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Seventh Biennial Religious Conference

This is a program for the seventh Biennial Religious Conference at Princeton University. Initially conceived shortly after World War II, the conference continues to confront important issues of human life. Under the leadership of the Student Christian Association, "Integration: Conscience in Crisis" will take place over a span of four days. Topics of the conference include "the historical and social as well as the judicial, international, and theological" implications of segregation and integration.

God (His Omnipotence)

Dr. King defines omnipotence as meaning that God has the power to carry out His will. He notes that God must hold characteristics of both good and evil and states that few philosophers have acknowledged God's omnipotence.

Letter from M. G. Greens to MLK

Saturday, November 23, 1963

Miss M. G. Green, member of the Church of the Open Door, informs Dr. King of her concern with the Civil Rights Movement and her desire to offer her services as contribution to the cause. She encloses two letters addressed to Reverend Andrew Young, who never responded to her request.

"The Drum Major Instinct" Ebenezer Baptist Church

Sunday, February 4, 1968

The Drum Major Instinct, a sermon delivered by Dr. King at the Atlanta Ebenezer Baptist Church, frames the “instinct” as being responsible for the social ills of the world. Dr. King proclaims that racial inequality in America and the war in Vietnam are the result of nations engaging in a “bitter colossal contest for supremacy.” He suggests that the only way to end this “suicidal thrust” is to abide by an altered definition of the instinct – the definition of Jesus Christ.

Letter from Rabbi Arthur J. Lelyveld to MLK

Thursday, March 8, 1962

Rabbi Arthur J. Lelyveld writes to Dr. King asking him to participate in a "Social Action Forum," in Cleveland, Ohio.

Letter to Martin Luther King Jr. from Clement Alexandre 1957

Friday, October 4, 1957

Dr. King received this letter from Doubleday & Company, regarding offering Dr. King royalties to write his first book. The owner/publisher of Doubleday, Clement Alexandre, tried to persuade Dr. King to work with them on a book that would expand his base of influence. The book would relate to issues of civil and political issues.

Hus, John

Dr. King makes biographical notes about John Hus, the leader of the Czech reform.

James Meredith Article

A newspaper article describes an argument that occurred between James Meredith and a group of black deacons in the city of Canton, Miss. The argument ultimately led to Meredith stating "I can understand why so many Negroes have been lynched."

Letter from a Supporter of MLK

An anonymous person pleads with Dr. King to not accept a rumored government job that was offered to him, in exchange of his plans to alleviate poverty.

Letter from MLK to Peter A. Mullin

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

Dr. King writes Mr. Mullin to express his deep appreciation for being selected to receive the Gold Key Award at Boston College.

Letter from Paul H. Douglas to MLK

Thursday, July 2, 1964

Paul H. Douglass extends his gratitude to Dr. King, Roy Wilkins and their followers for the "passage of the Civil Rights Bill."

Religion

Dr. King quotes Albrecht Ritschl's "The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation."

Letter from Robert R. Janks to MLK

Monday, October 14, 1963

Robert R. Janks writes Dr. King admiring his leadership during the fight for equality. Janks also recommends two additional quotes that Dr. King should use in his future speeches.

Letter from Michael Greywitt from to MLK Requesting Interview

Friday, May 21, 1965

In this letter dated 5/21/1965, Greywitt informs Dr. King that there have been many requests from listeners requesting an interview from Dr. King on the "current status of the Civil Rights Movement". Greywitt is the producer of the Michael Jackson Program on the CBS Radio Pacific Network.

Letter from Gerold Newmark to MLK

Monday, April 10, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Newmark requests a copy of the speech Dr. King delivered in New York City on Vietnam.

MLK Writes on Miracles

Dr. King outlines Dr. James Moffatt's views on students understanding of new testament.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. E. A. Larson

Wednesday, August 14, 1963

Dora McDonald notifies Mrs. E. Larson of Dr. King's absence and informs her that he has never been to Russia, but has no objection to a visit there.

Letter from Maj Palmberg to MLK

Wednesday, February 16, 1966

Maj Palmberg, Cultural Secretary of Abo Akademi University in Finland, inquires about Dr. King's availability to speak to Turku students during his upcoming visit to the region.

Letter from Amos O. Holmes to MLK

Wednesday, September 20, 1967

Amos Holmes, Georgia Field Director of the NAACP, appeals to Dr. King to reject the invitation to take leadership within the Atlanta community. He feels that the city can solve its own problems without the aid of SCLC or Dr. King.

One Vote for Every Man: Civil Rights Act

In this draft of an article for the March 1965 IUD Agenda, an AFL-CIO monthly publication, Dr. King recounts the progress made by the Civil Rights Movement and states that the issue in 1965 is the right to vote and the venue is Selma, Alabama. He discusses the pattern of exclusion, including the abuse of power by local sheriffs, illegal use of local and state laws, delay tactics of registrars, and literacy tests. He outlines measures that a Civil Rights Act of 1965 should include.

SCLC Retreat November 1967

Reverend Andrew Young discusses civil disobedience at the SCLC's retreat in South Carolina. Dr. King and Jesse Jackson also make presentations at the retreat. Jesse Jackson states "we are too conscious of philosophy" and mentions "what's significant to the people is jobs or income." Dr. King talks about upcoming projects that will involve civil disobedience.

Letter from Willis C. Tabor to MLK

Tuesday, June 15, 1965

In this letter from Willis C. Tabor to Dr. King Mr. Tabor requests an application for employment with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference after his dismissal as pastor of West Side Christian Parish.

Essay - MLK Entitled "The Bravest Man I Ever Met"

Dr. King's essay, entitled "The Bravest Man I Ever Met," profiles Norman Thomas, a prominent Socialist.

Letter from Dr. and Mrs. C. E. Woodruff to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967

Dr. and Mrs. C. E. Woodruff praise Dr. King for his stance on the Vietnam War and enclose a check for the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Kelly Miller Smith

Monday, June 3, 1963

Dr. King sends a letter to Rev. Kelly Miller Smith about other correspondence written in preparation for a meeting.

Letter from MLK to Viva O'Dean Sloan

Wednesday, October 17, 1962

Dr. King responds to Viva O'Dean Sloan's letter, extending his appreciation for her support of the Congress of Racial Equality. He regretfully informs her he does not know of anyone in the Dearborn, Michigan area who might be interested in the purchase of her property there.

Letter from MLK to Jessie Treichler

Friday, September 7, 1962

Dr. King writes Jessie Tresichler to inform her that he and his wife will be unable to accept her invitation to Antioch College. He explains that his calendar will not allow him to accept any more speaking engagements and that Coretta is an expecting mother.

Letter From Mattie M. Patterson to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964

Mattie Patterson congratulates Dr. King on the two awards he has recently received.

Letter from Jan H. Jansen to MLK

Saturday, January 11, 1964

Jan Jansen writes Dr. King a letter inquiring about him speaking at one of their meetings.

Postcard from Frank J. Meinen to the SCLC

Sunday, April 8, 1962

Upon recently hearing Dr. King speak, Frank J. Meinen writes the SCLC to ask how he can help.