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Appeal to the President of the United States

Thursday, May 17, 1962
Washington, D.C.

This document, prepared for the centennial of the Emancipation Proclamation, serves as a plea to President Kennedy and a legal brief. The plea is to use the centennial as an opportunity to "rededicate" the nation to the principles embedded in the Emancipation Proclamation; to make an executive order to end all statutory segregation and discrimination in the states; and to exercise full leadership protecting civil rights, including the use of force, if nonviolent methods fail.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Erik Ruden

Tuesday, March 17, 1964
London, England, UNITED KINGDOM

Dora McDonald informs Erik Ruden that Dr. King will only be able to speak twice during his upcoming trip to London and that an associate will need to travel with Dr. King.

SCLC Policy-Making Board to Meet in Washington, D.C. February 6-7

Thursday, February 1, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

The SCLC Executive Board of Directors will hold its semi-annual meeting in Washington, D.C. They intend to discuss future projects as well as continuing projects.

Letter to Mrs. King from Lillian Tynec

Saturday, October 10, 1959
Chicago, IL

Lillian Tynec writes Mrs. King to request the travel details related to a Women's Day program.

Birmingham Manifesto

Birmingham, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Birmingham Manifesto was formulated as a testament to explain the reasons why efforts were being made to desegregate Birmingham. According to the Manifesto, broken promises were made by city and state officials, which led to plans of direct action.

Letter from New York Third Grader Debbie Bass to MLK

Tuesday, April 6, 1965
New York (NY), Alabama (AL)

Third grade student Debbie Bass chose Dr. King for her writing assignment. Bass feels that Dr. King was the right individual chosen to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. She also conveys her frustration towards Alabama Governor George Wallace for not allowing Negroes to vote.

Letter from Minister C. Vernon Lake to MLK About a Vietnam Strategy

Monday, January 15, 1968
Minnesota (MN), VIETNAM

Minister C. Vernon Lake writes Dr. King with an enclosure containing a new strategy for vietnam. His plan is built on the shoulders of the World War II "Marshall Plan."

A Contentious Telephone Message

Wednesday, February 16, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

William Harold Johnson contacts Dr. King to inform him of a telephone message publicizing controversial information from a number listed in Springfield, Illinois. Mr. Johnson asks Dr. King for advice on how the Council of Churches could contend the information while also mentioning that he and his associates are interested in becoming more familiar with the approach being taken in Chicago.

MLK Press Statement After Receiving Nobel Prize

Thursday, December 17, 1964
Oslo, Norway, London, England, Stockholm, Sweden, FRANCE, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Mississippi (MS), Florida (FL)

Dr. King issued this statement to the press upon return from receiving the Nobel Peace Prize in Norway. In addition to declaring how he plans to distribute his prize winnings, Dr. King discusses the progress of the Civil Rights Movement.

Telegram from Dorothy Height to MLK

Saturday, December 5, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dorothy Height, President of the National Council of Negro Women, sends Dr. King well wishes.

Letter from James Scheuer to MLK

Monday, February 26, 1968
Washington, D.C., New York, NY

In this letter to Dr. King, Congressman Scheuer asks Dr. King to testify at a hearing of the Select Subcommittee on Labor of the House Committee on Education and Labor about House Resolution 12962. This bill focused on creating a Commission on Negro History and Culture.

Tillich's Philosophy of Religion

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's "The Protestant Era."

My Dream: The Violence of Poverty

New York (NY), California (CA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In this draft of an article that appeared in the New York Amsterdam News January 1, 1966, Dr. King points out that although the Negro in America is freer, he is “an impoverished alien in an affluent society.” He cautions that the Administration will fail in its War on Poverty if it substitutes welfare programs for the creation of new jobs. He says the Negro’s nonviolent movement directed at the violence of poverty as well as the violence of segregation.

Transformed Nonconformists Sermon Outline

In this brief outline for a sermon based on Romans 12:2, Dr. King asserts that Christians are citizens of two worlds, those of time and eternity. They are in the world, but not of it. In a generation of the mass mind, they are called to live differently – to make history not be made by history. But nonconformity in itself is not good; there must be a mental transformation. The world is on the brink of moral and physical destruction and the need of the hour is for nonconformists to materialism, nationalism and militarism.

Letter from Jesse Jackson to Negro Businessmen

Saturday, February 11, 1967
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Reverend Jesse L. Jackson informs Negro Businessmen on the requirements for attending the Businessmen's Workshop sponsored by Operation Breadbasket.

SCLC Meeting Agenda

Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA)

Dr. King notes agenda items to cover with the SCLC staff, including improving organization within the SCLC, finances and upcoming programs.

Letter from Richard W. Boone

Saturday, October 29, 1966
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), New York, NY, Memphis, TN, Chicago, IL, Cambridge, MA, New Orleans, LA, Texas (TX), Jackson, MS

The Child Development Group of Mississippi is being terminated by the Office of Economic Opportunity. This is not because the program isn't valid but because it would disturb the balance of politics in Mississippi. Klein and Saks, Inc. has helped keep the program alive. The goal of the program was to provide education, medical assistance, and nourishment for preschool children and their families.

An Invitation to a Dedication by Olivet and Her Friends

Wednesday, June 1, 1966
Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH

Olivet Institutional Baptist Church sponsors a month long dedication to the opening of the O. M. Hoover Christian Community Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Dr. King is listed as a participant in the dedication.

Letter from Charles and Leslie Gray to MLK about Contribution

Wednesday, December 13, 1967

In this letter, the Grays send an enclosed contribution to Dr. King in support of his "approach in the civil rights movement."

Quotes on Love

The document, seen here, displays special quotations that focus on the theme of "love." Prominent individuals and philosophers such as: Carlyle, Suard, the Pope and Washington Irving are just a few of the quotes chosen by Dr. King.

Community Salute to MLK Nobel Peace Prize Winner

Thursday, December 17, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

This program outlines an event to celebrate Dr. King's receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize. The event takes place in New York City on December 17, 1964.

Letter from Dora McDonald to H. L. Wynter

Tuesday, August 24, 1965
JAMAICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dora McDonald sends H. L. Wynter, Registrar for the University of the West Indies, an estimate on travel expenses Dr. King and Reverend Lee will require for their trip to Jamaica.

Northern District of Mississippi Court Order

Tuesday, November 8, 1966
Mississippi (MS)

District Court Judge Claude F. Clayton for Mississippi, issues an order sustaining part of the motion for supplemental relief on behalf of minor plaintiffs, Sharper T. Cunningham and Darlene Cunningham vs. Grenada Municipal Separate School District of Mississippi.

Scientific Method (Its Importance)

Dr. King quotes Henry P. Van Dusen’s article “How Do We Know?” from The Christian Century on the scientific method as central to Henry Nelson Wieman’s thinking. He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”

"They are Waiting for Godot in Mississippi, Too"

Sunday, January 31, 1965
Mississippi (MS), Illinois (IL), New York (NY), New York, NY, Florida (FL), New Orleans, LA, Cleveland, OH, New Jersey (NJ), Ohio (OH), Louisiana (LA)

This article, posted in the New York Times, discusses the play, "Waiting for Godot," held by the Free Southern Theatre in Mississippi. The play focuses on racial and social issues dealing with civil rights.

The Committee of Clergy and Laymen Speak on Vietnam

VIETNAM, New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA, CHINA

As a public service, the Committee of Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam have reprinted several statements and addresses of its members. The selected addresses of Dr. King were chosen because of their poignant exposition of the then current issues surrounding the Vietnam War. In the compilation's forward, Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr takes the opportunity to address two of the misconceptions that surrounded the included works of Dr. King.

Letter from R. Lennox to MLK

Wednesday, November 25, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, CANADA

R. Lennox, a principal at Presbyterian College in Montreal, Canada, invites Dr. King to speak on ministry at the college's 100th anniversary convocation address.

God (His Existence)

Change title to conform to Dr. King’s filing system.

Letter from Bill Dady to MLK

Tuesday, May 26, 1964
Kentucky (KY), Louisville, KY, New York (NY)

In this letter, "Free Men and Free Markets," a book by Robert Theobald, is introduced to Dr. King by Bill Dady.

Letter from Wilbur C. Davis to MLK

Tuesday, February 8, 1966
Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

Wilbur C. Davis writes Dr. King seeking prayer for him and his family. Davis also includes a poem that he wrote regarding Dr. King's life and involvement in the Civil Rights Movement.