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Peace of Mind

Dr. King quotes Marcus Aurelius about peace of mind.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Irvine I. Turner

Tuesday, April 24, 1962
New Jersey (NJ)

Dora McDonald explains to Irvine Turner that Dr. King is unable to endorse political candidates due to the "non-partisan nature" of the SCLC.

Letter from David M. Wallace to Dora McDonald

Monday, February 6, 1967
Chicago, IL

David Wallace writes Dora McDonald and attaches contributions from Negro businessmen involved with Chicago's Operation Breadbasket.

Notecard regarding freedom

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines another thinker's views on freedom, according to the book, "Human Nature and Conduct." This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from a Fellow American to MLK

Thursday, December 14, 1967
CAMBODIA, THAILAND, BURMA / MYANMAR, Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM, Georgia (GA)

This anonymous author expresses his concern regarding SNCC; explaining that the organization and its leaders have a communist backing. The author closes the letter with references to jobs, education, and a list of several small countries in need of assistance.

Letter from Charles Crawford to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Charles S. Crawford expresses his dissent with Dr. King on a variety of subjects, one specifically his stance towards President Johnson and the concept of civil disobedience.

Western Union Telegram Sent to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. from Richard Charles Boone 1965

Friday, November 5, 1965
Texas (TX)

Richard Charles Boone sent Dr. King this 1965 telegram informing him of possible racial hostility in Miami between the black community and Cuban immigrants moving into the city.

MLK Appearance List

Pennsylvania (PA), North Carolina (NC), Maine (ME), Ohio (OH), Washington, D.C., Texas (TX), New York (NY), Connecticut (CT), Massachusetts (MA), London, England, Berlin, Germany, New York, NY

This itinerary highlights Dr. King's appearances over a six month period.

Medical Order for MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

During a private medical visit at St. Joseph Hospital, Dr. James D. Palmer documents a list of orders to be administered to Dr. King.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Washington, D.C.

Roy Wilkins writes Dr. King requesting that Southern Christian Leadership affiliates overflow senators with messages promoting support.

Letter from Froydis Kvaerk to MLK

Monday, August 29, 1966
Oslo, Norway, Washington, D.C.

Norwegian student Froydis Kvaerk requests a copy of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech in fulfillment of a class assignment on Dr. King and the civil rights struggle.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, November 3, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves writes to Dora McDonald regarding copies of books that she requested Dr. King to autograph for the libraries of Mr. Enoch and Mr. Weybright. She asks Dora about their whereabouts and adds a request for Dr. King to autograph a copy for herself.

Memorandum from David M. Wallace to Dora McDonald

Saturday, February 11, 1967
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

David Wallace informs Dora McDonald of contributions made to the SCLC from John H. Johnson, George Jones, and Willard Payne, Sr.

Letter from the United Nations to SCLC

Friday, January 26, 1968
SOUTH AFRICA, New York (NY), New York, NY

The United Nations Special Committee on the Policies of Apartheid of the Government of the Republic of South Africa, requests information regarding activities planned and undertaken by the SCLC against apartheid.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Curtis Barge

Friday, September 24, 1965
Chicago, IL

In this letter addressed to Rev. Barge and Friends, of the Northern Illinois Ministerial Association. Dr. King expresses his gratitude for a contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the current endeavors of the organization and conveys the importance of their contribution.

Telegram from MLK to Sargent Shriver

Friday, May 12, 1967
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL)

Dr. King commends Mr. Shriver and the Office of Economic Opportunity for funding the Southwest Alabama Farmers Cooperative Association. Dr. King asserts that this decision is a positive step in the War on Poverty that will directly affect countless numbers of impoverished people.

Letter from W. Maxfield Garrott

Friday, October 16, 1964
Tennessee (TN), JAPAN, Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA, Richmond, VA

W. Maxfield Garrott, president of the Seinen Jo Gakuin Baptist School in Japan, invites Dr. King to make an appearance if he ever visits Japan. Garrot also congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

It is Not Enough to Condemn Black Power...

Saturday, October 1, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Chicago, IL

Dr. King addresses the "Black Power" movement in this two-page document. He also explains his thoughts and experiences relating to the tactics and goals of the Civil Rights Movement.

Message of Thanksgiving to SCLC Staff

Xernona Clayton wishes the SCLC staff a Happy Thanksgiving.

Letter from Dora Byron to MLK

Tuesday, February 25, 1964

Dora Byron wrote this letter to Dr. King inviting him to participate in a television program at Emory University.

Letter from Norman Baugher, Galen Ogden and W. Harold Row to MLK

Monday, July 29, 1963
Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA

Prominent officials from the Church of the Brethren's Committee on Race Relations writes Dr. King informing him of the power of television in promoting nonviolence. Since many individuals around the nation are unfamiliar with the practices of nonviolence, Norman Baugher, Galen Oden and W. Harold Row recommend that Dr. King call upon various associates to appear on television and educate the public on the nonviolent philosophy.

Letter from Rosetta Ritz to MLK

Sunday, March 13, 1966
Chicago, IL

Rosetta Ritz expresses admiration and gratitude to Dr. King for his selfless efforts in the Civil Rights Movement. Ms. Ritz hopes Dr. King will find time to visit with "economically deprived" children in the Chicago area.

Letter from Nancy Parr to MLK

Tuesday, December 10, 1968
San Francisco, CA

In this letter, Nancy Parr offers help to Dr. King in trying to "avert riots in 1968" to prevent the "right-wing" from taking over the nation.

Dr. King's Strategy

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Selma, AL

In this article L. Harold DeWolf, dean of the Wesley Theological Seminary, describes the strategy of Dr. King. He asserts that Dr. King follows "the way of the cross" and confronts racial hatred with "daring love."

Letter from MLK to Adam Clayton Powell

Tuesday, January 2, 1968
BAHAMAS, New York, NY, California (CA)

Dr. King writes Adam Clayton Powell to seek advice on how to handle Powell's return from self-imposed exile in Bimini. Powell sought to publicize the event with a public announcement by Dr. King. However, Dr. King and Powell's lawyers suggest that they arrange a quiet, staged arrest with local officials to prevent public pressure from forcing a more lengthy arrest over the criminal contempt charges Powell faced for vacating his seat in Congress. Dr. King suggests more publicity could follow once Powell's lawyers free him on bond and begin the appeals process.

Letter from Weston E. Vivian to MLK

Monday, January 11, 1965
Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

Congressman Weston Vivian responds to Dr. King's letter regarding the seating of the Mississippi Congressman. He tells Dr. King that he not only supported the "Ryan fairness resolution" to prevent the seating, but also voted against the motion to swear in the Congressman. Although he mentions that he was in the minority regarding this matter, he assures Dr. King that he will continue to "work for the opening of the Mississippi registration and election procedures."

Letter from Susan Agrest to MLK

Tuesday, January 2, 1968
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Susan Agrest of Harcourt, Brace & World, Inc. requests Dr. King's permission to reprint "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" in a book that will be published.

Man, a Being of Becoming

Dr. King documents ideas regarding the philosophy of man. Using the metaphor of a "flowing stream," he addresses man's experience from infancy through adulthood.

Voter Registration and Population Statistics

South Carolina (SC), Virginia (VA), Georgia (GA), Florida (FL), Alabama (AL)

This document lists statistical data for five southern states. The data categories include the overall voting-age populations, which is further broken down by race and registered versus unregistered voters.

Levels of Love

Sunday, May 21, 1967
Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, CHINA, FRANCE

Dr. King describes five levels of love, from lowest to highest: utilitarian love, friendship, romantic love, humanitarian love, and agape. The last he refers to as Christian love, the love of God operating in the human heart. The first four, he states, are love for one’s own sake. The fifth is love for another person for their sake. This sermon was delivered by Dr. King on May 21, 1967 at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.