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Letter of Gratitude to Dr. King from Willa Clark, Prince Hall Grand Chapter

Thursday, October 20, 1966

Willa Clark, Grand Worthy Matron of the Prince Hall Grand Chapter, Order of the Eastern Star, wrote to Dr. King expressing a debt of appreciation for his high civic service rendered to mankind. Putting action to sentiment, the Order of the Eastern Star encloses a $500.00 donation to aid in continuing the work toward dignity and freedom.

Letter from Ms. Gitta Gossmann to Ms. Dora McDonald

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

Ms. Gossmann writes to Ms. McDonald regarding Dr. King's "Strength to Love." Enclosed in the letter are contract copies for the Italian-language edition of the publication.

Letter from MLK to Linda Cann

Tuesday, November 30, 1965

Dr. King writes Linda Cann, a member of the Canadian Women's Press Club in Halifax, Nova Scotia. He informs Mrs. Cann that he cannot accept her invitation to speak in Nova Scotia because he is trying to "grapple with the problems of discrimination that Negroes still face."

Letter from Dr. S. M. Sophocles to MLK

Friday, July 10, 1964

Dr. S. M. Sophocles invites Dr. King to speak about civil rights at a cultural program for Pennsylvania Military College.

Conversion

Dr. King quotes Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy's book "What I Believe." Tolstoy asserts that when he came to believe in Christ's teachings his whole life and perception changed.

Letter from Paul Noe to MLK

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Mr. Noe shares his ideas and comments with Dr. King regarding the Civil Rights Movement. Mr. Noe describes the Civil Rights Movement as the "exclusive domain of the black man" and discusses how he has felt very left out of the movement due to his race. He hopes that the Civil Rights Movement will become the "domain of all Americans" and will change its appeal from racism to decency.

Letter from James C. Goodwin to MLK

Wednesday, March 8, 1967

Mr. Goodwin, Executive Director of the Bay Area Neighborhood Development Non-profit Foundation, informs Dr. King of an artist who would like to present him the painting "Give Me a Future."

Letter from M. G. Greens to MLK

Saturday, November 23, 1963

Miss M. G. Green, member of the Church of the Open Door, informs Dr. King of her concern with the Civil Rights Movement and her desire to offer her services as contribution to the cause. She encloses two letters addressed to Reverend Andrew Young, who never responded to her request.

Invitation from J.G. Kennelly to MLK

Wednesday, April 24, 1963

J.G. Kennelly invites Dr. King to address the Christian Culture Forum during their 1963-1964 season in Hamilton, Canada.

SCLC Retreat November 1967

Reverend Andrew Young discusses civil disobedience at the SCLC's retreat in South Carolina. Dr. King and Jesse Jackson also make presentations at the retreat. Jesse Jackson states "we are too conscious of philosophy" and mentions "what's significant to the people is jobs or income." Dr. King talks about upcoming projects that will involve civil disobedience.

The Dilemma of White America

This early draft of the Racism and the White Backlash chapter of Dr. King's Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? explores the history and philosophy of white supremacy. King insists the current status of Negroes is the direct result of oppression by whites, who have developed delusional beliefs to justify their historic acts of colonization and slavery.

Letter from Richard Tucker and Stanford Ovshinsky to Lyndon Johnson

Thursday, April 13, 1967

The Oakland County (Michigan) Peace Committee, believing U.S. involvement in Vietnam is a mistake, asks President Johnson and government representatives to stop bombing North Vietnam, promote a bilateral ceasefire, and enter multilateral negotiations.

Service of Dedication

Sunday, May 29, 1966

This program outlines the schedule for a service held at Cornerstone Baptist Church Center in Brooklyn, New York. Dr. King and Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller are featured as guest speakers.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967

Mr. Wilkins invites Dr. King to attend a meeting with Dr. K. O. Mbadiwe, former Nigerian Minister, and other Negro leaders in the United States to discuss the increasing conflict in Nigeria.

Press Conference on Chicago Movement

Wednesday, July 7, 1965

Dr. King shares his acceptance of the invitation to spend some time in Chicago. During his time in Chicago, Dr. King and other SCLC leaders plan to assist local civil rights organizations in organizing rallies throughout the city.

God

Dr. King cites "Totem and Tabu" and "The Future of an Illusion" for Sigmund Freud's view on the origin of the idea of God.

Anonymous Postcard to MLK

This postcard refers to 5 men arrested for exhibiting "black power."

Metropolitan Youth Commission of St. Louis

The following document recounts a three-year survey conducted by the Metropolitan Youth Commission in regards to the "Distribution of juvenile apprehensions by age, sex, and from the year 1960 to July 25, 1963."

Letter to Dora McDonald from Harper & Row, Publishers

Wednesday, October 24, 1962

The secretary of Mr. Mel Arnold of Harper and Row Publishers, sent this correspondence to Dr. King secretary, Miss. Dora McDonald. The content of the letter thanked Miss. McDonald, for sending a previous letter and requested additional chapters for Dr. King's second book. The book was entitled "Strength to Love."

Letter from MLK and Associates to Mr. Grover Hall

Friday, January 11, 1957

Dr. King and associates write to Grover Hall, Editor of the Montgomery Advertiser, to express appreciation for an article the publication carried. The clergymen state that "law and order can be restored" if other periodicals throughout the South follow the newspaper's example.

SCLC Fundraising Letter

Thursday, February 15, 1968

This 1968 SCLC fundraising letter is a personal appeal from Dr. King. He addresses subjects that would further polarize his supporters, detractors and the country as a whole.

March on Washington Address by Eugene Carson Blake

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Rev Dr. Eugene Carson Blake, Vice Chairman of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, addresses the March on Washington. He states that if all the clergy and church members he represents and all of the Roman Catholics and Jews in America were marching for jobs and freedom for Negroes, the battle for civil rights would be won. Despite the pronouncements of the religious community, the churches and society are still segregated. “Late, late we come,” he says, and in a repentant and reconciling spirit.

MLK Outline of Biblical Texts

Dr. King outlines the Old Testament biblical book of Samuel and records information regarding the lives of Saul and David.

Invitation to President Johnson's Inauguration

Dr. King receives an invitation to attend and participate in the Inauguration of President Lyndon B. Johnson and Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey.

Letter From Paul H. Boase

Friday, October 13, 1967

Paul H. Boase writes Dr. King concerning a sermon, recording and publication that he would like to use to demonstrate that the Social Gospel is still alive.

Project Chicago Staff Meeting Minutes

Monday, July 3, 1967

This document recaps the minutes of the Project Chicago staff meeting held at West Side Christian Parish on July 3, 1967. Dr. King is listed as a proposed member of the Advisory Committee.

Letter from MLK to Madame Bremond about a Visit to Lyons, France

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

In this letter Dr. King offers his gratitude to Madame Bremond for a pleasurable visit to Lyons, France at which occurred a "great ecumenical gathering."

References (Religion and Philosophy)

Dr. King cites three articles about Borden Parker Bowne. The first, “Personalism and the Influence of Bowne,” was written by Edgar S. Brightman and appeared in the journal The Personalist.

Letter from MLK to Hugh Daugherty

Friday, February 9, 1968

This letter, dated February 9,1968, was sent to Mr.Daugherty from Dr. King. In this letter, Dr. King thanks Mr. Daugherty for his contribution to the SCLC. He apologizes for being "tardy" in writing to him.

Introduction of Edward M. Kennedy

Dr. King introduces Robert Kennedy at a gathering in Jackson, Mississippi, calling him a "capable statesman" with a "great social vision."