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Letter from Donald Prince to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Donald Prince wrote this letter the day after Dr. King's assassination and addressed it to Mrs. King.

Letter from Douglas Elleby to MLK

Wednesday, December 30, 1964

The Governor of Brazil, Adhemar de Barros, congratulates Dr. King on his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize. Governor Barros expounds on what the Nobel Peace Prize stirred in the Brazilian nation. Sao Paulo, the larges city in Brazil, aspires to form a sense of fellowship with Dr. King and extend the appropriate honors for a man of peace.

Sin

Dr. King paraphrases the teachings of Amos about sin. Dr. King writes that Amos condemns Israel for the sins of bribery, oppression of the poor by the rich, sexual immorality and the "self-indulgent use of what has been wrung from the helpless."

Letter from MLK to Louise Andrews

Wednesday, January 3, 1962

Dr. King regretfully declines a speaking invitation of the American Friends Service Committee. Mrs. Louis Andrews is informed Dr. King has already accepted the maximum allowable speaking engagements for the season.

Showdown for Nonviolence

Tuesday, April 16, 1968

Dr. King discusses the rationale and strategy for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C. He explains that the SCLC hopes to avoid a national holocaust by promoting massive nonviolent demonstrations.

Vision of a World Made New

Thursday, September 9, 1954

This is a draft of "The Vision of a World Made New," a speech that Dr. King delivered during the 1954 Women's Auxiliary Convention. President Nannie H. Burroughs invited Dr. King to address the group's annual meeting where he condemned imperialism, colonialism, and segregation.

Telegram from Thomas K. Gilmool and David N. Wice to Dora McDonald

Friday, October 13, 1967

Mr. Gilmool and Mr. Wice write to confirm the date that Dr. King will be speaking at a dinner honoring Marjorie Penney.

Injustice

Here, Dr. King records Reinhold Niebuhr's thoughts on injustice as it relates to pride.

Walter Winchell: American Talking Back

In this article, Walter Winchell provides excerpts of news articles and adds his own commentary to each. Following an excerpt about Dr. King's having a conference to coordinate civil disobedience activities, Winchell urges his leaders to write to Dr. King and "tell him to stop posing as a Man of Peace and 'fess up that his big "act" is causing more trouble than Ho Chi Mihn." Other recipients of Winchell's attention in this column include President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Initiative for Peace In Vietnam

Friday, March 10, 1967

Philip Noel-Baker and Father George Dominique Pire detail the origins of the Initiative for Peace in Vietnam and its action plan. As they explain, a group of Norwegian citizens approached living Nobel Peace Prize winners to develop a project focusing on achieving peace in Vietnam. To reach that goal, the initiative plans to send representatives to each group involved with the conflict in Vietnam.

Operation Breadbasket Program Hosts MLK

Thursday, May 26, 1966

This program acts as proof of direct action as Dr. King, Reverend Newberry, Reverend Jesse Jackson, and Reverend Johnson present Operation Breadbasket to New Friendship Church.

God

Dr. King references a quote from Proverbs regarding creation and God's wisdom.

A Manual for Direct Action

In this foreword Bayard Rustin provides an introduction into the rules and tips involved in nonviolent action concerning protests. Mr. Rustin describes nonviolent methods that people can use when encountering dangerous or difficult situations.

National Student Christian Federation Bulletin

Monday, February 29, 1960

The National Student Christian Federation released several bulletins and informational letters regarding the student demonstrations in the 1960s. Herluf Jensen, General Secretary of the NSCF, provides readers with the progress of different trials related to the movement, arrest statistics and institutions involved. Obtaining strong civil rights legislation through Congress is discussed as well.

Letter from Mrs. Barbara Gonye to MLK

Tuesday, January 2, 1968

This is a handwritten note from Mrs. Barbara Gonye to Dr. King questioning his position as a "Man of God" and a "Man of Peace". She also accuses Dr. King of having hate and being a troublemaker.

Letter From Donald A. DiNuccio to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1968

Sixteen-year-old Donald DiNuccio writes Dr. King expressing his opinion on the "racial problem" and extends his support.

Kinloch Citizen's Self-Survey Committee

Sunday, September 15, 1963

A Police Advisory Committee releases its recommendations for the Kinloch, Missouri Police Department.

Letter from George Altman to MLK

Tuesday, December 10, 1963

George Altman informs Dr. King that one of his friends purchased a recording of Dr. King's speech entitled "The Great March to Freedom" and inquires about receiving the text of the speech.

Letter from Claudia Grams to MLK

Friday, November 15, 1963

Claudia Grams, a junior at Central High School in La Crosse, Wisconsin, has chosen Dr. King for her junior exposition project and writes him requesting information on his earlier life. She expresses how Dr. King's book, "Stride Toward Freedom," has inspired her and she inquires about how her organization can support his movement.

Letter from Charles E. Rogers to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

Charles Rogers writes Dr. King expressing his grief because of King's recent "allegiance to the communist cause in Southeast Asia." Rogers states that because of Dr. King's speech, his fame will face a decline and people will ask, "who is Martin Luther King?"

Letter from Curtis Harris to Wayne Duncan

Friday, January 1, 1965

Mr. Harris writes to Mr. Duncan informing him that the SCLC has received a petition from the employees at their firm. The SCLC accepted
the petition in order to remove segregation and racial discrimination from society.

Letter from Lawrence J. Rozman to MLK

Monday, March 8, 1965

Lawrence J. Rozman, who identifies himself as a white Catholic, is in admiration of Dr. King's avenue of execution to the racial issues in the United States. In addition, Mr. Rozman requests to become a member of the SCLC.

Injunction from the City of Birmingham

Several members of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, including Dr. King, receive a temporary injunction from the City of Birmingham.

Letter from New York City Mayor to MLK

Tuesday, March 28, 1967

The Mayor of New York, John V. Lindsay, invites Dr. King to a conference entitled "Puerto Ricans Confront the Problems of the Complex Urban Society: A Design for Change." Panel meetings will expound on twelve subjects ranging from "Education" to the "Administration of Justice."

Letter from Harry Denman to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Mr.Denman writes Dr. King to share words of support and encouragement as Dr. King prepares to turn himself over to the Birmingham officials. Denman suggests that Dr.King should turn this event into a major demonstration.

Letter from Pastor G. Murray Branch to MLK

Wednesday, June 7, 1967

In this letter, Pastor Branch invites Dr. King to be the speaker on the 90th Anniversary of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church.

Prayer Pilgrimage

Various quotes are cited surrounding Dr. King's perception on love, nonviolence, spirituality, Montgomery, and more. Dr. King elaborates on the history of Montgomery and its direct relation to slavery. Ebony Magazine releases the exclusive eight-point "Plan for Freedom" for Montgomery, calling Negros to mobilize for an all-out assault on segregation."The Death of Evil' is also cited which correlates such evil with details from the book of Exodus.

Waste in Foreign Aid

Sunday, February 19, 1967

Irene M. Kashmer suggests Dr. King address the issue of wasted foreign aid in his march on Washington. She encloses a New York Times article from February 15, 1967 to emphasize her point.

Letter from Irene S. Heath to MLK

Monday, December 28, 1964

Professor Irene Heath writes from Uruguay to suggest white missionary activity in Africa end, and that Dr. King and other black Christian leaders return to Africa to do missionary work there.

Worship

Dr. King notes some characteristics and requirements of worship.