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Letter from Rhonda Hutchins to MLK

Rhonda Hutchins, a seventh grade student from George A. Towns Elementary, encloses a copy of a recent interview with Dr. King. Hutchins states, "feel free to make any necessary corrections and/or additions" before it is published.

Transformed Noncomformist

Friday, November 1, 1957

Dr. King delivered this sermon in November 1957 while serving as the pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. In the sermon, Dr. King discusses the Christian dilemma of being "a citizen of two worlds: the world of time and the world of eternity." He situates the experience of black people in America within this dichotomy, and asserts that Christians must not conform to the world of mass opinion when it lacks Christian virtue, but must assume nonconformity.

SCLC News Release: Alabama Primary

This SCLC news release lists African American candidates running for elective office in an Alabama primary.

Letter from MLK to Broadway United about a Contribution

Monday, January 15, 1968

In this letter Dr. Offers his gratitude to the Broadway United for a contribution. Dr. King also comments on how such funds are used and why such funds are needed.

Letter from David H. Staley to MLK

Sunday, May 7, 1967

David H. Staley agrees with the SCLC's stance on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Dr. and Mrs. C. E. Woodruff to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967

Dr. and Mrs. C. E. Woodruff praise Dr. King for his stance on the Vietnam War and enclose a check for the SCLC.

Installation Program for Rev. Kelly Miller Smith

Sunday, September 29, 1963

This is the program for the installation of the Reverend Kelly Miller Smith as Pastor of the Antioch Baptist Church in Cleveland, Ohio. Reverend Smith is installed as the Eighth Minister of the historical church, which began in 1893.

Request from Virgil Jones to MLK

Wednesday, March 6, 1968

Virgil Jones requests photocopies of letters sent to him on Nov. 9, 1967, as well as some other materials.

Letter from Kenneth Lee to MLK

Monday, August 1, 1966

Kenneth Lee, President of the International Confederation of Disarmament and Peace, invites Dr. King to become a sponsor of the organization.

Letter from Roger Bobley to MLK

Thursday, November 9, 1967

Roger Bobley, Revision Editor for the Illustrated World Encyclopedia, writes Dr. King asking him to submit a report on the "goals, importance and achievements of the Civil Rights movement in America."

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, August 7, 1964

Ms. Daves writes Dr. King concerning an invitation to speak from the University Settlement.

Letter from Virginia Madden to Mrs. King

Sunday, October 25, 1964

Virginia Madden, a 91-year-old white woman from Philadelphia, writes to congratulate Mrs. King on Dr. King's winning the Nobel Peace Prize. She says she has deplored racism and welcomes the new Civil Rights Law.

Letter from Frederick E. Wallin to MLK

Sunday, March 1, 1964

Frederick E. Wallin, of Alderson-Broaddus College, invites Dr. King to debate Fulton Lewis III. The debate will be sponsored by the Young Americans for Freedom. Television and radio coverage will also be available.

The Christian Sense of Individuality

Dr. King quotes from "The Nature and Destiny of Man: A Christian Interpretation" by Reinhold Niebuhr, on the Christian sense of individuality.

Adverse Letter from J. H. Moore to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968

J. H. Moore expresses his dislike for Dr. King's leadership style. He argues that Dr. King's efforts have stirred up hatred and discontent, even amongst black citizens.

Letter from MLK to Walter Harding

Friday, November 26, 1965

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation for the dedication of Walter Hardin's book. Walter Hardin was considered a distinguished professor and scholar at State University College of Geneseo, New York.

Letter from the Knox's Church to MLK

Friday, January 24, 1964

The Knox's Church of Canada expresses their excitement to see Dr. King's image in Time Magazine for 'Man of the Year.' The author asserts that after all John F. Kennedy may have not died "in vain." Robert A. Jackson expounds on the societal issues in Canada and how they experience some aspects of segregation in cities. Mr. Jackson invites Dr. King to the Knox church upon his availability.

Join the Ranks! Support A Worker

An SCLC field worker writes to gain support for the SCLC so that the organization can fulfill its mission to help blacks "achieve full citizenship rights, stimulate nonviolent mass action, and secure the right to vote."

Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK 7/25/1967

Tuesday, July 25, 1967

Cass Canfield, of Harper & Row Publishers, drafted this correspondence to Dr. King. Mr. Canfield was delighted to inform Dr. King of the impressive sales of his last book. He acknowledged that reorders for Dr. King's book came to an amazing $1,020, the best in comparison to bestsellers and wholesale stores. The book being referred to, in this document, would be Dr. King's most prophetic, entitled, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

MLK Sermon: Non-Conformist

Sunday, January 16, 1966

Dr. King delivers this sermon at Ebenezer Baptist church in Atlanta, Georgia. He references the statement Representative Julian Bond made regarding the Vietnam War and discusses the responsibility of Christians to be morally noble instead of socially respectable. He references multiple biblical figures and explains the importance of not conforming to society.

Letter from Victor Seidel to MLK

Sunday, March 4, 1962

Victor M. Seidel requests a copy of Dr. King's lecture that was delivered at the University of Texas entitled "Civil Liberties and Social Action."

Letter from Bob Strain to MLK

Monday, December 25, 1961

Bob Strain writes Dr. King after reading an article in Newsweek entitled "Albany Movement." He apologizes for the ignorant behavior of fellow whites and expresses his desire to be a part of the movement. He also conveys his admiration for Dr. King and his work.

Letter from David Mays to Dora McDonald

Monday, October 28, 1963

David Mays, Chairman of the Department of Speech and Theatre at Austin Peay State College in Clarksville, Tennessee, participates in a continued correspondence with Dora McDonald. Mays inquires if the speech he requested will be under separate cover, as it was not enclosed in the recent letter. He also requests Dr. King's permission to make copies of the speech in order to pass out to students in his Principles of Rhetoric class.

Letter from Elsa Wischkaemper McIntyre to MLK

Sunday, November 3, 1963

Elsa McIntyre writes to Dr. King to seek information on how to contribute to his organization. Mrs. McIntyre was moved by Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech and inquires about obtaining a copy.

Letter from Macedonia Church to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1968

Members of Macedonia Church seek advice and help from Dr. King in regards to continuing Sunday worship service.

Suffering

Dr. King records J. S. Mill’s view of suffering.

Letter from Carlos G. Randall to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

Carlos Randall writes Dr. King expressing that he once really liked him, but now he is unsure due to King's stance on Vietnam. He asserts "So now the USA is a purveyor of violence?" and asks if Dr. King believed that he would be able to give a similar speech in Moscow or Pekin and still freely receive his letter.

Telegram from Artis Abrham to MLK

Friday, March 11, 1966

Artis Abrham asks Dr. King's assistance regarding the Freedom Festival. Abrham reports that he has delivered posters and sold tickets to the festival, but the financial secretary still wants him to purchase his own ticket to attend the event.

Letter from Mary Ann Quilter to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Ms. Quilter informs Dr. King of a political event taking place on campus and asks him for any campaign literature he can provide and a picture of himself.

The Pulpit: A Journal of Contemporary Preaching

As a "journal of contemporary preaching," The Pulpit includes numerous sermons and various religious teachings including Dr. King's "A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart."