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Remember Who You Are!

Thursday, December 6, 1956

Dr. King addresses the student body and officials of Howard University with a poignant sermon entitled, "Remember Who You Are." The content of the sermon makes various references between Jesus, Shakespeare and Greek philosophers who sought to identify the mechanisms that made man important to society.

Letter to MLK Requesting Aid

Saturday, September 9, 1967

In this plea to Dr. King, Mrs. Venis Whitten asks for assistance with obtaining adequate medical care and welfare, which would tremendously improve the livelihood of herself and her two grandchildren.

Telegram to MLK from A Phillip Randolph and Andrew Heiskell

Friday, December 22, 1967

Randolph and Heiskell request Dr. King's presence at an Urban Coalition Steering Committee Meeting in Washington.

Freud

Dr. King draws an analogy between Columbus and Dr. Sigmund Freud in that each discovered a "continent."

Erasmus

Dr. King writes about Erasmus, a Dutch scholar, who lived during the Reformation period.

Telegram from Mirzo Tursun Zade to MLK

Thursday, October 10, 1963

Mirzo Tursun Zade, Chairman of the Soviet Afro-Asian Solidarity Committee, assures Dr. King that Jews enjoy equal rights with individuals of other nationalities living in the Soviet Union.

How to Deal with Grief and Dissappointment

Dr. King discusses the many avenues and remedies for disappointment. He includes a verse from the Book of Jeremiah and describes disappointment to be a "hallmark of life." Dr. King asserts that the first proper reaction is acceptance. Furthermore he suggests that one must express their grief with a person of trust. Dr. King stresses that the third and most important resolution to disappointment is to refrain from rationalization.

Ebony: Advice For Living

Thursday, May 1, 1958

Dr. King answers readers' questions regarding family dynamics, the NAACP, outer versus inner beauty and the image of Negroes in literature and the media. He advocates for open communication and pleasant attitudes in familial relationships, and he offers hope that the portrayal of Negroes in movies and "other public channels" is improving.

Letter from Mrs. Ted Gustafson to MLK

Sunday, December 10, 1967

Mrs. Ted Gustafson writes Dr. King to express her dismay with pastors and the pulpit, providing her belief that a Saint is long overdue.

Letter from Ernestine Comegys to SCLC

Monday, April 5, 1965

Ernestine Comegys writes the SCLC in hopes of obtaining commemorative plates of Dr. King containing his biography on the back. Comegys plans to sell the plates at her church.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Sandra Durlauf

Thursday, October 29, 1964

Dora McDonald encloses Dr. King's biographical information to help aid Sandra Durlauf in her studies. She also refers Mrs. Durlauf to read Dr. King's books "Stride Toward Freedom," "Crusader Without Violence," and "Strength to Love."

Ebenezer Baptist Church. Dr. King with Daughter Bernice (Bonnie). Atlanta, 1967

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Dorothy Cotton telegraphs congratulations

Sunday, January 31, 1965

Dorothy Cotton, long-time colleague of Dr. King at Southern Christian Leadership Conference, congratulates Dr. King for being nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize. Cotton was one of the only non-family members to subsequently accompany Dr. King to Oslo, Norway, for the prize ceremony.

Letter from Cryssana Jenkins Bogner to MLK

Monday, June 19, 1967

Mrs. Cryssana Jenkins Bogner writes Dr. King with to both support his leadership in the Civil Rights Movement, and to share her discontent with Executive Director of the NAACP Roy Wilkin's stance on the Vietnam War.

Science and Religion

Dr. King documents a quote regarding science and religion from "The Finding of God."

Telegram from A. G. Downing to MLK

Monday, October 19, 1964

A. G. Downing, executive secretary of the Southern California Baptist Convention, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter with Enclosed Copy of Minutes of the SCLC Board Meeting

Wednesday, August 23, 1967

Mr. Eskridge sends a copy of the minutes for the SCLC Board Meeting to Secretary Dora McDonald. During the meeting, Andrew Young and Ralph David Abernathy address the twenty-eight board members of the organization at the Regency House in Atlanta, GA.

People in Action: The South -- A Hostile Nation

Saturday, May 11, 1963

In his regular column for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the unfair economic conditions of Negroes in America. He further explains how the employment rate of Negroes in America contribute to economic hardships.

Letter from Ann Lincoln to MLK

Thursday, June 24, 1965

The writer, who identifies herself as a "collateral descendent of Abraham Lincoln," relates a story involving a young colored girl to Dr. King. Ms. Lincoln explains that the incident disturbed her greatly and she feels it is time to educate Negros on white acceptance.

Letter from Warrington Allsop to MLK

Monday, October 6, 1958

During the fall of 1958, Dr. King was stabbed by an African American woman during a book signing in Harlem, an event that nearly cost him his life. Following this event, Warrington Allsop sends his support and well-wishes for Dr. King's immediate recovery.

Letter from Paul Madsen to MLK

Tuesday, November 5, 1963

Paul Madsen, Associate Executive Secretary of the American Baptist Home Mission Societies, offers Dr. King a consulting position with the organization. The organization needs someone to provide guidance on critical decisions, appear at a limited number of speaking engagements, and to make suggestions to the organization as needed. He mentions that the consulting arrangement could be used to help Ebenezer Baptist Church's budget.

Telegram from Donna Jean Stancliff to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1967

Donna Jean Stancliff informs Dr. King of Mrs. Zelma G. Proctor's funeral.

Check Distribution for the Crusade for Citizenship Program

Friday, December 31, 1965

Mildred Smith is given a check on behalf of the Crusade for Citizenship program.

Letter from Stephen J. M. Robbins to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965

Stephen Robbins thanks Dr. King for inviting the United States National Student Association to participate in the demonstrations in Selma and Montgomery, Alabama. Robbins states that the organization has directed its focus to equal opportunity for all and protection for demonstrators. Robbins also invites Dr. King to address the 18th National Student Congress at the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

Telegram from Chaim Potok to Andrew J. Young

Tuesday, May 11, 1965

Reverend Andrew J. Young informs Rabbi Chaim Potok that his heavy involvement in the South will not permit him to engage in any writing.

Letter from James E. Doherty to MLK Regarding School Desegregation

Monday, September 4, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Doherty encloses an article that includes civil right leaders views on school desegregation.

Letter from Jeffery Goldberg to MLK

Sunday, April 23, 1967

In this letter, Jeffery Goldberg comments on the Vietnam War and requests a copy of Dr. King's speech to Church Laymen.

Letter from D. E. Goorman to MLK

Saturday, February 17, 1968

D. E. Goorman advises Dr. King on how to promote peace, freedom and economic security for all US citizens. He suggests "appealing to the moral conscience" of the majority while implementing an economic action plan.

Declaration of Independence by MLK

Dr. King writes an article making reference to the Emancipation Proclamation, President Lincoln, and the historical impact they both have had on the economy and what is described to be a social revolution. It is noted that this article is intended for a December, 1962 issue of a publication.

Letter from MLK to Delta Air Lines Requesting Support

Friday, July 21, 1967

Dr. King writes Delta Air Lines asking for a cash donation to contribute to the production of a commemorative booklet celebrating the 10th anniversary of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.