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"We're Here Because We're Tired"

Washington, D.C.

Civil rights leader Andrew Young expresses the collective frustration of the African-American community concerning employment discrimination, housing segregation, and the welfare system.

Letter from Josephine Baker to MLK

Tuesday, October 20, 1964
New York, NY, FRANCE, Atlanta, GA

Dancer, singer, and actress Josephine Baker writes Dr. King to share her views on the current political climate of the United States of America. Her belief is that the best chance of retaining and continuing the progress made by John F. Kennedy is to re-elect Lyndon B. Johnson for President and Robert Kennedy as a New York Senator.

Professor Andrew Blane Offers Assistance to MLK

Saturday, November 4, 1967
New York, NY, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, Atlanta, GA

Andrew Blane, Assistant Professor of History at Hunter College, offers to brief Dr. King on the role of religion in Russian culture, particularly the Russian Baptists. He attaches along with his letter, a description of his "scholarly interests and training" for Dr. King to consider.

Letter from Eula M. Hanner to MLK

Friday, January 12, 1968
New York (NY)

Eula M. Hanner sends a monetary donation to the SCLC.

Hegel System Diagram

Dr. King outlines notes regarding Hegel's system, which includes logic, nature, the mind and the spirit.

Entering 1964: Toward Full Emancipation

Tuesday, December 17, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Philadelphia, PA

In this draft of an article for the NY Amsterdam News, Dr. King asserts that the thrust of the Negro will increase toward full emancipation as they began the year 1964. Dr. King highlights the March on Washington where both Negroes and whites collectively demonstrated the need for self-respect and human dignity in the United States. He also elaborates on the technique of "selective patronage" to broaden the economic and employment opportunities for the African American community.

Letter to MLK from Andrew W. Loewi

Saturday, October 28, 1967

Andrew W. Loewi writes Dr. King asking him to sign a petition against the Vietnam War.

Is Dialogue Alien to Marxism?" (Polemics)

New York (NY)

Czech philosopher Julius Tomin discusses the role of dialogue within Marxist discourse. Critiquing the position set forth by Milan Machovec in his text "Sense of Life," Tomin outlines the the definition of dialogue, the climate necessary for a dialogue to occur, and the role of dialogue in the humanization of men.

The Business Card of the Honorable Al Shabazz (Malcolm X)

New York, NY

During the late 1950s, Malcolm X began going by Malik Al-Shabazz. Shabazz, according to the Nation of Islam, was a Black Nation in central Africa from which all human beings descended. While the date of this card is unknown, it is presumed to be circa the late 1950s to early 1960s, before Malcolm X split from the Nation of Islam in 1964.

History

Dr. King provides the pessimist's perception of history.

Letter from James C. Soutar to MLK

Saturday, February 17, 1968
Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

James C. Soutar expresses gratitude for Dr. King's work and requests an autographed photograph to frame along with notable teachers like Paul Tillich, Reinhold Niebuhr, and Abraham Heschel. All of these teachers were heavy influencers of Dr. King.

Letter from Ned Griffin to MLK

Friday, February 1, 1963
Montgomery, AL, Chicago, IL

Ned Griffin, a fourth grade student at Betsy Ross School, acknowledges Dr. King's great contribution to the United States. He explains that his fourth grade class would like an autographed picture of Dr. King for their bulletin at school.

MLK Handwritten Note Card - "Peace of Mind or Soul"

In this handwritten note card, entitled, simply, "Peace of Mind or Soul," Dr. King quotes Dr. C.G. Jung on the subject of neurosis.

Two Poems for MLK

The unknown author writes two poems titled, "A Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." and "Time! Time!! Time!!!" One of the poems uses the letters of Dr. King's name for the leading word of each verse.

Newspaper Article Concerning Peace in North Vietnam

Tuesday, January 9, 1968
CANADA

This document contains two articles from various newspapers. The first article concerns the call of South Vietnamese Roman Catholic Bishops for the end of U.S. aggression towards North Vietnam. The second article concerns a South Vietnamese Roman Catholic woman who has asked the Pope to become a hostage for a day.

Statement Regarding Chicago Movement

Friday, December 2, 1966
Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King speaks about the Chicago Freedom Movement that is mobilizing to "launch an intensive voter registration" campaign in Negro communities. Dr. King states, "the ultimate goal of this drive is to add substantially to the voter registration and motivate the entire Negro community to participate in the political process."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Gladys Foreman

Friday, February 15, 1963
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Dora McDonald thanks Ms. Gladys Foreman for her contribution of stamps.

Letter from Ruth Olsen to Dora McDonald

Monday, July 6, 1964
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Iowa (IA)

Ruth Olsen of St. Ansgar's Lutheran Church writes Dora McDonald requesting 30 copies of Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Support Letter from Nelson A. Rockefeller to MLK

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
New York (NY)

New York Governor, Nelson A. Rockefeller, and Happy [Rockefeller] had the opportunity to spend time with Dr. King and his family after the Nobel Peace Prize Award ceremonies. Admist the renewal of personal attacks against Dr. King, Nelson Rockefeller offers his support and encouragement.

Letter From E. Spencer Parsons to MLK

Thursday, June 8, 1967
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

E. Spencer Parsons, Dean of the Rockefeller Memorial Chapel at the University of Chicago, invites Dr. King to preach at a university religious service. He also commends him for the leadership he has provided Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam.

Get well letter from Nicholas Altomerianos to MLK

Friday, September 26, 1958
New York, NY

Nicholas Altomerianos, Mayor of Charles Evan Hughes High School in New York, sent Dr. King this get well letter on behalf of its faculty and students.

Note Card on Democritus' Metaphysics

In this notecard, Dr. King writes on the subject of Metaphysics, focusing on the works of Democritus.

Telegram from Milton Powell to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1960
Iowa (IA), Atlanta, GA

Upon Dr. King's recent arrest, Milton Powell, the executive chairman of CORE, sends his whole-hearted support on behalf of the organization.

Note Explaining Reason for Coming to Los Angeles

Atlanta, GA, Los Angeles, CA, Georgia (GA), California (CA)

This document explains that Dr. King came to Los Angeles at the invitation of major organizations and concerned individuals.

Letter from Amnesty International to MLK

Tuesday, April 20, 1965
DENMARK

On behalf of Denmark's chapter of Amnesty International, Mr. Bent Ostergaard writes Dr. King extending a speaking invitation. He is hopeful that Dr. King will return to Europe and accept the invitation to speak to youth and instill in them the significance of justice.

Nonviolence: The Only Road to Freedom

Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), New York (NY), New York, NY, GHANA, ZAMBIA, ZIMBABWE, SOUTH AFRICA, TANZANIA, NIGERIA, ANGOLA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, INDIA, Georgia (GA)

In this article, Dr. King argues that the American Negro's salvation will be reached by "rejecting the racism, materialism and violence that has characterized Western civilization" and working instead toward a world of brotherhood and cooperation. The civil rights leader denounces recent violent uprisings in urban ghettos, as they only contribute to the growing frustrations and issues perpetuating America's racial divide.

Letter from Sister M. Angelice to MLK

Sunday, October 25, 1964
Alabama (AL), Louisville, KY, Montgomery, AL, Kentucky (KY)

Sister Angelice, Acting President of Ursiline College in Louisville, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and expresses admiration for his civil rights efforts.

Letter from Neal to Dr. James Cone

Tuesday, May 17, 1983
New York, NY, Illinois (IL)

Neal informs Dr. James Cone of a correspondence he found between Dwight Loder and Dr. King.

Project "C" Progress Report

Thursday, March 28, 1963
Johannesburg, South Africa, GEORGIA, Chicago, IL, New York (NY), Boston, MA, Dallas, TX, Detroit, MI, Philadelphia, PA

Detailed progress report on a project that is referred to as Project "C."

I Have A Dream

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C., New York, NY, New York (NY), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA), Louisiana (LA), New Hampshire (NH), Pennsylvania (PA), Colorado (CO), California (CA), Tennessee (TN)

Dr. King delivered the "I Have A Dream" speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 1963. Along with Lincoln's "Gettysburg Address," it is considered to be one of the greatest speeches of all time.