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Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence Newsletter

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

This newsletter, Volume I Number 4, is published by Henry and Sue Bass of Atlanta. They write about the Atlanta Peace Parade, an anti-Vietnam protest to take place on August 6, 1967. The Atlanta Peace Parade would become the south's first major peace parade, about which the Basses write President Johnson was worried, calling for counter-demonstrations.

Letter from Sam Gasbarre to MLK

Monday, August 21, 1967

Sam Gasbarre, identifying himself as a white American, writes Dr. King to support his opinion that the Vietnam War is evil and should end.

Letter from Mahalia Jackson Foundation Requesting Financial Support

In this letter addressed to "Friend," gospel singer Mahalia Jackson requests financial support for the Mahalia Jackson Foundation, which helps deserving children obtain a higher education.

Letter from MLK to W. Russell Chapman of the NAACP

Thursday, February 1, 1962

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak from the York County NAACP.

Anonymous Letter to President Johnson

The anonymous sender of this letter urges President Lyndon B. Johnson to take action to fund programs in order to get people in school or at work in order to quell rising tensions in cities filled with people dissatisfied with their social and economic positions.

Request For Information Sent to MLK from Abram Eisenman

This second "Request For Information" was sent from Abram Eisenman to Dr. King. He asks Dr. King if he and members of his organization will support him for president. He gives Dr. King five main points of his platform that he hopes to achieve as president. He believes it is "imperative" that someone run against President Johnson and unite the American people based on his platform.

Letter from Louis Rome to MLK

Saturday, February 10, 1968

Louis Rome, Executive Director of the Michigan Commission on Crime, extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak at the Governor's conference being held in Detroit.

SCLC Newsletter: April - May 1964

This second volume of the SCLC Newsletter includes a wide variety of articles on the organization's recent interests and activities. The feature article reports the success of the historic Selma to Montgomery march, and other articles touch on the SCLC's efforts to register new voters.

Goldwater's Nomination

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

Dr. King expresses his disdain for Republican presidential candidate Senator Barry Goldwater. Dr. King believes that Senator Goldwater is not an adequate candidate, due to his lack of knowledge in foreign policy and philosophies about equality for all.

Pelagianism

Dr. King defines Pelagianism as the belief that original sin did not taint human nature and that mortal will is still capable of choosing good or evil without divine aid.

Letter from Lyman Farrar to Ralph David Abernathy regarding Advice and Counsel

Monday, April 29, 1968

Mr. Farrar writes to Dr. Abernathy for advice and cousel in an effort to contact Negro colleges in the United States. Mr. Farrar would like to make a personal contribution for a cause in which he explains in an enclosure.

Letter from Jessie Jackson to C. L. Franklin

Tuesday, February 21, 1967

Reverend Jessie Jackson writes this letter to Reverend C. L. Franklin of the New Bethel Baptist Church in Detroit, Michigan. Jackson expresses his gratitude for Franklin's suggestions and assistance during a recent stay in Detroit. He also appreciates the solidarity exhibited towards the SCLC.

"Outrage in Alabama"

Sunday, May 5, 1963

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference reprinted the article, "Outrage in Alabama," which was originally printed in The New York Times. The article describes violent acts against civil rights demonstrators discussing the flaws within the legal system.

Sentinel: "King's Book Refutes Black Power"

Thursday, June 22, 1967

This document is a newspaper clipping from the Los Angeles Sentinel,l giving a review of Dr. King's book, Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community. Headlined under the title, "King's Book Refutes Black Power", the book review places special emphasis on Dr. King's objection of black power as a slogan. In his book, Dr. King informed his readers that the paths of black and white individuals intersected towards equality and black power totally killed that process.

Letter from Calhoun Geiger to MLK

Friday, April 26, 1963

Calhoun Geiger, director of the Peace Education Program, invites Dr. King and his family to a summer family camp hosted by the American Friends Service Committee, Inc. Geiger explains that John Yungblut suggested that Dr. King might be interested in attending.

Telegram from Reinhold Niebuhr to MLK

Friday, March 19, 1965

Theologian Reinhold Niebuhr regrets that a stroke prevents him from accepting Dr. King's invitation to participate in the Selma-to-Montgomery March and hopes there will be "massive" support.

Letter from Robert L. Tucker Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, February 7, 1967

Robert Tucker inquires about Dr. King's views on Adam Clayton Powell and his position in Washington. Tucker states that he has great respect for Dr. King, which is why he wants clarity on his sentiments regarding the Powell controversy.

Letter from Arthur C. Walter to MLK

Monday, November 18, 1963

Arthur Walter, Assistant Pastor at Park United Presbyterian Church, writes Dr. King regarding a boycott that will deny some African American children Christmas gifts. Walter inquires about how his church can use some of their funds to provide gifts for the children that will be affected by the boycott.

Draft of Speech On Passage of 1965 Voting Rights Act

Dr. King discusses the prevalence of racial issues in society. Discrimination and segregation still occur but through means in which the government has not declared unconstitutional. One of the main problems discussed was housing discrimination. Many African Americans were forced to live in slum housing in bad areas because they were not able to buy a house in the "white neighborhoods." Dr. King states that this type of social injustice cannot continue if the nation wants to progress.

Letter from Lorraine Small to MLK

Wednesday, November 17, 1965

Lorraine Small, a student at Margaret Washington High School, writes Dr. King and the SCLC requesting information on the organizational structure of the SCLC, as well as its leaders, goals, and purpose.

Meeting on National Negro Politics

Sunday, March 31, 1968

The Meeting on National Negro Politics highlights congressional races with "the most potential for political gains by black Americans" in the 1968 elections.

Letter from C. B. Olmstead to MLK

Tuesday, July 13, 1965

Olmstead writes that he is unable to reconcile Dr. King's support of civil disobedience with his plans for peaceful demonstrations. He contends the purpose of King's sustained agitation is to provoke violence. He feels the Civil Rights Act of 1964 should become the mechanism for opposing discrimination, not further boycotts and sit-ins.

Letter from Mrs. G. Wayne

Mrs. G. Wayne, a white American mother, expresses support for Cassius Clay and everyone who denounces the Vietnam War.

Letter to MLK

Tuesday, October 4, 1966

Here Mrs. L. Schmidt, acting through the office of Joan Daves, requests that Dr. King write an inscription in his book "Why We Can't Wait" for her son, Joachim.

Letter from Hubert Reaves to Ralph Abernathy

Thursday, May 2, 1968

Rev. Ralph Abernathy was the recipient of this letter from a prison inmate. The author also makes a request for an SCLC membership form and a picture of Dr. King, as a keepsake.

SCLC Citizenship Workbook

This workbook is an extension of the SCLC Conference Citizenship program "designed to acquaint citizens with the way in which our government is run and to help them meet voting requirements." This resource tool features a number of vocabulary-building, arithmetic, reading comprehension, and spelling exercises to better equip voters with the knowledge to "fight against prejudice and loss of human rights in education."

Letter from MLK to Dr. & Mrs. Bacon

Friday, October 17, 1958

Dr. King, in this letter, thanked Mr. and Mrs. Bacon for their kind donation of $200 sent to him, during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. He acknowledges his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process is complete.

Class Notes: Joshua

This eleven card series features Biblical verses from the Book of Joshua which Dr. King references under specific subject titles. The section titles range from "Knowledge" to "Passages for Homiletical Use."

Brotherhood

Dr. King quotes Leslie D. Weatherhead's "Why Do Men Suffer?"

Letter from David C. Morton to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1968

David C. Morton, Campus Coordinator at Biola College, writes Dr. King requesting a photograph and other campaign materials for Choice '68.