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"ISRAEL"

Letter from MLK to Hugh W. Nevin Jr.

Wednesday, November 20, 1963
Rhode Island (RI)

Dr. King acknowledges the receipt of Hugh Nevin's letter inviting him to speak at St. George's School. Dr. King regretfully declines the invitation due to his full calendar and thanks Mr. Nevin for his nice words regarding his book, "Stride Towards Freedom."

Tribute to Jimmy Lee Jackson

Friday, February 26, 1965
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King edits a draft of a eulogy he wrote in the wake of four girls killed in a bombing at the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King applauded these martyrs, for their brief yet powerful appearance on this Earth and their contribution to the "holy crusade for freedom and human dignity." Reiterating these sentiments, Dr. King edits the eulogy to fit the life story of Jimmy Lee Jackson.

Letter from Congressman James G. O'Hara to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Michigan (MI), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Congressman James G. O'Hara, US Representative from Michigan, informs Dr. King that he has signed the home rule discharge petition for the District of Columbia.

Letter from Emma D. Roberts to MLK

Friday, April 17, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA)

Ms. Roberts expresses her support for Dr. King's "campaign for civil rights for Negroes," which she contrasts with the efforts of other groups that involve violence.

Letter from Eunice Johnson to Coretta Scott King

Monday, October 12, 1959
NIGERIA, Georgia (GA), Ohio (OH), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Eunice Johnson, an African woman born in America but now living in Nigeria, writes Mrs. King in hopes of being able to meet her during her visit to America. She hopes that they can discuss Dr. King's nonviolent campaign.

Jefferson County Jail Guidelines

The Jefferson County Jail guidelines are listed in this document.

Bibliography Compiled by MLK

Chicago, IL, Boston, MA, New York, NY

This handwritten bibliography documents texts that discuss theology.

Atlanta SCLC Prexy Jailed in Albany

Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ)

During a prayer pilgrimage in Albany, Georgia Rev. John A. Middleton, Pastor of Atlanta's Allen Temple A. M. E. Church, and 75 other religious leaders were jailed.

"Discerning the Signs of History"

Sunday, November 15, 1964
Atlanta, GA

Dr. King believes that there are lessons in understanding the process of history, that evil carries the seed of destruction and that militarism is ultimately suicidal. Dr. King states that "history teaches the lesson that all reality hinges on moral foundations."

SCLC Virginia Program with MLK

Friday, July 2, 1965
Virginia (VA)

This is the program for SCLC's Virginia State Unit's observance of Nobel Peace Prize Day at Virginia State College, with Dr. King as guest speaker.

Letter from Prafulla Chandra Das to MLK

Monday, February 27, 1967
INDIA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Mr. Das informs Dr. King that his book "Why We Can't Wait" has been translated for readers in India and printing is underway. Mr. Das asks Dr. King to send a message to UN Secretary General U Thant, the recent Nehru Peace Prize Award winner.

Letter from Richard Boone Enclosing CCAP Statement

This letter from the Executive Director of Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty encloses a statement regarding the 1966 Amendments made to the Economic Opportunity Act.

Looking Forward: The Montgomery Improvement Association, Inc.

Montgomery, AL

This pamphlet outlines the ten points the Montgomery Improvement Association uses to promote healthy race relations.

Letter from D. E. Goorman to MLK

Saturday, February 17, 1968
Washington, D.C.

D. E. Goorman advises Dr. King on how to promote peace, freedom and economic security for all US citizens. He suggests "appealing to the moral conscience" of the majority while implementing an economic action plan.

In the Battle for Desegregation

Tuesday, September 1, 1964

Francis Keppel, U.S. Commissioner of Education, expresses his thoughts on the solution for desegregation. Keppel believes the best way to end segregation is through education, providing children with an education and outstanding teachers.

Action Among Nations: International Planned Parenthood Federation

INDIA, TAIWAN, HONG KONG, BARBADOS

This publication highlights collaborative efforts to support and expand the International Planned Parenthood Federation. The document highlights statistical data demonstrating the organization's successes in "voluntary fertility control," and references Planned Parenthood's conference scheduled in autumn 1966.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Saul Sherman

Thursday, August 20, 1964
Illinois (IL)

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Sherman for her financial contribution to the SCLC.

Outline of Sincerity Is Not Enough

This partial sermon outline in Dr. King's handwriting focuses on the subject "Sincerity Is Not Enough", based on the text Romans 10:2.

Telegram to MLK from W.E. Gardner

Thursday, August 16, 1962

Rev. Gardner organizes a board meeting to plan for a Southern Christian Leadership Conference Convention.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Theodore Smith

Tuesday, January 2, 1968
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Mr. Wachtel informs Theodore Smith and Hosea Williams that they are in danger of breaking the terms of a loan agreement from The American Foundation on Nonviolence.

Letter from Cirilo McSween to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1967
Chicago, IL, New York (NY)

Cirilo McSween congratulates Dr. King for the reorganization of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Annie Grace to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967
Boston, MA

Thirteen-year-old Annie G. Miller expresses her admiration for Dr. King.

News from Southern Conference Educational Fund

Monday, February 19, 1962
New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA)

This statement from the Southern Conference Educational Fund discusses the details regarding the arrest of Charles McDew and Robert Zellner in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Unitarian Universalist Statement of Consensus on Racial Injustice

Friday, May 20, 1966
Florida (FL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association listed several laws adopted by the association. Some of the laws incorporate civil rights, demonstrations, voting rights, equality, civil disobedience, and discrimination in employment and housing.

Letter From Peggy Mann to MLK Regarding Children's Book

Wednesday, February 1, 1967
New York (NY)

Mann informs King of the recent publication of the children's book "The Street of the Flower Boxes", a book which concerns itself with matters of integration. Mann, requests that Dr. King provide comments or suggested persons of whom may be interested in the literature.

Letter from Blanche Shropshire to MLK

Saturday, November 11, 1967
New York (NY)

Mrs. Shropshire expresses her gratitutde to Dr. King for his inspiring words at an address delivered in Buffalo, New York.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Ms. Dora McDonald

Monday, April 12, 1965
Georgia (GA), New York, NY, Mississippi (MS)

In this letter to Miss McDonald, Ms. Daves discusses a request for Dr. King to write a short introduction to William Bradford Huie's work "Three Lives for Mississippi". Ms. Daves stresses the importance of this opportunity as it addresses a topic "very much on Dr. King's mind," namely the starting of a "dialogue...between the two opposing forces."

Telegram from Konrad Bloch to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964
Stockholm, Sweden, Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA

Konrad Bloch congratulates Dr. King and says he will see him in Stockholm.

Pamphlet from the Child Development Group of Mississippi

Mississippi (MS), Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL, Tennessee (TN)

This pamphlet is entitled "Histories Of: Children, Employees, Centers, Community Support." The organization, sponsored by the Child Development Center of Mississippi, is a statewide Head Start program that was organized in the summer of 1965.

Letter from Helen Knox to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967
California (CA), New York (NY)

Mrs. Knox acknowledges receipt of Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" and briefly discloses details of her involvement in the Civil Rights Movement in Harlem.