education.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes G. W. Knox on religion from the Harvard Theological Review.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Prentiss Childs

Wednesday, May 20, 1964

Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, sends this letter to Mr. Prentiss Childs of CBS. The correspondence serves as documentation for reimbursement of Dr. King's recent trip to Washington, D.C.

God (His Omnipotence)

Dr. King defines omnipotence as meaning that God has the power to carry out His will. He notes that God must hold characteristics of both good and evil and states that few philosophers have acknowledged God's omnipotence.