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The Importance of Voting

Thursday, September 6, 1962

This transcript documents Dr. King's recorded statement intended to raise awareness of voting and voter registration.

Letter from T. K. Mahadevan to MLK

Friday, January 20, 1967

T. K. Mahadevan, of the Gandhi Peace Foundation in New Delhi, India, refers to potential meetings with Dr. King and his colleagues.

Letter from James Harrison to Otis Roberts

Friday, December 22, 1967

James Harrison, SCLC's comptroller, explains an itemized breakdown of finances related to a grant from the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

Letter from Robert Dent to MLK

Wednesday, May 20, 1964

Chairman Robert Dent welcomes Dr. King to San Diego County on behalf of the Board of Supervisors. Dent highlights the growth of Southern California in industry as well as the county's work towards equality. Dent also discusses the importance of Christianity in their endeavors.

Letter from a "White Power Militant"

A disgruntled writer criticizes leadership in the civil rights movement.

Letter from Harry Wunsch to MLK

Harry Wunsch encloses a contribution to support Dr. King's stance on the war in Vietnam.

Letter from the Interpreters' House to MLK

Thursday, February 8, 1968

Carlyle Marney and J. C. Herrin invite Dr. King to attend a conference to discuss the future mission and tasks for American Baptists in the South.

Request for Autographed Photo of MLK

Paul Garrison is requesting that Dr. King send an autographed photo so that he may add it to his collection.

Letter from Mrs. Ellen H. Mapes to MLK

Tuesday, March 21, 1967

Mrs. Ellen H. Mapes' letter to Dr. King to discusses her concerns regarding living in urban environments. She maintains that personal responsibility initiatives are more in order than current ones, e.g. family planning and self-improvement through education and job training.

Letter from G. Campbell-Westlind to MLK

Wednesday, July 21, 1965

G. Campbell-Westlind, Acting Consul General of the Royal Consulate General of Sweden, informs Dr. King that Simon & Schuster has asked the Nobel Foundation in Stockholm for permission to print his Nobel Award Acceptance Speech. The letter requests Dr. King's comments on the proposal.

The SCLC Hall of Fame Dinner of July 1962

Friday, July 20, 1962

This pamphlet is from the Hall of Fame Dinner for Jackie Robinson. It features several ads from organizations supporting the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Southern Junior High School to MLK

Thursday, December 21, 1967

R. E. Lyles, Principal of Southern Junior High School in Columbus, Georgia, requests that Dr. King provide biographical information and a photograph for the Muscogee County School District's Annual Social Science Fair.

War

Dr. King quotes the views of Italian politician Benito Mussolini, English public intellectual John Ruskin, and Nazi politician Dr. Robert Ley on war and its relationship to masculinity.

Detroit Free Press: Dr. King Strengthens an Anti-War Coalition

Thursday, April 6, 1967

This article, which appeared in the 'As We See It' column of the Detroit Free Press, reports Dr. King's speech in New York from April 4, 1967 on his opposition to the Vietnam War.

Letter from Charles Crawford to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Charles S. Crawford expresses his dissent with Dr. King on a variety of subjects, one specifically his stance towards President Johnson and the concept of civil disobedience.

Letter from Butler Henderson to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967

Butler Henderson invites Dr. and Mrs. King to the Dinner for the President of Morehouse College, Dr. Benjamin E. Mays.

Letter from Elder A. S. Grant to MLK

Monday, November 1, 1965

Elder A.S. Grant, a member of The West Indies Laymen National Christian League Church and State, writes a letter to Dr. King. Grant states the need for solidarity among global Black leaders, both church and state. He requests monetary donations that would go towards a headquarters for his organization.

The Meaning of Hope

Dr. King delivered this sermon while pastoring Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. In spite of the existence of racial injustice in America, Dr. King maintains hope for equality, and reminds the church of their responsibility to "keep the flame of hope burning."

Letter from James W. Kelly to MLK

Thursday, October 17, 1963

James W. Kelly, Director of Chaplains Division, writes Dr. King inviting him to a Supervisory Chaplains Conference headed by the Chief of Chaplains of the United States Navy. Kelly states that the conference is a rededication of service to God and his people in the military. Kelly closes by stating, "Your Cooperation will be a great contribution to the cause of religion in the United States Navy and Marine Corps and to their clergymen in uniform."

God

Dr. King references the Old Testament book of Job. In this scripture, Job regains hope in the midst of tribulation.

Letter from William H. Booth to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Commission on Human Rights Chairman William Booth invites Dr. King and a designated representative to a conference in New York entitled, "Testing Human Potential - New Techniques for Selecting Employees from Minority Groups."

Letter from Mrs. M. Happe to MLK

Friday, February 11, 1966

Mrs. M. Happe, a poor white woman, expresses gratitude to Dr. King for his campaign to clean up the slums in Chicago. She asserts that poverty is an issue, but education is the main problem and individuals cannot display appropriate behavior that they have never experienced.

Response from MLK to Priscilla C. Spagne

Dr. King extends his appreciation to Priscilla C. Spagne for her supportive letter to the Boston Globe. He proclaims that it is important to, "Take every opportunity to make our consciences known to the public."

Eternal Objects

Dr. King cites Alfred North Whitehead's book "Science and the Modern World."

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Monday, February 27, 1967

Mr. Schaefer writes Dora McDonald seeking confirmation for Dr. King's scheduled appearance at Kennett Square.

Our Struggle

Dr. King discusses blacks' struggle for racial equality in America. King explores racist whites' views of "the inferior social, economic, and political position" of the Negro. However, when Negroes begin to reevaluate their position in society and tension in race relations arise, he argues that the Negro begins to "organize and act" against the status quo as evident in the boycotts and sit-in demonstrations occurring throughout the South.

Civil Rights Photographic Series

These fifteen photographs chronicle several historical moments in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Robert Friedman to MLK Regarding "The Forensic Quarterly"

Thursday, February 15, 1968

Robert Friedman informs Dr. King that manpower needs and compulsory service systems will be the topics of national discussion in high schools of the nation. Friedman asks King to contribute an article stating his view on the problem area for publication in "The Forensic Quarterly".

Telegram to MLK from John Jacobs

John Jacobs accuses Dr. King of being associated with Communists. He proclaims that Negroes learned raping, robbing and relief with Dr. King's training.

Letter From a Very Concerned Christian to MLK

The Christian author of this letter includes a poem to express concern and anguish regarding the War in Vietnam.