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10th Anniversary SCLC Convention Program

This document contains a program for the SCLC's Tenth Anniversary Convention hosted by Rev. Howard Creecy, President of the Atlanta Affiliate Chapter of the SCLC. The theme of the convention is "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Medical Order for MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

During a private medical visit at St. Joseph Hospital, Dr. James D. Palmer documents a list of orders to be administered to Dr. King.

Correspondence to Dr. King from Chuck Wallis, 11/15/1962

Thursday, November 15, 1962

Chuck Wallis, of Keuka College in New York, wrote to Dr. King at the request of Melvin Arnold an executive at Harper and Rowe Publishing Company. In the letter Wallis informs Dr. King of his editing responsibilities for a forthcoming book project highlighting Dr. King's sermons and requests a face to face meeting to discuss revisions.

Letter From MLK to Ada Hill

Thursday, July 25, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Hill for her letter commending his letter from the Birmingham jail. He assures Mrs. Hill her encouraging words will help give him the courage to continue in the struggle to make brotherhood a reality.

Statement by MLK Regarding All-White Jury Trials

Friday, December 3, 1965

Dr. King approves of recent court cases where all-white juries convicted all-white defendants in murder and conspiracy cases. He calls these cases "rays of light and hope," but claims that federal legislation is needed to ensure that discriminatory practices are not involved in impaneling juries.

Chicago Urban League Golden Fellowship Dinner and Dance

The Chicago Urban League coaxes members and invitees to their Golden Fellowship Dinner and Dance with a night of privilege and a chance to win a 1967 Pontiac.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Louis Andrews Sims

Tuesday, November 6, 1962

Dr. King informs Mrs. Louis Andrews Sims that due to his multiple responsibilities within the SCLC and his various pastoral duties, he will not be able to accept speaking engagements at this time. He assures her that if his schedule clears up, he will be happy to accept her "gracious invitation."

Opportunity, Fidelity, and Reward

Friday, January 1, 1954

This handwritten outline reflects a sermon delivered by Dr. King at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in January of 1954. The sermon is structured around "The Parable of the Talents" taken from Matthew 25:14-30. Dr. King highlights how the passage assures a "reward for faithfulness."

Letter from Howard Frazier to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Mr. Frazier thanks Dr. King for his "courageous" stand on the Vietnam War. He is impressed by Dr. King's plan to organize thousands of volunteers to participate in the Peace Movement and makes a donation of $25.00 to the peace fund.

Kierkegaard

Dr. King sketches notes on "the most original thinker in Danish history."

Statement by the President of the Montgomery Improvement Association

Thursday, December 20, 1956

As the President of Montgomery Improvement Association, Dr. King elaborates on the past twelve months and the city's efforts to fight against racial injustice through the bus boycott. Their journey concluded victoriously with the acknowledgment of the Supreme Court that invalidated segregated transportation. Dr. King informs the Montgomery community that they are to "return to the buses" on a "non-segregated basis."

Southern Conference Educational Fund Endorsement of MLK Vietnam Stance

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

The Southern Conference Educational Fund issues this article in the Patriot News Service. This statement supports Dr. King's sentiments regarding the Vietnam War and also details issues of race, injustice, and inequality in various places throughout the world.

Oberlin College Commencement

This issue of the Oberlin Alumni Magazine features commencement articles and photos as well as Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution, Dr. King’s address to the graduating class.

Introduction to the Demands of the Freedom Movement

This document discusses the injustices and inequalities that Negroes are facing in Chicago's urban communities. The author outlines the struggles blacks endure in a variety of different arenas such as racism, discrimination, poverty, unemployment and segregation.

Letter from John H. Telfer to MLK

Saturday, March 13, 1965

Mr. Telfer, a 6th grade teacher, offers his sincerest gratitude for Dr. King and his efforts to eradicate injustice. He includes an additional thanks to Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth, a fellow civil rights leader.

Press Release from SCLC on New Biography of MLK

Monday, October 19, 1964

This 1964 press release from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference focuses on a new biography of Dr. King "...written especially for children."

An Interview With MLK

A young student from Towns Elementary School in Atlanta interviews Dr. King for a class assignment. The student asks important questions relating to Dr. King's family background, career in ministry and his influence in the civil rights movement. When asked about being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King responds by saying, "It is more of a tribute to the thousands of gallant people who have participated in the struggle for equality, and who have done it in a peaceful, courageous manner."

God

Dr. King cites a scripture from the biblical book of Isaiah regarding God's grace and mercy.

Letter from Ronald Kessebring to SCLC

Friday, March 30, 1962

Ronald Kessebring sends a contribution along with a letter of support to the SCLC. As a former resident of Atlanta, Mr. Kessebring witnessed what the organization provided for the community and the country at large.

Letter from Gunnar Jahn

Thursday, June 15, 1967

Gynnar Jahn organizes a delegation of Nobel Peace Prize winners who will have a discussion about the Vietnam War.

Letter from Emma D. Roberts to MLK

Friday, April 17, 1964

Ms. Roberts expresses her support for Dr. King's "campaign for civil rights for Negroes," which she contrasts with the efforts of other groups that involve violence.

Letter from Kenneth Lee to MLK

Monday, August 1, 1966

Kenneth Lee, President of the International Confederation of Disarmament and Peace, invites Dr. King to become a sponsor of the organization.

Letter from Irene S. Heath to MLK

Monday, December 28, 1964

Professor Irene Heath writes from Uruguay to suggest white missionary activity in Africa end, and that Dr. King and other black Christian leaders return to Africa to do missionary work there.

MLK Addresses the Atlanta Press Club

Wednesday, November 10, 1965

Dr. King discusses the struggle for racial justice and the concept of goodwill with the Atlanta Press Club. He stresses that any opposition in the fight for equality will inevitably fail in the face of a unified effort across America.

MLK Address to the United Neighborhood Houses of New York

Tuesday, December 6, 1966

Dr. King delivers this address to the United Neighborhood Houses of New York. He expresses that a lack of job opportunities, education and community economic development contributes to the growing levels of poverty in the United States.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Harry Walker

Tuesday, September 19, 1967

Ms. McDonald writes to Mr. Walker and states that Dr. King will accept the invitation to speak at Fairleigh Dickinson University in Rutherford, New Jersey on 10/25/67.

MKL At Zoin Hill - "The Ballot"

Tuesday, July 17, 1962

This transcript of a passionate, poetic, and inspiring speech touches on many of King's motifs. It starts with an appeal for voting rights, addresses the despair the audience feels from time to time, and ends with a refrain of "we shall overcome."

Letter from Walter Gibson to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967

Mr. Gibson writes to Dr. King concerning his political position on the Vietnam War. He believes that the war is a just war because the end is to help the South Vietnamese halt the spread of communism.

Letter From MLK to Pastor Charles Westphal

Monday, November 8, 1965

Dr. King thanks Pastor Westphal for the opportunity to address the French Protestant Federation.

Antidotes For Fear

Dr. King uses this sermon to discuss the causation of human fears while identifying four ways in which these shortcomings can be combated. He does not promote the eradication of all human fears, for some are essential to creation and innovation. However, Dr. King encourages the elimination of unfounded fears as a method to overcome adversities that are experienced in life.