Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"HUNGARY"

Letter to William H. Andrews from MLK

Wednesday, July 10, 1963
Detroit, MI, Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation for the members of the Georgia Family Circle's contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the inability of the SCLC's continuance of the movement in Birmingham without their "dollars for freedom." He further expounds on the importance of their moral support.

Suffering

Dr. King questions whether the statement in Proverbs 11:23 that the righteous are rewarded with goodness and the wicked wrath is always true.

Letter from MLK to the United Presbyterian Church

Wednesday, June 14, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Rev. Edward Williams for the support of the United Presbyterian Church Commission on Religion and Race. He encloses a receipt for $5000 for partial payment of a grant for the salary of Hosea Williams. Williams was National Program Director for SCLC from 1967 to 1969 and was arrested more than 125 times for his civil rights activism.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rabbi Joel Goor

Monday, August 17, 1964
California (CA)

Dora McDonald informs Rabbi Joel Goor of Dr. King's absence from the city due to an engagement to speak before the European Baptist Federation. She promises to have Dr. King signed a copy of his book for Goor to keep and appreciates Goor's support to the civil rights movement.

The Influence of the Right and Left in the Civil Rights Movement

Sunday, January 31, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, Mississippi (MS), California (CA), FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, HUNGARY, CHINA, CUBA

Activist Bayard Rustin prepared these remarks for the Negro Leadership Conference in New York in January 1965. He discusses the influence of the American right, the traditional Communist left and the unaffiliated left (the Thirties veterans and the spontaneous left of Harlem and Mississippi).

Statement to SCLC Board: Alabama Movement

Friday, April 2, 1965
Alabama (AL), Baltimore, MD, Montgomery, AL, GERMANY, Nashville, TN, Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Marion, AK, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN)

Dr. King discusses the various issues within the State of Alabama. Dr. King and the SCLC have maintained leadership in the Alabama Movement and have proposed a plan to continue the acts of nonviolence.

Letter from Joseph Caputo to MLK

Thursday, June 1, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

Joseph Caputo, a graphic arts teacher from Russell Sage Jr. High School in Queens, New York, collaborated with his students on a booklet entitled, "Let My People Go." The booklet features various illustrations and verses; and focuses on themes prominent to Dr. King's life and work. The accompanying letter includes a dedication to Dr. King and Roy Wilkins.

Letter to the SCLC from The United Church Board for World Ministries

Wednesday, April 10, 1968
New Delhi, India, New York, NY, Boston, MA, Missouri (MO)

In this document, is a note to request acknowledgement of a $50 dollar contribution, from Andrew C. Mills of New Delhi, India.

Telegram from MLK to the Honorable Carl Sanders

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York (NY)

Dr. King invites the Honorable Carl Sanders to share the pulpit with himself and Mayor Ivan Allen at the Annual Layman's Day celebration at Ebenezer Baptist Church. He also invites him to a dinner to honor Governor Nelson Rockefeller at the home of Rev. Martin Luther King Sr.

Jesus

This note card seems to reflect some of Dr. King's personal insights on Jesus. It belongs to a series of note cards devoted to the topic of Jesus.

Letter from Dr. MLK to A Fellowship of Concern at the First Presbyterian Church about a Contribution

Friday, February 9, 1968
Virginia (VA)

In this letter Dr. King offers his belated gratitude to A Fellowship of Concern at the First Presbyterian Church in Stuanton, Virginia while explaining how such contributions help the SCLC and civil rights.

Letter from Glen Nixon to SCLC

Tuesday, February 28, 1967
Birmingham, AL, Chicago, IL, Pennsylvania (PA), Alabama (AL), Illinois (IL)

Glen Nixon offers to participate in the SCLC's Chicago project in order to gain a better understanding of Northern slums. Nixon asks to be referred to other programs and organizations, if his assistance is not needed in Chicago.

Letter from Norma Lineberger to MLK

Tuesday, December 17, 1963
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C.

Mrs. Lineberger encloses a financial contribution for Dr. King to use for his personal well-being. She states that the gift is in memory of the late President Kennedy with hopes that his death will result in a unified stride "toward the good life."

Letter from Abraham Ribicoff to MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Senator Abraham Ribicoff, Chairman of the Subcommittee on Executive Reorganization, asks Dr. King to appear at a congressional hearing about the problems facing urban cities. He explains that the subcommittee does not understand the full psychological, social and economic conditions that challenge people living in urban areas.

Statement by Dr. Robert W. Spike on the Mississippi Seating Challenge

Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Reverend Dr. Robert W. Spike writes a statement concerning a plan to dismiss a seating challenge in the U.S. House of Representatives. Reverend Spikes discusses the political inadequacies concerning the denial of the Mississippi residents right to vote. Following the seating of the delegation, an investigation commenced to ensure the political legitimacy.

Monotheism

Dr. King describes monotheism, the belief in the existence of one God, as it compares to Hebrews and Greeks in a civilized world. He quotes Albert C. Knudson from "Religious Teachings of the Old Testament."

Scientific Method (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman’s article “Authority and the Normative Approach” in the Journal of Religion for a definition of the scientific method. He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”

Anonymous Letter to MLK

This note, signed "A white citizen who likes good Negroes," warns that President Johnson is no friend to the Civil Rights Movement, only supporting African American voting rights to earn more votes for his reelection. It is unclear if both sides of this note were written by the same author. Both discuss how they are conscientious objectors, although they object to an integrated society, writing that "[No] high-class, intelligent persons (politicians excepted) will accept the Negro when he has an axe to grind."

Royalty Statement for Strength to Love

Thursday, December 31, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves issues this royalty statement for a German language edition of Dr. King's Strength to Love. The statement includes the amount earned and number of copies sold.

Minutes of National Action Council Meeting

Sunday, July 1, 1962
Florida (FL), Washington, D.C., Brooklyn, NY, New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ), Philadelphia, PA

The National Action Council, a sector of the Congress of Racial Equality, hosts a regional meeting in Miami, Florida where they will vote on council member positions, as well as regional and national NAC meeting logistics.

Metaphysics

Dr. King quotes from F. H. Bradley's "Appearance and Reality."

Letter from Genevieve Young to Joan Daves Regarding MLK Manuscript

Thursday, March 9, 1967
New York, NY, ECUADOR

In this letter, Genevieve Young informs Joan Daves of the notes created for the manuscript of Dr. King's book and questions about the sources of some of Dr. King's facts.

Letter from Donald F. Hinds to MLK

Saturday, March 16, 1968
VIETNAM, Geneva, Switzerland

Donald Hinds writes Dr. King to discuss issues such as the Vietnam War and economic injustice towards Negroes.

Letter from Hal Mason to MLK

Monday, March 18, 1968
North Carolina (NC), Atlanta, GA

Hal Mason, campaign chairman for Choice "68, requests that Dr. King send any materials pertaining to Dr. King's potential candidacy.

Introduction to the Demands of the Freedom Movement

Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

This document discusses the injustices and inequalities that Negroes are facing in Chicago's urban communities. The author outlines the struggles blacks endure in a variety of different arenas such as racism, discrimination, poverty, unemployment and segregation.

Letter from Carey Preston to Dora McDonald

Thursday, July 9, 1964
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Mrs. Carey B. Preston confirms the details of Dr. King's trip to Philadelphia to speak at the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Convention.

Letter to Dora McDonald Regarding Persons Receiving Autographed Books

Thursday, June 29, 1967
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, California (CA), Berkeley, CA, Massachusetts (MA), Florida (FL), Minnesota (MN), Los Angeles, CA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Connecticut (CT), Washington, D.C., Maryland (MD), Baltimore, MD

Dora McDonald receives a list of names who are to receive autographed copies of Dr. King's book. The list consists of contributors to American Foundation on Nonviolence and SCLC.

Letter from Margo George to MLK

Friday, April 23, 1965
Connecticut (CT)

Margo George, a student at the Kent School, wrote to Dr. King requesting any suggestions on how she could help with the Civil Rights Movement.

Powell's Court Suit Challenged by House Move

Saturday, April 1, 1967
Florida (FL), Massachusetts (MA), Washington, D.C.

Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, the first black Congressman from New York State, files a suit with the federal court to regain his congressional seat after being excluded from Congress due to "unauthorized travel at taxpayers' expense and payroll padding." This newspaper article briefly details Powell's suit and The House of Representatives' response to the charge. The case would eventually be heard by the Supreme Court in Powell vs. McCormack, leading to the Federal Contested Elections Act in 1969.

Letter from Glenn M. Dunkle to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967
Richmond, VA, Virginia (VA)

Glenn Dunkle, Senior Planner for the City of Richmond, Virginia, requests a copy of a bill proposed by Dr. King that addresses slums and housing clearance. The bill will be used by the Richmond City Planning Commission as it studies "methods of stimulating urban redevelopment and new low income housing."