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Letter from Carl Haessler to MLK

Monday, June 12, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Massachusetts (MA), Michigan (MI)

Mr. Haessler informs Dr. King of the closing of the Michigan newspaper, "The Federated Press." Mr. Haessler writes that the remaining funds from the Press will be distributed among certain organizations, including the SCLC.

Letter from Ozro T. Jones to the SCLC's C. T. Vivian

Friday, May 28, 1965
Philadelphia, PA

Ozro Jones, President of the International Youth Congress, writes C. T. Vivian stating that he sincerely appreciates Dr. King for accepting the invitation to speak at the International Youth Congress in Chicago.

Letter from Mary A. Edmonds to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Mary A. Edmonds expresses her disapproval of Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Dr. S. M. Sophocles to MLK

Friday, July 10, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. S. M. Sophocles invites Dr. King to speak about civil rights at a cultural program for Pennsylvania Military College.

Letter from Judith D. Greenberg to MLK

Saturday, March 23, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York, NY, New York (NY)

Judith Greenberg of the Stern College for Women asks Dr. King about material for a report concerning Choice '68.

March for Peace Flyer

VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This flyer advertises the March for Peace. The event, which was organized in Atlanta and held on Hiroshima Day, focused on ending the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Jack Egle to Reverend Martin Sargent

Tuesday, April 12, 1966
FRANCE

The European Director of the Council of Student Travel, Jack Egle, writes Martin Sargent addressing a statement made in the Herald Tribune regarding Dr. King's and Harry Belanfonte's opinions on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Ellen G. Clarke to MLK about Information Request

Thursday, February 15, 1968
North Carolina (NC)

In this letter, Ellen Clarke, a student at St. Andrews College in North Carolina, requests the opportunity to meet with Dr. King and gather information about the SCLC, which she will then use in a school panel on religion and politics.

Paul's Letter to American Christians

FRANCE, New York (NY)

This is a sermon chapter and possible draft for Dr. King's book "Strength to Love." Dr. King writes from the perspective of Paul the Apostle. Through the words of King, Paul speaks to modern day American Christians and challenges them to uphold true Christian values. Paul notes the presence of economic, scientific, and technological development, yet questions the contradiction of social injustices in a society that seems so advanced.

Biographical Sketch of James Bevel

Nashville, TN, Tennessee (TN), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Jackson, MS, McComb, MS, Greenwood, MS, Mississippi (MS), Albany, GA, Selma, AL, Chicago, IL

This one page biography summarizes the achievements of James Bevel, one of the founding members of SNCC. The biography highlights Bevel's involvement with civil rights drives in Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi, including the Freedom Rides and numerous SCLC action programs.

The Commercial Appeal: But No Services

Sunday, January 7, 1968
Memphis, TN, Virginia (VA)

This photo and accompanying caption relate the story of Dr. King and an associate clerical organization conducting a silent vigil at Arlington National Cemetery after being blocked judicially from holding a memorial service in that venue.

Otherworldliness

Dr. King quotes the Epistle of Clement and Friedrich von Hügel's "Eternal Life."

Letter from Helen Paul to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C.

Helen Paul of Follett Publishing thanks Ms. McDonald for informing Dr. King of her request to publish several of his speeches.

An Edition of the SCLC Newsletter

Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

This April/May 1964 SCLC newsletter highlights the recent accomplishments of the SCLC and its members. Some of the topics discussed are the 50-mile march from Selma to Montgomery, Ben Hooks' recent judicial appointment, and Dr. King being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Canary McKay to MLK

Friday, February 4, 1966
Chicago, IL

Canary McKay shows her appreciation to Dr. King for the progress made as a result of the Civil Rights Movement. She also extends an invitation for King to speak at her church.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967
MALAYSIA, Atlanta, GA, SINGAPORE

This letter, signed "A Malaysian Citizen," expresses the author's hatred of African Americans. In addition to urging for their genocide, the author states that African Americans ought to be grateful that they are no longer enslaved. The author tasks the recipients of this letter, including Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and President Johnson, to circulate it widely in order to express what he claims are the Malaysian views of the 20th century.

Let My People Vote

New York (NY), Alabama (AL), GEORGIA, South Carolina (SC), Florida (FL), Louisiana (LA), Virginia (VA)

Dr. King addresses the problem of voting that Negroes in America are encountering and also talks about SCOPE's upcoming initiatives.

Dexter Echo: March 2, 1960

Wednesday, March 2, 1960
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This edition of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church newsletter, The Dexter Echo, reports information about upcoming events and the latest news, including a recent gift made to Dr. King and his family. A key article speaks to the power and necessity of worship.

SCLC Mail Log: January 12, 1968

Friday, January 12, 1968

This mail log lists several contact names and businesses that have had mailing correspondences with the SCLC. It is an example of the manner by which Dr. King and the SCLC handled such a large quantity of incoming mail every day.

Letter from Glenn Leggett to MLK

President Leggett expresses his appreciation to Dr. King for agreeing to speak at an upcoming Convocation, for Grinnell College. Leggett informs Dr. King that he is welcomed to rest in his home during his visit at the college.

Jo Marks writes Harry Belafonte Regarding Civil Rights Help

Thursday, February 2, 1967
Texas (TX), Chicago, IL, New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS)

Jo Marks writes Mr. Harry Belafonte a lengthy letter about the civil rights situation in Houston and to request that he perform at the Astrodome.

What Moderation Means

Saturday, August 14, 1965
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King explores the meaning of the word moderation, and shares his thoughts on its position in relation to nonviolence.

Grants of the Stern Family Fund

New York, NY

This memorandum, released by the Stern Family Fund, details grant offerings made by the foundation between March 1967 and February 1968. Among the grant recipients are the United Negro College Fund and the National Council of Churches.

SCLC Approved Budget

Tuesday, October 17, 1967

Planned financial expenditures are listed in this approved 1968 budget for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Stiv Jakobsson to MLK

SWEDEN, FINLAND

Stiv Jakobsson expresses his wishes for Dr. King's well being due to the recent attacks against him. Various organizations in Sweden are engaging into an annual conference and are confirming Dr. King's acceptance to speak at the event.

Dedication Page (Edited Draft) for "Why We Can't Wait"

Dr. King drafted this dedication page for his children, in his book, "Why We Can't Wait." Similar to the famous quote in his "I Have A Dream" speech, the dedication hoped that his children "would not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character."

Routing Slip

Wednesday, October 4, 1967

This document is an Office of Economic Opportunity routing slip from Maurice Dawkins. The slip has Dr. Kings signature on the first line.

The Many Faces of Black Power

CHINA, CUBA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

The author identifies several approaches to the notion of Black Power. The author concludes that Black Power is "a programmatic concept capable of objective definition", "it presents many difficulties", and that the negatives have outweighed the positives.

Supererogation

Dr. King defines supererogation.

Letter from Anonymous Sender to MLK

A critic writes Dr. King defending President Johnson regarding his decisions for the Civil Rights Movement and African-Americans.