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MLK - Out of the Night of Segregation

Saturday, February 1, 1958
Philadelphia, PA, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

This essay by Dr. King is featured in the February 1958 edition of Lutheran Woman's Work. King focuses on nonviolence and segregation while critiquing the sociological impacts of oppression.

Letter from Ruth E. Foster to MLK

Monday, March 11, 1968
Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Foster writes Dr. King expressing doubt in his nonviolent methods. She feels his nonviolent marches are an ineffective way to gain equality for Negroes.

MLK Outline of Biblical Texts

Dr. King outlines the Old Testament biblical book of Samuel and records information regarding the lives of Saul and David.

Sermon Outline

This document outlines sermon notes and ideas. Dr. King references passages from the book of Luke. He also wonders what Christ did to give people hope when their desires had not been reached. King also discusses that Jesus conquers time, where as, human beings are victims of time.

Letter from the Frink Family to MLK

Monday, December 25, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL)

Father and husband John Frink, sends a $200 donation to Dr. King and the SCLC. The donation was made possible by not getting anyone any Christmas gifts. The author writes of a future intent to contribute physical aid to the organization in their hometown of Florida. In closing, Frink requests information regarding sponsorship of a needy family for the purpose of teaching his children how to be of service to others.

Vote of Confidence for Negro Leader

Wednesday, January 24, 1968

In this editorial, a study of 300 negro in 13 cities, was conducted to determine the public attitude towards Dr. King.

Letter from Donald W. Morgan to MLK

Thursday, December 31, 1964
Vermont (VT), Atlanta, GA

Donald Morgan informs Dr. King that northern locations such as New England and Vermont experience racial issues. Mr. Morgan serves as the chairman of the program committee for the 1964 Annual Meeting of the Vermont Congregational Conference. Dr. King is extended an invitation to speak at this conference which is located at the Rutland Congregational Church.

Letter from Paul Sturges to MLK

Wednesday, November 18, 1964
Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Rev. Paul Sturges invites Dr. King to address the annual meeting of the Massachusetts Baptist Convention.

Telegram from Bishop Ljungberg Dean Zetterberg to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964
Stockholm, Sweden, Oslo, Norway, Atlanta, GA

Bishop Ljungberg Dean Zetterberg writes Dr. King on behalf of the Cathedral in Stockholm congratulating him on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and invites him to attend a peace service.

Secular

Dr. King identifies the origin of the term secular as "meaning 'century,' that in time as distinguished from eternity." He explains that eternal things were more important that the things deemed to be belonging only to the present.

Letter from Beatrice Sutton Rogers to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967
Illinois (IL), VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CHINA, Washington, D.C.

Beatrice Rogers writes Dr. King expressing her disappointment with his change in his position after he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She encloses an article from the Washington Post in which critics discuss a speech King gave regarding Vietnam War.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding the "Times"

Tuesday, June 9, 1964
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, provided a detailed advertisement schedule for his latest book "Why We Can't Wait." Advertisements appeared in the Times, Harper, The Atlantic, Christian Herald and the Christian Century to name a few.

The Task of Christian Leadership Training for Education in the Local Community

Atlantic City, NJ, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New Jersey (NJ)

This undated manuscript was used as the basis for a speech Dr. King gave at the National Sunday School and Baptist Training Union Congress in Atlantic City, New Jersey in 1944. Dr. King defines community, lists three current problems within the community and explains the role of Christian leaders and education in a community. Dr. King identifies the most pressing problems as the economy, divisions within Christianity and race relations.

March for Poor People

Washington, D.C.

This document outlines the problem of poverty in America and suggests active participation as the only answer to the issue of poverty. The author argues that the March of Poor People to Washington is an opportunity to become involved in the effort to counteract poverty in America.

Letter from Joseph M. Hendricks to MLK

Monday, September 10, 1962
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Joseph M. Hendricks writes Dr. King requesting a copy of the speech Dr. King gave at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.

Letter from Harris McDowell, Jr. to MLK

Friday, January 8, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS)

Representative Harris McDowell, Jr. writes Dr. King stating that he voted against seating the Mississippi delegation. McDowell states, "I appreciate having your views regarding this important problem."

Letter from Larry T. Wimmer to MLK

Friday, December 2, 1966
Utah (UT), Atlanta, GA, Tennessee (TN)

Larry T. Wimmer, Assistant Professor at Brigham Young University, writes Dr. King seeking information regarding his views on communism and the Civil Rights Movement. He also asks if it is possible to obtain any films regarding the Civil Rights Movement and Dr. King's leadership.

Letter from Raphael Demos to MLK

Tuesday, May 28, 1963
Massachusetts (MA), Nashville, TN

Professor Demos commends Dr. King on his statement in "Christianity and Crisis" and inquires whether Dr. King was a student of his at Harvard. Demos also expresses his views on race relations in the South.

Letter to Twelve Southern Governors

Dr. King addresses twelve southern governors regarding the urgency of a unification between the Negro community and government leaders. Dr. King requests a meeting between the governors and himself to address and resolve their issues concerning race relations.

Letter from Harry B. Henderson Jr. to MLK

Sunday, April 23, 1967
New York (NY), VIETNAM

Harry Henderson writes Dr. King in support of Dr. King's stance on Vietnam. Henderson expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's "clearout and moving" speech regarding the United State's presence in Vietnam and he feels that only clergymen can take an effective stance. He also discusses how the Vietnam War is used as a scapegoat to keep the government from having to deal with discrimination issues in America.

Why We Cant Wait Sticker

This document is a New American Library window sticker advertising Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Letters from Irwin G. Perkins to MLK

Tuesday, June 7, 1966
CANADA, Montgomery, AL

Irwin Perkins, Minister of Donlands United Church, invites Dr. King to visit Toronto for their church's anniversary in the month of October. Perkins expresses their enjoyment of Mrs. King's inspirational visit the previous month and states that his expenses will be covered if he is able to attend.

Letter from Douglas Mosley and Dwight Eisenhower Campbell to MLK

Thursday, September 3, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

The Methodist Youth Fellowship of Philadelphia extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak at their Freedom Rally in early 1965. The officers of the fellowship also request the address of Reverends Walter Fauntroy and Wyatt Walker of SCLC.

Congressional Record: The President's Housing Bill, or, How To Succeed in Politics Without Really Trying

Washington, D.C., Illinois (IL), New York (NY)

Senator Charles Percy forwarded this article, published in the Congressional Record, to Dr. King. The article discusses President Johnson's attempted housing referendum, known as the Fair Housing Bill, in March of 1968.

Statement on Nonviolence in the South

Thursday, January 10, 1957
Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Tallahassee, FL, Montgomery, AL

This document is a statement addressing the need to combat the growing violence between southern Caucasian Americans and African Americans.

Letter from Hazel Gregory to MLK

Friday, July 19, 1963
Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Hazel Gregory, on behalf of the Montgomery Improvement Association, asks Dr. King about transportation to the March on Washington. She also commends him on his recent article published in "Ebony." Dr. King was president of the Montgomery Improvement Association from 1955 to 1960. The organization was founded after the arrest of Rosa Parks, which sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Letter from O. L. Sherrill to Ralph David Abernathy

Thursday, April 25, 1968
North Carolina (NC)

The Executive Secretary of the General Baptist State Convention of North Carolina requests multiple copies of the program from Dr. King's funeral service.

Response Letter to Mr. Frank Abrams from Dr. King

Friday, October 24, 1958
Montgomery, AL, New York, NY

Dr. King addressed this letter to Mr. Frank Abrams, as an expression of thanks, in response for his well wishes. As a another gesture of thanks, Dr. King indicated that he also enclosed a copy of his first book "Stride Toward Freedom."

Follow Me

Dr. King outlines a sermon. "Follow Me" and "The Call of Christ" are considered as possible titles.

Totalitarianism

New York (NY)

Dr. King quotes a modern historian on their ideas of totalitarianism.