Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"EGYPT"

Letter From India to MLK

Friday, June 25, 1965

Ram Aurangabadkar and Dinkar Sakrikar of India write to Dr. King concerning his civil rights efforts in the United States. As a token of appreciation for Dr. King's work, they offer a bronze statue of Gandi on behalf of their society. Aurangabadkar and Sakrikar request that the statue be placed in a children's park.

Telegram from MLK to Ralph McGill Regarding Bereavement

Thursday, March 22, 1962

In this telegram to Ralph McGill, Dr. King expresses his sympathy for the passing of his wife.

Adverse Postcard

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

The author of this postcard questions the concept of Black Power and informs Dr. King of his dismay for integration.

Letter from Irmgard Svenson

Monday, August 14, 1967

Irmgard Svenson requests that Dr. King send copies of his "Beyond Vietnam" speech.

Telegram to W. L. James from Dr. and Ms. King

Monday, January 2, 1967

Dr. and Mrs. King write Mrs. James expressing condolences following the death of her husband. Dr. James was a music educator at Spelman College and a 1923 graduate of Morehouse College . He served as Chairman of the Music Department at Spelman and Director of the Glee Club from 1933 to 1966. Dr. James died December 27, 1966.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eartha Kitt

Wednesday, January 24, 1968

Dr. King's secretary Dora McDonald commends actress Eartha Kitt for speaking "as a woman, among women.” Responding to a question by the First Lady at a White House luncheon hosted by Lady Bird Johnson, Kitt linked youth violence to the Vietnam War.

Letter from Alfred Martin of the Jefferson Democratic Association to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1961

Alfred Martin, representing the Jefferson Democratic Association, offers his support to Dr. King and the struggle for equality in the south. He forwards two documents to Dr. King pertaining to his potential run for Congress and his ideas to assist Negroes in being able to vote. Martin also encloses a donation and apologizes for his inability to send more.

John Coleman Bennett

John Coleman Bennett's work is used to flesh out an outline on the issues that plague society. The issues are broken up into five sections: the fact of evil, four problems of social gospel, economic, state and the church, and Communism. Bennett was a Christian theologian, author, and president of the Union Theological Seminary in New York.

Letter from Vice President Johnson to MLK

Friday, April 27, 1962

Lyndon B. Johnson invites Dr. King to a conference to hear a progress report on the work of the President's Committee for Equal Employment.

Race Problems in Albany

Wednesday, December 13, 1961

In the midst of some very disturbing events taking place in Albany, GA, Edward P. Morgan of the American Broadcasting Company writes this captivating broadcast message reflecting his personal view of the Negro's increasing self-awareness and recognition of its place in society.

Appeal to the President of the United States

Thursday, May 17, 1962

This document, prepared for the centennial of the Emancipation Proclamation, serves as a plea to President Kennedy and a legal brief. The plea is to use the centennial as an opportunity to "rededicate" the nation to the principles embedded in the Emancipation Proclamation; to make an executive order to end all statutory segregation and discrimination in the states; and to exercise full leadership protecting civil rights, including the use of force, if nonviolent methods fail.

Letter from August Schou to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964

August Schou, the Director of the Nobel Committee, sends Dr. King more information regarding the 1964 Peace Prize Award Ceremony. Logistics such as the time, location and instructions for his speech are described in this letter.

Dr. King Acceptance as an Honorary Member of Wellesley College

Dr. King often had delayed responses due to his strenuous schedule, traveling obligations, and completion of the necessary duties as the President of the SCLC. Dr. King's letter to Miss Knight provides an example of the unintentional unpunctuality as he accepts an award as an honorary member of Wellesley College class of 1966.

Letter from Mary L. Powell to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1968

Mary L. Powell writes to Dr. King expressing how she has been following and considering his plans, but disproves of his methods.

Request for MLK To Submit an Article for TV Guide

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

TV Guide seeks Dr. King's critique of television's positive contributions to life in the U.S., race relations, and negro life.

Letter from Melvin Kennedy to Mr. Ralph Helstein Recommending a Student Scholarship

Thursday, March 2, 1967

Melvin Kennedy, Chairman of the Department of History at Morehouse College, recommends a student for a United Packinghouse Scholarship.

Invitation from The European Baptist Federation to MLK

Friday, March 6, 1964

A representative from the European Baptist Federation writes Dr. King thanking him for accepting the invitation to speak at their fifth conference. Dr. King will be a guest of honor and speak among Europeans of all denominations.

Letterfrom Agricultural, Mechanical and Normal College to MLK

Thursday, October 7, 1965

Haridas T. Muzumdar, Chairman of the Department of Sociology and Dean of the Division of Arts and Sciences at Agricultural, Mechanical and Normal College, inquires if Dr. King will have time to have a meeting with him.

Letter to Mrs. King from Mrs. Lawrence Greene

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

In this letter, Mrs. Lawrence Greene offers encouragement to Mrs. King. As such she writes, "You have today made yourself a woman among women. In your time of grief you thought not of yourself but of us that cry in the night."

Injustice

Here, Dr. King records Reinhold Niebuhr's thoughts on injustice as it relates to pride.

MLK Sermon Outline

Dr. King prepares an Easter sermon entitled "Why Death Could Not Hold Him." He references scripture passage Acts 2: 24. The date and place of delivery for this sermon is unknown.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Royalties

Tuesday, October 25, 1966

In this letter, J. Campe encloses royalties for Dr. King's "Why We Can?t Wait," and "Strength to Love."

Letter from Daniel B. Brewster to MLK

Monday, July 20, 1964

Senator Brewster thanks Dr. King for his kind letter and encloses a copy of the speech he delivered on the Senate floor before the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was passed.

Letter from MLK to J. Frank Patch

Friday, May 13, 1966

Dr. King declines to accept J. Frank Patch's invitation to attend the conference sponsored by the Baptist Union of Western Canada due to prior commitments in the United States.

Man

Dr. King quotes Psalms 144:4 and comments briefly on this biblical passage.

The Inauguration of Hugh Morris Gloster

This program commemorates the inauguration of Hugh Morris Gloster as the seventh president of Morehouse College.

Civil Rights Movement Suggestions from MLK Supporter

This note to Dr. King outlines six suggestions to address inequality and aid with employment, education and civil rights reform.

Monotheism

Dr. King cites passages in the sixth century BCE Second Isaiah (chapters 40-55) as the first clear evidence of monotheism.

Letter from Senator Hubert H. Humphrey to MLK

Tuesday, July 7, 1964

Minnesota Senator Hubert Humphrey thanks Dr. King for his praise regarding Humphrey's role in the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Humphrey would become Vice President later that year.

Proposal for Preventing Denial of the Right to Vote

Thursday, October 29, 1964

William L. Higgs proposes that the Democratic Caucus in the US Senate adopt a resolution that no Democratic Senator shall become chairman of a Senate Standing Committee if his seat was won in an election where there was substantial denial of the right to vote based on race. In Mississippi only 6% of eligible Negroes are registered to vote, yet US Senator James Eastland chairs the powerful Senate Judiciary Committee that considers legislation regarding the right to vote and also the appointment of judges charged with enforcing those laws.