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Apocalyptic Religion

Dr. King quotes John Oman's "the Natural and The Supernatural."

Religious Book Club Invoices to MLK

New York (NY)

The Religious Book Club sends Dr. King complimentary copies of books on prejudice and healing ministry in the church.

Letter from Gino Gullace to MLK

Wednesday, December 1, 1965
New York, NY, ITALY

Dr. King is asked to participate in a worldwide survey on the topics of "Happiness" and "Life After Death." The survey is sponsored by OGGI magazine a weekly publication in Milano, Italy.

Rutgers Professor Liberties Advocate

Thursday, August 18, 1966
New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), Mississippi (MS)

Arthur Kinoy, a civil rights lawyer, was arrested in House Un-American Activities Committee hearings. During the few minutes he was in jail, Kinoy spent his time offering free advice to the other inmates.

Letter from MLK to May Edward Chinn

Monday, December 23, 1963
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King responds to Dr. May Chinn's letter of support and encouragement. King states, "Our struggle for freedom is often difficult and the moments are often frustrating, but we gain new courage to carry on..."

Letter from Sue Jane Mitchell Smock to MLK

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
NIGERIA, New York (NY)

Mrs. Smock writes to Dr. King a "note of appreciation" regarding the Nobel Peace Prize and her artwork. A 1964 issue of Time Magazine featured a photograph of Dr. King's living room which displayed a "woodcut print" of Mrs. Smock's work. She also invites Dr. and Mrs. King to a future exhibition in Atlanta.

What Is Man?


This excerpt from Dr. King's book entitled "The Measure of Man" defines the physical and spiritual doctrines of Man. The passage highlights the sinful nature of human beings.

Telegram from Dr. Robert Green to MLK

Monday, September 12, 1966
Los Angeles, CA

Dr. Robert L. Green, Executive Director of Friends of SNCC Los Angeles, criticizes recent remarks made by the SCLC regarding his organization. Dr. Green also advises Dr. King that the SCLC should not comment on SNCC, if the SCLC cannot say something positive.

Letter from Donna Mitchell to MLK

Thursday, May 16, 1963
Detroit, MI, Birmingham, AL

Donna Mitchell, an African American youth from Detroit, writes Dr. King to extend her support and express her appreciation for what he and others are doing in Birmingham, Alabama.

Notes - Dr. King's Rough Draft of a Response to Mr. Walter Harding

This document is a rough draft of Dr. King's thank-you letter to Mr. Harding for a book he dedicated in part to Dr. King.

Letter from Richard Todd to Reverend Abernathy

Sunday, April 28, 1968
Connecticut (CT)

Richard Todd writes to Reverend Abernathy to provide and informative article regarding media personality and Yale University professor Dr. Albert E. Burke.

Letter from Gladys Bilcher to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967
California (CA)

Gladys Bilcher writes Dr. King expressing her enjoyment of one of Dr. King's speeches. This particular speech denouncing the war in Vietnam was given exactly one year before Dr. King's assassination on April 4, 1968.

Letter from Charles S. Spivey, Jr. to the Racial Justice Committee

Wednesday, March 6, 1968
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Jackson, MS, Chicago, IL, Boston, MA

Charles S. Spivey, Jr. outlines the events to take place during the SCLC Poor Peoples Campaign under the leadership of Dr. King. The main events all transpired after Dr. King's assassination on April 4th, 1968.

Letter from James P. Dixon of Antioch College to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965
Ohio (OH)

James P. Dixon, President of Antioch College, thanks Dr. King for accepting an invitation to speak at the school's commencement ceremony.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Abram Heschel

Friday, March 29, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

Harry Wachtel, legal counsel to Dr. King, expresses his gratitude to leading Jewish theologian Rabbi Heschel for his great works.

Saint Mary's Sends Invitation to MLK

Monday, November 28, 1966
Cambridge, MA, Atlanta, GA

This telegram sent to Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, requests that Dr. King make an appearance on March 12, 1967.

Letter from Barbara Hannagan to MLK

California (CA)

Barbara Hannagan, a student at Gridley Union High School in California, requests information from Dr. King to assist her with a term paper. She expresses her interest in the history of Negroes in America and how that correlates to the current issues of Negroes in "white society."

Telegram from A Philip Randolph to MLK

Tuesday, October 31, 1967
Alabama (AL)

Mr. A. Philip Randolph offers his brotherhood and support to Dr. King, who is imprisoned in the Jefferson County jail.

The Danger of Misguided Goodness

Under the title, "The Danger of Misguided Goodness," the central message in these sermon notes is the need for all individuals to be morally conscientious.

Telegram from John Barber and Rev. L. C. Filer to MLK

Albany, GA, Connecticut (CT)

John Barber, President of the New Haven Branch of the NAACP, sends his support to Dr. King while he serves time in Albany County Jail. Barber expresses sympathetic concern and promises to register financial support soon.

Letter from Bernard Roche to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
New York (NY)

Mr. Roche asks Dr. King whether he has considered that whites not only intimidate and murder African Americans, but also each other. He argues that whites don't treat anyone any worse than they treat themselves.

Mixed Marriage

Arizona (AZ), VIETNAM

This illustration, created by Reg Manning, depicts Dr. King presiding over an interracial marriage between the Civil Rights Movement and "Veatnik War Protests." This drawing was published in the "Arizona Republic."

MLK Outline - "Beyond Condemnation"

This handwritten note of Dr. King's is one of many such notes and outlines he wrote in preparation for a speech or sermon. The body of this outline references the Biblical passage John 8:2-11.

Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967
New York, NY

Cass Canfield, of Harper & Row, informs Dr. King about the enclosure of the first copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Letter to Representatives of Harper & Row and N.A.L from Joan Daves Regarding "Why We Cant Wait"

Tuesday, April 14, 1964
Chicago, IL

This memo serves to inform all parties involved with the publishing of "Why We Can't Wait" of the arranged prepublication agreements made by Mrs. Joan Daves.

Letter from Mrs. Stitzinger to Martin Luther King Sr.

Albany, GA

Mrs. Stitzinger asserts that the African American community is entitled to their rights but that it doesn't mean that white people have to acknowledge or accept them. She suggests that they create black owned restaurants, hotels, etc. solely so black people will not have to interact directly with the white race.

MLK Speech at Nobel Peace Prize Recognition Dinner

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Los Angeles, CA, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King delivers this address after returning from his trip to Oslo, Norway. A recognition dinner is held in his hometown of Atlanta, Georgia as an honor for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. King thanks supporters, family, and friends, however, accepts the award on behalf of the many people struggling for justice and civil rights. He states that oppressed people can only stay oppressed for so long because "the yearning for freedom eventually manifests itself."

Letter from Mrs. Lois Wheeler Snow to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

Ms. Snow writes to Dr. King extending support to the Reverend for his courageous condemnation of the Vietnam War. She makes a financial contribution, with regret for the inability to send more.

Letter from Norman Thomas to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Norman Thomas offers his congratulations to Dr. King for being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. Thomas also feels the need to thank the Nobel Committee for recognizing Dr. King's leadership in being the one to receive the coveted award.

Letter from Josephine Baker to MLK

Saturday, August 31, 1963

Josephine Baker expresses her admiration for Dr. King as a great leader and articulates her commitment to the Civil Rights Movement.