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Society

Dr. King quotes a statement from Charles H. Cooley's "The Social Process," in which Cooley defines society as a living, unified group of processes.

Refinement by Fire

R. Elizabeth Johns describes the events surrounding voter registration in the South and tactics used by civil rights and opposition leaders.

Letter from Charles W. Lockyer to MLK

Tuesday, August 15, 1967

Charles Lockyer sends Dr. King a special limited edition of the International Library of Negro Life and History as a gift. Lockyer explains that the book series is a collaboration between his publishing company and the Association for Study of Negro Life and History.

Letter from Marcellus Biot to Coretta Scott King offering Condolences

Monday, April 8, 1968

Mr. Biot of Los Angeles, CA offers sympathies to Mrs. King behalf of himself and Mother Green.

1967 Geneva Convocation

Monday, May 29, 1967

Dr. King provides introductory remarks to participants of the Pacem In Terris II Convocation held in Geneva, Switzerland. He addresses several moral and political concerns as it relates war and Vietnam.

Problems of Whitehead

Dr. King discusses the problem of metaphysical dualism as presented by philosopher Alfred North Whitehead. Dr. King reviewed much of Whitehead's work while at Boston University and later quoted him in his Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech.

God (Niebuhr Conception)

Dr. King outlines Reinhold Niebuhr's views on God as outlined in "The Nature and Destiny of Man."

Resolutions of Institute on Non-Violent Resistance to Segregation

Tuesday, August 11, 1959

This document contains SCLC resolutions of July 22-24, 1959, regarding nonviolence. The resolutions include: commending the 50th Anniversary Convention of the NAACP, thanking the staff of Spelman College, and calling upon organizations to "initiate plans against forms of racial discrimination."

Clergymen Set Negro Market Wholesaler

Monday, February 7, 1966

This article explains how "three clergymen have organized a wholesale tour service which will cater to the Negro travel market." The service was called "Concreta Tour Service" and it took tourists abroad, focusing on many cities with religious significance.

Letter from Harry Walker to Dora McDonald

Monday, September 25, 1967

Harry Walker writes Dora McDonald regarding contracts for Dr. King's future speaking engagements.

Letter from the Employees of Western Yard to MLK

Monday, June 1, 1964

The Employees of Western Yard of Detroit send a contribution to Dr. King. The employees highlight citizenship training, literacy education and voter registration as the top initiatives of the civil rights movement.

Letter from Richard Boone Enclosing CCAP Statement

This letter from the Executive Director of Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty encloses a statement regarding the 1966 Amendments made to the Economic Opportunity Act.

Johnson Said to be Choice of Negroes

Kivie Kaplan, the President of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, said that they would be endorsing Johnson for President. Kaplan said their decision was not made lightly, and they will always endorse the candidate who has a principle of equality for all.

Letter from MLK to Professor William Goldsmith

Thursday, October 17, 1963

Dr. King sends his appreciation to Professor William Goldsmith for the contribution made by the students and faculty of Brandeis University to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Otto Fuerbringer of Time Magazine

Tuesday, February 18, 1964

Dora McDonald inquires about receiving additional copies of the Time Magazine issue that featured Dr. King as the Man of the Year. She informs Otto Fuerbringer that Mrs. King's relatives in her hometown of Marion, Alabama were unable to buy copies of the magazine.

Transcript of Press Conference on Hotel Restaurant Desegregation

Dr. King states in this 1962 press conference that he sees integration of Atlanta hotels and restaurants as imminent. With the exception of Mississippi, Alabama, and South Carolina, civil rights are progressing throughout the South. The many groups working on the issue are working toward a common goal and using a variety of strategies, including direct action, litigation, legislation, and education.

Letter from Jan A. Hatch & Norman A. Bacon to MLK

Tuesday, February 23, 1965

Jan Hatch and Norman Bacon, white citizens of Athol, Massachusetts, write Dr. King inquiring about how they can contribute to the fight for racial equality. They inform him of the non-existent Negro population in Athol and request information on how to join the NAACP if it is conducive to their movement and financial limitations.

Letter from Executive Director of Catholic Interracial Council to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967

The following document is a cover letter of enclosed letters John A. McDermott sent seventeen Negro state legislators "congratulating them on their fight for fair housing".

The Nation: Fumbling on the New Frontier by MLK

Saturday, March 3, 1962

Dr. King elaborates on a report regarding civil rights and the collective efforts with the Kennedy Administration to eradicate racial discrimination. The Executive Orders from President Kennedy are unprecedented as he is attempting to eliminate employment discrimination and has appointed Negroes to key government positions. In an effort not to move "too fast," the President's legislative programs have now commenced a pace that is parallel with the consensus. Dr.

Syllabus for the History of Christianity

This document is a course syllabus for the History of Christianity.

Letter from E. R. Boynton to SCLC

Monday, March 18, 1968

Mr. Boynton inquires about a financial contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Fund for which he has not received a receipt.

Introduction to the Demands of the Freedom Movement

The Negros in Chicago are faced with numerous systematic societal restrictions as they are excluded from many aspects of an American life. The Negros are subjected to segregation and substandard housing that are identified as "crime-infested slums." The plight of the Negro in Chicago involves insufficient housing and education as well as economic and social exclusion.

Letter from Richard K. Goidel

Friday, March 15, 1968

Mr. Goidel, a student editor, requests a photograph from Dr. King to be featuredd in an article referencing the recent Time Magazine's Choice "68. Dr. King was nominated as a candidate for by Time magazine's Choice '68 collegiate Presidency. Sadly, Dr. King was assassinated two weeks later.

Letter from Maj Palmberg to MLK

Wednesday, February 16, 1966

Maj Palmberg, Cultural Secretary of Abo Akademi University in Finland, inquires about Dr. King's availability to speak to Turku students during his upcoming visit to the region.

Letter from Inam Rahman to MLK

Friday, July 10, 1964

Inam Rahman, member of the Indian Council for Cultural Relations, sends Dr. King a copy of the letter from the President of the Council inviting him to present a speech at the Azad Memorial Lectures.

SCLC Executive Board Approves Montgomery March

Dr. King’s handwritten notes report on SCLC Executive Board approval of four of his recommendations: a March on the State Capitol in Montgomery, a nationwide economic withdrawal from Christmas shopping to commemorate the tragic deaths of children in Birmingham, a massive direct action program in Danville, Virginia, and selective buying campaign in the South to get better jobs for Negroes

Letter from Gerhard Amendt to MLK

Gerhard Amendt of the West German Radio Corporation expresses his interest in having Dr. King give his opinion of the Civil Rights Movement.

Thank You Letter from MLK to Anne Eaton

Friday, May 5, 1967

In this letter Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Mrs. Eaton's contribution of $500 to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Dr. King emphasizes the importance of such financial support in maintaining the organization's efforts.

Letter from Areatha G. Bailey to MLK

Thursday, February 22, 1968

Areatha G. Bailey, President of the Highland Park Branch of the NAACP, invites Dr. King to speak at their Freedom Fund Dinner.