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Letter from L. Alexander Harper and Charles E. Cobb to Edith M. Lerrigo

Monday, October 24, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY

Edith Lerrigo writes with concern regarding the support of the "Crisis and Commitment" call by several civil rights leaders. Lerrigo endorses Dr. King's decision to refuse his signatory on the document supporting the call, stating that this act "should have been sufficient to give pause to groups like the YWCA before jumping on the moderate bandwagon."

Southern Christian Leadership Resolutions

Friday, June 30, 1967
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

Chauncey Eskridge sends Andrew Young resolutions related to the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation. Mr. Eskridge explains that an examination into the foundation's tax exempt status by the IRS prompted his letter.

Letter from Mr. Levison Regarding U.S. Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.

Monday, September 19, 1966

Mr. Levison expresses his support for Representative Powell during the controversial House of Representatives committee chairmanship and ethical dilemma. Levison goes on to defend the suggestion of race being the determining factor of his criticism by volunteering his support of any review of congressional systems.

Social Ethics in Psalms

Dr. King writes about social ethics as discussed in Psalms 72.

Letter from B. J. Mason to President Johnson

Friday, February 9, 1968
Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL)

B. J. Mason deplores how justice is not yet color-blind, at least in Alabama. Mason states that Mr. Boykin's right to "due process of law" is being violated. Edward Boykin admitted guilt to a crime and was sentenced to death, but the trial judge had not ensured that the defendant understood the plea. The U.S. Supreme Court overturned the conviction in Boykin vs. Alabama (1968), citing the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments.

Letter from Nancy Parr to MLK

Tuesday, December 10, 1968
San Francisco, CA

In this letter, Nancy Parr offers help to Dr. King in trying to "avert riots in 1968" to prevent the "right-wing" from taking over the nation.

Letter from Charles H. Percy to MLK

Chicago, IL

U.S. Senator Charles H. Percy expresses his appreciation for Dr. King, while also expressing his hope that the senate will soon pass a housing bill.


Dr. King writes about Lewis Mumford’s view in “The Condition of Man” that an increase in scientific knowledge requires an increase in moral discipline.

Letter from John Edgar Hoover to All Law Enforcement Officials

Saturday, April 1, 1961
Washington, D.C.

In this letter, President Hoover addresses all F.B.I. law enforcement officials. He discusses America's opposition to communism and describes it as an "insidious menace." However, Hoover warns that "attributing every adversity to communism" is ineffective and senseless. Instead he suggests that in order to defeat communism, it must be thoroughly studied and analyzed.

Letter from Sidney M. Peck to MLK

Thursday, March 17, 1966
Cleveland, OH

On behalf of the University Circle Teach-In Committee, Western Reserve University Professor Sydney Peck invites Dr. King to speak about the Vietnam War at a conference on US foreign policy.

MLK Address - The Association of The Bar of the City of New York

Wednesday, April 21, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Washington, D.C., Jackson, MS, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Arkansas (AR), St. Augustine, FL, Florida (FL)

Dr. King gives an address to the Association of The Bar of the City of New York at the Hilton Hotel in New York. He praises lawyers for using their knowledge to aid the Civil Rights Movement. He states that Negro lawyers bring wisdom and a determination to win to the courtroom. Dr. King also defines an unjust law as a law that is "out of harmony with moral law of the universe."


Dr. King references a quote from St. Paul regarding a theological perspective of history.

Letter from the Associated Negro Press to MLK

Saturday, November 27, 1965
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Michigan (MI), GEORGIA, Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C., Detroit, MI, Chicago, IL, Los Angeles, CA, San Francisco, CA, Philadelphia, PA, New Jersey (NJ), VIETNAM

Donald Kittell, an administrative assistant for the Associated Negro Press, writes to Dr. King regarding his four "My Dream" columns. Enclosed in the letter is a copy of each column. Dr. King writes on a variety of topics such as social justice, equality, nonviolence and the progress of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to Sara B. Jackson

Friday, April 13, 1956
New York, NY

Dr. King extends gratitude to Mrs. Jackson for her moral and financial support.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding ?Why We Can?t Wait? Royalties

Tuesday, January 17, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

In this letter Campe encloses payment from Econ Verlag for ?Why We Can?t Wait? royalties.

Essay - MLK Entitled "The Bravest Man I Ever Met"

Dr. King's essay, entitled "The Bravest Man I Ever Met," profiles Norman Thomas, a prominent Socialist.

Memo From Dora McDonald to MLK

Thursday, November 16, 1967
SOUTH AFRICA, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Los Angeles, CA, Chicago, IL

Miss Dora Mcdonald provides a brief summary of phone calls to Dr. King and the context of each.

Memorandum from William A. Rutherford and Bernard Lafayette to SCLC Staff Members

Thursday, January 4, 1968
Atlanta, GA

William Rutherford and Bernard Lafayette inform the SCLC staff members of an impromptu retreat on the Poor People's Campaign, which will be held at Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Letter from Gunter Kohlhaw to MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966
Atlanta, GA, Indiana (IN), GERMANY

Dr. Gunter B. Kohlhaw shares the memorable experience of hearing Dr. King deliver a sermon while attending Sunday service at Ebenezer Baptist Church. Kohlhaw also requests copies of Dr. King's collection of sermons.


Dr. King references the religious philosopher William Ernest Hocking regarding the topic of evil.

Memorandum from William M. Gray

Friday, April 5, 1968
Brooklyn, NY, New York (NY)

This memorandum from William M. Gray lists the address to which mourners should send acknowledgements following Dr. King's death.

Moral Law

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman on the principle of moral law.

Social Ethics

Dr. King cites a scripture that deals with the topic of social ethics.

Letter from Samuel McKinney to MLK

Monday, June 20, 1966
Washington (WA), Jackson, MS, Mississippi (MS)

Reverend McKinney, of the Mt. Zion Baptist Church, informs Dr. King he is unable to participate in the Mississippi Freedom March. A check from the Mt. Zion congregation is enclosed to assist with registering voters.


Dr. King references behaviorist John B. Watson regarding man's behavior.

Letter from Thomas T. Krampf to MLK

Wednesday, May 3, 1967
New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY)

New Jersey resident Thomas T. Krampf expresses support for Dr. King's leadership and viewpoints on race relations, morality, and equality. Krampf encloses a self-written story, "The Rosebuds," which speaks to the "'oneness' and the peaceful 'togetherness' of all humanity."

Letter from MLK to Chandrasekhar Bhattacharya

Wednesday, January 12, 1966

Dr. King writes Chandrasekhar Bhattacharya in response to a letter that requested prayer for their first born child, Chiraashree. Dr. King expresses his appreciation for their sentiments regarding his work and informs Bhattacharya that their child will forever be in his prayers.

Outline on Aristotle

In this outline, Dr. King documents elements of Aristotelian philosophy which deal with ethics and metaphysics. The outline includes a brief biography which chronicles Aristotle's life and a reference to his well known work "Nicomachean Ethics."

Mobilizer: February 1967

Monday, February 6, 1967
VIETNAM, New York (NY), San Francisco, CA, Chicago, IL, SOUTH AFRICA, Washington, D.C., Baltimore, MD, Geneva, Switzerland, Cleveland, OH, Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, New York, NY

This February 1967 issue of the "Mobilizer: To End Mass Murder in Vietnam" focuses on James Bevel's direct action anti-war demonstrations. As National Director of the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, Bevel outlines his strategy to launch a national movement involving community churches, students, labor groups, and others. The initiative is designed around a march to be held on April 15, 1967 in San Francisco and New York.

Rutgers Professor Liberties Advocate

Thursday, August 18, 1966
New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), Mississippi (MS)

Arthur Kinoy, a civil rights lawyer, was arrested in House Un-American Activities Committee hearings. During the few minutes he was in jail, Kinoy spent his time offering free advice to the other inmates.