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Letter from James W. Sheaffer to MLK

Thursday, January 21, 1965

James Sheaffer, of Lycoming College's Department of Music, invites Dr. King to return to the college for another visit. Sheaffer also offers to arrange fundraising opportunities for the SCLC.

Dorothy Cotton's Notes

Dorothy Cotton's compilation of notes includes topics such as the advantages of urbanization, diversity, automation, the "purpose of human effort," Denmark, community mobilization, the democratic method, the behavior of a responsible citizen and the "greatest prize" for mankind. Dorothy Cotton was the SCLC's Education Director and one of the organization's highest ranking female members at the time.

Letter of Thanks from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. J Parry Jones for an SCLC Contribution

Friday, December 8, 1967

This letter from Dr. King responded to a donation to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference from Mr. and Mrs. J. Parry Jones of Newton, Pennsylvania. Dr. King expressed deep appreciation on behalf of the multitudes who would benefit from the support.

Letter from Judy Palmer to MLK

Saturday, January 6, 1968

Judy Palmer agrees with Dr. King concerning the traffic jam in Washington D.C, and asks if Dr. King can befriend the White House.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes from D. Miall Edwards’ “The Philosophy of Religion.” Miall is misspelled on the note card.

Dr. King Sermon Notes

Under the subject, "The Vision of a World Made New," Dr. King drafted these sermon notes. The essential message of the sermon referred to a need for a "new world order". Plato and Karl Marx are two of the great philosophers referenced in this document. Dr. King delivered this sermon at the annual meeting of the Woman's Convention Auxiliary, National Baptist Convetion in St. Louis, Missouri on September 9, 1954.

Newspaper Article on MLK

Sunday, August 9, 1964

In this article from the Miami Florida Herald, the writer summarizes a portion of the book "Why We Can't Wait", written by Dr. King.

1964 Election

Dr. King explains "a sizable number of Negro voters" will register for the 1964 presidential election, recognizing the significance of political participation.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rose R. Silvers

Tuesday, January 26, 1965

Dora McDonald informs Rose Silvers that Dr. King was concerned about an unknown speaking arrangement that he was scheduled to fulfill. Due to a congested schedule, Dr. King will notify Silvers about his availability to speak in the near future.

Letter from MLK to Jo Ellen Braveman

Friday, July 9, 1965

Dr. King thanks Jo Ellen Braveman, an employee at the Julia Richman High School, and the Human Relations Club for presenting him with an award.

Letter from Helen Marrow to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967

Mrs. Marrow thanks Dr. King for his leadership and position on the Vietnam War. She also encloses a special composition dedicated to Dr. King for his commitment to peace.

Letter from Esther Davey to MLK

Friday, April 23, 1965

Esther Davey writes Dr. King in support of his crusade. She expresses her dismay in some of Dr. King's speeches made after the march from Selma, Alabama and stresses the importance of Christianity in his crusade.

Anaximenes

Dr. King writes notes about the views of philosopher Anaximenes on the universe, comparing them to those of Thales and Anaximander.

Letter from Maurice B. Fagan to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967

Mr. Fagan, Executive Director of the Fellowship Commission, requests Dr. King?s suggestion for nominees for the 1967 National Fellowship Award. As a former award recipient, Dr. King's opinion and advice is highly valued.

Letter from Mary L. Powell to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1968

Mary L. Powell writes to Dr. King expressing how she has been following and considering his plans, but disproves of his methods.

Remarks by MLK in Acceptance of the Spingarn Medal

Friday, June 28, 1957

In his acceptance speech for the Spingarn Medal, Dr. King remarks about the need for continuing the fight for social justice and equality around the world. He acknowledges the work of NAACP along with protesters as they continue to be on the frontline in addressing the nation's social ills.

Letter from Gloria Caruthers to MLK

Saturday, October 17, 1964

Miss Caruthers congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. She states that no other individual is more deserving of the award.

MLK Sermon: The Dimensions of A Complete Life

Sunday, April 19, 1959

In this sermon given at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, Dr. King details the three dimensions of a complete life: length, breadth, and height.

Letter from MLK to Richard Bennett

Thursday, April 6, 1967

Dr. King graciously declines Mr. Bennett's invitation to speak in St. Paul under the sponsorship of the Minnesota Federation of Teachers. Dr. King will be traveling to Israel and Africa during this time.

MLK's Index Card Referencing Bertrand Russell

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Bertrand Russell's views on man.

Letter from Maurice A. Dawkins to MLK concerning VISTA volunteer training

Tuesday, November 23, 1965

Maurice A. Dawkins, of the Office of Economic Opportunity, requests leadership training from the SCLC for the VISTA volunteers who were expected to work in the rural South.

Letter from Herbert G. Cave to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

Director Dr. Herbert G. Cave represents the Department of Anesthesiology at the Harlem Hospital Center in congratulating Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. Seven years earlier, in 1958, Dr. King had been a surgical patient of the hospital due to being stabbed with a letter opener while on a book tour.

Letter from Neil Sullivan to MLK

Thursday, May 25, 1967

In this letter, Superintendent of Schools Neil Sullivan writes about the complete integration of the Berkeley County Public Schools.

Introduction to the Demands of the Freedom Movement

This document discusses the injustices and inequalities that Negroes are facing in Chicago's urban communities. The author outlines the struggles blacks endure in a variety of different arenas such as racism, discrimination, poverty, unemployment and segregation.

Christianity

Through quoting an unknown Christian, Dr. King calls for modern Christians to accept a personal challenge that will one day enable historians to declare that it was Christianity that held the world together.

Isaiah

Dr. King references the Old Testament biblical Book of Isaiah regarding topics like ritual sacrifice, knowledge, social ethics, and the doctrine of man.

Letter to Melvin Arnold from MLK

Wednesday, December 26, 1962

In this correspondence to Mr. Mel Arnold, Dr. King informed him that he has enclosed the final draft of the sixteen sermons to be included, in his second book. He also added that he was in the process of working on the final two sermons to be published in the book.

Worship

Dr. King describes the challenge of the Protestant Church as finding a balance between objective and subjective worship.

Letter from Mrs. David Bowen to MLK

Mrs. David Bowen suggests that SCLC start a poor people's campaign. She says that they should focus on a specific group of people instead if just problems in general. She also says that she and others will be willing to help when they know how to find the people who truly need it.

MLK Notes - Voting Issues and Strategies

These handwritten notes of Dr. King's, found on the back of a memorandum, focus largely on voter registration issues and strategies. Of interest is an item adjacent to the body of the notes remarking, "Daddy King has yet to understand non-violence."