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Letter from Nils K. Stahle to Joan Daves

Wednesday, December 2, 1964

The Director of the Nobel Foundation, Niles K. Stahle, explains the copyright of Dr. King's Nobel Lecture. Stahle states that the Lecture belongs to the Nobel Foundation and that measures will be taken to preserve its integrity.

Telegram From Edwin Berry to MLK

Wednesday, October 14, 1964

Edwin Berry congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter From Mitchell Sviridoff to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

Mitchell Sviridoff responds to a telegram from Dr. King, in which Dr. King states his support of the Queens Clinical Society's proposal for a neighborhood health service center.

Note Card from H. Plant

H. Plant expresses his approval for the Civil Rights Movement, but also shares his frustration with the implication that all whites carry the blame for the current situation.

Letter from MLK to Ernest Gruening

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Ernest Gruening, a United States Senator from Alaska, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Jerome Davis to MLK

Sunday, May 29, 1966

Jerome Davis invites Dr. King to receive the Gandhi Peace Award. The Gandhi Foundation wants to give Dr. King the award alongside U.S. Senator Fulbright.

Rev. P.A. Berry Invites MLK to England

Friday, June 9, 1967

Rev. Quinland R. Gordon informs Dr. King of a recent letter sent to him by Rev. P. A. Berry. Father Berry is interested in securing Dr. King as a guest speaker at his Cathedral in England on Sunday November 12, 1967.

Letter from William L. Hungate to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

Congressman Hungate challenges allegations made by Dr. King in a recent telegram regarding the Mississippi Delegation. Dr. King states, "A vote to seat the Mississippi delegation is a vote for organized violence, murder, and oppression." However, Congressman Hungate implies that Dr. King's claim is dubious unless he has sufficient evidence to support it. In closing, Congressman Hungate assures Dr. King of his allegiance to "real progress" while disapproving of "headline-hunting tactics."

Letter from J. Campe to Dr. King Regarding "Stride Toward Freedom"and "Why We Can't Wait"

Monday, March 6, 1967

In this letter is enclosed a check and details of expenses for the Italian Edition of "Stride Toward Freedom and "Why We Can't Wait".

Letter from David Brandyberry to MLK

Thursday, June 20, 1963

David Brandberry, a student 16 years of age, informs Dr. King that he desires to voice his opinion about the racial issues in the south. Mr. Brandberry cannot comprehend the logical reasoning of racism and the motives of the "ignorant whites." Furthermore, the student discusses the issues of immigration and the political concept of communism. Mr. Brandberry states that he "wish he had been born a Negro" to he could be of more assistance in the movement.

Letter from Jonathan B. Bingham to MLK

Thursday, February 17, 1966

Congressman Bingham of New York replies to Dr. King's donation solicitation letter requesting a renewal of the previous year's fifty dollar contribution to SCLC. The congressman states that he would like to know whether contributions will be used to influence foreign policy before committing to a decision.

Letter from L. Serron to MLK

L. Serron writes to Dr. King requesting materials on the Selma Demonstration and the March on Montgomery for class usage.

Letter from Alma Weil to MLK

Thursday, August 11, 1966

Alma Weil expresses deep intolerance for prejudice and further discloses a desire to support Dr. King's efforts.

Letter from Amelia P. Boynton to the SCLC

Wednesday, June 2, 1965

Amelia Boynton writes the members of the SCLC seeking financial assistance to help purchase a particular piece of land to help start a new sewing machine factory and other projects in Selma, Alabama. Boynton provides details of the history of the struggle of people of color in Selma, and stresses that the land would be used to help teach the underprivileged in the area to help themselves.

MLK Sermon: The Dimensions of A Complete Life

Sunday, April 19, 1959

In this sermon given at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, Dr. King details the three dimensions of a complete life: length, breadth, and height.

Letter from Eleanor Lawrence to MLK

Sunday, May 7, 1967

Eleanor Lawrence thanks Dr. King for his bold opposition to the Vietnam War. She understands that Dr. King's views transcend all across the globe and believes that Dr. King would make a perfect peace candidate for President in the 1968 elections.

Negroes See No Future for King as National Leader, Except in Politics

Thursday, August 10, 1967

Almena Lomax discusses the public opinions of African Americans on Dr. King being elected to a national office.

A Blind Woman's Request for MLK

Juilia Lockheart, a blind 75 year old woman, requests aid from Dr. King. Many people envisioned Dr. King to be the savior of their time; they would contact him with unrelated requests outside of the non-violent movement in hopes that he could be the remedy to their current issue.

Letter from PLAYBOY Magazine to MLK

Thursday, February 15, 1968

Playboy Editorial Director A.C. Spectorsky requests comments from Dr. King regarding Kenneth Tynan's article "Open Letter to an American Liberal," which accompanies the letter.

Poor People's Campaign

Sunday, March 17, 1968

Dr. King is touring the nation to meet poor people in an effort to expose their living conditions. He also wants them to join the campaign to fight for better housing and jobs.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Abram Heschel

Friday, March 29, 1968

Harry Wachtel, legal counsel to Dr. King, expresses his gratitude to leading Jewish theologian Rabbi Heschel for his great works.

Letter to Mr. R.C. Firestone

Sunday, January 22, 1967

An unknown author writes to Mr. R. C. Firestone stating how delightful it is to hear that the Firestone Company plans to build a new plant in Albany, Ga.

Justification

Dr. King quotes Albrecht Ritschl as he discusses the concept of justification and its relationship to sin, guilt and salvation.

Letter from H. C. Whitley to MLK

Friday, September 3, 1965

H. C. Huntley invites Dr. King to come speak at St. Giles Cathedral in Scotland during Holy Week.

Letter from Walter Gibson to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967

Mr. Gibson writes to Dr. King concerning his political position on the Vietnam War. He believes that the war is a just war because the end is to help the South Vietnamese halt the spread of communism.

Original Sin

From "The Epistle of the Romans," Dr. King records Karl Barth's observations regarding original sin, which are compared to views of the Bible, Saint Augustine and the Reformers.

Letter from MLK to Margo

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Margo for her inquiry about summer work with the SCLC and suggests she contact Hosea Williams about the SCOPE project for the following summer.

Letter from Wolfgang S. Homburger to MLK

Tuesday, October 17, 1967

Mr. Homburger, Assistant Director for the Institute of Transportation Studies in Berkeley, requests additional information from Dr. King before responding to his appeal for funds.

Letter from David P. Gaines to MLK

Friday, July 12, 1963

David P. Gaines criticizes Dr. King's tactics for instant integration.

God

Dr. King references the Old Testament book of Numbers regarding the topic of God.