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"ISRAEL"

Niebuhr (Christ)

Dr. King writes on Niebuhr's perception of Christ.

Letter from Jimmie Wattson to MLK

Monday, February 26, 1962

An inmate at the Virginia State Penitentiary requests Dr. King's help with his legal situation. The sender informs Dr. King that he is serving a fifteen-year sentence for second-degree murder although he did not get a fair trial. He claims he has written government officials to appeal his case, however he cannot "seem to get any consideration." The inmate asks Dr. King to write him back and let him know what information is required for further assistance.

Letter from J. Carter Fahy to Mr. Roy Wilkins about NAACP Name Change

Friday, July 28, 1967

In this letter to the president of the NAACP, Fahy suggests changing the name of the NAACP to NAABA, replacing "colored people" with "Black Americans."

Letter from the Chester, Pennsylvania Branch of the NAACP to MLK

Tuesday, December 4, 1962

The Chester Branch of the NAACP invites Dr. King to attend its celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. The organizers ask for information about the process to arrange the visit and for a picture to be enclosed with Dr. King's reply.

Letter from Dr. Joseph R. Swartwout to MLK

Friday, January 19, 1968

Dr. Joseph R. Swartwout invites Dr. King to eat lunch at the Chicago University faculty club.

Letter from MLK to Michael J. Quill

Thursday, August 24, 1961

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Michael J. Quill's dedication to the "front lines" during a libel case. Dr. King informs Mr. Quill of the current status of the case and the courts response. He further provides Mr. Quill with the operations in the south and their deep involvement in the "Freedom Ride."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. William Lawson

Wednesday, May 6, 1964

Dora McDonald writes in response to a request from Reverend William Lawson of Texas Southern University. McDonald encloses a biographical sketch and photograph of Dr. King, then relays a message from the Reverend to exclude a reception for him on May 17.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Elisabeth Babcock

Tuesday, April 27, 1965

Dora McDonald responds to a request from Elisabeth Babcock regarding the possibility of Dr. King visiting her in New York. Unfortunately, the hectic schedule in Dr. King's travels will not allow him such an opportunity. She conveys their gratitude for the "moral and financial support" Babcock has made for the betterment of the movement.

Moment (Its Meaning)

Dr. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's "The Concept of Nature."

Letter from Silas K. Brown to MLK

Tuesday, December 26, 1967

Mr. Brown requests the help of Dr. King and the SCLC on behalf of Reverend U.S. Gilliam. Reverend Gilliam, the first Negro to run for public office in Grenada, Mississippi, is under attack by whites in his community.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald about Contracts

Friday, January 29, 1965

In this letter Joan Daves requests from Ms. McDonald the required signatures from Dr. King for the contract for the Oriya-language edition of "Why We Can't Wait," which is to be published in India.

Letter from Senora Springfied to MLK

Tuesday, September 6, 1966

Mrs. Senora Springfied requests that Dr. King send Leon Hall, an SCLC employee, back to Grenada, Mississippi. She praises Hall and mentions that the town needs leaders like him.

Cape Times: No Reply to Luther King Invitation

Tuesday, November 23, 1965

L. Marquard writes an article discussing the discontent that Dr. J. D. Vorster and Rev. J. A. Heynes had regarding Dr. King's honorary degree from the Vrye Universiteit of Amsterdam.

Hegel's Social Ethics

Dr. King writes notes on Hegel's social ethics. He quotes, "The principle triad here consist of law in the sense of abstract right, morality, and social ethics." According to Hegel, abstract right may be defined as being a person and respecting other people, while morality refers to one's conscience and social ethics regards another triad, being family, civil society, and the state.

Face the Nation Interview

Sunday, August 29, 1965

This is a transcript of an August 1965 interview of Dr. King on the CBS television news program Face the Nation. King is asked to comment on numerous issues facing American society including the conflict in Vietnam, civil rights, housing and birth control.

Letter from Victor J. Schoenbach to MLK

Monday, May 22, 1967

Victor Schoenbach writes Dr. King expressing his support for Dr. King's views on the Vietnam War in the midst of dissenters.

Letter to Rev. Malcolm Calhoun to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968

Dr. King appreciates Rev. Calhoun's concern for the SCLC and the mission the organization has for the creating equality. Dr. King then explains how other programs offer contributions to the SCLC so that they may continue to engage in education, voter registration, economic development, and training of ministers for urban ministries.

Truth

Dr. King quotes Robert Browning's "Paracelsus."

Draft Position Paper on Economic and Fiscal Policy

Saturday, April 1, 1967

The basis of this draft paper is about the proposed elimination of poverty in the United States within a ten-year span. A plan called the "Freedom Budget" has been endorsed by the A. Philip Randolph Institute. The premise of this paper is to "carry forward these developments in the economic and fiscal area, setting forth suggested policies which might be supported by all individuals and groups associated" with the goal of eradicating poverty in the United States.

Letter from MLK to Dr. James Costar at Michigan State University

Wednesday, February 9, 1966

In this letter to the Chairman of the Department of Counseling and Guidance at Michigan State, Dr. King gives a stellar review of the work of Dr. Robert Green. Dr. King commends Dr. Green's performance in stabilizing the SCLC Citizenship Education Program and expresses appreciation to the university for sharing his expertise.

Letter from James Hershey to MLK

Thursday, March 25, 1965

Joe T. Denman writes Dr. King on behalf of the Citizens For Progress Organization hoping to sponsor a speaking date in Yakima, Washington. Denman requests that the Reverend forward the date that he will arrive.

Letter from JohnFischer to MLK Regarding an Article in Harper's Magazine

Wednesday, September 26, 1962

John Fischer of Harpers Magazine informs Dr. King that the Albany Georgia article will not be published in the upcoming edition.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to the Women's Strike for Peace

Saturday, June 22, 1963

Mrs. King writes to the Women's Strike for Peace to extend her appreciation for their support in the area of civil rights.

Letter from Senator Edward V. Long to MLK

Thursday, July 2, 1964

Senator Edward V. Long (D-Missouri) writes Dr. King to thank him for his letter concerning Long's support of the civil rights bill.

Program from The Poor People's Campaign Committee for Nassau County

Dr. King delivers an address for the Poor People's Campaign Committee of Nassau County.

Letter from MLK to Canon H. W. Montefiore

Tuesday, January 17, 1967

Dr. King informs Canon H. W. Montefiore of his inability to accept the "gracious" invitation to speak at the University Church in England. Dr. King's commitment to the racial injustices in the United States and new book makes it impossible for him to travel to Cambridge.

May 17 -- 11 Years Later

Saturday, May 22, 1965

Dr. King discusses the eleven years since the Supreme Court ruled that segregated schools were not constitutional in Brown v. Board of Education. He explains that it was not until the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that people began to understand the harms of segregation.

Letter from David Mays to Dora McDonald

Monday, October 28, 1963

David Mays, Chairman of the Department of Speech and Theatre at Austin Peay State College in Clarksville, Tennessee, participates in a continued correspondence with Dora McDonald. Mays inquires if the speech he requested will be under separate cover, as it was not enclosed in the recent letter. He also requests Dr. King's permission to make copies of the speech in order to pass out to students in his Principles of Rhetoric class.

Letter from Myles Horton to Friends of Highlander

Friday, December 8, 1967

Myles Horton, the co-founder of the Highlander Research and Education Center, explains that he has been working on a program for the Appalachian area. He also mentions that the Center sponsors voter registration, political education programs and a series of workshops to help Negro candidates run for local and state offices.

Letter from Beatrice Schultz to MLK

Thursday, August 11, 1966

Beatrice Schultz responds to a letter from Dr. King and expresses her appreciation towards him for explaining his stance on "Black Power." She also encloses a contribution to further demonstrate her support of Dr. King.