Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"ISRAEL"

Letter from Paul H. Douglas to MLK

Thursday, July 2, 1964

Paul H. Douglass extends his gratitude to Dr. King, Roy Wilkins and their followers for the "passage of the Civil Rights Bill."

Non-Violence Takes Courage: King's Wife

Friday, March 29, 1968

Mrs. Coretta Scott King elaborates on her commitment to nonviolence, referring to it as "the best instrument of change," throughout her involvement in the Civil Rights and Peace Movements.

Dr. Spock, Dr. King and Rev. Rice Marching Down 5th Ave. NYC. April 15, 1967

Saturday, April 15, 1967

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Condolence Letter Regarding Assassination of MLK

Monday, April 8, 1968

Anabella Anderson discusses the sadness that she feels over Dr. King's assassination. She says that she grieves for his family and the conditions that brought about Dr. King's death. Ashamed of her white skin, she blames the white race for social ills. Ms. Anderson wants to give of her self to non-whites in America and those under white domination in Africa. Though saddened, she is comforted by the words she heard at Dr. King's funeral and is hopeful that his legacy will live on.

Letter from Marie Brookter to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

Marie Brookter offers Dr. King "information as to the needs of the Poor" in preparation for the upcoming March of Poor People to Washington.

Letter from Ben A. Todd to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

Ben A. Todd commends Dr. King for his recent stand against the United States' position in Vietnam, particularly because making such a statement may hurt the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from the Holy Name College to MLK

Friday, October 11, 1963

The Holy Name College requests Dr. King's written contribution for a new section in their publication entitled Interest Magazine. Interest Magazine is an international publication dedicated to the understanding and appreciation of theology. Dr. King has been selected to focus on the issue regarding Christianity and the American Negro. The college provides Dr. King with the restrictions of his essay and assures him that they will print his written work without editing for authenticity.

Letter from James W. Sheaffer to MLK

Thursday, January 21, 1965

James Sheaffer, of Lycoming College's Department of Music, invites Dr. King to return to the college for another visit. Sheaffer also offers to arrange fundraising opportunities for the SCLC.

Telegram from Nathan Cooper to MLK

Sunday, October 23, 1960

Referring to Dr. King as a southern fascist, Nathan Cooper telegrams his demands for an immediate two- hour national radio television civil rights debate.

Letter from Philip E. Jones to MLK

Thursday, October 6, 1966

Philip E. Jones, a SCOPE volunteer, recollects a "terrible night at Canton, Mississippi" where he met Dr. King and was assigned the duty to find Rev. Young. Jones invites Dr. King to speak about civil rights issues at Juniata College where he is enrolled.

Letter to MLK from F.D. Patterson regarding Differences of Opinion

Monday, April 17, 1967

The president of Phelps-Stokes Fund writes to encourage Dr. King to meet annually with other Negro leaders for a discussion on their differences of opinion.

Letter to MLK from VP Hubert H. Humphrey

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

This letter from Dr. King is from Vice President Humphrey and references recommendations for personnel and employment opportunities.

1965 Pacem In Terris Peace and Freedom Award

This program details the events surrounding the Davenport Catholic Interracial Council's 1965 Pacem In Terris Peace and Freedom Award. Dr. King received the award that year for exemplifying principles of peace and freedom.

Memo from Dora McDonald to MLK

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Dora McDonald sends Dr. King a list of the letters, telephone calls and voice mails he received while out of the office. She also sent him information on public speaking arrangements and the publishing of books along with the royalties Dr. King would receive.

Statement from MLK Regarding Albany Movement

Wednesday, August 1, 1962

While serving a forty-five day sentence alongside Ralph D. Abernathy, Dr. King releases a statement expressing his appreciation for President Kennedy's support of the Albany Movement.

News from the American Jewish Committee

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

This news release announces that John Gardner, former Secretary of Health (among other positions) accepted the head position of the Urban Coalition, a campaign that combats urban poverty.

Telegram from Newcastle University to MLK

Tuesday, January 17, 1967

The registrar of Newcastle University inquires if Dr. King would be able to accept an honorary degree from the institute.

SCLC Newsletter: August 1963

Thursday, August 1, 1963

This is volume one of the SCLC Newsletter, printed for the month and year of August 1963. Several topics are covered including; the March on Washington, Rebuilding Bombed Churches, the WCLC, and Negro voting registration.

Letter from MLK to Viva O'Dean Sloan

Wednesday, October 17, 1962

Dr. King responds to Viva O'Dean Sloan's letter, extending his appreciation for her support of the Congress of Racial Equality. He regretfully informs her he does not know of anyone in the Dearborn, Michigan area who might be interested in the purchase of her property there.

Memo from S. Leiss to MLK

Monday, June 7, 1965

S. Leiss encloses payment from Gakashu Kenkju Sha for a Japanese-language digest of "Why We Can't Wait" that was published in "Fair Lady."

Letter from MLK to Fellowship Baptist Church

Friday, May 5, 1967

In this letter Dr. King offers his gratitude for the contribution made by the Fellowship Baptist Church in Chicago, Illinois to the SCLC while explaining what the contribution is envisioned to accomplish and what the SCLC has already accomplished.

Letter from Mrs. G. E. Coleman to MLK

Wednesday, June 23, 1965

Dr. King writes Mrs. G. Coleman to acknowledge the receipt of her letter inviting him to speak at a Freedom Rally in Beckley, West Virginia. Dr. King expresses his deep regret in his inability to attend.

Letter from Dennis Crawford to MLK

Monday, May 25, 1964

Dennis Crawford, Executive Secretary of the YMCA-YWCA, invites Dr. King to the first Northwest Collegiate Civil Rights Conference. In addition, Crawford makes mention of their contributions to the movement in the form of students, money, books and community leadership.

Letter from MLK to SNCC's John Lewis Regarding the Nobel Peace Prize

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

Dr. King extends gratitude to John Lewis, Chairman of SNCC, for his encouraging letter upon the announcement of Dr. King being chosen to receive the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. Dr. King states he does not accept this award as a tribute to himself, but as a tribute to the entire Civil Rights Movement. Lewis was regarded as a key SNCC leader and became the US Representative for Georgia's 5th congressional district in 1987.

Discrimination Act by a Licensee of the Illinois Department of Registration and Education

Saturday, April 16, 1966

The following is a complaint about an act of discrimination sent to the Illinois Department of Registration and Education from Mrs. McLouis Robinet and William Moyer.

Letter from Susan Neisuler to MLK

Sunday, August 14, 1966

Susan Neisuler encourages Dr. King to speak out against anti-semitism, for there are many Jews who believe that "black power" means anti-semitism.

The Method of Personalism

Personalism is a philosophical thought that attempts to understand the unparalleled identity of human's in relation to nature. Dr. King references this ideology with a handwritten note.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 1, 1964

In this letter Joan Daves informs Ms. Dora McDonald that all matters pertaining to the published works of Dr. King must pass through her office, as she is the literary agent for Dr. King.

Letter from James P. Dixon of Antioch College to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

James P. Dixon, President of Antioch College, thanks Dr. King for accepting an invitation to speak at the school's commencement ceremony.

Southern Rural Action Project

The Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty announces the initiation of its Southern Rural Action Project. The Southern Rural Action Project coordinates local support groups in the areas of housing, voter registration and other issues in the fight against poverty.