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D. McDonald's Response to Melvin Arnold's Letter Dated 11/7/62

Thursday, November 8, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY

In this correspondence to Mr. Melvin Arnold, Miss Dora McDonald, at the request of Dr. King, informed Mr. Arnold that Dr. King was still working on his sermons for publication. She also regretted that Dr. King and Mrs. King would not be available for dinner Sunday, November 18, 1962.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. Arrignton

Monday, May 16, 1966
Virginia (VA)

Miss McDonald writes on behalf of Dr. King concerning a photograph request. She informs Mr. Arrington that Dr. King will be unable to honor his request due to his apprehension surrounding for profit merchandise.

Invitation to Harry Belafonte Concert

Friday, May 25, 1962
Johannesburg, South Africa, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King invites friends to a Harry Belafonte concert, which is a benefit performance for the SCLC.

Knowledge

Dr. King outlines epistemological claims that deal with the "universals" and the "particulars" of knowledge. In doing so, he references the philosophical views of Socrates and St. Thomas Aquinas.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Edwin Fenton

Monday, July 10, 1967
Pittsburgh, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Ms. McDonald is responding to the letter requesting permission of the use of Dr. King's speeches. The permission was granted to the Carnegie Institute of Technology. If any other services were needed then SCLC would be at their disposal.

Letter of Support to SCLC from SAVE

Friday, July 7, 1967
New York, NY

Gladys Weekes states that she and her fellow members of the Southern Assistant Volunteer Effort (SAVE) are happy to again support the SCLC.

Mysticism

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of God" as an able defense on mysticism.

The Kinship Between the Labor Unions and Negroes

Dr. King presents a speech at the United Auto Workers Convention in May 1961, which acknowledges the new challenges faced by factory workers because of technological advances that threaten to leave them jobless. He draws a parallel between the plight of auto workers and the Negro experiences of disenfranchisement in the US to highlight the potential for alliance between the two groups.

Letter from Dolly Davis to MLK

Tuesday, February 19, 1963
New York, NY

Dolly Davis, Publicity Director of the John Day Company publishers, writes Dr. King to request his reaction to Harold Isaac's book, "The New World of Negro Americans." Davis asks permission to quote his comments and sends him the advance galleys.

Letter from MLK to Elaine Walster

Thursday, January 4, 1968
New York (NY)

Dr. King writes to express his appreciation for Dr. Walster's encouraging words concerning his speech to the American Psychological Association. Dr. Walster is a professor at the University of Rochester in New York.

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson about VISTA Director

Thursday, September 15, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes President Johnson recommending that Dr. Maurice Dawkins become the new director of VISTA.

Mrs.Herr of the Yakima Chapter to MLK

Friday, April 2, 1965
Washington (WA)

Mrs. Herr, on behalf of the Yakima Chapter of United Nations Association invites Dr. King to speak October 24, in honor of United Nations Week. The organization offers to pay his fee for speaking to their organization.

Letter from Missouri Prisoner Melvin Shepard to MLK

Missouri (MO)

Melvin Shepard, a prisoner in the Missouri State Penitentiary, requests that Dr. King respond to his earlier letters. Shepard explains that Dr. King can help by sending "some young lawyers."

Letter from Tevan Ware to MLK

Sunday, August 20, 1967
Texas (TX)

People in Action: Albany Justice

CUBA, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King discusses numerous injustices in Albany, a pacifist movement to Cuba, and police brutality against Negroes.

Letter from the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
New York (NY)

Mr. Rutledge and Mr. Wood inform several civil rights activists of the practices of the New York City housing agencies to exclude African Americans and Puerto Rican Americans from upper level administrative posts.

The Church Says No on Proposition 14

California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Thie Council of Churches in Northern and Southern California argues against the goals of Proposition 14. This 1964 ballot proposition sought to amend the California consitution by nullifying the Rumford Fair Housing Act. Prop 14 would go on to pass, but two years later the California Supreme Court deemed it unconstitutional.

Letter from Morton S. Grossman to MLK

Thursday, January 5, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

In this correspondence, Morton S. Grossman, expressed his joy, over Dr. King's New Year's card, and enclosed a check, in support of the Civil Rights Movement. In addition, Mr. Grossman requested a note, signed by Dr. King, to add to his autograph collection.

Chicago Daily Defender: SCLC Aide Makes Spirited Capital March Call Here

Monday, February 5, 1968
Chicago Theological Seminary, S.C.L.C. Operation Breadbasket, United States White House, Poor People's Campaign, Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, FRANCE

The Chicago Daily Defender published this article about Rev. Ralph Abernathy's visit to Chicago to promote the Poor People's Campaign. According to Abernathy, "Come this summer, thousands of poor Americans are going to take their burdens to the White House and they'll leave them with LBJ."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Sylvester Webb

Monday, January 17, 1966
Philadelphia, PA

Dora McDonald writes Sylvester Webb of Edward Gideon Public School on behalf of Dr. King. McDonald states that Dr. King is honored that an oil portrait of himself is being presented at the school, but he regrets that he cannot be present during the ceremony. Dr. King is sending the Director of the Washington bureau of the SCLC, Reverend Walter Fauntroy, to represent him in his absence.

Letter from Judy Richardson to Mrs. King

Thursday, September 30, 1965

In this letter, Judy Richardson of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee asks Mrs. King to help them revise a second edition of the "Negro History Primer."

Annihilationism

Dr. King defines annihilationism as a belief regarding the death of the wicked.

Dialectical Theology

Dr. King outlines dialectical theology, an approach to theology in Protestantism. King discerns that the "dogmatic arise primarily out of the demands of the religious consciousness."

Standing By The Best in an Evil Time" E

Sunday, August 6, 1967
Atlanta, GA

In this sermon, Dr. King addresses the evil in the world and suggest to his congregation that they counter this by being strong and steadfast in the Lord. Dr. King also touches on the current issues in society and how to continue the use of nonviolence as means to for peace and social justice.

What Martin Luther King Really Has on His Mind

Sunday, July 9, 1967
VIETNAM, Chicago, IL

The Detroit Free Press reviewed Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The review examines Dr. King's stance on the slogan "Black Power," his disappointment with moderation and his views against the Vietnam War. According to Dr. King, "The bombs in Vietnam explode at home; they destroy the hopes and possibilities for a decent America."

Seating List for Pacem In Terris II

Geneva, Switzerland

This document is an alphabetical seating list of participants for the Pacem In Terris II (Peace on Earth) Convocation held in Geneva, Switzerland.

Letter from Mr. Raymond F. Gregory to MLK

Wednesday, February 28, 1962
New York, NY

In this letter dated 2/28/1962, Mr. Raymond F. Gregory of a New York City law firm writes to Dr. King regarding legal considerations for the "Ghandi [sic] Foundation."

MLK at his 36th Birthday Celebration

This series of photographs depicts Dr. King celebrating his birthday with family and friends.

Telegram from B. Hicks to Herbert Coulton

Tuesday, August 3, 1965
Virginia (VA)

B. Hicks telegrams Herbert Coulton stating that he will pay for his transportation and expenses during his visit.

Telegram from Thomas Penna to MLK

Monday, November 6, 1967
New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Thomas A. Penna, the president of the Interracial Council of Buffalo, lists his concerns related to a poverty bill that will be debated the next day. Penna points out that the bill will harm impoverished Negroes, who are already being denied their right to vote. Penna urges Dr. King to address these issues during his upcoming speech in Buffalo, New York.