Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR"

SCLC Action Committee Meeting

Sunday, February 11, 1968

This critical 2-day strategy meeting of key SCLC staff takes place 2 months prior to the projected start of the Poor People’s Campaign in Washington, DC. Dr. King expresses concern that they have not met their target goals for participation. Debate ensues about whether to call off the campaign or push it to a later date, and also whether SCLC should abandon all of its other commitments to ensure the success of this project. Problems and solutions are discussed. Staff assignments made for recruitment of the poor, materials, organizational structure, tentative plan of action, D.C.

SCLC Administrator Job Description

Monday, August 29, 1966

This document outlines the responsibilities of the role of an Administrator for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

School of Youth for Social Service

The School of Youth for Social Service in South Vietnam aided in immediate war relief, as well as a long range of programs such as rural health & sanitation, agriculture, and illiteracy.

Letter from Mildred R. Morris to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, August 27, 1963

Mildred R. Morris acknowledges receipt of a letter from Dora McDonald. She expresses her excitement regarding the possibility of meeting and informs McDonald about her new rates as a Professional Placement Counselor.

Letter from William Eerdmans, Jr. to MLK

Saturday, June 15, 1963

William. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company requests to reprint Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail" in a small booklet for wider circulation. Eerdmans, Jr. writes, "your words...are those of a Christian martyr and saint."

Letter from J. R. Coan to Alumni of Turner Theological Seminary

Friday, January 12, 1968

Mr. Coan, acting director of Turner Theological Seminary at the Interdenominational Theological Center, issued this correspondence to all of Turner Theological Seminary's Alumni. The letter announces the details and record of minutes for the Seminary's Third Annual Founders' Day Convocation.

Letter from William L. Hungate to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

Congressman Hungate challenges allegations made by Dr. King in a recent telegram regarding the Mississippi Delegation. Dr. King states, "A vote to seat the Mississippi delegation is a vote for organized violence, murder, and oppression." However, Congressman Hungate implies that Dr. King's claim is dubious unless he has sufficient evidence to support it. In closing, Congressman Hungate assures Dr. King of his allegiance to "real progress" while disapproving of "headline-hunting tactics."

Letter from MLK to The Honorable John Sherman Cooper

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Kentucky Senator John Sherman Cooper to commend his role in facilitating the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Pamela Buckler to MLK

Monday, September 26, 1966

Ms. Buckler writes Dr. King requesting SCLC literature on Negro politics for her sociology paper.

Letter from Richmond Rudden to MLK

Wednesday, October 20, 1965

Richmond Rudden, Chairman of the Lectures-Concerts Committee to Lafayette College, invites Dr. King to speak at the college during the 1966-1967 academic year.

Letter from Stacti L. Hourley to MLK

In this document, the Academic Vice President of Howard University requests an essay from Dr. King, on the occasion of his Gandhi Memorial Address. The writer further requests an autographed picture.

Forgiveness

Dr. King gives examples of what it means to forgive. Among other definitions, forgiveness means "that the past is overlooked" and that there is "a renewal of higher fellowship."

Telegram from J.C. Willimas and George Moore to the National Education Association of America

Tuesday, October 24, 1967

Mr. Williams writes to the National Education Association of America requesting an immediate investigation take place on behalf of the Atlanta School System. He suggests that discriminatory practices are present.

Letter from Grace Newman to Rev. Abernathy

Saturday, April 27, 1968

Ms. Grace Newman, National Chairman of the Fort Hood Three Defense Committee, informs Rev. Abernathy of her support of his leadership in SCLC. In honor of her pledge to Dr. King, she promises to continue working to organize poor communities in Puerto Rico.

Letter from MLK to Mimi A. Edwards

Tuesday, December 4, 1962

Dr. King responds to the letter of Mimi Edwards, as student at Elizabeth City Teachers College in North Carolina. He stresses the impact that a nonviolent movement can have on the South, the nation, and the world. He also enclosed copies of two articles to assist Miss Edwards with a paper she is writing.

Letter from Don Dickson to MLK

Monday, November 2, 1964

A representative of the New Zealand Baptist Theological College invites Dr. King to write an article for their 1965 college magazine.

Letter from Mrs. Ellen H. Mapes to MLK

Tuesday, March 21, 1967

Mrs. Ellen H. Mapes' letter to Dr. King to discusses her concerns regarding living in urban environments. She maintains that personal responsibility initiatives are more in order than current ones, e.g. family planning and self-improvement through education and job training.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Vincent

Wednesday, November 23, 1966

Dr. King expresses his gratitude, to Mrs. Vincent and the Millinery Workers Union, for their support and hard work towards the SCLC.

Letter to Mrs. Coretta Scott King from R. A. Peterson

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

This letter of condolence, originating from a Bank of America executive in San Francisco, CA and addressed to Mrs. King. The writer expresses hope that Dr. King's work and legacy will carry forward in his tradition of nonviolence.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Mr. August Schou

Friday, November 20, 1964

In this letter Ms. Daves addresses Mr. Schou's request to have copyright assignment to the speech which Dr King delivered at the University of Oslo, after receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. She stipulates to Mr. Schou's "first call" but stresses the importance of copyright protocol "after Oslo."

Letter from Philip M. Segelin to MLK

Wednesday, July 29, 1964

Philip M. Segelin, Member of the Cleveland Heights-University Heights School Board, informs Dr. King that he has read Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" and that said publication has provided enlightenment on the issue of civil rights. He recommends that Dr. King look into having a paperback edition published to widen distribution.

Miracle

Dr. King quotes an excerpt from Fosdick's "Modern Use of the Bible."

Poor People's Campaign 1968

This is an ad and itinerary for the Poor People's Campaign of 1968.

MLK's Address About South Africa

Friday, December 10, 1965

Addressing the apartheid situation in South Africa, Dr. King states that white rulers of South Africa, rather than black Africans, are "modern day barbarians." He continues to say that although black South Africans are the majority, they are oppressed by the minority. This is one of many occasions that Dr. King parallels racial injustices and views civil rights as an international issue.

Letter from Lou Goldstein to NAACP, February 6, 1968

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

In this letter, Lou Goldstein contacts the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to inquire about the location of photographs of Dr. King, Roy Wilkins, and A. Philip Randolph.

On Being A Good Neighbor

In Dr. King's sermon "On Being A Good Neighbor," he explains variety of stories that aid him in defining a good samaritan as an altruistic human being. He uses the path to Jerusalem and Jericho as a walking path where people must help others to accomplish one goal equality.

Gunnar Jahn's 1964 Nobel Peace Prize Speech on MLK

Gunnar Jahn shares background information about Dr. King prior to presenting him the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. In his speech, Jahn informs the audience about the bus boycotts and the campaign for equality that Dr. King led. He also discusses Dr. and Mrs. King's choice to leave the easier life in the North to fight a racial battle in the South. Lastly he discusses Dr. King's dedication to his church and his faith in God.

Knowledge of God

Dr. King quotes a segment of Professor John Baille's work regarding self-consciousness and God.

Anonymous Letter to Mrs. King following MLK's Assassination

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

This letter was written anonymously to Mrs. Coretta Scott King following the televised funeral of Dr. King. The author questions the nerve of Mrs. King to be in mourning, stating that she is no Jackie Kennedy and calling the entire thing a farce. In addition to accusing "The Black King," presumably Dr. King, of planning to burn D.C. and then swoop in to save the city, the author states their desire for African American leaders to receive "a belly full of lead."

Letter from MLK to Professor Zeegus

Dr. King commends Professor Zeegus for his organization, Heart of Africa, and its mission to "mobilize public support for the struggle of the American Negro in efforts to help achieve freedom and equality."