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Detroit Council for Human Rights: Walk To Freedom

Sunday, June 23, 1963

The Detroit Council of Human Rights adopted a declaration for Detroit, Michigan on May 17, 1963. In the declaration, the Council decided to stand in solidarity against the injustices that plague the city's African American population. This program is from the yearly demonstration that the Council holds to commemorate their pledge to combat the "inequality of this country."

Augustine (Concept of Evil)

Dr. King quotes theologian St. Augustine's "Confessions."

How Modern Christians Should Think of Man

In the early 1950's, Dr. King writes a paper elaborating on how modern Christians should think about man. He discusses the difficulty of transition by idealizing the perception of man in a mild neo-orthodox or liberal view. Dr. King battles with having an optimistic view of man and the reality of his experiences in the south. He asserts that man is neither good nor bad by nature by has the potential for either. The objectivity of man as a finite child of nature is further expounded upon. He explains that man is rational, free, and a responsible being.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Wednesday, October 16, 1963

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General, writes Dr. King in response to a telegram sent by the Reverend protesting action be taken by the State of Louisiana against the Southern Conference Educational Fund.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK and Others

Sunday, February 11, 1968

This is a memorandum from Theodore E. Brown concerning his trip to Nigeria. Brown attaches a newspaper article referencing the turmoil in Nigeria.

Letter of Support from James Duren to MLK

Thursday, July 21, 1966

James Duren informs Dr. King that he was impressed by his speech at the Chicago Rally and requests a copy. He closes the letter with an inquiry about SCLC activity in Milwaukee.

Faith in Man

Dr. King discusses people's general lack of faith in man. He asserts that because of Christianity one can have faith in man because "man's plight is never so low that he can't do better."

MLK Draft from Strength to Love: The Answer to a Perplexing Question

Here is a draft chapter from Dr. King's book "Strength to Love" in which Dr. King discusses that the casting out of evil in human lives requires "both man and God."

Letter from Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall to MLK

Monday, June 17, 1963

Assisrtant US Attorney General Burk Marshall informs Dr. King that the allegations of police misconduct in Danville, Virginia are being investigated by the Department of Justice and assures him that the appropriate actions will take place "with respect to any violations of federal law."

Letter from Ruth Wood to MLK

Ruth Wood of Virginia offers her gratitude to Dr. and Mrs. King for their efforts in search of a better society. Mrs. Wood also expresses her pleasure at attending Ebenezer Baptist Church and intends to attend the upcoming SCLC meeting.

Letter from Marshall Breland to MLK

Saturday, January 29, 1966

Marshall Breland, a student from P.S. 200, requests information from Dr. King for the purposes of a school related assignment. Breland deems Dr. King "The Non-Violent Crusader".


Dr. King quotes Herbert Spencer regarding the inevitability of progress.

Anonymous Letter to Mrs. King following MLK's Assassination

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

This letter was written anonymously to Mrs. Coretta Scott King following the televised funeral of Dr. King. The author questions the nerve of Mrs. King to be in mourning, stating that she is no Jackie Kennedy and calling the entire thing a farce. In addition to accusing "The Black King," presumably Dr. King, of planning to burn D.C. and then swoop in to save the city, the author states their desire for African American leaders to receive "a belly full of lead."

Letter to the Editor of Chicago Daily News Regarding Israeli Statehood

Friday, September 8, 1967

This letter from Mrs. Irene M. Koch to the editor of the Chicago Daily News addresses the issue of anti-Semitism and the Israeli War in 1967. Mrs. Koch, while not anti-Semitic, does not support the war Israel is prosecuting against its Arab Neighbors. Mrs. Koch draws parallels between Israel's war and the United State's involvement in Vietnam.

Letter from Beryl Bugatch to MLK

Sunday, July 25, 1965

Beryl Bugatch of the University of Pennsylvania asks Dr. King to speak on "the governments role in enforcing racial morality."

Letter from Aileen B. Armstrong to MLK

Saturday, May 18, 1963

Mrs. Armstrong writes Dr. King to express her regard and deep appreciation for his work.

Telegram to Dr. King about Vietnam

Monday, April 10, 1967

The Magee Volunteers for International Developement have communicated with Dr. King regarding the international projects within Vietnam.

Moral and Religious Imperatives for Brotherhood

Saturday, February 9, 1963

Dr. King shares how important it is for America to obtain racial integration.

Letter from Lucille D. Anderson to MLK inviting him to Philadelphia

Monday, January 8, 1968

In this letter, Dr. King's presence is requested by Lucille Anderson in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

MLK Makes Request About Bill Stein

Monday, November 21, 1966

Dr. King requests that the Protestant Episcopal Church of New York allow Bill Stein to continue his work with SCLC programs.

Letter from Bella McGregor to MLK

Tuesday, October 17, 1961

Bella T. McGregor asks Dr. King for a copy of his sermon titled "St. Paul's Letter to American Christians."

Letter from MLK to Donald Lincoln Cook

Monday, February 7, 1966

Dr. King thanks Mr. Cook for letter, in which Cook stated his support of Dr. King's stance against the United States military's involvement in Vietnam.

Western Union Telegram from James McDaniel to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966

Mr. McDaniel invites Dr. King to serve as a member of the executive committee of the National Citizens Committee for the Child Development Program in Mississippi.

Telegram from Mark O. Hatfield to MLK

Mark Hatfield declines an invitation from Dr. King due to other commitments.


Dr. King cites a publication by theologian Albert Knudson.

Telegram from Berry Gordy, Jr. to MLK

President of Motown Record Corporation, Berry Gordy, Jr., awaits Dr. King's decision on the album, "The Great March on Washington."

Telegram from Carl and Anne Braden to MLK

Monday, October 24, 1960

Carl and Anne Braden offer their support to Dr. King while he remains in the Fulton County Jail.

Letter from High School Senior Doris Magwood to MLK

Thursday, November 5, 1964

The senior class of Haut Gap School in John's Island, South Carolina invites Dr. King to deliver its baccalaureate sermon.

Letter from MLK to Ada B. H. Murray

Monday, January 14, 1963

Dr. King writes Mrs. Ada Murray to send her holiday greetings and to express his sorrows in hearing about two of her bad experiences. He also discusses his future commitment to visit California.

Letter from MLK to W. M. Jones

Monday, September 9, 1963

Dr. King writes Bishop W. M. Jones of Israel of God's Church expressing his gratitude for their generous contribution to the SCLC.