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Telegram from MLK to H. Rap Brown

Tuesday, January 9, 1968

In this telegram, Dr. King tells H. Rap Brown that he will undertake all measures to stop Brown being denied free movement and basic constitutional rights.

Letter from MLK to a Former Supporter

Thursday, July 20, 1967

This is an edited copy of Dr. King's response to someone withdrawing support due to his position on the Vietnam War. King's detailed rewrites show efforts to avoid further misunderstandings about his position. He applies nonviolent philosophies to both the civil rights and peace movements, however, does not attempt to link the two. Rather than asking for Negroes to be exempt from the draft as a special privilege, he believes Negroes have an intimate knowledge of the effects of violence. As such, they should have a special moral obligation not to inflict violence on others.

Peter Denied His Lord, And Cryed

Sam Bradley, from Friends Journal, composes a poem illustrating Saint Peter's denial of Jesus.

Letter from Prafulla Chandra Das to MLK

Monday, February 27, 1967

Mr. Das informs Dr. King that his book "Why We Can't Wait" has been translated for readers in India and printing is underway. Mr. Das asks Dr. King to send a message to UN Secretary General U Thant, the recent Nehru Peace Prize Award winner.

Press Release from Edward Lamb

Friday, October 13, 1967

This press release from Edward Lamb, an Ohio delegate to the 1964 Democratic National Convention, expresses his opposition to the Vietnam War and to President Lyndon Johnson, who had pledged as a candidate not to escalate the war.

Letter from Moss Kendrix to MLK

Wednesday, February 27, 1963

Mr. Kendrix wishes to meet with Dr. King to discuss a certain rumor concerning him and the Coca-Cola Company.

Letter from Henry Lee Gibson to MLK

Henry J. Gibson is aware of Dr. King's understanding of "God" and spirituality. Subsequent to a recent surgery, Mr. Gibson is now conscious of the meaning of being "born again." Praying enhanced his knowledge of God's presence in the human race which brought clarity for his perception of the "yellow man." Mr. Gibson requests to meet with Dr. King to further discuss his recent spiritual experiences and newly found wisdom.

Religion

Dr. King paraphrases H. G. Wells.

Letter from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Thursday, March 2, 1967

Roy Wilkins, Chairman of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, invites Dr. King to serve as a member of the conference's executive committee.

Letter from the Committee To Secure Justice for Morton Sobell to MLK

Tuesday, April 10, 1962

Helen Sobell, wife of Morton Sobell and co-chair of the committee trying to free him, requests that Dr. King write a letter supporting the approval of his parole. She includes an attachment explaining the parole process and contact information for the US Board of Parole.

Letter from Joan Daves to Seong Hak Lee

Wednesday, October 21, 1964

Joan Daves responds to a request to translate Dr. King's books "Strength to Love" and "Why We Can't Wait" into the Korean language. She conveys Dr. King's gratitude about such an interest while also expressing hesitancy in granting permission immediately. The project can only be green lighted if specific procedures are followed which Daves lays out in her response.

Letter from J. R. Coan to Alumni of Turner Theological Seminary

Friday, January 12, 1968

Mr. Coan, acting director of Turner Theological Seminary at the Interdenominational Theological Center, issued this correspondence to all of Turner Theological Seminary's Alumni. The letter announces the details and record of minutes for the Seminary's Third Annual Founders' Day Convocation.

Letter from MLK to Adam Clayton Powell

Tuesday, January 2, 1968

Dr. King writes Adam Clayton Powell to seek advice on how to handle Powell's return from self-imposed exile in Bimini. Powell sought to publicize the event with a public announcement by Dr. King. However, Dr. King and Powell's lawyers suggest that they arrange a quiet, staged arrest with local officials to prevent public pressure from forcing a more lengthy arrest over the criminal contempt charges Powell faced for vacating his seat in Congress. Dr. King suggests more publicity could follow once Powell's lawyers free him on bond and begin the appeals process.

Highlander Folk School April 1961 News Release

Monday, April 3, 1961

The Citizen Education Program efforts and past accomplishments are outlined in this document.

The SCLC and Leadership of MLK

The various protest mechanisms and action organizations serves as a long lasting contribution to the Negro community initiated by the movement in the South. The church has served as a location for organization which progresses community participation. During slavery, the slaves were allowed to congregate only at weddings and funerals. Many of these events were fabricated in order to create a means of collective communication between the slaves. The author asserts that it was in this tradition that the SCLC was formed.

Letter From Dora McDonald to Rev. Albert F. Campbell

Tuesday, May 2, 1967

Secretary McDonald writes Rev. Campbell on Dr. King's behalf, informing him of that Dr. King will consider his invitation to the next Men's and Women's Day celebration.

Wellesley class of 1966 letter to Dr.King

Wednesday, January 26, 1966

Wellesley College class of 1966 asks Dr.King to become an honorable member of their class.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Ms. Dora McDonald Regarding Samples

Thursday, June 25, 1964

In this letter, Ms. Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, is asking Ms. McDonald if Dr. King wants to see copies of the promotion for his book's paperback edition.

Letter of White Opposition to MLK

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

A gentleman by the name of David writes to Dr. King expressing his belief that segregation is the "best way to avoid dating, dancing, sex and marriage" between Negroes and whites.

Van Til, Cornelius

Dr. King cites Cornelius Van Til's "The New Modernism."

Telegram from Rev. Ralph Abernathy to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1961

Rev. Ralph Abernathy sends best wishes to Dr. King and everyone affiliated with the Civil Rights Movement. Rev. Abernathy is disheartened because he is not present to assist with the movement, but assures Dr. King that he wants to be an active participant.

Telegram from Rev. Ralph Abernathy to President Johnson

Wednesday, December 22, 1965

Rev. Abernathy urges President Johnson to meet with a group of poverty-stricken people from Syracuse, New York at Johnson's Texas White House.

Letter from Lynn Ewell to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. about Comments on College Course

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

In this letter Lynn Ewell inquires as to whether Dr. King will offer any comments pertaining to the college course "Education of the Adolescent" and the class research topic of "Building an Enduring Peace."

MLK Address on Racial Injustice, Poverty, and War

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Dr. King addresses the French community during his "Racial Injustice, Poverty, and War" speech. He discusses topics such as poverty, politics, war, and the government.

Letter from Miriam Ottenberg to MLK

Friday, October 30, 1964

Miriam Ottenberg, President of the Women's National Press Club, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and asks if he would address a luncheon for the Club. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Letter from MLK to Murray Thomson

Thursday, February 18, 1965

Dr. King writes Murray Thomson expressing his inability to accept an invitation to be a consultant for Thomson's organization's conference in Portland, Ontario. He explains that due to his commitment to the civil rights struggle he can only accept a limited amount of engagements.

Letter from Percival Ennis to MLK

Percival Ennis, president of the Universal Negro Improvement Association in British Honduras, asks Dr. King if he is able to visit British Honduras and speak to his organization.

Letter from Rev. J. Edward Lantz to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964

Rev. Lantz, Executive Director of the Southern Office of the National Council of the Churches of Christ, congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Check from New York Times Company to MLK

Saturday, March 13, 1965

The New York Times company presents Dr. King with a $400 check for his article on civil rights.