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Family Planning-A Special and Urgent Concern

Thursday, May 5, 1966

This document contains Dr. King's response on receiving the Margaret Sanger Award in Human Rights at the Fiftieth Anniversary Banquet of Planned Parenthood-World Population. Margaret Sanger is famous for opening the first birth control clinic in the USA and establishing Planned Parenthood. Dr. King discusses the benefits of family planning for the Negro family, as well as similarities between his and Margaret' Sanger's efforts for equality. Also featured is a photograph of Coretta Scott King accepting the award on Dr. King's behalf.

Letter from Jeriann Kelsey to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967

Jeriann Kelsey writes Dr. King to contrast and compare her experiences raising her son in Mississippi to the Civil Rights Movement and the war in Vietnam. She includes a photo of her son to show that a son "I have seen and touched and loved" is more important to her than "a war I've merely heard about."

Telegram from Teamsters Vice President Harold Gibbons to MLK

International Brotherhood of Teamsters Vice President Harold Gibbons conveys his support to Dr. King for a statewide Mississippi boycott. Gibbons congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize.

Telegram from Roland Wolf

Wednesday, March 1, 1967

In this Western Union telegram, Roland Wolf requests Dr. King's appearance on a "conversation show" with one or two writers, allowing an opportunity to learn his views on existing issues.

Emergency Rally--Walk with Dr. Spock for Peace in Vietnam

The following document is promoting a rally for peace in Vietnam. Dr. Benjamin Spock, among others, is scheduled to speak at the rally.

Letter from W. A. Rutherford to James Orange

Friday, December 15, 1967

Mr. Rutherford encourages Reverend Orange to be patient regarding his request for a raise, which must receive Dr. King's final approval.

Memorandum from David M. Wallace to Dora McDonald

Saturday, February 11, 1967

David Wallace informs Dora McDonald of contributions made to the SCLC from John H. Johnson, George Jones, and Willard Payne, Sr.

Freedom (Of Choice)

Dr. King quotes Thomas Huxley's "Collected Essays" on the freedom to do right and to do wrong.

MLK Interview: The Negro Protest

Kenneth B. Clark conducts a televised interview with Dr. King, James Baldwin, and Malcolm X. Clark discusses with Dr. King his personal history, the relationship between the love ethic and nonviolent direct action, Malcolm X's claim that nonviolence is perceived by white leaders as weakness, and Baldwin's concern that Negroes will not remain nonviolent if met with brutal responses.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Sodd

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Sodd regarding her concerns for fair and just treatment.

Letter from Ken Dyal to MLK

Friday, January 8, 1965

California Congressman Ken Dyal writes Dr. King to acknowledge receipt of a telegram and agree with his comments in reference to an enclosed supporting newspaper article.

Telegram from Newcastle University to MLK

Tuesday, January 17, 1967

The registrar of Newcastle University inquires if Dr. King would be able to accept an honorary degree from the institute.

Letter from Robert T. Stafford to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Congressman Robert T. Stafford writes to Dr. King acknowledging receipt of a recent request to support a particular bill. Stafford asserts that he will respect the majority rule of the District of Columbia and possibly revisit the petition at a later date.

Letter from Hans-Luder Temmen to MLK

Sunday, July 10, 1966

This document contains a request for Dr. King's autograph from Mr. Temmen in Germany.

Biographical Sketch of Dr. Ralph David Avernathy

This biographical sketch of Dr. Abernathy outlines his positions, recognitions, education, travel experience and personal life. Dr. Abernathy served as President of the SCLC after Dr. King's death and also served as a member of the NAACP, and Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Geiser

Dr. King offers praise and support to Mrs. Geiser for her efforts to teach her children tolerance in the face of bigotry and racial hatred.

MLK's Address to the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity

Monday, October 12, 1964

This address by Dr. King was delivered to the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity the day before it was announced that he had been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. In addressing the topic "Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution," Dr. King argues that the church must inspire it's members to be active and advocate against injustice, reaffirm the misconduct of racial segregation, and work towards social change in a nonviolent and peaceful manner.

The Negro In America: What Must Be Done

Monday, December 4, 1967

In a full page of letters to the editor, civil rights advocates praise the Newsweek cover issue on the Negro in America for its analysis of the racial crisis and editorial recommendations for an emergency national program of action.

Letter from MLK to Newsweek Editor Joseph Cummings

Friday, December 22, 1961

Dr. King writes Joseph B. Cummings, Jr. in response to a headline article suggesting that Dr. King had advocated that Negroes turn to a new ideology in their struggle – Communism or the Muslim Movement. He wonders how his statement on a television program in Cleveland could be so misinterpreted.

Letter from Sharyl Green to MLK

Saturday, November 9, 1963

Sharyl Green, a junior at Roosevelt School in Michigan, expresses her admiration for Dr. King's work and inquires if Dr. King could send her his biography. Green also shares a piece of her literary work with Dr. King.

Letter from Rev. L. K. Jackson to MLK

Tuesday, April 9, 1963

Reverend L. K. Jackson thanks Dr. King for his hospitality while he was in Atlanta. Jackson states that his only regret was not seeing more of Dr. King and his wife.

Letter to SCLC from Lisa Goldiamond about Volunteer Service

Monday, April 15, 1968

Goldiamond, a student at Royal Victoria College, requests that the SCLC. Putting words to action, she offers to keep Dr. King's work alive by volunteering in local civil rights organizations over summer break.

Letter from Prince Johannes of Bohemia to MLK

Sunday, December 17, 1967

Prince Johannes, claimant to the throne of Bohemia, requests Dr. King's participation in the Presidium of the World Government.

MLK Statement Before the Credentials Committee of the DNC

Saturday, August 22, 1964

Dr. King addresses the Democratic National Committee urging them to stand up against the inequities that prevent Negro participation in the political process in the state of Mississippi.

The Birth of a New Nation

Dr. King compares the ongoing civil rights struggle in the United States to the Hebrews' Exodus from Egypt.

A Look to 1964

This is a draft of the article "A Look to 1964" written by Dr. King. Published on January 1, 1964 in the New York Amsterdam News. In the article, Dr. King addresses the strides the African American people have taken towards the struggle for equality.

Letter from MLK to Ellis Pinkston

Friday, January 19, 1968

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Mrs. Ellis Pinkston for her support. He also extends gratitude on behalf of Mrs. King.

Financial Breakdown of Individual Contributors

Dr. King lists the monetary calculations of those who have individually contributed to the "Souvenir Program."

Letter from Walter Jackson to MLK

Thursday, March 11, 1965

Walter Jackson of Lincoln School in Berkley, California writes Dr. King extending his gratitude for the Reverend's efforts in Civil Rights.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Alfred A. Haesler Regarding "Where Do We Go From Here"

Thursday, October 5, 1967

In this correspondence to Alfred A. Haesler, Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary, acknowledged the receipt of Mr. Haesler letter, inviting Dr. King to complete a writing assignment. However, due to prior engagements, Dr. King would not be able to complete any other publications, but offered that his book entitled, "Where Do We From Here: Chaos or Community?" answered most of the questions raised in the letter.