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Address on Anti-Poverty by Jerome P. Cavanagh

Monday, August 22, 1966

Jerome P. Cavanagh, Mayor of Detroit, delivers this speech before the Office of Economic Opportunity Urban Areas Conference, Great Lakes Region. The conference is dedicated to sharing experiences in the War on Poverty and taking a realistic assessment on the issues in urban areas. Inadequate education, food, housing, and disjointed welfare systems are major problems of concern. Cavanagh encourages the analysis of programs addressing these situations. He also advocates an understanding of federal aid cutbacks and connects insufficient funds to the Vietnam War and space exploration.

Letter from K. B. M. Crooks, Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, November 7, 1967

K. B. M. Crooks, Jr., of the Southeast Regional Office of the National Urban League, writes to Dr. King about a letter of recommendation for Lonnie King, Jr.

Address by Dabbs entitled 'Quit You Like Men' Delivered at SCLC

Thursday, October 1, 1959

This address to the Fall Session of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference was delivered in October, 1959, by James McBride Dabbs. Dabbs speaks to the social condition in the United States, highlighting the equality of the races. Arguing that justice is a two way street, Dabbs brings up Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," in which Dr. King defends the Montgomery bus boycott as an essential non-cooperation to show discontent.

Letter from Rev. S. A. Owen to MLK

Friday, November 13, 1964

In this letter, Reverend S. A. Owen of the Tennessee Baptist M. & E. Convention congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Charles B. McConnell

Thursday, October 31, 1963

Dr. King thanks Rev. McConnell for his words of encouragement and financial contribution following the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King explains that Americans of all races and ethnicities must join together in this common cause to achieve American community.

The Crisis in America's Cities

Tuesday, August 15, 1967

Dr. King provides an analysis of "social disorder" and a plan of action against poverty, discrimination and racism in Urban America. Dr. King states that, "If the soul is left in darkness, sins will be committed."

Letter from Miss Ethel Klemm to MLK

Friday, October 18, 1963

Miss Ethel Klemm, a retired white teacher from Mississippi, suggests that Dr. King ease on trying to push for intergration so rapidly. She recommends that, thru education and job training, Negroes will be in a better position to be accepted and integrated into mainstream society.

MLK Requests Federal Protection from US Attorney General

Friday, February 19, 1965

Dr. King sends this urgent request for protection to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach. Negro citizens were brutalized while protesting the arrest of James Orange. Alabama State Troopers prevented protestors from seeking medical attention by refusing to allow them to leave Zion Methodist Church.

Letter from Joan Daves to Coretta Scott King

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Joan Daves expresses her gratitude toward Mrs. King for her support of her husband throughout his work in the Civil Rights Movement, following his receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from David B. Lord to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967

In this letter to Dr. King , David B. Lord draws connections between the Vietnam War and poverty in American society. He agrees with Dr. King's stance on the war and approach to civil rights. According to Mr. Lord, real civil rights progress cannot be made until a solution is found to the war.

Letter from Vivian Washington to MLK

Tuesday, September 30, 1958

Vivian E. Washington requests that Dr. King, who is recovering in a Harlem Hospital, review her publication "Mount Ascutney" and provide her with feedback.

Ebony: Advice For Living

Thursday, May 1, 1958

Dr. King answers readers' questions regarding family dynamics, the NAACP, outer versus inner beauty and the image of Negroes in literature and the media. He advocates for open communication and pleasant attitudes in familial relationships, and he offers hope that the portrayal of Negroes in movies and "other public channels" is improving.

Letter from MLK to Edwin C. Berry

Tuesday, August 30, 1966

Dr. King thanks Edwin Berry of the Council of Coordinating Organizations for presenting the Rosa Parks Award to Al Raby at the annual SCLC convention.

Telegram from Dr. Benjamin Spock to MLK

Wednesday, September 8, 1965

Mr. Spock invites Dr. King to send a representative to a discussion on the upcoming Washington Vietnam Mobilization.

Death of a King

Mrs. D. M. Murray wrote this poem, entitled "Death of a King," following Dr. King's assassination. Murray writes "you've set an example for us here, your very presence brought us cheer" and adds a post script asking the recipient to contact her.

Letter from MLK to Roberta Evans

Thursday, August 23, 1962

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Evans for her kind gesture in sending a letter enclosed with a book by Will Campbell. Dr. King believes his views on race will be a benefit to him.

Letter from Mrs. Ernest Erber to MLK

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

Mrs. Erber tells Dr. King that she is sending the newspaper clipping featuring her daughter Elena. Elena raised eighty cents to fight the injustices of racism.

God (Knowledge of)

Dr. King references St. Thomas Aquinas' "Summa Contra Gentiles" in a quotation focusing on man's "threefold knowledge of divine things."

Telegram from Lawrence MacGregor to MLK

Wednesday, November 15, 1967

In this telegram, Lawrence J. MacGregor informs Dr. King that there will no longer be a memorial service for Rufus E. Clement.

Letter from MLK to Knights of Peter Claver, Ladies' Auxiliary Members Expresing Thanks for Their Contribution

Monday, January 30, 1967

Dr. King thanks the Knights of Peter Claver, Ladies' Auxilary Members for their generous contribution to S.C.L.C. Dr. King acknowledges the impact of such support on improving race relations throughout the nation.

Letter to MLK from G. Houghton

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Mr. Houghton writes to Dr. King with a plan for SABON (Saving and Building Organization of, by, and for the Negroes).

Black is Beautiful, and It's So Beautiful To Be Black

Sunday, October 1, 1967

This staff newsletter "Black Is Beautiful, and It's So Beautiful," published by the SCLC, explains the upcoming events that the organization has in store. The newsletter communicates as to who acquired new positions within the SCLC and speaks to how the SCLC wishes to continue with projects based in Chicago, Cleveland, and Washington through Operation Breadbasket.

Advice for Living

Dr. King addresses questions in the "Advice for Living" column published in Ebony Magazine on February 12, 1958.

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church

Sunday, January 22, 1956

This is a church program for Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in early 1956. As Pastor, Dr. King gave a sermon on "Redirecting Our Missionary Zeal."

Letter from George Fedak to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

George Fedak writes Mrs. King to express his sympathy for Dr. King's death.

Letter from Alice Mary Hilton and Kathryn Anne Hilton Hayward to MLK

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

Kathryn, a young American girl, writes a letter to Dr. King expressing her sympathy for a girl in the Vietnam War. Kathryn sends twelve cents to help the girl in the war smile. Kathryn's mother also expresses her concern about the war.

Letter from Glenn Leggett to MLK

President Leggett expresses his appreciation to Dr. King for agreeing to speak at an upcoming Convocation, for Grinnell College. Leggett informs Dr. King that he is welcomed to rest in his home during his visit at the college.

Letter from A. S. Young to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967

Mr. Young criticizes Dr. King and the black community for their support of heavyweight champion Cassius Clay's refusal to be drafted into the military. He also expresses worry about the quality of black leadership and urges a move from a selfish focus on Negroes only to concern for all people.

Handwritten Notecard Regarding Cyril of Alexandria

In this handwritten notecard, Dr. King makes reference to Cyril of Alexandria.

Letter from MLK to the Lamar W. Sessoms Family

Wednesday, July 19, 1967

Dr. King replies to the Sessoms' previous letter that requested assistance in alleviating racial inequality in Mississippi. King informs them that the first step is to "urge the struggle in our own community," and the second step is for everyone to "join together across the nation with people of good will and combat the evils of racism and injustice."