Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"FRANCE"

Letter from J. Saba to Clarence B. Jones

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

"In this the blackest hour of our nation...," J. Saba refers to the assassination of Dr. King. Saba speaks to the urgency to preserve the "American Dream", in light of Dr. King's untimely death. He offers two fitting suggestions: first to establish a MLK, Jr. Memorial Library on Non-Violence and Civil Rights and second to erect a MLK, Jr. Interfaith Chapel at Morehouse College.

Letter from Daniel L. Eckert to MLK

Monday, January 9, 1967

This letter was written to Dr.King to express disapproval for Dr.King's support of Adam Clayton Powell. Mr. Eckert states that Mr.Powell should be treated as white leaders are treated.

Letter to Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968
Virginia (VA)

In this letter, the author suggests that the marchers of the Poor Peoples March should make a surprise visit to the estates of Senator Robert and Edward Kennedy during the historic event.

Letter from Walter Davis, Jr. to MLK

Monday, April 11, 1966
CONGO / ZAIRE, Atlanta, GA

Walter Davis, Jr. encloses a donation to SCLC sent all the way from the Congo. Mr. Davis expresses, "Of particular interest to us is the way in which you and your organization are able to get the participation of many groups who are interested in justice and social reform."

Telegram from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966
Chicago, IL

A. Philip Randolph expresses his discontent with the release of a manifesto from civil rights leaders without Dr. King's signature.

Loving Your Enemies

Sunday, November 10, 1957
Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL

In this sermon, Dr. King states that "love is the key to the solution of the problems which we confront in the world today." Dr. King notes that this is not a simple task, but it is necessary.

The Urban Coalition's National Coordinators Weekly Report

Friday, December 8, 1967
Washington, D.C., Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), New York (NY), New York, NY, Arizona (AZ), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Missouri (MO), Florida (FL), California (CA), Washington (WA), Pennsylvania (PA), Baltimore, MD, Maryland (MD), New Jersey (NJ)

This document contains The Urban Coalition's national coordinators weekly report. The report consists of a schedule of activities, a list of the Task Force on Educational Disparities members, and a list of the Task Force on Housing, Reconstruction, and Investment members.

A Realistic Look at Race Relations

Thursday, May 17, 1956
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King gives the three views one can take regarding the state of race relations: optimism, pessimism, and realistic. Dr. King argues for a realistic stance because America has accomplished much in race relations, but still has a long way to go. He further explains that he thinks segregation is in its last days.

Telegram from Evert Svensson to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964
SWEDEN, Oslo, Norway

Evert Svensson congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of the Christian Social Democrats and his friends in Parliament. On behalf of his organization, he also invites Dr. King to visit Sweden in connection with his visit to Oslo.

Letter from Joseph S. Clark to MLK

Friday, July 17, 1964
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Senator Joseph S. Clark informs Dr. King of the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's support.

I Have A Dream

South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Alabama (AL)

In the most famous of his speeches, given from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial at the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Dr. King drew on themes from previous sermons and speeches, including an address he called The American Dream. Citing Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation, the US Constitution, and the Declaration of Independence, King calls upon the nation to fulfill its promise of freedom and justice for all of its citizens. Although he began by reading from a manuscript, he later abandoned it and spoke directly to the crowd of more than 200,000.

Free Southern Theater Requests MLK's Financial Assistance

Tuesday, June 29, 1965
New Orleans, LA, Atlanta, GA

John O'Neal, Executive Director of the Free Southern Theater in New Orleans, requests financial assistance from Dr. King and the SCLC. Mr. O'Neal oversees a professional touring ensemble that performs in six states in the Deep South and a pilot project for a community theater program.

Statement by the President of the Montgomery Improvement Association

Wednesday, November 14, 1956
Montgomery, AL

Dr. King makes a public statement regarding the Montgomery Bus Boycotts. The Supreme Court rendered a decision making separate but equal unconstitutional. Dr. King states that the next course of action that should be taken is the implementation of this noble decision and the end of the long night of enforced segregation.

Letter from Marlys Michels to MLK

Tuesday, April 4, 1967
Minnesota (MN)

Miss Michels informs Dr. King that she will no longer contribute to the SCLC. She disagrees with Dr. King's statements on the Vietnam War, as well as his support of Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from Don DuMont to MLK

Sunday, October 24, 1965
Chicago, IL

Mr. DuMont expresses his disapproval of Dr. King's leadership of the negro race and the association of the movement with Christianity, because he seeks proof that Dr. King's movement is not "Communist-inspired." Dumont was an evangelist who ran unsuccessfully for a variety of political offices.

Letter from MLK to Chris Folker of Sweden

Wednesday, April 20, 1966
Stockholm, Sweden

Dr. King expresses gratitude for Chris Folcker's support and hospitality during his trip to Sweden. He also shares his satisfaction with the unique reaction of Mr. Folcker's organization.

University of Wisconsin Speakers Bureau Contract for MLK

Atlanta, GA, Wisconsin (WI), Chicago, IL

This is a contract from the Adult Education Council of Greater Chicago signed by Darrel R. Douglas, of the University of Wisconsin. It records the stipulations agreed upon for Dr. King to deliver a speech.

Letter from MLK to Joseph White

Monday, January 30, 1967
New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Dr. White's contribution to the SCLC and apologizes for the delay of response that was due to a high volume of other calls and letters.

Letter from James Dombrowski to Mrs. King

Thursday, October 1, 1959
New Orleans, LA, Mississippi (MS)

In this letter, James Dombrowski of the Southern Conference Educational Fund requests financial contributions from Mrs. Coretta S. King for a proposed publication to be entitled "The Color Line in Voting." The initial prototype publication would include the stories of Gus Courts and George W. Lee, who were assassinated, after refusing to remove their names from a voter registration list in Humphreys County, Mississippi.

Letter from M. C. Chagla to MLK

INDIA

On behalf of the Indian Council for Cultural Relations, the president, C. Chagla invites Dr. King to deliver the seventh series of Azad Memorial Lectures.

Worship

Dr. King defines worship.

Telegram from Richard C. Gilman to Dora McDonald

Saturday, November 12, 1966
Los Angeles, CA

Richard C. Gilman sends this telegram to Dora McDonald confirming Dr. King's speaking engagement at Occidental College.

Letter from Asbury Howard to MLK

Wednesday, June 30, 1965
Denver, CO, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN), South Carolina (SC), Texas (TX), Mississippi (MS)

Asbury Howard, Vice President of the International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, informs Dr. King of the harassment and attacks their union has endured for several years. He explains the 1949 indictment of officers from the union on charges of "falsely signing non-Communist affidavits." The case was dormant until government brought the case to trial in 1959 during a strike of 40,000 allied worker and copper miners. Howard cites this as evidence of union busting. He requests Dr. King's commentary and encloses a pamphlet regarding the case.

Appreciation Letter to MLK

Wednesday, August 21, 1963
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

President John F. Kennedy writes Dr. King expressing appreciation for his support during this difficult time. President Kennedy is referring to the death of his second son, Patrick Bouvier Kennedy, who died two days after his birth August 7, 1963.

Letter from MLK to Dr. E.F.S. Davies

Tuesday, July 20, 1965
Virginia (VA)

Dr. King recognizes the significant work of fellow activist A.J. Muste and the Fellowship of Reconciliation. He states that he is a diligent member of the organization and pledges his full fledged support to Muste's leadership.

William James

Dr. King briefly discusses philosopher William James and his lectures entitled "The Variety of Religious Experience."

Card from Sophia Anderson to MLK

New York, NY, New York (NY)

Mrs. Sophia Anderson wishes Dr. King a speedy recovery.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK

Thursday, July 26, 1962
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

In reply to Dr. King's telegram concerning the actions of a Mitchell County peace officer towards Mrs. Slater King, the wife of a civil rights activist and successful real estate broker, Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall writes that an investigation of this matter has been ordered.

Letter from MLK to Louis O. Kelso

Friday, January 26, 1968

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Attorney Louis O. Kelso for sending him an autographed copy of, "How to Turn Eighty Million Workers into Capitalists on Borrowed Money."

MLK's Statement Upon Return to Montgomery

Friday, October 24, 1958
Montgomery, AL, New York, NY

Dr. King expounds on his brutal attack by the "deranged woman" Izola Ware Curry, in which he was stabbed near the heart. He stresses the importance of remaining committed to nonviolence and says he is grateful for the outpouring of sympathy and affection he received while in the hospital.