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Letter from Mrs. Flossie Dedmond to MLK

Monday, July 6, 1964

A representative of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority invites Dr. King to speak at the Public Meeting of the Forty-first National Convention held in Philadelphia, PA. For publicity purposes she requests several glossy photographs for distribution.

MLK's Statement to SCLC Describing SCOPE

Wednesday, June 16, 1965

In this statement, Dr. King describes the Summer Community Organization and Political Education (SCOPE), an initiative of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Its goals are to train local leaders, inform the public, and register individuals to vote.

I Have A Dream

In the most famous of his speeches, given from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial at the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Dr. King drew on themes from previous sermons and speeches, including an address he called The American Dream. Citing Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation, the US Constitution, and the Declaration of Independence, King calls upon the nation to fulfill its promise of freedom and justice for all of its citizens. Although he began by reading from a manuscript, he later abandoned it and spoke directly to the crowd of more than 200,000.

Letter to Clark, Dodge and Company from MLK

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

Here is a letter from Dr. King to anonymous donor through Clark, Dodge and Company acknowledging the receipt of stock shares to the SCLC. Dr. King goes on to elaborate on how this contribution will directly impact the efforts of SCLC.

Note card-Dr.King

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Herbet Spencer's views on religion. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Telegram from Lee C. White to MLK

Saturday, June 1, 1963

Lee C. White, Assistant Special Counsel to the President, informs Dr. King that President Kennedy is unable to meet on the suggested days due to his travels.

Order Form: These Are Our Children

This order form depicts a photograph of children of varying races at the 1960 White House Conference on Children and Youth.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. H. Libby

Friday, September 8, 1961

Dora McDonald sends Mrs. Libby a copy of Dr. King's sermon "Paul's Letter to American Christians." McDonald could not retrieve a copy of the address preached at the Riverside Church that Mrs. Libby requested.

Letter from MLK to Delta Air Lines Requesting Support

Friday, July 21, 1967

Dr. King writes Delta Air Lines asking for a cash donation to contribute to the production of a commemorative booklet celebrating the 10th anniversary of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

News Article "Who Creates Slums?"

J. Frank Lindsey reports Mr. Hilliard's views about how slums are created. The reasons cited by Mr. Hilliard include undisciplined children and landlords who don't take care of their property.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Charles Szolyvai

Sunday, July 26, 1964

Ms. McDonald responds to Mr. Szolyvai's request for a meeting with Dr. King. She informs him that Dr. King is unsure of the next time he will be in New York, however she says they will keep his letter in mind.

Letter from Anderson Davis to MLK

Thursday, October 3, 1963

Mr. Davis invites Dr. King to speak at West Virginia's Emancipation Proclamation centennial celebration. Mr. Davis informs Dr. King that the event is an opportunity to collect contributions for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi S. Burr Yampol

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Rabbi Yampol, Chairman of the National Committee to Combat Nazism, for sending a copy of his organization's resolution.

The World of the Patriarchs

Dr. King records historical and geographical data regarding several countries, such as Egypt, Greece, and Palestine. King places a special emphasis on the "World of the Patriarch," the title of this document, and writes notes on the "age of the Patriarch," which takes place after 2000 B. C.

Letter from MLK to SNCC's John Lewis Regarding the Nobel Peace Prize

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

Dr. King extends gratitude to John Lewis, Chairman of SNCC, for his encouraging letter upon the announcement of Dr. King being chosen to receive the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. Dr. King states he does not accept this award as a tribute to himself, but as a tribute to the entire Civil Rights Movement. Lewis was regarded as a key SNCC leader and became the US Representative for Georgia's 5th congressional district in 1987.

War

Dr. King quotes Napoleon, Gen. Dwight Eisenhower, Gen. Douglas MacArthur, and Gen. Omar Bradley on war as impractical.

Letter from MLK to Paul Andrews

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Dr. King acknowledges Mr. Andrews' commitment to racial justice and expresses gratitude for his encouraging letter. Dr. King states that the most important contribution to justice anyone can make is a "thorough examination" of one's own behavior.

The Baccalaureate Service of Keuka College

Sunday, June 16, 1963

Dr. King gives the baccalaureate sermon for Keuka College on June 16, 1963.

Letter from Harry Boyte to Celia Howard Casey

Tuesday, August 13, 1963

Harry Boyte writes Celia Casey, on behalf of Dr. King, to express appreciation for her letter.

Letter from MLK to Dr. James Costar at Michigan State University

Wednesday, February 9, 1966

In this letter to the Chairman of the Department of Counseling and Guidance at Michigan State, Dr. King gives a stellar review of the work of Dr. Robert Green. Dr. King commends Dr. Green's performance in stabilizing the SCLC Citizenship Education Program and expresses appreciation to the university for sharing his expertise.

Letter to MLK from Homer Brown

Monday, October 4, 1965

Homer Brown writes Dr. King regarding his experience with racism in the Railway Express Agency.

Letter from Lawrence Friedman to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968

The former president of the Los Angeles Theatre Arts Foundation, Lawrence J. Friedman, writes Dr. King to inform him of a letter concerning the Kennedy assassination, which was written on an unauthorized piece of stationery. The letter is dated January 29, 1968, but The Los Angeles Theatre Arts Foundation was dissovled under the laws of the State of California on May 16, 1966. The letter was signed by Donald Freed. Lawrence P. Friedman wishes to make it clear that he had no knowledge of the letter being sent.

Ethical Relativism

Dr. King outlines an unknown author's views on ethical relativism.

Letter from Louis Lurie to Dizzy Gllespie

Monday, October 14, 1963

San Francisco philanthropist and real estate developer Louis Lurie forwards a donation for the SCLC to famous trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie. Gillespie often performed at fundraising concerts for the SCLC.

Letter from Martha Roberts to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Martha Roberts, of Scranton, Pennsylvania, chastises Dr. King for leading marches and speaking against the war in Vietnam. She expresses to Dr. King that his focus should be on teaching "your people" to learn trades, enhance education and accept gradual change.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division of the US Department of Justice, writes Dr. King in response to a joint telegram concerning an investigation in Lee County, Georgia.

Letter from Joseph Clark to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

Joseph S. Clark, Chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on Employment, Manpower and Poverty, writes Dr. King to request his testimony. Dr. King's speech would serve as a preface to the hearing on public service and private enterprise employment/training programs.

Letter from Isaac Franck to MLK

Wednesday, September 25, 1963

Issac Franck extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak at Adas Israel. Adas Israel is the largest Conservative Congregation in the Greater Washington area.

Letter from Gail Lamb to MLK

Monday, April 1, 1968

Gail Lamb requests information from Dr. King for her research on prejudice, especially on "manifestations, kinds, and objects of prejudice."

A Gift from Mr. and Mrs. Digioia to MLK

Thursday, April 21, 1966

Greta B. Digioia expresses how she and her husband have come to know Dr. King as a "symbol" of his race. She then offers Dr. King a one-of-a-kind gift.