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"Georgia (GA)"

Telegram from Mrs. Frances Lucas to C. T. Vivian and Alvin Pitcher

Thursday, January 9, 1969
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Lucas informs Mr. Vivian and Mr. Pitcher of Mrs. King's unavailability to speak at the YMCA in Chicago. A memorial service in honor of Dr. King is scheduled on the same date in Atlanta.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rose R. Silvers

Tuesday, January 26, 1965
Selma, AL, New York (NY)

Dora McDonald informs Rose Silvers that Dr. King was concerned about an unknown speaking arrangement that he was scheduled to fulfill. Due to a congested schedule, Dr. King will notify Silvers about his availability to speak in the near future.

Telegram from Floyd B. McKissick to MLK

Wednesday, July 6, 1966
Chicago, IL

In this telegram, Floyd B. McKissick tells Dr. King that he will not be able to attend a march and rally in Chicago due to his schedule.

Trinity

Dr. King quotes a sermon by Bernard of Clairvaux

Hungry Club Speech

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King speaks on "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He contends that the dilemma in the world is the result of three major evils: racism, poverty, and war. Dr. King encourages the audience to work toward making America a moral example for the rest of the world.

Letter from MLK to William Sibley

Monday, July 13, 1964
Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), St. Augustine, FL, Florida (FL)

Dr. King thanks Dr. Sibley for his contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He also reports the results of a recent fundraising reception, which will be used to establish Dr. Robert Hayling's practice and provide legal defense to participants in the Albany and St. Augustine Movements.

White House Message on Civil Rights

Friday, January 26, 1968
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

President Johnson's message to Congress explains strides the U.S. has made in the social, educational and economic conditions of minorities in America. It also discusses areas that need improvement such as infant mortality rates and poverty levels among non-whites. The President calls for legislation to prevent violence against those exercising their civil rights, to strengthen enforcement powers of the Equal Employment Opportunities Commission, to prevent discrimination on federal and state juries, and to guarantee fair housing.

Royalty Statements from Harper & Row, Publishers

Sunday, June 30, 1963
New York, NY

Harper & Row, Publishers sends Dr. King this royalty statements for sales of "Strength to Love" and "Stride Toward Freedom" for the first 6 months of 1963.

Letter from Rev. Allen Clark to MLK

Texas (TX)

Rev. Allen Clark sends Dr. King words of encouragement and requests a copy of a book regarding Dr. King's faith.

Program for MLK's Baccalaureate Commencement

Sunday, June 7, 1959
Boston, MA

This program is from Dr. King's Baccalaureate Commencement at Boston University.

Letter from MLK to Jefferson Poland

Friday, November 16, 1962
California (CA), San Francisco, CA

Dr. King thanks Mr. Poland for sharing his story and comments that the story shows "that it is possible to grow and change after a long heritage of prejudice."

Letter to Ralph Abernathy from Abraham Grinoch

Monday, April 22, 1968
New Jersey (NJ)

Rev. Ralph Abernathy received this letter addressing the issuance of war bonds to meet financial requirements during war emergencies. Grinoch proposes that the country issue "War on Poverty Bonds", to provide the funds necessary for eradicating poverty in the United States.

Killing Won't Frighten Negroes

Monday, May 24, 1965
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL

Regarding the violence in Alabama, Dr. King decries the lack of justice for the ten murdered civil rights demonstrators under Governor Wallace's administration. He continues by saying that "eyes should have been on God" the Sunday morning the four girls were killed in Birmingham. King declares that the killings will not frighten the activists into submission.

Letter from Walter Davis, Jr. to MLK

Monday, April 11, 1966
CONGO / ZAIRE, Atlanta, GA

Walter Davis, Jr. encloses a donation to SCLC sent all the way from the Congo. Mr. Davis expresses, "Of particular interest to us is the way in which you and your organization are able to get the participation of many groups who are interested in justice and social reform."

Letter from Maurice Dawkins to MLK

Thursday, May 25, 1967
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA

Maurice Dawkins, Assistant Director for Civil Rights of the Office of Economic Opportunity, invites Dr. King to attend a meeting aimed at funding summer projects for riot-prone cities. Mr. Dawkins has already encouraged President Johnson to help fund $75 million for summer programs.

Letter from MLK's Secretary to Dr. Lawrence D. Reddick

Wednesday, November 18, 1964
Maryland (MD), Baltimore, MD, Oslo, Norway

Dr. King's secretary sends Dr. Lawrence D. Reddick information regarding the upcoming trip to Oslo, Norway. The trip is associated with Dr. King's acceptance of the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Arlen B. Makler and Alfred J. Lindh to MLK

Sunday, October 23, 1966
Delaware (DE)

Mr.Makler and and Mr.Lindh provide details for the Delaware Citizens Housing Conference that Dr. King has contingently agreed to participate in. The overall purpose of the conference is to explore race relations as it pertains to "equal opportunity in housing".

Letter from Bertha Baker to MLK

Monday, April 5, 1965
Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Pennsylvania (PA)

Bertha Baker requests Dr. King's assistance regarding discrimination issues involving employment, private industry, housing and education. Mrs. Baker details inequalities in numerical form and concludes with a request to join Dr. King's organization.

Catholic Interracial Council's JFK Awards Dinner Honoring MLK Brochure

Thursday, October 29, 1964
Chicago, IL

This brochure outlines the Catholic Interracial Council's (CIC) John F. Kennedy Awards Dinner honoring Dr. King, to be held on October 29, 1968. In addition to describing the mission of the dinner, the brochure adds a description of the CIC and a biography of Dr. King. Also included is an article and photo from Dr. King's visit with Pope Paul VI.

Invitation to President Kennedy's Inauguration

Washington, D.C.

This invitation was sent to Dr. and Mrs. King, inviting them to the inauguration ceremony of President-elect John F. Kennedy and Vice President-elect Lyndon B. Johnson.

Telegram from Andrew Young to Moreland Griffith Smith

Thursday, February 25, 1965
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL

Andrew Young informs Moreland Griffith Smith Sr. that he will be unable to attend a meeting in Montgomery, Alabama. Reverend James Bevel will attend the meeting instead.

Letter from A. Dudley Ward to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Oregon (OR)

A. Dudley Ward, General Secretary for the General Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church, forwards an enclosed resolution to Dr. King.

Different Meanings of Prehension

Dr. King outlines the different meanings of "prehension" in Alfred North Whitehead's books Science and the Modern World and Process and Reality.

Coretta Scott King - Soprano

Friday, July 10, 1959
Ohio (OH), Alabama (AL)

This 1959 program features Mrs. King in concert. One section of the performance is entitled "Portrait of the Non-Violent Integration Movement in Montgomery."

Letter from William Eerdmans, Jr. to MLK

Saturday, June 15, 1963
Michigan (MI)

William. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company requests to reprint Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail" in a small booklet for wider circulation. Eerdmans, Jr. writes, "your words...are those of a Christian martyr and saint."

Wave of Violence Against Blacks

Philadelphia, PA, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Minnesota (MN), New York, NY

This pamphlet produced by the NAACP, New York Branch, begins with the discussion of a controversial statement made by Senator James Eastland and its adverse affect of increased violence among blacks. Eastland attacked the Supreme Court's desegregation edict by stating, "You are not required to obey any court which passes out such a ruling. In fact, you are obligated to defy it." Newspaper clippings are shown with headlines that illustrate the violence, murder, bombings, and attacks blacks faced.

MLK's Response to Vietnam Criticism

VIETNAM

This is an early draft of Dr. King's response to those who wrote him letters critical of his stance on Vietnam. He says that it would be hypocritical to protest against black oppression in America, but not against Vietnamese colonization. He also cites the ideology of non-violence as an explanation for his stance, and expresses regret that "much of America has failed to understand the full meaning of the non-violent method."

Joint Statement on Violence in the Cities

Wednesday, July 26, 1967
Detroit, MI, Atlanta, GA, New Jersey (NJ), Georgia (GA), Michigan (MI), New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King, A. Philip Randolph, Whitney M. Young Jr., and Roy Wilkins issue a joint statement urging Negro Americans in cities such as Newark and Detroit to end the public disorder and rioting. The civil rights leaders emphasize the potential damage the urban riots pose to "the Negro population, to the civil rights cause, and to the entire nation."

Patripassianism

Dr. King gives a definition of patripassianism.

Letter From PFC Harold Mac Kenzie To MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968
San Francisco, CA, THAILAND, South Carolina (SC)

In this letter to Dr. King, serviceman Harold Mac Kenzie explains how he is interested in the welfare of Black people and would like to know how he can contribute to the movement.