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Letter from Dora McDonald to Altina Carey

Monday, January 8, 1962
California (CA)

Dora McDonald informs Altina Carey that she discussed his letter with Dr. King over the telephone and he looks forward to hearing from Mr. Carey after his meeting with Mr. Killens.

Letter from Florence Read to MLK

Wednesday, May 5, 1965
LEBANON, California (CA), ISRAEL

Florence Read informs Dr. King that she received news of his Nobel Peace Prize while traveling in the Middle East. She encloses articles from The Jerusalem Times and The Daily Star of Beirut for Dr. King's records.

Letter to Mrs. King from Mrs. Lawrence Greene

Tuesday, April 9, 1968
New York (NY)

In this letter, Mrs. Lawrence Greene offers encouragement to Mrs. King. As such she writes, "You have today made yourself a woman among women. In your time of grief you thought not of yourself but of us that cry in the night."

Letter from Shirley Bird to Miss Sander

Monday, February 19, 1962
Texas (TX)

Ms. Bird discusses Dr. King's lecture appearance at the University of Texas. Dr. King's lecture was entitled "Civil Liberties and Social Action."

Statement for "Stride Toward Freedom"

New York (NY)

This is a financial statement for Dr. King's book "Stride Towards Freedom".

Letter from James Allen to MLK

Wednesday, April 6, 1966
Chicago, IL, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

James Allen expresses his opinion of the United States' involvement in Vietnam.

Memo from S. Leiss to MLK

Monday, June 7, 1965
JAPAN

S. Leiss encloses payment from Gakashu Kenkju Sha for a Japanese-language digest of "Why We Can't Wait" that was published in "Fair Lady."

Letter from Helga Gulbrandsen to MLK

Thursday, February 13, 1964
Oslo, Norway, Atlanta, GA, London, England

Helga Gulbrandsen invites Dr. King to speak for the Norwegian Fellowship in Oslo, Norway.

Letter from Morehouse College President to MLK

Saturday, May 7, 1966
Atlanta, GA

Morehouse College President Dr. Benjamin E. Mays appeals to Dr. King to contribute to the school on the occasion of the college?s 100th anniversary.

Revised School Desegregation Policies Under Civil Rights Act of 1964

Thursday, December 1, 1966

This document, published by the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, gives revised policies for school desegregation. The list of areas covered includes unequal programs and facilities, desegregation of staff and dismissals.

Statement to Confront the Conflict in Harlem

Monday, July 27, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. Arthur C. Logan, Chairman of the Board of Directors for HARYOU-ACT, Inc., writes this statement addressing the conflict in Harlem. According to Logan, "the present conflict in the Harlem community is a consequence of a long-standing feeling of powerlessness and its resultant frustrations." Specifically, the unrest in Harlem is attributed to the unreasonable behavior and inadequate training of the Police Department. This statement includes a list of recommendations to help confront the crisis.

Progress

Dr. King quotes from Browning's "A Death in the Desert."

Letter from Daniel Gallagher to MLK

Wednesday, May 23, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Connecticut (CT)

Daniel Gallagher, manager of Textile Workers Union of America, encloses a check in the amount of $10.00 as a contribution to the SCLC.

Support from Gardner Taylor to MLK

Brooklyn, NY

Mr. Taylor expresses his disappointment in the City of Atlanta's decision to arrest Dr. King along with 14 other individuals.

Letter from Rabbi Byron T. Rubenstein to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964
Connecticut (CT)

Rabbi Rubenstein writes to congratulate MLK on the Nobel Peace Prize and recounts his experience while working with the SCLC in St. Augustine, Florida.

Letter from Robert Dent to MLK

Wednesday, May 20, 1964
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

Chairman Robert Dent welcomes Dr. King to San Diego County on behalf of the Board of Supervisors. Dent highlights the growth of Southern California in industry as well as the county's work towards equality. Dent also discusses the importance of Christianity in their endeavors.

Letter from Benjamin Spock to MLK

Tuesday, September 15, 1964
Cleveland, OH, New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Ohio (OH), Georgia (GA)

Benjamin Spock, Co-Chairman for the National Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy, solicits Dr. King as a sponsor for a testimonial dinner. The committee will honor Max Youngstein with its Eleanor Roosevelt Peace Award at the dinner.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Heardy

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Heardy offering his apologies for being unable to financially assist her. He asserts that the SCLC financial resources are aimed at changing the laws so that a welfare system can be developed to further provide for the less fortunate.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Crawford Johnson

Tuesday, April 5, 1966
FRANCE

Dr. King expresses thanks to Mr. Johnson for the international support as demonstrated by the success of the recent Palais des Sports benefit. MLK goes on to elaborate on the impact of "friends of the Movement" in far away places such as Europe.

Letter From Joan Daves to MLK about Book Review

Monday, August 28, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter, dated August 28, 1967, Joan Daves writes to Dr. King concerning the review of "Where Do We Go From Here?" Daves comments, "It is not my favorite kind of review--when three books are reviewed jointly."

Letter From Don Rothenberg of Ramparts to MLK

San Francisco, CA, VIETNAM, California (CA)

Don Rothenberg, the Assistant to the Publisher of Ramparts Magazine, sent this letter to Dr. and Mrs. King with an advance copy of the January issue. The magazine, which was associated with the New Left, reported on the napalming of Vietnamese children in the war. Upon reading this, Dr. King was moved to become more vocal against the Vietnam War, which he later did, starting in April of 1967 with his "Beyond Vietnam" speech.

Aristotle in Thomas

Dr. King outlines aspects of St. Thomas Aquinas' philosophy, which are structurally Aristotelian. Points he discusses include similarities between the two philosophers' ontology and epistemology, while also outlining a point of divergence in Aquinas' view of God as an "efficient cause."

Letter from Rev. John Bartos to MLK Regarding "Strength to Love"

Monday, March 1, 1965
Wisconsin (WI)

Rev. John Bartos referenced Dr. King's book, "Strength to Love," in his sermon to the First Baptist Church congregation. Rev. Bartos focused on the chapter "Being a Good Neighbor," in which Dr. King discusses a story of a car accident and the discriminatory triage process that contributed to the occupants' deaths. The sermon produced questions and reactions the writer is hoping Dr. King can address.

Letter to Rev. Thomas Thrasher from MLK and Others

Friday, January 11, 1957
Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King and other civil rights leaders contact the President of the Montgomery Ministerial Association, Rev. Thomas Thrasher, to compliment him on his statement subsequent to the bombings in Alabama.

Letter from Anwar Katib to MLK

Sunday, January 22, 1967
ISRAEL, JORDAN

Anwar Katib, the Governor of Jerusalem, states that he is pleased to hear about Dr. King's decision to lead a pilgrimage to the Holy Land. He also tells Dr. King that his visit will be a blessing and a historical event.

Oppositional Letter to MLK

Washington, D.C.

A critic of Dr. King advises him to help his supporters purchase birth control instead of focusing on civil rights.

Letter from Joe Augustine to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967
Birmingham, AL

Mr. Augustine claims that he is able to point directly to who is responsible for the wrong that is going on in the country, and would like to mail Dr. King more information to this effect.

Letter from Anna Gallaspy to MLK

Monday, December 12, 1966
Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA

Anna Gallaspy, Production Director of the Immanuel United Church of Christ in Los Angeles, extends an invitation for Dr. King and members of the SCLC to review their outline of a youth festival pilot program.

People in Action: Sit In, Stand In, Wade In, Kneel In

Nashville, TN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Chicago, IL, Philadelphia, PA, Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News May 25, 1963, Dr. King says that, through the ballot, Negro voters can change the political structure of the South. He states that for democracy to live, segregation must die; therefore, every form of nonviolent direct action will be used to dismantle it in the South, where it is visible, and in the North, where it is more hidden. Finally, he points out that modern psychologists use the term “maladjusted.” He is glad to be “maladjusted” to segregation, religious bigotry, economic injustice, and militarism.