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"GHANA"

Why We Chose Jail Rather than Bail

Dr. King cites seven reasons for choosing jail not bail. Among them is that ?the highest expression of nonviolence is self suffering.?

President Kennedy's Record

Friday, February 9, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

In this February 1962 column for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King acknowledges President Kennedy's appointment of Negroes and executive order ending employment discrimination. But he calls the President “cautious and defensive” in providing strong leadership in civil rights and criticizes him for not ordering an end to discrimination in federally-assisted housing.

Letter from James M. Nielsen to MLK

Tuesday, January 14, 1964
Washington (WA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Rhode Island (RI)

James M. Nielson congratulates Dr. King on receiving Time Magazine's Man-of-the-Year Award. Mr. Nielson invites Dr. King to the Sixth Annual Trade Fair sponsored by the Anacortes Jaycees.

Letter from Tadashi Akaishi to MLK

Monday, December 20, 1965
Virginia (VA)

Tadashi Akaishi, Associate Book Editor for John Knox Press, writes Dr. King requesting to use his endorsement for Dr. Kyle Haselden's book "Mandate for White Christians" as the book's preface. The endorsement was initially to be included on the book's cover, but Akaishi feels that it is so well written that he now asks permission to use it as the preface.

Letter from Tom Perry to MLK

Tuesday, December 26, 1967
CANADA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

Tom Perry thanks Dr. King for inspiring him to continue his work in the peace movement in Canada.

History

Dr. King references a quote from St. Paul regarding a theological perspective of history.

Discerning the Signs of History

FRANCE, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King's sermon "Discerning the Signs of History" asserts "evil carries the seeds of its own destruction." King gives examples throughout history, such as slavery, colonialism, and the rise and fall of King Louis XVI.

Toward Responsible Freedom

Chicago, IL

This manuscript describes the state of the country democracy and the challenges resulting from rapid urbanization, social dislocation and complexities of technological existence. Community organization is the solution provided to establish a sense of self-reliance and local democracy.

Letter from MLK to R. P. Bass, Jr.

Thursday, June 16, 1966
New Hampshire (NH)

Dr. King thanks Mr. Bass for his contribution to the SCLC. He briefly explains the progress of Negros in the South and explains the importance of supporters.

Letter from Mrs. H.S. Johnson to Golden Frinks

Friday, January 19, 1968
North Carolina (NC)

In this letter Mrs. H.S. Johnson informs Mr. Golden Frinks of an enclosed letter forwarded from Mr. Richard Williamston of North Carolina.

Catholic Interracial Council's JFK Awards Dinner Honoring MLK Brochure

Thursday, October 29, 1964
Chicago, IL

This brochure outlines the Catholic Interracial Council's (CIC) John F. Kennedy Awards Dinner honoring Dr. King, to be held on October 29, 1968. In addition to describing the mission of the dinner, the brochure adds a description of the CIC and a biography of Dr. King. Also included is an article and photo from Dr. King's visit with Pope Paul VI.

Letter from Sanford Kahn to MLK

Wednesday, December 21, 1966
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Sanford Kahn requests Dr. King's support for an effort to abolish the death penalty at the federal level. If given Dr. King's support, Kahn proposes listing the SCLC as a participating member of the ad hoc committee. If the SCLC cannot be listed, Kahn suggests Dr. King serve as an advisor.

Letter from A.J. Hoffman to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

In this letter, A.J. Hoffman offers a few words of admiration to Dr. King for his work for the "brotherhood of man."

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967
New York, NY

This New York writer castigates Dr. King and refers to him as "the worst phoney [sic] in the country."

Letter from L. H. Horace Perera to MLK

Monday, August 1, 1966
Geneva, Switzerland, Atlanta, GA

L. H. Horace Perera, Secretary General of the World Federation of United Nations Associations (WFUNA), invites Dr. King to be the speaker of honor at the 20th Plenary Assembly of WFUNA.

Telegram from MLK Congratulating Georgia Legislators Elect

Friday, June 18, 1965
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King congratulates Grace Hamilton, William Alexander, Julian Bond, J. D. Grier, and J. C. Daugherty on their recent election to the Legislature of the State of Georgia. He offers his support in "our quest for freedom and human dignity."

Carbon Copy Letter from Dr. King to Joan Daves Regarding rights of "Strength To Love"

Tuesday, May 26, 1964
New York, NY

In this letter, Dr. King acknowledges that he is in receipt of Joan Daves letter about the schedule on June 8, as well as, the letter concerning the offer for the Japanese rights of "Strength To Love".

Sermon Notes: Christianity Explored

Dr. King discusses the various concepts of the religious body of Christianity. He specifically highlights the Christian perspective in relation to life, the Kingdom of God on Earth, and Jesus Christ.

March for Peace Flyer

VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This flyer advertises the March for Peace. The event, which was organized in Atlanta and held on Hiroshima Day, focused on ending the war in Vietnam.

Pinn Memorial Baptist Church

Sunday, September 11, 1960
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

This program outlines the Sunday morning worship service for Pinn Memorial Baptist Church. Dr. King is featured as a guest speaker to deliver a sermon on September 11, 1960.

Letter from MLK to William B. Simpkins

Tuesday, June 16, 1964
Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

Dr. King responds to a letter from William Simpkins, in which Simpkins discusses freedom and perfect justice. Dr. King thanks Simpkins for the letter and comments that Simpkins' letter has provided "additional food for contemplation."

Newspaper Clipping - "In Memoriam" MLK, NY Amsterdam News

Saturday, April 13, 1968
New York (NY)

This newspaper clipping is one of several full page "In Memoriam" dedications featured in various New York City newspapers following the assassination of Dr. King. The clippings accompany a letter from the Public Relations Director of the NAACP to the Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy, newly installed as the head of the SCLC in the aftermath of Dr. King's death.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

VIETNAM

Dr. King received this letter from an individual who urges that both poverty and the Vietnam War should be ended by helping Americans and building up communities, and then sending peaceful volunteers to South Vietnam to do the same. The author, who has several family members in the service, chooses not to sign their name, fearing retribution, and states that they wish to broadcast this message around the world.

Letter from Roslyn Wilkins to MLK

Friday, June 11, 1965
California (CA)

Roslyn Wilkins of California asks Dr. King for his opinion on interracial marriage. Wilkins asserts that her mother would rather her marry a Japanese man because, as Wilkins is white, they are closer in color.

Miracle

Dr. King references the Old Testament Biblical Book of Numbers regarding the topic of miracles.

Abelard

Dr. King quotes 12th century French philosopher Peter Abelard on the relationship between doubt, inquiry and truth.

Ebenezer Project Bill

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Citizens Trust Company reminds the SCLC of an upcoming payment related to the "Ebenezer Project."

Letter from Congressman John McCormack to MLK

Saturday, July 10, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Congressional House Speaker John McCormack writes that he is very glad the McCulloch Substitute Bill was rejected by the House of Representatives.

Letter from Warren R. Austin to MLK

Wednesday, September 17, 1958

In this letter, Mr. Austin, Honorary Chairman of The Committee of One Million, writes to Dr. King and encloses an advanced review copy of the "Black Book on Red China." The book is scheduled to be published soon and was commissioned by the Committee of One Million as an "international public service."

Eisenhower - Views on the Racial Question

Dr. King notes General Dwight D. Eisenhower's justification of racial segregation during Eisenhower's 1948 testimony before a Senate subcommittee.