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The Student Voice

Wednesday, March 1, 1961
Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C., Florida (FL), Georgia (GA)

SNCC's Newsletter, The Student Voice, updates readers on the progress of the civil rights movement throughout the United States. This issue gives details on incidents of discrimination throughout the South, boycotts, "Stand-Ins," and education opportunities for African Americans.

Amsterdam News Article by MLK About European Tour

Thursday, September 17, 1964
Berlin, Germany, Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), New York, NY, GERMANY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King recalls an address he gave at the Berlin Arts Festival, where he witnessed an enthusiastic crowd. The crowd's interest confirmed his belief "that the Negro is now in a position to lead the world." He also mentions the Christians of East Berlin, who, though Communists, maintain their faith in God.

Letter from a School Teacher to MLK

A Negro special education teacher of a white class asks Dr. King to send her students a letter. She is teaching them about race relations and believes that a letter from Dr. King would be very encouraging.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Prentiss Childs

Wednesday, May 20, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, sends this letter to Mr. Prentiss Childs of CBS. The correspondence serves as documentation for reimbursement of Dr. King's recent trip to Washington, D.C.

Letter from Edris Head to MLK about Mormans and the Presidential Election

Saturday, May 20, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

In this letter, Mrs. Head conveys to Dr. King her opinion of potential presidential candidate George Romney while criticizing the Mormon clergy and their road to priesthood. Additionally, Mrs. Head compares Dr. King to Gandhi and Jesus.

Preaching

Dr. King notes three points about preaching.

Letter from Paul H. Douglas to MLK

Thursday, July 2, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Paul H. Douglass extends his gratitude to Dr. King, Roy Wilkins and their followers for the "passage of the Civil Rights Bill."

Telegram from Rev. Ralph Abernathy to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1961
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

Rev. Ralph Abernathy sends best wishes to Dr. King and everyone affiliated with the Civil Rights Movement. Rev. Abernathy is disheartened because he is not present to assist with the movement, but assures Dr. King that he wants to be an active participant.

MLK Urges the Vice President to Visit the South

Thursday, June 13, 1957

Dr. King informs the press that he is articulating plans with the SCLC to launch a campaign to prepare the Negro community for the 1958 election. Dr. King appeals to Vice President Richard Nixon to perform three duties to aid the practice of justice and freedom in the United States. The first of the three involves personal appearances of Nixon to speak to the people of the South about civil rights. The second duty asserts Nixon's initiation of the United States Constitution to support the Negro's voting rights.

Letter to MLK from Raymond Brown

Sunday, December 10, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA

Raymond Brown writes to Dr. King admonishing him for his affiliations with Adam Clayton Powell and Stokely Carmichael and hopes that these associations are temporary.

Letter to MLK from Lee Wood

Thursday, May 11, 1967

Lee Wood writes to Dr. King explaining that the Democratic Party and Republican Party are "two shades of the same color." He suggests that because of his qualifications, Dr. King should run for President with Robert Kennedy as his Vice President.

Letter from Ruth E. Foster to MLK

Monday, March 11, 1968
Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Foster writes Dr. King expressing doubt in his nonviolent methods. She feels his nonviolent marches are an ineffective way to gain equality for Negroes.

MLK Press Conference and Speech Notes

Cleveland, OH, Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King stresses that his appearance to Cleveland is not in the interest of the candidates but to urge the people to exercise their political and moral responsibility.

MLK's Remarks at the World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964
EGYPT, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS)

This is a draft of remarks made by Dr. King to the World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon of the NAACP's Legal Education Defense Fund. The event took place at the Americana Hotel in Arlington, Virginia. Dr. King states that human rights involve two elements: recognition and opportunity. Dr. King proposes that the United States launch a Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged.

Immortality

Dr. King cites the Old Testament Book of Isaiah regarding the topic of immorality.

The Atlanta Constitution: Dr. King Warns Against the Riots

Tuesday, June 27, 1967
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

Eugene Patterson describes Dr. King's position against violent race riots and the consequences of these movements on the Black and White community.

Letter to MLK from Vice President Hubert Humphrey

Thursday, June 15, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this letter, U.S. Vice President Hubert Humphrey thanks Dr. King for his support and applauds him for all his hard work, while commenting on fair and decent housing.

Letter from MLK to Nelson A. Rockefeller

Monday, November 1, 1965
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King thanks Governor Nelson Rockefeller for taking the pulpit at Ebenezer Baptist Church for their Men?s Day Observance. He appreciates the Governor?s contribution of $25,000 to their tax exempt Society to match his own donation from the Nobel Peace Award.

Letter from Mr. Peter Feldman to MLK

Thursday, March 7, 1968
New York, NY

In this letter Peter Feldman, the production manager for WRVR Radio in New York City, requests an interview with Dr. King the day of his sermon at Riverside Church. WRVR feels the interview would be a "significant platform" for his upcoming march on Washington. Dr. King would be assassinated less than a month later.

White House Message on Civil Rights

Friday, January 26, 1968
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

President Johnson's message to Congress explains strides the U.S. has made in the social, educational and economic conditions of minorities in America. It also discusses areas that need improvement such as infant mortality rates and poverty levels among non-whites. The President calls for legislation to prevent violence against those exercising their civil rights, to strengthen enforcement powers of the Equal Employment Opportunities Commission, to prevent discrimination on federal and state juries, and to guarantee fair housing.

Letter from Dorothy O. Bucklin to MLK

Wednesday, November 27, 1963
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, New York (NY), Wisconsin (WI), Pennsylvania (PA)

Mrs. Bucklin invites Dr. King to deliver a series of sermons highlighting his biblical preference and his experiences with the SCLC. The conference will host affiliates of the American Baptist Home Mission Societies.

Letter from Stanley Becker to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964
New York, NY

Stanley Becker, the principal at the Amsterdam School in New York, congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

MLK Address at Park Sheraton Hotel

Wednesday, September 12, 1962
New York, NY

Dr. King gives an address commemorating the one hundredth anniversary of the passage of the Emancipation Proclamation. In the celebratory speech, he calls all Americans to take action in applying the principles of the Emancipation Proclamation to society. Dr. King states that the commands of the Proclamation have fallen short in practice and that it will take a cumulative effort from every citizen to undo this process.

Letter from Alversia Dunkley to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Illinois (IL)

Mrs. Dunkley writes Dr. King hoping to receive permission to publish her song, "Man of God," about Dr. King. She also requests contact information for the family of "Miss Viola" to receive permission to publish a poem entitled "Viola."

Telegram from L. V. Booth and Otis Moss to MLK

Cincinnati, OH, Ohio (OH)

Dr. L. V. Booth and Reverend Otis Moss thank Dr. King and the SCLC for their efforts during the last ten years.

Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence Newsletter

Tuesday, August 1, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, Chicago, IL, San Francisco, CA, Boston, MA, California (CA), Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA), Massachusetts (MA), New York (NY), VIETNAM, Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Connecticut (CT), CANADA

This newsletter, Volume I Number 4, is published by Henry and Sue Bass of Atlanta. They write about the Atlanta Peace Parade, an anti-Vietnam protest to take place on August 6, 1967. The Atlanta Peace Parade would become the south's first major peace parade, about which the Basses write President Johnson was worried, calling for counter-demonstrations.

Letter from Lawrence J. Rozman to MLK

Monday, March 8, 1965
Selma, AL, Detroit, MI

Lawrence J. Rozman, who identifies himself as a white Catholic, is in admiration of Dr. King's avenue of execution to the racial issues in the United States. In addition, Mr. Rozman requests to become a member of the SCLC.

Letter from Carlos G. Randall to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
MEXICO, New York, NY, New York (NY)

Carlos Randall writes Dr. King expressing that he once really liked him, but now he is unsure due to King's stance on Vietnam. He asserts "So now the USA is a purveyor of violence?" and asks if Dr. King believed that he would be able to give a similar speech in Moscow or Pekin and still freely receive his letter.

Invitation to Emergency Convocation: The Urban Coalition

Saturday, August 12, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

This letter from Andrew Heiskell and A. Philip Randolph invites Dr. King to attend the Emergency Convocation of the Urban Coalition, to address the issue of violence in 104 cities. The goals set forth in the letter include an emergency work program, a major expansion of the private sector for job provision and training, and establishment of a long-range program for the physical and social reconstruction of American cities.

Letter from Solomon Mendelson to Dora McDonald

Friday, January 5, 1968
New York (NY)

Solomon Mendelson writes to Dora McDonald to inform her that the "I Have A Dream" speech will be televised and that the Congregation of Beth Sholom will be taking action in seeing that it is properly promoted.