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The Misuse of Prayer

Monday, July 17, 1950

In this sermon delivered at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, Dr. King elaborates on the proper uses of prayer and how it should be a supplemental asset.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The anonymous author details some of the hardships of his life and expresses his desire to incarcerate Dr. King permanently.

A Plan for Establishing Independently Owned and Operated Businesses in Inner City Areas

This document explains the need for independently owned and operated businesses in the city of Rochester, NY. It explains the path towards business development and the role that Kodak might play in encouraging that development.

Letter from Reverend A. S. Markham to MLK

Friday, November 27, 1964

Rev. Markham requests a response from Dr. King to an earlier letter. In the previous letter, Markham informed Dr. King that the Brotherhood Society of Beth Shalom Synagogue would like to present an award to Dr. King.

Draft of Where Do We Go From Here?

This document is a selection of a draft from Chapter VI of "Where Do We Go From Here," which is featured in the book "The World House."

Letter from MLK to Burke Marshall of the US Justice Department

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General in the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, expressing gratitude for Marshall's leadership in guiding the Civil Rights Act of 1964 through both houses of Congress.

Man The Christian View

Dr. King outlines Reinhold Niebuhr’s three ways in which the Christian view of man differs from all others, citing “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Sin

Dr. King outlines some insights regarding moral duty and sin.

Highlander Folk School April 1961 News Release

Monday, April 3, 1961

The Citizen Education Program efforts and past accomplishments are outlined in this document.

Letter from MLK to The Farmington Ministerial Association

Monday, January 30, 1967

This letter, dated January 30, 1967, was sent from Dr. King to the Farming Ministerial Association. In this letter, he thanks them for their contribution and apologizes for responding late. Their letter was accidentally placed in a folder entitled "Letters to be filed". He further goes on to state how he wishes they, along with other loyal contributors could know more directly how important their support is to the SCLC and all that it stands for.

"Are We Ready"

This column by Joseph D. Bibb makes the argument that not only is "the colored American" ready for his civil rights, but also it is hypocritical to deny him those rights given the ignorance and savagery of many of his white counterparts.

A Letter to Advisory Council Member from Robert L. Green

Wednesday, September 6, 1967

In this correspondence, Robert L. Green writes an Advisory Council member concerning the Chicago adult education project. Mr. Green notifies the member that due to a reduced monetary grant from the federal government, the program will officially close.

Letter from Martin J. Morand to MLK

Wednesday, May 20, 1964

Martin J. Morand, Vice-President of the Human Relations Council of Greater Harrisburg, inquires about Dr. King's availability to serve as a guest speaker at a late 1964 meeting in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

The SCLC Story in Words and Pictures

Ed Clayton creates a brochure on behalf of SCLC. The brochure contains a message from Dr. King, pictures of SCLC members, a history of the organization and information regarding their initiatives.

Letter from Philip Harnden to MLK

Friday, February 16, 1968

After reading Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait," Philip Harnden, a sophomore at Wheaton College, writes Dr. King expressing his newly changed insight on the Negro struggle. Mr. Harnden inquires about Dr. King's nonviolent approach and the black community beginning to abandon nonviolence by adopting more aggressive means to achieve their goals.

God

Dr. King writes about God, according to Isaiah 40: 12-31.

Get well letter from Nicholas Altomerianos to MLK

Friday, September 26, 1958

Nicholas Altomerianos, Mayor of Charles Evan Hughes High School in New York, sent Dr. King this get well letter on behalf of its faculty and students.

Letter from Mrs. Edna E. Williams to MLK

Thursday, March 17, 1966

Mrs. Edna E. Williams invites Dr. King to attend The Friendship Baptist Church's annual Harry W. Knight Award and Mortgage Retirement Fund Banquet.

A Chronology of Violence and Intimidation in Mississippi Since 1961

Thursday, April 4, 1963

This pamphlet produced by SNCC includes a number of reported violent attacks and intimidation tactics imposed on black Mississippi citizens from January 1, 1961 through February 4, 1964.

Letter from Chuck Barris to MLK

Tuesday, May 4, 1965

Chuck Barris has received national monetary support for the truck rentals used for the Selma to Montgomery March.

Notes Regarding Marriage

The handwritten outline conveyed Dr. King's view on marriage and what is required to maintain a happy union.

Program of the Chicago Freedom Movement

The SCLC and the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations (CCCO) issues a program addressing the goals of the Chicago Freedom Movement. The Chicago Freedom Movement is composed of a coalition of organizations who have decided to eradicate slums, ghettos and racism from the city.

Letter from Richard Schweiker to MLK

Tuesday, October 5, 1965

Representative Richard Schweiker offers his gratitude to Dr. King for his support for home rule in the District of Columbia. He, however, states that the legislation has been defeated on the floor of Congress. Schweiker urges persistence to see that home rule is established in Washington, D.C.

Schleiermacher

Dr. King quotes theologian Schleiermacher regarding the universe.

Letter from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Thursday, March 2, 1967

Roy Wilkins, Chairman of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, invites Dr. King to serve as a member of the conference's executive committee.

Letter from Leila Robins to MLK

Mrs. Robins thanks Dr. King for his stance against the Vietnam War. She and her fellow Canadians who object to their government supplying the United States with arms are particularly glad to hear him speak out against the war.

Draft of Address at the Fourth Constitutional Convention of the AFL-CIO

In this address to the AFL-CIO, Dr. King compares the labor and civil rights movements. He argues that those who are anti-labor are also likely anti-civil rights. Thus, the Negro understands the labor movement and shares the same enemies. Dr. King also predicts that the coming years will be trying ones for laborers due to the automation of work processes, stating that "automation will grind jobs into dust." Dr. King urges the labor movement to strengthen itself by embracing the Negro people.

Card from Dr. and Mrs. H. R. Holman

Dr. & Mrs. H. R. Holman send a holiday card with wishes for a prosperous New Year.

How Do You View the Progress in School Desegregation?

In this special for the New York Times, Dr. King shares his opinion on the progress made in desegregating schools.

Telegram from Sen. Edward Kennedy to MLK

Saturday, October 17, 1964

Senator and Mrs. Edward M. Kennedy congratulate Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.