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Letter from R. William Johnson to MLK

Monday, December 5, 1966

Bill Johnson writes Dr. King with an interest in starting a chapter of the SCLC in Oak Ridge. Johnson also invites Dr. King to visit Oak Ridge and speak with members of its community.

Knowledge of God

Dr. King references religious philosopher Henry Nelson Wieman regarding his views on science and knowing God. In part of this eight card series, Dr. King records Wieman's belief that "It is probable he can never be known completely; but we can increase our knowledge of Him by contemplation... and form scientific methods on the other."

Schleiermacher (Where Religion Is to Be Found)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”"

Telegram From the National Committee For Free Elections to MLK Regarding 1967 Sunflower County, Mississippi Elections

Dr. King requests a meeting with Attorney General William Ramsey Clark, to discuss the need for federal voting registrars to oversee upcoming elections in rural Mississippi counties. In these elections, Negroes will run as candidates for the first time in American history.

Letter from Richard Tucker and Stanford Ovshinsky to Lyndon Johnson

Thursday, April 13, 1967

The Oakland County (Michigan) Peace Committee, believing U.S. involvement in Vietnam is a mistake, asks President Johnson and government representatives to stop bombing North Vietnam, promote a bilateral ceasefire, and enter multilateral negotiations.

Letter from Ralph D. Abernathy to John Lewis of SNCC

Thursday, August 19, 1965

Ralph D. Abernathy, Vice President and Financial Secretary-Treasurer of the SCLC, sends a check as a gift to John Lewis, Chairman of SNCC. Abernathy also informs Lewis of the SCLC's financial situation, which prevents the organization from making a loan to SNCC.

Telegram from St. James Baptist Church to MLK

Tuesday, September 23, 1958

Rev. W.C. Barnett, pastor of St. James Baptist Church, sent this telegram expressing well wishes, from his congregation, towards Dr. King.

CORE List of Cities Where Lunch Counters Have Opened Since February 1st, 1960

Monday, February 20, 1961

This document is a list of locations where lunch counter sit-ins have occurred, provided by the Congress of Racial Equality

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK Regarding Regarding Wiley Branton

Thursday, April 29, 1965

In this letter the office of the Vice President informs Dr. King of the new role of Wiley Branton to serve as Executive Secretary of the President's Council on Equal Opportunity.

Telegram from Curtis W. Harris to Dora McDonald

Monday, April 5, 1965

Curtis Harris, President of the Virginia State unit of the SCLC, asks Miss McDonald to confirm some scheduled dates that have been previously discussed with Dr. King.

Royalty Statement for MLK from Joan Daves

In this royalty statement, Joan Daves provides a detailed report of earnings for the British edition of Dr. King's book "Strength to Love."

Letter from MLK to the Lamar W. Sessoms Family

Wednesday, July 19, 1967

Dr. King replies to the Sessoms' previous letter that requested assistance in alleviating racial inequality in Mississippi. King informs them that the first step is to "urge the struggle in our own community," and the second step is for everyone to "join together across the nation with people of good will and combat the evils of racism and injustice."

Handwritten Notes on Science and Religion

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on science and religion. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definition, and bible verses.

Our Struggle

Dr. King drafts this speech entitled "Our Struggle" for the April 1956 publication of Liberation. Dr. King discusses how both whites and blacks have internalized a caste system that perpetuates Negroes as inferior beings. He speculates that racial peace is maintained in the caste system due to harsh discrimination and a loss of faith in the black community. Dr. King states that the shift in race relations, and subsequent tension, occurred when Negroes "began to re-evaluate themselves," finding self-respect and dignity.

Memo to Members of the National Board of Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty

Friday, January 6, 1967

This letter from Richard W. Boone invites recipients to attend a workshop for the Citizens Crusade Against Poverty.

MLK Press Conference Birmingham, Alabama

Saturday, November 4, 1967

This document contains dialogue during a press conference in Birmingham, Alabama. The reporters asks Dr. King questions regarding plans for the Soviet Union, Washington D.C., and the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Lorraine Small to MLK

Wednesday, November 17, 1965

Lorraine Small, a student at Margaret Washington High School, writes Dr. King and the SCLC requesting information on the organizational structure of the SCLC, as well as its leaders, goals, and purpose.

Letter from Mrs. Ruth Spencer to MLK

Sunday, August 27, 1967

Mrs. Spencer shares her belief that "the Negro problem and the Vietnamese War are part of the same problem," though often concealed by news media propaganda. She expresses her gratitude towards Dr. King for his nonviolent philosophy and offers her financial support.

"DuBois State Memorial Proposed; Would Be in Great Barrington"

Monday, February 12, 1968

William F. Bell writes an article concerning a proposed W. E. Dubois State Memorial in Great Barrington.

What Is Salvation

Dr. King writes notes regarding several components of salvation.

Invitation to Birthday Celebration for Haile Selassie

This document invites Dr. and Mrs. Martin Luther King, Jr. to a reception to celebrate the birth of the Ethiopian Emperor.

Draft of MLK's Public Statement Concerning SCLC Supporting Communism

Dr. King addresses the accusation in the New York Herald Tribune that some SCLC members support Communism. He also states that the SCLC has severed ties with former member Jack O'Dell, including the fundraising that had taken place in New York.

Telegram from Zaira Singh to Pope Paul VI

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

Mrs. Singh, a Roman Catholic, requests that Pope Paul VI becomes a hostage in Hanoi, in order to end "barbarous American bombardment."

Letter from Henry Gonzalez to MLK

Tuesday, June 28, 1966

Representative Henry Gonzalez, a democratic politician representing Texas, responds to a request letter for donations from the SCLC. While he encloses a check, he criticizes the fact that the NAACP was excluded from the Mississippi March.

Man's Dilemma

Dr. King states that man’s dilemma results from “the divorce of nature from the supernatural.”

Draft of a Letter from MLK to Dr. Lawrence Alex Whitfield

This is a draft of a letter written by Dr. King to Dr. Lawrence Alex Whitfield. Dr. King indicates that he recieved a letter from Barbara Payne which suggested that Dr. Whitfield had expressed a desire to support the Freedom Movement and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Dora McDonald to H. Baum

Monday, February 28, 1966

Dora McDonald writes H. Baum requesting that he relay to Monica Wilson that Dr. King has accepted her invitation to speak at the University of Cape Town in South Africa.

Letter from David Cassat to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1966

Mr. Cassat, Treasurer for the National Council of Churches, informs Dr. King about the benefits of the organization's Gift Annuity Program. He also encloses a brochure that outlines the various details of this innovative initiative.

Meet the Press Interview

Sunday, August 13, 1967

This is a transcript of NBC television's Meet the Press interview with Dr. King in August 1967 with Edwin Newman as moderator. King answered questions about his views on the Vietnam conflict, nonviolence, and the presidency of Lyndon B. Johnson.

Letter from Martha Kennedy to MLK Regarding March on Washington

Thursday, February 29, 1968

This document is a letter from Martha D. Kennedy to Dr. King in response to a previous letter from Dr. King in regards to a pilgrimage to Washington, D.C..