The Archive

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"Indiana (IN)"

Stop the War Bring the Troops Home

This brochure advertises a program to rally the support for eradicating the United States influence in Vietnam. It is distributed by The October Mobilisation, an Australian initiative responding to a call for international protest of the Vietnam War.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding a Publication

Thursday, March 30, 1967

In this letter Joan Daves informs Dr. King that a copy of the jacket text for "Where Do We Go from Here" is enclosed.

Letter from John F. Steinman to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

John F. Steinman commends Dr. King for his courageous leadership and encloses a check for the SCLC and SCLF.


Dr. King compares Iago's description of Shakespeare's Othello to the view many have of Jesus.

Letter From Chas D. Wherry to MLK

Thursday, January 18, 1968

Chas Wherry advises Dr. King to consult with Dr. H. H. Brookins about accumulating more funds for the March on Washington. Wherry also inquires about Dr. King sending a letter to the Los Angeles Times regarding Mrs. Bain's newly appointed position.

Anonymous Sender Criticizes MLK

This anonymous writer challenges Dr. King with his complaints concerning the Civil Rights Movement. He argues that a Negro man should be held responsible for breaking the law and should expect rightful punishment.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Harry Walker

Tuesday, September 19, 1967

Ms. McDonald writes to Mr. Walker and states that Dr. King will accept the invitation to speak at Fairleigh Dickinson University in Rutherford, New Jersey on 10/25/67.

Letter from Joyce Wilmoth to MLK

Tuesday, April 2, 1968

A student at Lesley College requests Dr. King's presence at their school debate in honor of their participation in Choice '68 sponsored by Time.

Letter from Reverend R.V. Brown to MLK about Moral Support

In this letter Reverend R.V. Brown offers his moral support to Dr.King.

Telegram from Charles Hayes to to MLK

Charles Hayes, an official of the AFL-CIO, sends Dr. King best wishes for a "speedy recovery." He also thanks Dr. King for sending Ralph Abernathy to speak at a banquet held for the organization.

The New York Times: Books of The Times Storm Warnings

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

Eliot Fremont-Smith examines Dr. King's stance on the term of Black Power, his views on political power for Negroes and his focus on nonviolence.

Letter from Mrs. King to Ms. Dixie Lee Kisor Regarding Home Helper Position

Saturday, June 22, 1963

In this letter dated 6/22/63, Mrs. King informs Ms. Kisor of her decision not to employ her as a home-helper. She and Dr. King believe it would be in the best interest of the children to have someone who would be available on a permanent basis.

Letter from Lloyd E. Abbey to Mr. Duncan J. Parks about Communism

Sunday, March 17, 1968

In this letter Lloyd E. Abbey reacts to an article in the Star-Gazette. Abbey asserts that "Our survival, in relation to the ideology of communism, is very questionable" and "The principle fault... ... the nine old men...," namely Dr. King, Benjamin Spock, William Coffin, Rap Brown, 'Hooligan' [Stokely] Carmichael and others. Abbey connects this to the war in Vietnam.

Difference of the Transition Period from the Early Scientific Period

Dr. King references Alfred North Whitehead by noting the differences between the Transition Period and the Early Scientific Period.

Dedication Page (Edited Draft) for "Why We Can't Wait"

Dr. King drafted this dedication page for his children, in his book, "Why We Can't Wait." Similar to the famous quote in his "I Have A Dream" speech, the dedication hoped that his children "would not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character."

Memo from Weston Hare to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1968

Weston Hare offers support to Dr. King in regards to SCLC's training program for Negro ministers in urban leadership. The Ford Foundation issued a grant to SCLC to fund the program.

SCLC Annual Meeting

This program outlines the schedule of events for SCLC's 1961 annual meeting.

Transcripts for Courses at Harvard University

Thursday, August 13, 1953

Lois Ryan forwards a transcript for two courses that Dr. King took while studying at Harvard University. These courses were Philosophy of Plate: Introductory and The Philosophy of Whitehead.

OEO Moves to Aid Hungry Families in Seven States

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

The Office of Economic Opportunity initiates a new Food Stamp Loan program that will enable impoverished families to purchase "much needed" food.

Statement by the Leadership Conference Executive Committee on the Kerner Commission Report

Tuesday, April 2, 1968

This statement put forth by the Leadership Conference Executive Committee addresses the results of the Kerner Commission Report, in which the author stresses that without creating viable and integrated communities in our cities "we shall have no cities".

Handwritten Notecard Regarding "Pelagianism"

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines "Pelagianism". This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Pledge of Support from Thelma Rutherford

Wednesday, March 15, 1967

Thelma Rutherford, Missions Representative for the Church of the Savior in Washington D. C., pledges the churches support for Dr. King and the work of the SCLC. She encloses a check for $500.00 with this letter.

Letter from Fred Becker to MLK in Regard to Speaking Engagements

Monday, January 14, 1963

Mr. Fred C. Becker writes to Dr. King about his speaking engagement, lectures, and attendance at special meetings. He requested that Dr. King would send a list of speaking engagements in as advance as possible. The publishers wanted the opportunity to allow the public to be aware of his speaking schedule, so they may be able to purchase his books.

My Trip to the Land of Gandhi

Dr. King documents his travel throughout India beginning in February 1959 with his wife and Dr. Lawrence Reddick. During his stay Dr. King reflects on the manifestation of Gandhi's nonviolent teachings in low crime rates amidst the impoverished living conditions. Dr. King also addresses the notion of a "divided India," a country deliberating the varying effects of Western modernization.

Letter from Charles T. Dubin to MLK

Sunday, February 11, 1968

Attorney at Law, Charles T. Dubin writes Dr. King to express his approval of the nonviolent practices of the SCLC, and assures Dr. King of the legal effect on the American judicial system. Dubin closes by imploring that Dr. King does not place himself in jeopardy and danger of life and limb.

Telegram from MLK to Mr.& Mrs. Dick Gregory

In this telegram, Dr. King praises Mr. Gregory for his stance regarding human justice on behalf of another oppressed minority, the Nisgually Indians.

Greetings from The English Family on Thanksgiving Day

This greeting letter was written to Dr.King from the English Family. In it they expressed their appreciation to Dr.King and wished him a Happy Thanksgiving. The English Family also offered their congratulations to Dr.King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Dr. King to Earnest Dale

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

This letter serves to acknowledge Earnest Dale's missed call to Dr. King and to thank Professor Dale for his support.

Letter from MLK to Jacob Nolde

Dr. King discusses with Jacob Nolde the importance of nonviolent peace movements and the malady of the Vietnam War. He stresses that these nonviolent actions should be exercised internationally and America should cease its desire to maintain wide-spread military control.


Dr. King quotes Bertrand Russell’s “Power: A New Social Analysis.”