Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"HUNGARY"

Letter from Gino David Dassatti to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967

Gino David Dassatti expresses his concern that Dr. King's stand on the war in Vietnam may deem him a traitor. In Dassatti's words, "The blood of these Americans will rest forever on your soul and conscience."

Letter from Victoria Bellard to MLK

Sunday, May 6, 1962

Bellard invites Dr. King to speak on behalf of voting rights and awareness. The event will host members of The Cordelia Green Johnson Beauty Forum. This displays the level of concern at the grassroots.

MLK Thanks a Contributing Author

Dr. King writes to Mr. Morrow thanking him for sending a written manuscript of Marrow's new book. He apologizes for being unable to fully assist him in his writing endeavors.

Liberal Theology

Dr. King paraphrases [Theodore G.] Soares on the religious liberal.

Article Written by MLK for The Progressive

In this unfinished draft of an article for The Progressive, Dr. King writes about the social ills of America through the context of what he calls the two most important documents in American history: the Declaration of Independence and the Emancipation Proclamation.

MLK Statement about the New York Riots

Monday, July 27, 1964

Dr. Kind addresses the press' claim that civil rights leaders are involved in the outbreak of riots in New York. He says that violence creates more social problems than it solves. He says that government officials need to take responsibility and help all American citizens gain justice and equality.

Letter from Phyllis Kaplan to Readers

Academic Media sends out a questionnaire to gather important data regarding financial aid programs.

Letter from J. L. Roberts to MLK

Tuesday, September 19, 1967

Minister Roberts writes to Dr. King expressing his support of the Civil Rights Movement along with making a donation to the SCLC.

American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa: Advance Registration

Monday, January 9, 1967

Theodore E. Brown, the Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, sends a letter with attached registration forms for the Third Biennial National Conference.

Letter from Mr. Joseph Mermel to Coretta Scott King

Thursday, March 18, 1965

In this letter to Mrs. King, Mr. Mermel informs her that a sculptress, Sally Stengel, would like to make a sculpture of Dr. King, given he is one of "two outstanding leaders of the Negro race."

Letter from John and Enid Howarth to Friends Soliciting Financial Support

Sunday, June 26, 1966

Mr. and Mrs. Howarth of New Mexico express their disapproval of violence against Negroes in the South and request donations for a Fourth of July celebration in support of SCLC, SNCC and other civil rights groups.

Letter from Congressman Augustus F. Hawkins to MLK

Friday, June 11, 1965

Augustus Hawkins, the first black Congressman from California, asks Dr. King to offer suggestions and comments about how to further the aims of the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964. Hawkins reports that the act has garnered resistance from local political leadership because many fear it will undermine their power.

Letter from Joe Johnson and Lewis Black to Robert Swann

Members of the Southwest Alabama Farmers Cooperative Association send this letter of appreciation to the International Independence Institute.

Letter from MLK to Congressman Charles C. Diggs, Jr.

Wednesday, July 17, 1963

Dr. King responds to the concerns of Congressman Charles Diggs regarding the March on Washington. He encloses a privately distributed memorandum about the march that Dr. King believes will answer the questions Congressman Diggs has about the march. Dr. King also briefly explains the purpose and some logistics of the march.

Letter from the Associated Negro Press to MLK

Saturday, November 27, 1965

Donald Kittell, an administrative assistant for the Associated Negro Press, writes to Dr. King regarding his four "My Dream" columns. Enclosed in the letter is a copy of each column. Dr. King writes on a variety of topics such as social justice, equality, nonviolence and the progress of the Civil Rights Movement.

Annual Report of The President: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

In the SCLC's Annual Presidential Report, Dr. King chronicles a decade of organization's activities to eliminate segregation. The report was delivered at the Tenth Anniversary Convention of the SCLC.

Prayer

Dr. King writes about the topic prayer.

Letter from MLK to George Carlson

Tuesday, October 2, 1962

Dr. King responds to George Carlson's letter of recent date informing him that he cannot accept the invitation to speak at the Temple. Dr. King states that he would love to speak in Portland, but his schedule does not permit any more engagements.

Operation Breadbasket of the SCLC

How to Win Jobs And Influence Businessmen; a speech given by the SCLC'S Operation Breadbasket, discusses job discrimination and the stimulation of Negro businessmen.

Annual Address Delivered at the First Annual Institute on Nonviolence and Social Change

Monday, December 3, 1956

Dr. King's speech at the First Annual Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change addresses many issues regarding the African American. The most recurring issues are of obtaining and maintaining freedom, equality and personal dignity.

Letter from Mary A. Edmonds to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Mary A. Edmonds expresses her disapproval of Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to Richard V. Grulich

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Dr. King expresses his agreement with Mr. Grulich regarding U.S. foreign policy, asserting that the federal government needs to develop the "moral courage" to admit past mistakes.

Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

Wednesday, March 22, 1967

Rodney Clurman, of the World Food and Population Crisis Committee, outlines Dr. King's itinerary for a global trip that includes meeting with officials from Scotland, the Pope in Rome, and travelling to New Delhi.

Letter from MLK to Michael J. Quill

Thursday, August 24, 1961

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Michael J. Quill's dedication to the "front lines" during a libel case. Dr. King informs Mr. Quill of the current status of the case and the courts response. He further provides Mr. Quill with the operations in the south and their deep involvement in the "Freedom Ride."

Civil-Righters Isolation

Saturday, April 1, 1967

David Lawrence states that the recent initiatives of Negro leaders are hindering the overall mission of the Civil Rights Movement. He believes that Negro groups are defeating their own cause.

Letter Regarding Politics

The author discusses political issues regrading the president and political parties. In addition, the author suggests that Black Power leaders should obtain positions within the "nut house" and the NAACP should support these appointments.

Telegram from Students at Syracuse University to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

The students of Syracuse University thank Dr. King for his opposition to the war in Vietnam. They encourage him to appear in New York City for the mobilization rally scheduled for April 15, 1967 outside the United Nations.

Letter From Irene M. Kohlmeyer of WBJC to MLK

Thursday, December 1, 1966

Irene M. Kohlmeyer, Program Director of WBJC radio at Baltimore Junior College, asks Dr. King for his permission to rebroadcast the transcription of a Phi Beta Kappa address he gave at Johns Hopkins University.

Transcript of Press Conference on Hotel Restaurant Desegregation

Dr. King states in this 1962 press conference that he sees integration of Atlanta hotels and restaurants as imminent. With the exception of Mississippi, Alabama, and South Carolina, civil rights are progressing throughout the South. The many groups working on the issue are working toward a common goal and using a variety of strategies, including direct action, litigation, legislation, and education.

Declaration of Independence by MLK

Dr. King writes an article making reference to the Emancipation Proclamation, President Lincoln, and the historical impact they both have had on the economy and what is described to be a social revolution. It is noted that this article is intended for a December, 1962 issue of a publication.