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The Dexter Echo: Not Guilty!

Wednesday, June 8, 1960

This article states that Dr. King was found not guilty for tax evasion charges. The state's tax agent refused to lie under oath or allow prejudice to sway the facts.

John Coleman Bennett

John Coleman Bennett's work is used to flesh out an outline on the issues that plague society. The issues are broken up into five sections: the fact of evil, four problems of social gospel, economic, state and the church, and Communism. Bennett was a Christian theologian, author, and president of the Union Theological Seminary in New York.

Letter from L. Hayne To Whom it May Concern

L. Hayne requires Dr. King, and only Dr. King, to endorse a check before he will accept it.

Anonymous Adverse Letter

Thursday, April 6, 1967

An anonymous writer sends Dr. King this adverse letter equating Dr. King to a gorilla he saw at the zoo.

Symbolism and the Cross

Dr. King records notes on symbolism as the expression of spiritual truths.


Dr. King documents a J.B. Pratt quote from "What is Pragmatism."

Letter from the Brith Abraham Fraternal Order to MLK

Monday, August 21, 1967

Representatives of the Brith Abraham Fraternal Order write Dr. King in response to anti-semitic statements made by members of SNCC. They ask that Dr. King provide a statement that condems SNCC's statement due to the fact the Jewish community has strongly supported the civil rights movement.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Theodore Smith

Tuesday, January 2, 1968

Mr. Wachtel informs Theodore Smith and Hosea Williams that they are in danger of breaking the terms of a loan agreement from The American Foundation on Nonviolence.

Letter From PFC Harold Mac Kenzie To MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968

In this letter to Dr. King, serviceman Harold Mac Kenzie explains how he is interested in the welfare of Black people and would like to know how he can contribute to the movement.

Statement by Congresswoman Leonor K. Sullivan

Tuesday, November 28, 1967

Congresswoman Leonor K. Sullivan issues a statement on the passing of the Consumer Credit Protection Act of 1967.

Telegram from Reverend Fred L Shuttlesworth to MLK

Friday, July 20, 1962

Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy assures Dr. King that the nation extends their congratulations and prayer for his success. Reverend Abernathy asserts that as soldiers of freedom, they must "win this battle" for their country and that there "can be no retreat" in the movement.

Institute on Nonviolent Resistance to Segregation

Tuesday, August 11, 1959

The SCLC publishes this manifesto declaring that all eyes are focused on the South as it confronts the controversial issues of freedom and equality for Negroes. In the quest for equality, the southern Negros' plan of defense is Christian love and non-violent resistance. The document not only reveals tragic conditions in the South, but also affirms five principles by which equality can be achieved for Negro citizens.

Birmingham Manifesto

The Birmingham Manifesto was formulated as a testament to explain the reasons why efforts were being made to desegregate Birmingham. According to the Manifesto, broken promises were made by city and state officials, which led to plans of direct action.

Telegram from Beryl Sacks to Dora McDonald

Thursday, December 14, 1967

Ms. Beryl Sacks inquires about the availability of Dr. King to speak for the Speakers Bureau Adult Education Council.

Letter from MLK to Rev. John A. Clark

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

Dr. King expresses his agreement with Reverend Clark regarding the church's lax position on "racial justice and brotherhood among men." Although he cannot participate in Reverend Clark's suggested campaign, Dr. King encourages the minister to move forward with his plans of establishing a revival campaign to preach "the message of Our Lord at every opportunity."

Letter from MLK to Sr. Joao Carlos Meirelles

Thursday, February 25, 1965

Dr. King informs Sr. Meirelles that prior commitments regarding the Right-to-Vote Campaign in Alabama preclude his ability to attend the conference in Brazil.

Letter from J. Purcell to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

A "Poor White Texan" sends Dr. King a letter of support and encourages him to run for President. The writer explains that it is not until the people achieve racial unity that the world will be at peace.

Letter from Mrs. R. K. Matthews to Mrs. King

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

This letter is from a middle class housewife who expressed her despair and frustration to Mrs. King in learning of Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from MLK to Glenn Greenwood

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

Dr. King responds to Glenn Greenwood's letter thanking him for his suggestion regarding the Pentagon directive "in relation to Armed Forces personnel participation in civil rights demonstrations."

Service of Dedication

Sunday, May 29, 1966

This program outlines the schedule for a service held at Cornerstone Baptist Church Center in Brooklyn, New York. Dr. King and Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller are featured as guest speakers.

Letter from MLK to FDR III

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the contribution of $1,000.00 made by Franklin D. Roosevelt III to the SCLC.

Letter to MLK Regarding the Poor

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

This letter, written under the pseudonym "A. Christian," criticizes Dr. King's work for the poor in the years following 1966. He states, "you have lost all respect for law and order what good do you think you are doing for the poor?" He further critiques Dr. King's public response to Communism and the Vietnam War.

Letter from Colin W. Bell to MLK

Tuesday, May 17, 1966

Colin W. Bell invites Dr. King to deliver a lecture during the anniversary activities of the American Friends Service Committee. This letter also includes Dora McDonald's shorthand in red ink.

Telegram from Dick Rettig to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1960

Dick Rettig, President of the United States National Student Association, writes Dr. King to express the organization's solidarity with the sit-in movment.

SCLC Administrator Job Description

Monday, August 29, 1966

This document outlines the responsibilities of the role of an Administrator for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1967

This royalty statement reflects the amount earned for the Japanese edition of "Stride Toward Freedom".

Letter from the United Nations to SCLC

Friday, January 26, 1968

The United Nations Special Committee on the Policies of Apartheid of the Government of the Republic of South Africa, requests information regarding activities planned and undertaken by the SCLC against apartheid.

Black Power: Two Views

Saturday, October 1, 1966

James Peck, a white civil rights activist, writes an article concerning the path of the Civil Rights Movement. He is beginning to notice that black power and black racism are taking over organizations that had been focused on nonviolence and racial equality.

Holiday Card from the King Family to Rosa Parks

The King Family send their holiday greetings to Mrs. Rosa Parks in this holiday card.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Baruch Treiger

Thursday, October 21, 1965

Dr. King thanks the National Women's League for its continued financial support of the SCLC.