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SCLC: MLK Still Most Influential Negro According to Studies

Friday, November 3, 1967

The SCLC issues a news release stating that Dr. King is the most influential Negro leader in America. Dr. King, along with other prominent members of the SCLC, was serving a five-day jail sentence in Birmingham, Alabama at the time of the news release.

I Wish...

Dr. King writes a nursery rhyme on wishes.

Grotius

Dr. King writes that Grotius' view was "that God should be thought of as 'a great moral ruler'" and that Christ's death was "but a tribute to the sanctity of a divine government."

For Healing of The Nations

Sunday, February 14, 1954

The National Council of Churches of Christ in the USA publishes this brochure on peace and race relations, calling Christians into action with the responsibility of making brotherhood a reality. Guidelines are presented for individual Christians and Churches to follow in order to create a world full of love and free of racial turmoil.

Poetry

Dr. King quotes Shelley's views on poetry from the book "Defiance of Poetry."

Telegram from UFT President Albert Shanker to MLK

Wednesday, September 13, 1967

Albert Shanker expresses his appreciation to Dr. King for his support throughout the tumultuous 1967 education crisis in New York City.

Dorothy Cotton's Notes

Dorothy Cotton's compilation of notes includes topics such as the advantages of urbanization, diversity, automation, the "purpose of human effort," Denmark, community mobilization, the democratic method, the behavior of a responsible citizen and the "greatest prize" for mankind. Dorothy Cotton was the SCLC's Education Director and one of the organization's highest ranking female members at the time.

Letter from MLK to Ambassador Adlai Stevenson

Monday, December 28, 1964

Dr. King thanks Adlai Stevenson, America's ambassador to the UN, for sponsoring a reception in his honor following his trip to Oslo to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. He commends Stevenson on his dedication to promote peace and reason in helping to solve world problems.

TV Guide Requests Article on TV's Contributions to Civil Rights

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

TV Guide, in a letter signed by editor Merrill Panitt dated April 11, 1967, invites Dr. King to write an article of 1500 to 2000 words on the positive role television has played in fostering better relations between the races. The previous year, the magazine published a series on television?s impact on society that was largely negative. A proposed series for the 1967-1968 television season would recognize some of the good things television has accomplished. Dr. King is offered $1000 for the article.

Adverse Postcard

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

The author of this postcard questions the concept of Black Power and informs Dr. King of his dismay for integration.

Press Release and Interview from Radio Norway

Wednesday, December 9, 1964

Dr. King addresses the press the day before receiving the Nobel Peace Prize in a statement from Radio Norway.

Letter from Henry J. Dillon to MLK

Saturday, August 20, 1966

Henry Dillon, Vice President of Lithographers and Photoengravers International Union, writes Dr. King. He states, "as long as you choose to support the discredited program and philosophy of this Local...I cannot support- or ask my members to support your organization."

School Desegregation 10 Years Later

Thursday, May 7, 1964

This statement was released by Dr. King ten years after the Supreme Court's decision, Brown versus Board of Education, which made segregation in public schools unconstitutional. The Reverend states, "The naive might believe great strides have been made in school desegregation over the past decade, but this is not at all true."

Is It All Right To Break The Law?

Monday, August 12, 1963

Excerpts from Dr. King's 1963 "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" are used to establish an affirmative answer to the question, "Is It All Right to Break The Law?"

Request from Virgil Jones to MLK

Wednesday, March 6, 1968

Virgil Jones requests photocopies of letters sent to him on Nov. 9, 1967, as well as some other materials.

Letter to Dr. Abernathy from Rev. Parker

Wednesday, May 1, 1968

Rev. Ralph Abernathy, President of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, received this correspondence following the assassination of Dr. King. In this letter, Rev. Richard Parker of the St. Cross Episcopal Church in California, highlighted his interest in a television interview of Mrs. King, shown on the day of Dr. King's funeral.

Letter from Elmer Jordan Admonishing MLK

Monday, February 12, 1968

In this letter dated February 12, 1968, Elmer Jordan writes, "your ideas will cause your death because of your heart" as he advises Dr. King to refrain from his "threatening proposals.".

Telegram from George Field to MLK

Wednesday, September 25, 1963

In this telegram, George Field, Executive Director of Freedom House, was willing to set a new date for their civil rights dinner, so that Dr. King would be able to attend.

Letter from MLK to Rev. M. L. Shepard, Sr.

Monday, February 26, 1962

Dr. King thanks Rev. M. L. Shepard for his "generous gift." Dr. King stresses the importance of support from friends like Rev. Shepard for the survival of SCLC. He also informs Rev. Shepard that he will receive material from the SCLC to update his congregation on the progress of work in the South.

Post Card to MLK from Benjamin Mays, Morehouse College

Monday, September 12, 1966

This 1966 post card from Benjamin Mays, Morehouse College, is a thank-you note to Dr. King and "the Morehouse men" who made alumni contributions.

Letter from Rev. Hedley W. Plunkett to MLK

Friday, March 3, 1967

Reverend Hedley W. Plunkett of Belfast, Northern Ireland, invites Dr. King to include the city on his schedule the next time he comes to Europe. Plunkett describes his interest in King's work and Ireland's own "Color Bar."

Letter from Jack Stern to Romanelli Studios

Monday, May 17, 1965

Jack Stern discusses the details with Romanelli Studios regarding the portrait plaque of Dr. King.

MLK Handwritten Notes

Dr. King outlines some principles regarding 'Love' and uses Reinhold Niebuhr as a reference.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, August 4, 1964

Joan Daves requests confirmation of a possible press conference, subsequent luncheon, and speaking engagement made by Dr. King. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Letter from Armour G. McDaniel to MLK

Monday, March 20, 1967

Armour G. McDaniel, Director of the Small Business Development Center, writes Dr. King to alert him that government assistance to low-income individuals is at risk. Mr. McDaniel describes the Small Business Administration's initiative to assist poor Negroes and states that since the Economic Opportunity Act of 1966 was amended, not a single loan has been granted in Atlantic or Cape May Counties by the SBA.

Bacon

Dr. King notes Alexander Pope's characterization of Francis Bacon.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Jessie Stephens

Wednesday, September 16, 1964

Miss McDonald informs Jessie Stephens that Dr. King is out of the country, but she recommends that Mrs. Stephens contact Dr. King's lawyer, Chauncey Eskridge, for help.

A Note with no Addressee from the Desk of Joan Daves

A note on Joan Daves, literary agent to Dr. King, letterhead to an unaddressed recipient about Japanese annotations of "Strength to Love."

Letter from Paul Yelter to MLK

Monday, December 11, 1967

Signed by twenty-one supporters, this letter requests that Dr. King make a public statement about his disapproval of the 1968 Olympic Boycott by American Negro athletes. The authors argue that the boycott will ruin a chance for Negro athletes to prove their equality to white athletes.

Community of Glenville, City of Cleveland,

This 1965 brochure from the Office of the City Planning Commission, Cleveland, OH, focuses on the "almost all-Negro community" of Glenville. In it the Commission discusses both its ability to assist the community and the responsibility of the community to engage in grass roots activities that would serve as a springboard for larger scale urban renewal. The overall message of the brochure is that for the City to provide assistance, the community will have to "begin at home".