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Letter from Rembert Stokes to MLK

Monday, December 16, 1963

The President of Wilberforce University anticipates Dr. King's speech before a delegation of the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Rembert Stokes also notes that Dr. King would receive a donation following his address, to help support the civil rights movement. Stokes wishes that Dr. King's message would center around the AME church leadership's involvement in the freedom struggle.

Letter from G. Merrill Lenox to MLK

Friday, April 19, 1963

G. Merrill Lenox, Executive Director for the Metropolitan Detroit Council of Churches, informs Dr. King he is being remembered and in the daily prayers of thousands during his incarceration in the Birmingham Jail.

Letter from MLK to Robert Weaver

Monday, August 21, 1967

Dr. King writes HUD Secretary Robert Weaver to discuss issues regarding urban conditions and economic development.


Dr. King writes about God, according to the first chapter of the Old Testament book, Nahum.

MLK on the Seating of Julian Bond

Wednesday, January 12, 1966

Georgia State Legislature has refused to seat Representative-Elect Julian Bond. Dr. King expresses his disdain for the social injustice. His plan of action is to combat this prejudice by rallying members of the white and black community to engage in protest.

I've Been To The Mountaintop

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

"I've Been to the Mountaintop" is the last speech Dr. King delivered. A day after making this address at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, Tennessee, he was assassinated on the balcony of his hotel room. Dr. King spoke of faith, nonviolent protest and his support of the Memphis Sanitation Workers Strike. He urged both a march and a boycott against Memphis area businesses. Dr. King ended his speech by musing about his previous brush with death and other threats against him.

Letter from L. K. Jackson to MLK

Wednesday, May 29, 1963

Rev. Jackson updates Dr. King on his recent activities, how hard he has been fighting for equality for all Americans, and regrets to inform him that he is ill.


Dr. King notes a view of liberalism in Harry Emerson Fosdick’s “The Modern Use of the Bible.”

Thank-U-Gram from June E. Price to MLK

June E. Price sends Dr. King a "Thank-U-Gram" to congratulate him on the inspiring message he recently delivered and his dynamic leadership in the fight for first-class citizenship.

Letter from Carolyn Fewell to MLK

Monday, June 12, 1967

In this letter, Mrs. Fewell, secretarial assistant to the dean of the Wesley Theological Seminary, thanks Dr. King for his sending his book, "Where Do We Go From Here."

Letter from MLK to Herschel McGee about a Corporation

Monday, October 4, 1965

In this letter Dr. King thanks Mr. McGee for his $50.00 check for the starting of a corporation for Negroes, but he lets McGee know that he is unable to concentrate on the devlopment and is returning his check.

President Kennedy's Stand on Negotiation in Albany

In this statement made from the Albany, Georgia city jail where he was imprisoned, Dr. King expresses appreciation for President Kennedy's support of negotiation between Albany's City Commission and civil rights leaders.

Letter from Frank Thompson Jr. to MLK

Monday, February 17, 1964

New Jersey Democratic Congressman Frank Thompson thanks Dr. King for his message regarding the Congressman's part in the fight for civil rights. Thompson mentions that he considers Dr. King to be one of the "great leaders" of their generation.

Letter from Robert S. Swann to MLK

Monday, February 5, 1968

This letter to Dr. King accompanies the enclosure of a proposal regarding the Southwest Alabama Farmers Co-operative Association. Robert Swann hopes that this proposal can be discussed at the upcoming SCLC meeting in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Bishop P. Randolph Shy to MLK

Friday, August 11, 1967

Presiding Bishop of The Christian Methodist Episcopal Church, P. Randolph Shy, declines Dr. King's invitation to attend an upcoming convention. Bishop Shy mentions that he will make a contribution "through our churches to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference."

Letter from MLK to Robert Lewis Jr.

Wednesday, July 19, 1967

Dr. King expounds on Mr. Lewis' experiences and how they directly correlate with the effects of the racial divide. Dr. King further explicates the emotional stress that one faces as a child of both Africa and America.

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to President Lyndon Johnson

Tuesday, July 18, 1967

A. Philip Randolph, the President of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (an AFL-CIO affiliate), writes to President Johnson to urge him to convene a small group of national civil rights leaders to advise local leaders and businessmen on how to deal with the escalation of riots occurring all over the country.

Letter from Roud Shaw to MLK

Roud Shaw of Kentucky writes to Dr. King informing him that his defense is "too well written" and should be crafted for a second grade level. Shaw also encloses a self-written article that appeared in the Louisville Courier Journal, in which he affirms his support to Dr. King and asserts that Cassius Clay should not be drafted for military service.

Letter from A.C. Spectorsky to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

Editorial Director, A.C. Spectorsky, requests comments from Dr. King regarding an interview with Senator Charles Percy from the April issue of PLAYBOY Magazine. The Illinois Republican
discusses a range of subjects including American military presence in Vietnam, President Lyndon B. Johnson's leadership style, and Negro-white relations.

The Sentinel: Sweetheart's Korner

Sunday, August 21, 1966

Hattie Bea Carney expresses her views and feelings on the moral trend of young people. Throughout the article, Ms. Carney offers alternative, as well as, parental advice for Christian parents.


Dr. King identifies the origin of the term secular as "meaning 'century,' that in time as distinguished from eternity." He explains that eternal things were more important that the things deemed to be belonging only to the present.

Vietnam Week Pledge Card

The Student Mobilization Committee distributed this card as a promise to participate in the Student Week of Protest on April 8th- the 15th against the Vietnam war.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, August 21, 1964

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, writes about plans for a reception and press conference in Bonn, Germany. Ms. Daves mentions that Dr. King may be asked to deliver an address.

Southern Christian Leadership Conference Resolution

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference issues a resolution urging all religious institutions to encourage their members to vote in the local, state and national elections of 1964.

Letter from Dora McDonald to H. L. Wynter

Tuesday, May 18, 1965

Ms. McDonald writes a representative of the University of the West Indies to outline details regarding Dr. King's trip to the school. She confirms that Mrs. King will be traveling with Dr. King, provides their arrival times, and requests that the university does not schedule Dr. King for any additional engagements outside of the Valedictory Sermon.


Dr. King writes on the topic of religion, stating that the people living in the 18th century regarded religion as "the source of both political tyranny and social conflict."


Here Dr. King quotes Proverbs 8:22-23 and sketches his view that "Wisdom was created by God before the earth was created, and it aids him [sic] [in] the creative process."

Letter from MLK to Fellowship Baptist Church

Friday, May 5, 1967

In this letter Dr. King offers his gratitude for the contribution made by the Fellowship Baptist Church in Chicago, Illinois to the SCLC while explaining what the contribution is envisioned to accomplish and what the SCLC has already accomplished.

Letter from Ruthe T. Sheffey to MLK

Thursday, November 9, 1967

In this letter, Ms. Sheffey asks Dr. King's permission to use his "I Have a Dream" speech in her upcoming textbook, "Impressions in Asphalt." Ms. Sheffey is a faculty member at Morgan State College, who is working on a textbook of poetry and prose with coworker, Eugenia Collier.

Letter From Vice President Johnson to MLK

Friday, April 27, 1962

Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson wrote this note to Dr. King to respectfully decline his invitation to a luncheon and to serve on the board of directors of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights. He states he enjoyed their last meeting and is looking forward to the next one.