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Crisis of Culture

Dr. King refers to his note card on "morality" and cites an example of the crisis of culture.


Dr. King writes about resurrection, according to Daniel 12:2.


Dr. King notes some characteristics and requirements of worship.

Join the Ranks! Support A Worker

An SCLC field worker writes to gain support for the SCLC so that the organization can fulfill its mission to help blacks "achieve full citizenship rights, stimulate nonviolent mass action, and secure the right to vote."

Primer For Delegates to the Democratic National Convention

The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party informs citizens of the mistreatment incurred by African Americans attempting to register to vote and participate in election process. The Party also outlines its journey to sending 64 delegates to the Democratic Convention of 1964 and how President Johnson denied them seats at the Convention.

Telegram from Mr. David Susskind to MLK

In this telegram, Mr. Susskind invites Dr. King to participate in a "'Open End' two hour debate with Governor George Wallace."

Washington State University Students Invite MLK to Speak

Tuesday, December 22, 1964

Timothy D. Bradbury writes Dr. King on behalf of the students of Washington State University inviting him to speak about civil rights on their campus.

Preliminary Outline for a Conference on Democratic Planning For America

This preliminary outline features a number of keynote dignitaries and leaders who will address a number of economic, labor, and social justice issues during the three-day Conference on Democratic Planning for America.

Letter from Andrew Bell III and Fred Fechheimer to MLK

Wednesday, June 30, 1965

The "Americans in Ethiopia Who Support Civil Rights in the United States" committee sends its support and a monetary contribution to Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Annie Grace to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967

Thirteen-year-old Annie G. Miller expresses her admiration for Dr. King.

Letter from Jacques Muhlethaler to MLK

Thursday, May 25, 1967

Jacques Muhlethaler writes Dr. King requesting that he accept a committee position with EIP. The EIP is an organization seeking to contribute to world peace by instituting an interdisciplinary curriculum in classrooms domestically and abroad.

Letter from Mr. Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Saturday, September 15, 1962

Benjamin Mays, President of Morehouse College, informs Dr. King he has reviewed the document sent to President Kennedy on 5/17/62.

Telegram from Thomas Penna to MLK

Monday, November 6, 1967

Thomas A. Penna, the president of the Interracial Council of Buffalo, lists his concerns related to a poverty bill that will be debated the next day. Penna points out that the bill will harm impoverished Negroes, who are already being denied their right to vote. Penna urges Dr. King to address these issues during his upcoming speech in Buffalo, New York.

Dr. Abernathy Appeals to New Governor of Alabama

Tuesday, January 17, 1967

Ralph David Abernathy, vice-president of the SCLC, issues a press release concerning the federal governments decision to halt funding to the state of Alabama for noncompliance with the 'law of the land'. Abernathy appeals this decision and asserts that the blame should be directed towards local government officials such as George C. Wallace.

94:17 General Correspondence 1966(B)

Thursday, April 21, 1966

Mrs. Burke, a representative of the Wisconsin Council of Teachers of English, requests permission to reprint several exerts from the "I Have a Dream" address. The material will be included in the Johnson publication, entitled "The Day They Marched".

Statement by MLK Regarding His Five-Day Jail Sentence in Birmingham

Monday, October 30, 1967

Dr. King releases a statement regarding his return to Birmingham, Alabama to serve a five-day jail sentence. He states that he is happy to serve the sentence, but sad that the Supreme Court did not "uphold the rights of individual citizens." He also questions why the United States' resources are being used to fund the Vietnam War rather than to help the poor.

Letter from AJ Muste to MLK

Monday, October 19, 1964

A.J. Muste encloses a letter from Cherian Thomas to Dr. King and references a previous telegram he sent congratulating Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

This sermon is one draft of Dr. King's "Three Dimensions of a Complete Life." It was first delivered by Dr. King to the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama.
Another version is entitled, "The Dimensions of a Complete Life." The first dimension is concerned with the well-being of the self. The second dimension is concerned with the well-being of others. The last dimension is concerned with reaching towards God.
As Dr. King implies, if all of these dimensions are equal, then a complete life will be obtained.

Letter from MLK to Reverend and Mrs. Sargent

Monday, November 15, 1965

Dr. King expresses his gratification for the courtesies of Reverend and Mrs. Sargent during his recent visit to Paris. He also updates the couple regarding the planned SCLC fundraiser expected to take place in France.

Letter from Frank Meranda to President Johnson

Monday, October 17, 1966

Frank Meranda, chairman of the Boston chapter of CORE, writes President Johnson to point out that job tests for the federal government result in discrimination against minorities.

Workers Defense League Docket

The Workers Defense League was an organization that defended workers in the interest of social and economic justice. This docket is simply a schedule of the upcoming proceedings in a court of law. The lawsuits deal with immigration, selective service, and the rights of the mentally ill, to name a few.

Certainty (Religious)

Dr. King refers to Brightman's "Philosophy of Religion" in regard to religious certainty.

Letter from MLK to Sara Mitchell

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Mitchell, a representative from the Atlanta Board of Education, for her recent letter acclaiming his book "Where Do We Go From Here." Dr. King states that the lack of material on Negro History and culture in America's public schools is "appalling" and children from all races will benefit from learning about another aspect of American culture and history.

Letter from Ellen G. Clarke to MLK about Information Request

Thursday, February 15, 1968

In this letter, Ellen Clarke, a student at St. Andrews College in North Carolina, requests the opportunity to meet with Dr. King and gather information about the SCLC, which she will then use in a school panel on religion and politics.

Telegram from Rev and Mrs A C L Arbouin to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

Reverend and Mrs A.C.L Arbouin offer Dr. King spiritual encouragement during his time in Birmingham Jail.


Dr. King expresses the power of God as being infinite beyond comprehension of man.

Letter from Edward J. Warren to Senator Jacob K Javits

Friday, March 16, 1962

Mr. Warren writes to Senator Javits to confirm receipt of a previous correspondence. He expresses gratitude for Javits position on Human Rights.

Letter from Saul Miller to MLK

Tuesday, September 13, 1966

Saul Miller, Director of the Department of Publications for the AFL-CIO, writes Dr. King requesting him to write a description of the activities of the SCLC. This write-up will be featured in the November issue of the AFL-CIO magazine, which will be devoted entirely to the issue of civil rights.

Letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy from Fred Lofton

Written on SCLC stationary, Fred Lofton addressed this letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy. On behalf of his church, First African Baptist Church, Mr. Lofton pledged to continue to extend support for the work of SCLC.

Letter from Jan A. Hatch & Norman A. Bacon to MLK

Tuesday, February 23, 1965

Jan Hatch and Norman Bacon, white citizens of Athol, Massachusetts, write Dr. King inquiring about how they can contribute to the fight for racial equality. They inform him of the non-existent Negro population in Athol and request information on how to join the NAACP if it is conducive to their movement and financial limitations.