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Letter from Manie Callahan to MLK

Sunday, January 13, 1963

Manie Callahan expresses her admiration to Dr. King and informs him of the passing of her parents which left her with a five bedroom apartment. Callahan understands the lack of opportunity for Negroes in the south and offers her home to a deserving married couple looking for work. She trusts Dr. King's judgment of character and hopes to hear from him soon.

SCLC Press Release

Monday, May 16, 1966

This press release announces Dr. King's election as a Fellow of The American Academy of Arts and Sciences. The statement provides a brief history of the research center, including its affiliation with prestigious figures such as President John Adams and American writer Ralph Waldo Emerson. The release concludes with a brief biography of Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Spilman

Thursday, July 30, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Mr. and Mrs. Spilman for their monetary contribution to the SCLC. He acknowledges how such funds have been allocated to combat the civil injustices faced by Negroes in America. He concludes by addressing the future social and political agendas of the SCLC.

God (His Existence: Psalms)

Dr. King references the Old Testament biblical Book of Psalms regarding God's existence.

Pilgrimage for Democracy

Sunday, December 15, 1963

Dr. King makes an address at the "Pilgrimage for Democracy" in Atlanta during the winter of 1963. He opens with the Supreme Courts ruling to cease segregation in schools and how Atlanta served as the "epitome of social progress." He continues to elaborate on how the city needs to continue its desegregation efforts to achieve justice. Dr. King numerically highlights the inadequacies of the integrated schools in Atlanta and expresses the reality of the continuing segregation in the city's public accommodations.

Letter from Bayard Rustin to MLK

In a statement to the Democratic National Convention, the authors of this document proclaim that they are seeking freedom. They say that immediate change will only come if the elected Chief Executive is committed to giving life to the Constitution. In an attempt to achieve this, they request that all of the Presidential nominees meet the people's delegation.

Letter From Harry A. Ploski to MLK

Tuesday, September 13, 1966

Harry A. Ploski writes Dr. King concerning a book he and Professor Roscoe Brown have written. Hoping to solicit endorsement, he encloses a copy of the table of contents and an outline of the topics addressed.

Letter from MLK to Senator Daniel Brewster

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King commends Senator Daniel Brewster for his support of the 1964 Civil Rights Act.

Letter from Baptist World Alliance to MLK

Wednesday, October 14, 1964

Baptist World Alliance Church expresses its gratitude to Dr. King for his visit to the Amsterdam Conference, and follows up with a reminder of his promise to consider an invitation from Scandinavia.

Letter from Joe Augustine to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Mr. Augustine claims that he is able to point directly to who is responsible for the wrong that is going on in the country, and would like to mail Dr. King more information to this effect.

Letter from The Norwegian Church to MLK and Friends

Wednesday, December 9, 1964

A member of the Norwegian Church extends congratulations to Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize for 1964.

Letter from Clarence Henry to Robert F. Kennedy

Friday, February 2, 1962

Clarence Henry requests the immediate surveillance of Fred Shuttleworth's home by Kennedy's office in lieu of Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth's arrest.

SCLC Financial Report

Ralph D. Abernathy releases the Southern Christian Leadership Conference Annual Fiscal Report for 1962-1963.

Letter from MLK to Norman Baugher

Thursday, August 15, 1963

Dr. King conveys his support to Norman Baugher for the Church of the Brethren's past correspondence regarding publicizing the philosophy of nonviolence.

Letter from Albert E. Manley to MLK

Tuesday, September 3, 1963

Spelman College President Albert E. Manley congratulates Dr. King for the "highly effective" March on Washington. Manley commends Dr. King for his "I Have A Dream" speech. He found the speech inspirational and considers it to be "one of the greatest speeches of this century." As a result of their continued support to the struggle, the Manleys enclose a financial contribution to assist the work of the SCLC.

Young Americans Newsletter

This Young Americans newsletter covers topics such as: The Vietnam War, Young Americans for Freedom, and the usage of violence for a good cause.

Faith As A Way of Knowing (Wieman)

Dr. King cites Henry Nelson Wieman's "The Source of Human Good" on faith as a way of knowing.

Fellowship of Reconciliation Campaign Proposal

Thursday, October 27, 1966

The Fellowship of Reconciliation announces its "Thanksgiving-To-Tet" campaign and includes details of the types of aid that will be given to the people of Vietnam.

Telegram from President Johnson to MLK

Thursday, June 23, 1966

President Lyndon B. Johnson writes to Dr. King sympathizing with his concern over the incidents that occurred in Philadelphia, Mississippi. King was continuing the March Against Fear of James Meredith, who was shot by a sniper on June 6. A rally in Philadelphia commemorating the murder two years earlier of three civil rights activists was angrily attacked by a white mob. Homes of blacks were later sprayed with gunfire.

Letter from Silas K. Brown to MLK

Tuesday, December 26, 1967

Mr. Brown requests the help of Dr. King and the SCLC on behalf of Reverend U.S. Gilliam. Reverend Gilliam, the first Negro to run for public office in Grenada, Mississippi, is under attack by whites in his community.

Letter from Jack Malpas to MLK

Thursday, December 21, 1961

Jack Malpas, a member of the Episcopal Church's Society for Cultural and Racial Unity, contributed financially to the SCLC. Mr. Malpas informs Dr. King that he is working on the appeal for the Prayer Pilgrimage and expresses his previous experience in Jackson, Mississippi.

Neoplatonism

Dr. King describes neoplatonism as "ideas of God." Neoplatonism is focused on the thoughts of Greek Philosopher, Plato.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Friday, November 29, 1963

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays writes to Dr. King shortly after President Kennedy's assassination to urge him to take precautions.

Letter from W. F. Washington to MLK

Thursday, April 13, 1967

Rev. Washington assures Dr. King that he has his support as a fellow minister for his stand on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Congressman Phillip Burton to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

Representative Burton, a Democrat from California, commends Dr. King for the speech he delivered at the Spring Mobilization. The congressman says Dr King has "served the cause of peace."

Copernicus

Dr. King discusses how the discoveries of renowned astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus and German philosopher Immanuel Kant revolutionized thinking regarding the human mind. The note card also outlines philosophical views originating from the "analogy of two clocks" referencing prominent thinkers Rene Descartes and Gottfried Leibniz.

Telegram from Georgiana Hardy to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, August 7, 1963

Georgiana Hardy, president of the Los Angeles City Board of Education, requests a meeting with Dr. King's upon his upcoming visit to California.

Congressional Record Regarding Antipoverty Funding

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

This Congressional Record documents a statement regarding the antipoverty bill. The statement, made to the public by the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, urged Congress to support funding towards eradicating poverty for both black and white citizens.

Letter from MLK's Secretary to Rev. and Mrs. Martin Luther King, Sr.

Wednesday, November 18, 1964

Dr. King's secretary sends information to Dr. King's parents regarding their upcoming trip to Oslo, Norway.

Letter from Berwyn Jones to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

Berwyn Jones offers his gratitude to Dr. King for his strong stance in opposition to the Vietnam War. The letter is written a day after Dr. King makes his famous speech entitled "Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence" at Riverside Church in New York.