Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Des Moines, IA"

Statement by Linda Dannenbreg

In this statement, Linda Danneberg protests the war in Vietnam by discussing the formation of the Student Mobilization Committee. She also expounds on the organization's upcoming national conference in Chicago, Illinois.

Letter from James Godfrey to MLK

Monday, July 29, 1963

Mr. Godfrey invites Dr. King to speak at the Radio Music Hall in Washington D.C. for a fundraising event on behalf of the NAACP.

God (Definition)

Dr. King references Schleiermacher as he attempts to define God.

Telegram from Mrs. J W E Bowen and Mrs. S F Crank to MLK

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Mrs. J W E Bowen and Mrs. S F Crank write Dr. King expressing their joy in having a spiritual leader who challenges them to be active in the movement.

Telegram from Franklin D. Roosevelt, Jr. to MLK

Franklin Delano Roosevelt Jr. requests the presence of Dr. King to serve on a panel discussing Title VII and Equal Employment. The Department of Labor event also included civil rights lumaniaries such as A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, James Farmer and Whitney Young. Roosevelt, fifth child of the late president Franklin Delano Roosevelt, served as the Chairman of the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission from May 26, 1965 to May 11, 1966.

Death

Dr. King meditates on death and a quotation from Thomas Carlyle in which Carlyle compares the death of his mother to the moon sinking into a dark sea.

Letter from Byron F. Mische to the Members of Congress Regarding Vietnam

Monday, March 20, 1967

In this letter to the members of Congress, Byron E. Mische took the initiative to combine letters sent to government officials, editors of publications and congressmen regarding Vietnam. This letter was copied to Dr. King.

Letter from Cornell E. Talley to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967

Cornell E. Talley, Pastor of New Light Baptist Church, tells Dr. King that his church is withdrawing their pledge of $100 per month to the SCLC. Talley felt as if Dr. King was no longer fighting for civil rights, and that his leadership of anti-war demonstrations was counterproductive.

Invitation from Harry Wachtel to the Members of the Research Committee

Monday, February 26, 1968

Harry Watchel writes to the members of the research community to inivite theim to participate in a meeting called by Dr. King.

Excerpt from The Drum Major Instinct

This passage quotes one of Dr. King's acclaimed sermons delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia. He defines the desire to lead as "the Drum Major instinct." Seeing himself as a Drum Major for justice, peace, and righteousness, Dr. King posits what should be said at his funeral.

Letter from Shirley Leonard to MLK

Sunday, December 31, 1961

Shirley Leonard encloses a check for ten dollars to help Dr. King further integration.

Poor People's Campaign

Sunday, March 17, 1968

Dr. King is touring the nation to meet poor people in an effort to expose their living conditions. He also wants them to join the campaign to fight for better housing and jobs.

Letter to Clark, Dodge and Company from MLK

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

Here is a letter from Dr. King to anonymous donor through Clark, Dodge and Company acknowledging the receipt of stock shares to the SCLC. Dr. King goes on to elaborate on how this contribution will directly impact the efforts of SCLC.

Telegram from MLK to President Kennedy

Dr. King praises President John F. Kennedy for his eloquent appeal for freedom and justice and says the President's message will become "a hallmark in the annals of American history" if his proposed legislation is passed.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ivor M. Liss

Friday, April 19, 1963

Dora McDonald thanks Ivor M. Liss for his contribution, and informs him that Dr. King will be in contact upon his return from Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Walter W. Windisch to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967

Walter W. Windisch writes to Dr. King to express his gratitude for the Peace March led by Dr. King in New York City. He also expresses his desire to be a part of any upcoming demonstrations.

Our Struggle

Dr. King discusses blacks' struggle for racial equality in America. King explores racist whites' views of "the inferior social, economic, and political position" of the Negro. However, when Negroes begin to reevaluate their position in society and tension in race relations arise, he argues that the Negro begins to "organize and act" against the status quo as evident in the boycotts and sit-in demonstrations occurring throughout the South.

Adverse Letter from J. H. Moore to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968

J. H. Moore expresses his dislike for Dr. King's leadership style. He argues that Dr. King's efforts have stirred up hatred and discontent, even amongst black citizens.

Letter from Joan Daves Regarding International Travel

Tuesday, September 15, 1964

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she telephoned Mr. Smeaton regarding lodging arrangements in London and Berlin.

Letter to MLK Regarding the Poor

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

This letter, written under the pseudonym "A. Christian," criticizes Dr. King's work for the poor in the years following 1966. He states, "you have lost all respect for law and order what good do you think you are doing for the poor?" He further critiques Dr. King's public response to Communism and the Vietnam War.

Sin

Dr. King highlights a definition of sin according to Reinhold Niebuhr.

Letter to Dr. Abernathy from Carl Andrew Moore

Friday, April 26, 1968

Carl Andrew Moore, from the University of the Pacific, in Stockton, California, expresses his support of Rev. Ralph Abernathy's leadership during these trying times.

Address Given by Vice President Nixon in Asheville, North Carolina

Wednesday, June 5, 1957

This is the text of an address given by Vice President Richard Nixon before the sixty-sixth annual convention of the General Federation of Women's Club. He discusses the differences in countries dealing with Communism and America being a democracy.

Letter from MLK to William A. Rutherford

Wednesday, November 23, 1966

Dr. King encourages Mr. Rutherford that he would be a great asset to the S.C.L.C. and the Civil Rights Movement.

103:15 General Correspondence 1967 (R)

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

Mrs. Reich suggests that Dr. King join the "other side" since he feels that the government is on the wrong side.

Letter from Joseph S. Clark to MLK

Friday, May 20, 1966

Mr. Clark, a representative of the United States Senate, requests a written statement from Dr. King concerning a recent Bill (2993) up for election.

Invitation from Israeli Ambassador to MLK

Tuesday, March 30, 1965

In this letter, Avraham Harman invites Dr. King to Israel on behalf of the Embassy of Israel.

Letter to MLK from The Adult Education Council of Greater Chicago

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Emma Kramer, the Secretary of the Speakers Bureau, writes to Dr. King to negotiate the details of his presentation at the University of Illinois.

Crozer Theological Seminary: The Bulletin

Saturday, July 1, 1950

The Bulletin, a newsletter sent to Dr. King from the Crozer Theological Seminary, includes information on the 1950 commencement. This is this institution from which Dr. King himself will graduate from in 1951.

Telegram from Charles Hayes to to MLK

Charles Hayes, an official of the AFL-CIO, sends Dr. King best wishes for a "speedy recovery." He also thanks Dr. King for sending Ralph Abernathy to speak at a banquet held for the organization.