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"Florida (FL)"

Schleiermacher (The Church)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “The Christian Faith.”

Proposed Agenda of Board Meeting

This document is a draft of an outline for the proposed agenda of an SCLC board meeting.

Letter from Rev. O. L. Westley to Local Board

Massachusetts (MA)

In this undated letter, Rev. Westley writes to the "Local Board" on the behalf of Mr. Stanley Howard, who is claiming status as a conscientious objector after being called to serve "in the Armed Service" [sic].

Letter from Armour G. McDaniel to MLK

Monday, March 20, 1967
Atlantic City, NJ, Philadelphia, PA, Washington, D.C.

Armour G. McDaniel, Director of the Small Business Development Center, writes Dr. King to alert him that government assistance to low-income individuals is at risk. Mr. McDaniel describes the Small Business Administration's initiative to assist poor Negroes and states that since the Economic Opportunity Act of 1966 was amended, not a single loan has been granted in Atlantic or Cape May Counties by the SBA.

Letter from Archbishop Hallinan to MLK

In this letter, Archbishop Hallinan offers his words of gratitude to Dr. King, for his work, and requests a copy of "Where Do We Go From Here."

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Joanne Baker

In this letter, Dr. King offers his instructions and a statement pertaining to the history of the "Negro Revolution of the 1960's," including a statement on the Watts and Harlem riots.

Telegram from SCLC to Miss Geneva Jones

Tuesday, August 17, 1965
Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA)

The SCLC writes Miss Geneva Jones providing her information on their traveling agenda for a trip to McIntosh, Georgia.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Raphael Demos

Friday, July 19, 1963
Cambridge, MA

Dr. King writes Harvard University professor Dr. Demos confirming his enrollment in the professor's Philosophy of Plato course. He also thanks Dr. Demos for his "kind words" regarding an article he wrote for "Christianity and Crisis." In addition, Dr. King further extends his regards to Mrs. Demos, whom Mrs. King studied with at the New England Conservatory of Music.

Letter from Robert Harris to SCLC

Thursday, June 17, 1965
Michigan (MI)

Mr. Harris offers the SCLC assistance from the Michigan Chapter of the Law Students Civil Rights Research Council to research civil rights problems.

The Central Presbyterian Church Letter to MLK

Monday, August 1, 1966
Denver, CO, JORDAN

Elmer Elsea enlightens Dr. King on how his involvement with the previous Holy Week brought joy and blessings. Mr. Elsea discovers Dr. King will be returning to the Holy Land of Jerusalem for the Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom. Mr. Elsea encourages Dr. King to utilize Citexco Tours to conduct his expedition.

Statement by Roy Wilkins to Congress

Thursday, January 12, 1967

The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights adopted this statement by Roy Wilkins, Chairman, for the opening of the 1967 Congressional session. Their agenda includes full compliance with all existing civil rights legislation, equality and justice in the courts, greater protection for those who exercise their civil rights, and an end to housing discrimination. Wilkins states that economic and social conditions must be created so that civil rights guaranteed by law can be realized.

Request For Meeting Telegram From Dr. King To Mayor Daley of Chicago

Sunday, March 13, 1966
Chicago, IL

This telegram dated March 14, 1966, was sent to Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley of Chicago from Dr. King. Dr. King asks the Mayor if he can meet with him in city hall, along with other religious leaders. He wants to discuss with the Mayor about considering programs to eliminate slums,expand health services, and to improve employment and job training opportunities for the people of Chicago.


Dr. King cites the political philosopher Montesquieu on his ideology of the weakness of laws. He further details the comparison of coexistence and consecutive social status. Dr. King concludes with the elaboration of Montesquieu's use of facts.

Letter from Dorothy Height to Dr. and Mrs. King

Thursday, December 8, 1966
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Noted civil rights leader and women's activist Dorothy Height invites Dr. and Mrs. King to be special guests at the National Council of Negro Women's Life Membership Dinner. The event is also set to honor union leaders A. Philip Randolph, Walter Reuther and Mrs. Arthur Goldberg. Singer Lena Horne serves as a co-host to the dinner.

Letter from Mrs. Emma L. Jones to MLK

Wednesday, February 3, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Richmond, VA

Emma L. Jones writes Dr. King on behalf of Third Street Bethel A. M. E. Church requesting permission to use his name and picture on their key ring project.

Support Correspondence from Harold Ford to MLK

Sunday, September 3, 1967
Washington (WA)

In this letter, Harold Ford stresses the importance of the movement and the need for more privileged whites to lend a helping hand. He states that everyone has a moral responsibility to ensure the welfare of man kind and no one should haphazardly turn a blind to the issues of race and economics.

Letter from Philip M. Segelin to MLK

Wednesday, July 29, 1964
Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Philip M. Segelin, Member of the Cleveland Heights-University Heights School Board, informs Dr. King that he has read Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" and that said publication has provided enlightenment on the issue of civil rights. He recommends that Dr. King look into having a paperback edition published to widen distribution.

Letter from Rosemary O'Neill to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968
New York (NY)

Rosemary O'Neill of the College of Saint Rose in Albany, New York writes Dr. King regarding Choice '68, the National Collegiate Presidential Primary. O'Neill, Choice '68 Campus Coordinator, requests campaign materials such as fliers, pamphlets and fact sheets to inform students on various candidates.

Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

Tuesday, June 11, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes to President John F. Kennedy about the President's speech to the nation. Dr. King writes that he found the speech to be most eloquent and unequivocal.

Letter from Darnell Garner to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Darnell Garner offers condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death, and he invites her to a mass at his church

Telegram from Thich Nhat Hanh to MLK

Saturday, February 24, 1968
Missouri (MO), VIETNAM

Thich Nhat Hanh informs Dr. King that he will be in Atlanta from February 24th to February 29th.

MLK in Memoriam

Washington, D.C., Pennsylvania (PA), VIETNAM, Georgia (GA)

Following Dr. King's assassination, this tribute highlights King's life and the impact he had on the world. It includes a reading from "The Negro American: A Documentary History," an audio recording of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream Speech" and his eulogy. test2

James Meredith Article

Mississippi (MS)

A newspaper article describes an argument that occurred between James Meredith and a group of black deacons in the city of Canton, Miss. The argument ultimately led to Meredith stating "I can understand why so many Negroes have been lynched."

Letter from Irene M. Koch to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

Irene M. Koch uses a Native American legend of a man walking in the moccasins of his enemy to gain understanding of his enemy. She relates this legend to the current civil rights movement and specifically the civil rights movement in Chicago, Illinois.

Letter from Dave G. Pettigrew to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968
Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Dave Pettigrew, the Campus Coordinator for Choice '68 at the University of South Florida, invites Dr. King or "any of his representatives" to speak to the University. If someone is able to attend, Pettigrew requests information on their candidate and their potential responses to the three referendum questions listed.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Watkins

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Watkins regarding her son's current legal situation.

Letter from M. Emelene Wishart to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

M. Emelene Wishart is concerned that Dr. King is weakening the fight for civil rights by campaigning to end the Vietnam War. Wishart asks Dr. King if he is attempting to "embarrass the US administration or beat Carmichael in the civil disobedience game."

Selma Friendship Day Report

Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS)

This document highlights information surrounding "Selma Friendship Day," which was a white-led counter-protest intended to offset the effects of Kingian boycotts. This counter-protest was met with a demonstration, in which 120 pro-Kingian persons were arrested and the local SCLC office was barricaded.

Letter from Dora McDonald to H. D. Bollinger

Tuesday, January 5, 1965
Nashville, TN, Nebraska (NE)

Miss McDonald sends Dr. Bollinger an expense statement for Dr. King's appearance in Lincoln, Nebraska.

We are Still Walking

Saturday, December 1, 1956
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King describes how African Americans reacted to the Klan's plan to intimidate them after the decision of the Supreme Court. Although deeply involved in the bus protest, Dr. King stated that there were other goals to achieve such as establishing a bank and credit union in Montgomery for African Americans.