Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR"

Telegram from Jacob K. Javits to MLK

Washington, D.C.

Amidst the confusion of varying interpretations, Senator Jacob K. Javits asks Dr. King to share his interpretation of the term "black power," so that it can serve as a guide to others.

Letters Between MLK and Max Dean

Thursday, June 1, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Chicago, IL, Kentucky (KY), Louisville, KY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, Illinois (IL)

Dr. King sends a letter out to supporters, updating them on the progress made through the Civil Rights Movement. Dr. King also informs supporters that the work is far from done and asks for support. Writing on the back of Dr. King's letter, Max Dean informs Dr. King that his most important priority is an immediate and unconditional withdrawal from Vietnam. This is despite that Dean has "great respect" for Dr. King and the SCLC.

Letter from Paul R. Davis to MLK

Friday, June 23, 1967
Missouri (MO), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Paul R. Davis, Minister at First Congregational Church of Webster Groves, writes Dr. King regarding an interview between Dr. King and Father Daniel Lyons, S. J. about the connection between Vietnam and the need for US federal poverty program funding. Davis requests any material to "clarify critical interpretations" that may have been perceived by the interview.

Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

Monday, February 6, 1967
INDIA, New York (NY), New York, NY

Rodney Clurman, of the World Food and Population Crisis Committee, asks Dr. King if he can access his mailing list or circulate material that Clurman provides in an effort to end the famine in India.

Thank You Letter from MLK to Chilean Citizens

CHILE

Dr. King thanks Rodolfo Molina and Arturo Venegas for their contribution and support to the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Meir Weiss to MLK

Saturday, August 5, 1967
NORWAY, New York (NY), Georgia (GA)

Meir Weiss reports the facts that he has learned about Dr. King. He also requests an autographed picture and additional information about Dr. King's life.

God

Dr. King uses a series of scriptures from the Book of Psalms and I Chronicles to show God's abiding love and faithfulness.

Anonymous Postcard to MLK

Monday, September 18, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), Tennessee (TN)

Postcard has a photo entitled "Training Schools for Communists". American Opinion claims the photo was taken at the Highlander Folk School over Labor Day weekend 1957. Dr. King is depicted as one the attendees. Postcard was stamped with an Abraham Lincoln postage stamp (One of the guiding forces to Dr. King and his efforts)

Telegram from Newcastle University to MLK

Tuesday, January 17, 1967
UNITED KINGDOM

The registrar of Newcastle University inquires if Dr. King would be able to accept an honorary degree from the institute.

Legal Brief of Robert Greene

New York (NY), Alabama (AL)

Robert Greene, a mixed race individual from New York, appeals his case to the Supreme Court of the United States. Greene asserts that New York investigators and police conspired to violate his civil rights by means of wrongful arrest and detention, even after his innocence became apparent. Furthermore, as Greene is recognized as indigent, his case proceeds "in forma pauperis," or without the burden of court costs and legal fees.

Newsletter from The Knights of the Confederacy

Georgia (GA), New Orleans, LA, Atlanta, GA

The Knights of the Confederacy, a student organization that promoted segregation in public schools, used this flyer to recruit students who were aligned with their goal of protecting "white rights."

Letter from MLK to William Proxmire

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks William Proxmire for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter to MLK from Lee Wood

Thursday, May 11, 1967

Lee Wood writes to Dr. King explaining that the Democratic Party and Republican Party are "two shades of the same color." He suggests that because of his qualifications, Dr. King should run for President with Robert Kennedy as his Vice President.

Letter from Frederic C. Smedley to MLK

Sunday, May 14, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), New York, NY

Frederic C. Smedley, a lawyer and peace activist, writes to Dr. King regarding the 1968 election. He argues against Dr. King's picks for the best potential Republican and Democrat presidential candidates, saying that Vice President Humphrey would have a good chance at the White House if he were to publicly break with President Johnson over the Vietnam War.

Letter from Robert L. Green to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Illinois (IL), Michigan (MI)

Robert Green requests for Dr. King to write an introduction to the book, "Education and the Urban Poor."

Letter from Mary Tumbull to Dr. and Mrs. King

Wednesday, January 17, 1968
Ohio (OH), Columbus, OH, Chicago, IL

Mrs. Turnbull expresses her gratitude to Dr. and Mrs. King for their hard work in human rights.

Letter from Hosea Williams to Project Leaders and Field Staff

Tuesday, March 5, 1968
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Louisville, KY, Kentucky (KY), Tennessee (TN), New York (NY), Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), North Carolina (NC), Virginia (VA), Baltimore, MD, Maryland (MD), New Jersey (NJ), Pittsburgh, PA, Cincinnati, OH, Ohio (OH), Milwaukee, WI, Wisconsin (WI), Chicago, IL, South Carolina (SC), Detroit, MI, Cleveland, OH, Washington, D.C.

Hosea Williams, Director of National Mobilization for the Washington Poor People's Campaign, informs each project leader of their immediate supervisors of mobilization.

Letter from Stuart Nelson to Dora McDonald

Thursday, December 29, 1966
Washington, D.C.

The Vice President of Howard University writes to Dora McDonald, inviting Dr. King to visit the school while he is in town for the presentation of the Gandhi statue.

Letter from Erma Burton to the Steering Committee of SCLC

Monday, October 3, 1966
Atlanta, GA

Erma Burton stresses the importance of preserving important SCLC documents for the purpose of not only securing information for future research, but so that there will be no misinformation about their own history. She gives guidelines for how the documents should be protected and stored.

Letter from Roy T. Poorman to Philadelphia Tribune Editor

Monday, July 12, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL, GERMANY

Roy T. Poorman writes the editor of the Philadelphia Tribune regarding an article by Morris I. Liebman that opposed "negro civil rights protest demonstrations." Poorman identifies Liebman as a person of Jewish descent and compares the techniques of Dr. King to Biblical leader Moses. Poorman also discusses the lack of action by Jews in America or Germany prior to the genocide of 6,000,000 Jews along with the recent discrimination of the Jewish people in other countries. He writes in support of Dr. King's approach.

National Sharecroppers Fund Annual Report

Frank P. Graham, chairman of the National Sharecropper's Fund, mails out two separate articles from The New York Times and The New York Post that referencing the organization which supports migrant farm workers. Graham provides factual information pertaining to the proposed legislation to improve living standards for farm workers, and communicates the need for such a proposal.

Letter from MLK to Attorney Bell

New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King writes Attorney Bell thanking him for offering his services "to the Freedom Movement and the work of the SCLC."

MLK Question Response on Ministry and Segregation

Georgia (GA)

This document features Dr. King's listed "Question: How far is the fact that you are a minister involved in your action?" and its subsequent answer. Citing the "church...[as]...the chief moral guardian of the nation," Dr. King uses the example of the Southern Baptist Convention's hypocrisy regarding segregation.

Epicureanism

Dr. King documents a passage from William De Witt Hyde's "Five Great Philosophers of Life" on Epicureanism. The passage outlines Epicurus' view on pleasure and the impersonal nature of the world.

Statement by MLK

Virginia (VA), Arkansas (AR), North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King discusses the backlash received during the protests and demonstrations for civil rights. He asserts that nonviolence is the most successful weapon, and that in order to participate the individual must be bold, brave, and disciplined.

Attitude, Knowledge and Apperception of the Civil Rights in the Puerto Rican Public

PUERTO RICO

E. Seda Bonilla, Ph. D. writes about the acts of discrimination that occur in Puerto Rico. Backed by data, it is said that colored groups are being kept from achieving higher levels of education. In addition, Bonilla observes a correlation between individual occupational rate and individual degree of intolerance.

Schleiermacher (Religion & Ethics)

Dr. King quotes and writes about Friedrich Schleiermacher’s view in “Speeches on Religion” that criticizing a man’s actions is not criticizing his religion because he does not act from his religion. The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Debit Memo from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Friday, April 7, 1967
New York, NY

This debit memo from Joan Daves informs Dr. King of the expenses for "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Man

Dr. King quotes T. E. Hulme's publication Speculation regarding the nature of man.

Black Americans Take the Lead in War Protest

New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, CHINA

In this press release, the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam has mustered a significant following of supporters who are in staunch opposition to United States involvement in Vietnam. Black community leaders such as Stokley Carmichael, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and Rev. James Bevel reflect the growing discontent of blacks who "view this war as a war against a colored people" merely serving the economic interests of America.