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"EGYPT"

Evil

Dr. King references the religious philosopher William Ernest Hocking regarding the topic of evil.

Newspaper Article about Refresher Training and Employment for Teachers Displaced by Integration

This newspaper article frames the dilemma of teachers displaced by integration. Secretary of Labor W. Willard Wirtz urged state employment agencies to make a maximum effort to provide employment assistance and refresher training opportunities for these teachers.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963

Wyatt Tee Walker writes a letter to Attorney General Eugene Cook to clarify their previous conversation. Mr. Walker addresses multiple issues that were misunderstood. He then encourages Attorney General Cook to provide his office with a list of any questions and informs him that he is releasing the text of this letter to the news media.

Prayer

Dr. King writes about the topic prayer.

Statement on Morality in Selma Crisis

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

The undersigned individuals present at the Selma to Montgomery March write a statement regarding the conduct of participants. Accusations have been made stating marchers committed "acts of sexual immortality," which the undersigned aim to prove are absolutely untrue. Also included is a section on fiction and facts about the march, and a "Concluding Page Regarding Clergy for Alabama Truth."

Letter from Representative Charles Longstreet Weltner to MLK

Monday, January 4, 1965

Representative Weltner disagrees with Dr. King's assessment that Weltner's decision to seat the regular Mississippi delegation "was a vote for organized violence, murder, and oppression." Weltner also reminds Dr. King that he voted for the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Stichting Werkgroep Wereldunie Writes to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1967

Johan Keijser, writing for the Board of the Foundation of Stichting Werkgroep Wereldunie, sends a letter to Dr. King. It includes a list of names of those whom the group has invited to form a committee of support for their efforts in creating a "provisional world government." The list includes artists, intellectuals, national government leaders, and religious leaders from all over the world. Remarkably, it also includes "father of the hydrogen bomb" Edward Teller.

Letter from Henry R. Luce to MLK

Thursday, January 30, 1964

Henry R. Luce expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's letter that will be placed in his personal archives as a "highly treasured memory."

The Importance of Voting

Thursday, September 6, 1962

This transcript documents Dr. King's recorded statement intended to raise awareness of voting and voter registration.

Press Release Regarding Child Development Group of Mississippi

Friday, September 30, 1966

The CDGM Board of Directors expresses their outrage over being replaced by the group "Action for Progress in Mississippi." They feel that Sargent Shriver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, formed the group without their input and in violation of the OEO's stated policies.

Letter from Edward Rutledge and Jack Wood to Robert Weaver

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Edward Rutledge and Jack E. Wood Jr. represent the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing, Center for Fair Housing. They expound on housing, planning policies, and programs for New York City. In addition, they affirm their belief that policy-makers should include and reflect the concerns of the minority.

Prayer Pilgrimage

Various quotes are cited surrounding Dr. King's perception on love, nonviolence, spirituality, Montgomery, and more. Dr. King elaborates on the history of Montgomery and its direct relation to slavery. Ebony Magazine releases the exclusive eight-point "Plan for Freedom" for Montgomery, calling Negros to mobilize for an all-out assault on segregation."The Death of Evil' is also cited which correlates such evil with details from the book of Exodus.

Letter from E. H. Williams to MLK

E. H. Williams writes to tell Dr. King of the great job he is doing speaking out on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Kenneth M. Stewart to MLK

Thursday, December 2, 1965

Mr. Stewart informs Dr. King that the local paper on Long Island recently ran an ad by the John Birch Society which featured a photograph of Dr. King at the Highlander Folk School. The photograph was used to associate Dr. King with communists. Stewart requests information about the photograph from Dr. King so that he can write a letter to the editor of the paper to protest the insinuation of "guilt by association."

Letter from Alma Szatmary to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

Alma Szatmary writes Dr. King concerning his stance on the Vietnam war. Szatmary writes that it should be prohibited for Puerto Ricans and African Americans to serve as oppressors in Vietnam when they are the ones being oppressed here at home.

Telegram from MLK to the Letters Department at Newsweek Magazine

Tuesday, November 21, 1967

Dr. King praises Newsweek magazine for making a persuasive appeal to the conscience and sanity of the nation on the racial crisis which engulfs America.

Letter From India to MLK

Friday, June 25, 1965

Ram Aurangabadkar and Dinkar Sakrikar of India write to Dr. King concerning his civil rights efforts in the United States. As a token of appreciation for Dr. King's work, they offer a bronze statue of Gandi on behalf of their society. Aurangabadkar and Sakrikar request that the statue be placed in a children's park.

Letter from The Bulstrode School Children to MLK

The Bulstrode school children write Dr. King concerning their initiative to fundraise for the Negro children in Mississippi and Alabama. They expressed to Dr. King how they decided to sell daffodils that were grown from their own gardens.

Letter from Eunice Janousek to MLK

Saturday, June 1, 1963

Eunice Janousek requests that Dr. King review materials in the matter of the Blakey case with the hope that he can provide assistance to those who are being oppressed in South Dakota.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Royalties

Tuesday, December 6, 1966

In this letter, J. Campe, associate of literary agent Joan Daves, encloses royalties for Dr. King's French edition of "Strength to Love".

Letter from Bent Ostergaard to MLK

Thursday, February 3, 1966

Mr. Ostergaard, a representative of the Danish section of Amnesty International, invites Dr. King to speak publically at a Copenhagen Cathedral. He also invites Dr. King to participate in a local tour to bear witness schools and various social institutions. The document concludes with an additional letter addressed to Dr. King's assistant Miss D. McDonald.

Daily News: NAACP Anti-South Propaganda Article

Thursday, March 5, 1959

The author writes about a secret meeting that was held at the NAACP's headquarters regarding race identification.

Telegram from Bill Barrett to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Congressman Bill Barrett sends this telegram to Dr. King notifying him of his support of the Committee Bill.

SCLC Fund Appeal from MLK

Dr. King discusses SCLC's continued priority work in the South. the Los Angeles riots and the need for ongoing voter registration. He makes the point that, "contributions are more than money - they are affirmations of confidence and dedication to democratic change."

Telegram from Congressman Don Edwards to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

California Democratic Congressman Don Edwards congratulates Dr. King on his April 4th, 1967 speech "Beyond Vietnam," and commends his courage in speaking "so clearly on this vital question."

Telegram from Zaira Singh to Pope Paul VI

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

Mrs. Singh, a Roman Catholic, requests that Pope Paul VI becomes a hostage in Hanoi, in order to end "barbarous American bombardment."

Letter from Henry Zucker to MLK

Friday, January 27, 1967

Henry Zucker, Executive Vice President of the Jewish Community Federation of Cleveland, encloses a check to Dr. King for the SCLC.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Dr. King received this letter from an individual who urges that both poverty and the Vietnam War should be ended by helping Americans and building up communities, and then sending peaceful volunteers to South Vietnam to do the same. The author, who has several family members in the service, chooses not to sign their name, fearing retribution, and states that they wish to broadcast this message around the world.

Letter of Condolences on the death of MLK

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

This letter of condolence was written less than week after the assassination of Dr. King. In this letter the writer states,"We shall work toward his dream".

God

Dr. King quotes Blaise Pascal's statement that there is no "medium point" as it relates to God.