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Letter to MLK from the Women For: Organization

Thursday, May 25, 1967

The WOMEN FOR: organization sent Dr. King a letter with their enclosed policy regarding the conflict in Vietnam. Women For: is a non-partisan civic organization that is actively involved in local, national, and international affairs. The group of over 2,000 women believed, unanimously, that the United States should cease all military occupation.

News/Letter: Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Here is a 1967 newsletter from the Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence, covering a number of topics including the Vietnam War, the March on Washington, fascism, and non-violent tactical plans.

Letter from Frank Randolph Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, April 17, 1968

Frank Randolph highlights how Dr. King "brought to light" many things that were once unseen. Mr. Randolph writes this letter subsequent to the assassination of Dr. King and notes that he would like copies of the "I Have a Dream" speech. The writer is apparently unaware of Dr. King's death.

Letter from Erskine Caldwell to MLK

Wednesday, November 11, 1964

Noted author Erskine Caldwell congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. Caldwell's works, including the highly acclaimed book Tobacco Road, addressed poverty, racism and social problems in his native South.

Letter from Neil Crichton-Miller to MLK

Tuesday, October 20, 1964

Neil Crichton-Miller, the Producer of the Talks Department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, congratulates Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize. Crichton-Miller asks Dr. King if they can reschedule a previously cancelled interview with Richard Kershaw and Leigh Crutchley for the BBC's "Frankly Speaking" program. He would like to conduct the interview when Dr. King flies to Europe to receive the Nobel Prize.

Letter from US Ambassador Findley Burns, Jr. to MLK

Monday, January 23, 1967

United States Ambassador Findley Burns writes Dr. King expressing his joy regarding King's upcoming pilgrimage to the Holy Land. Despite warnings due to Middle East conflict, Burns hopes that Dr. King will not cancel the trip. He sees the visit as an opportunity to strengthen the bonds between the US and Jordan.

Letter from Alice Brainerd to MLK

Saturday, August 19, 1967

Ms. Brainerd criticizes the methods of Dr. King, asserting that "civil disobedience and non-cooperation" are not the best approach to take towards justice.

My Trip to the Land of Gandhi

Dr. King documents his travel throughout India beginning in February 1959 with his wife and Dr. Lawrence Reddick. During his stay Dr. King reflects on the manifestation of Gandhi's nonviolent teachings in low crime rates amidst the impoverished living conditions. Dr. King also addresses the notion of a "divided India," a country deliberating the varying effects of Western modernization.

Letter from James R. Herrington to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

James R. Herrington wrote this adverse letter to Dr. King, calling both him and his doctrine of civil disobedience "trash." Herrington ends his letter by saying that President Johnson cared more for Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement than the rest of the country, and therefore, won't be president again.

Letter from MLK to First Prebysterian Church Regarding Contribution

Monday, January 30, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King personally thanks Jordan and First Presbyterian Church for their contribution to SCLC. Dr. King states, "I know that you cannot enjoy the experience of change as we who see it first hand everyday, but I trust that these fews words will convey our appreciation and gratitude."

Catholic Interracial Council Newsletter Honoring MLK

Sunday, March 7, 1965

This 1965 newsletter from the Catholic Interracial Council honors Dr. King with the Pacem in Terris Peace and Freedom Award.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Ernest J. Foster

Saturday, July 25, 1964

Dr. King thanks Dr. Ernest Foster for his financial contribution to the SCLC. He informs Dr. Foster of the distribution of the proceeds from a previous reception and discusses the significance of supporters to the movement. Dr. King also encloses a copy of his recent book, "Why We Can't Wait."

Man

Dr. King interprets Psalm 90, which he explains discusses the transience of man as compared to God.

Christmas Card from Mrs. King to MLK

Mrs. King sends holiday greetings to Dr. King.

Invitation from Manitoba New Democratic Party

Thursday, August 19, 1965

B. Swailes, Provincial Secretary of the Manitoba New Democratic Party, extends a speaking invitation to Dr. King to discuss human rights.

Letter from a Lithuanian American to MLK

In this letter to Dr. King, a Lithuanian immigrant to the United States writes that he agrees with the campaign for Negro rights and believes that all U.S. citizens should be treated equally.

MLK Announces End of Montgomery Bus Boycott

Thursday, December 20, 1956

Dr. King, as President of the Montgomery Improvement Association, issued this statement following the US Supreme Court’s decision declaring laws requiring segregation on busses unconstitutional. He announces that the year-long bus boycott is officially over and urges Negroes to return to the buses the next morning on a non-segregated basis. Negroes need to adopt a spirit of understanding toward their white brothers, he says. It is time to move from protest to reconciliation.

Vietnam and the Conscience of U.S.A.

Monday, May 1, 1967

The author argues that the U.S. is fighting a false bogey of international communism in Vietnam at the expense of Great Society programs at home.

Letter from the International Convention of Christian Churches to MLK

Friday, October 7, 1966

The International Convention of Christian Churches communicates their appreciation for Dr. King's participation in the evening panel on "The Churches and the Struggle for Human Freedom, Dignity and Brotherhood." The executive secretary informs Dr. King of the enclosed honorarium for his contribution to this panel discussion.

Letter from Chauncey Eskridge to MLK about Court Case

Wednesday, November 29, 1961

Chauncey Eskridge, Dr. King's legal counsel, sent this message requesting the signatures of Dr. King's parents on a legal document. The latter part of the message asks for Rev. King, Sr. to trust the expertise of Attorney Eskridge.

Map of Morehouse College

These maps are an overview of the buildings located at Morehouse College.

Notes on a Letter from Birmingham Jail

Dr. King records notes on three different topics. First, he examines the concept of extremism and individual responses in their respective environments. Next, he expresses disappointment with the white church and its leadership. The final note describes the challenges and hardships of early Christians.

Letter to Andrew Young from Irving Kaler

Thursday, February 16, 1967

Kaler writes to express excitement in the SCLC working with The Community Relations Commission of the City of Atlanta (of which he is a part). He looks forward to discussing ways in which both organizations can compliment each other.

Letter from Lars Andr. Larssen to MLK

Wednesday, February 23, 1966

The Fredskontoret (Peace Bureau) of Norway invites Dr. King to speak in Oslo, with proceeds from the broadcast of his speech going towards the Civil Rights Movement.

Memorandum to Files

A memorandum to file was written to explain how the SCLC will proceed in a pending legal case. In the case, the plaintiff has sought compensation for a car accident in which an alleged employee of the SCLC, Major Johns, was the driver at fault. A joint decision was issued against both parties. However, the decision was rendered in Louisiana and the SCLC claims that the court lacks jurisdiction. The memorandum concludes with why the SCLC will wait to assert its claim until the plaintiff brings suit to a court in Georgia.

Letter from Vernon R. Byrd to MLK

Wednesday, April 4, 1962

Vernon R. Byrd invites Dr. King to be the speaker at the Annual Men's Day Service at St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church in Bermuda.

Letter from Ruth E. Foster to MLK

Monday, March 11, 1968

Mrs. Foster writes Dr. King expressing doubt in his nonviolent methods. She feels his nonviolent marches are an ineffective way to gain equality for Negroes.

Letter from George W. Chivers to MLK

Saturday, August 20, 1966

George W. Chivers writes to Dr. King objecting to the Alabama law that disallows women from sitting as jurors. He compares this denial of women's civil rights to the injustices suffered by Negroes in Alabama.

Letter from MLK to Clara Graves

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dr. King responds to Clara Bell Graves thanking her for the encouraging letter. Dr. King states, "please be assured that we welcome with grateful heart such letters as the one you directed to me."

Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

Dr. King requests that President Kennedy give full consideration to judges William Hastie and Thurgood Marshall for appointment to the US Supreme Court.