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Robert Garrett Asks Dr. King for Information

New York (NY)

Robert Garrett writes Dr. King to find out more information about the goals of his organization. Dr. King decides to send a brochure.

Dr. King Leaves Montgomery for Atlanta

Tuesday, December 1, 1959
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This news release announces Dr. King's decision to resign as Pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama and move to Atlanta, Georgia. Relocating to Atlanta will enable Dr. King to Co-Pastor Ebenezer Baptist Church with his father, and will leave him in close proximity to the SCLC.

Letter from Christa Beer to MLK

Monday, October 25, 1965
GERMANY

Christa Beer, a student at the English Institute of Frederick-Schiller University of Jena in East Germany, informs Dr. King that she is writing her final paper on his works in civil rights. She explains the lack of resources at her university and asks that he send her information to aid her in her research.

Philosophical Work

Dr. King outlines significant philosophical and theological publications from the eleventh to the nineteenth century. Thinkers whose work is referenced include: St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Machiavelli, Thomas Hobbes, and John Locke.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Earl C. Scott

Thursday, September 13, 1962
Texas (TX)

Dr. King writes Reverend Earl C. Scott expressing appreciation for his words of encouragement and providing Reverend Scott with information regarding his current work towards social justice.

God

Dr. King writes about God, according to Isaiah 6:1.

Telegram Text from MLK to USAG Robert Kennedy

Sunday, October 6, 1963
New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King requests that Attorney General Robert Kennedy intervene in New Orleans to prevent further intimidation of civil rights supporters by police.

Aquinas, Thomas

Dr. King notes biographical information about Thomas Aquinas.

Letter from Eleanor Roosevelt to MLK

Saturday, March 31, 1962
New York, NY, Illinois (IL)

Eleanor Roosevelt invites Dr. King for afternoon tea to discuss ongoing issues in Deerfield, Illinois with Rev. Bletzer and members of the American Freedom of Residence Fund.

Letter from Prof. D. Martin Fischer to MLK

Berlin, Germany

Professor Fischer writes a word to the American people urging them to be merciful in their acts and deeds, especially as pertains to the Vietnam war.

God

Dr. King quotes Psalms 111:3 and writes that "here is the familiar emphasis of the mercy and grace of God."

Letter from Canary McKay to MLK

Friday, February 4, 1966
Chicago, IL

Canary McKay shows her appreciation to Dr. King for the progress made as a result of the Civil Rights Movement. She also extends an invitation for King to speak at her church.

Letter from Charles McC. Mathias, Jr. to MLK

Friday, January 8, 1965
Maryland (MD), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

Congressman Mathias of Maryland thanks Dr. King for his recent letter urging him to vote against the seating of the Mississippi Delegation. Although Mathias' vote against the seating was defeated, he states that the mere challenge to it "has drawn once again the attention of the American public to this unfortunate situation."

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK about an Invitation

Wednesday, July 20, 1966
Jackson, MS, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

In this letter, Mr. Hubert Humphrey, Vice President of the United States, writes to Dr. King declining his invitation to address the 10th Annual Convention of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

A Call to Vietnam Week

VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This article discusses the Call to Vietnam Week, scheduled to take place April 8 through the 15th. The goal of this event was to promote grass roots awareness of war's destruction.

Letter to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

This handwritten letter was written the day after Dr. King's assassination and is addressed to Mrs. King.

Letter from MLK to Third Grader Debbie Bass

Thursday, June 3, 1965
New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks Debbie Bass of New York for her thoughtful letter. Debbie Bass is a third grade student from the Birch Lane School of Massapequa Park. Dr. King expresses that her letter encourages everyone to hasten their efforts in the fight for freedom.

What Are We Fighting For?

This outlines the sermon "What Are We Fighting For" into three components: the past, the present, and the future.

Presentation of the Marcus Garvey Prize for Human Rights

JAMAICA

Dr. King was a recipient of the first Marcus Garvey Prize for Human Rights. This award was issued by the Jamaican Government and was presented to Coretta Scott King due to the tragic death of Dr. King earlier in the year. This program outlines that event.

Letter from David T. Doherty to MLK

Saturday, June 6, 1964
Oregon (OR)

David T. Doherty, President of the Western Regional Interfraternity Council, invites Dr. King to attend the W.R.I.F.C. Conference in April to express his views on the role of fraternities within American culture.

Statement Regarding Fred L. Shuttlesworth's Court Appearances

Tuesday, July 12, 1966
Louisville, KY, Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA

This document explains Rev. Shuttlesworth upcoming court appearances as a result of his civil rights activities. He faces charges for blocking a sidewalk during a demonstration and for protesting at Drake Memorial Hospital.

Telegram from Charles Evers to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966
Jackson, MS

This telegram, from board members of MAP, expresses their dissatisfaction with Dr. King's comments regarding refunding efforts of the Child Development Group of Mississippi.

Letter from J. L. Richard to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965
California (CA), Selma, AL

Reverend J. L. Richard, from Evergreen Baptist Church, sends prayers for Dr. King and the Negro race. Richard also sends a monetary contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from Robert Friedman to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, February 28, 1968
Oregon (OR), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Robert Friedman, a representative of "The Forensic Quarterly," asks Dora McDonald to find out if another SCLC staff member can write an article about compulsory service systems for his publication.

Thank You Letter from MLK to Anne Eaton

Friday, May 5, 1967
Ohio (OH)

In this letter Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Mrs. Eaton's contribution of $500 to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Dr. King emphasizes the importance of such financial support in maintaining the organization's efforts.

Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech Draft

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, SWEDEN

This is a draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. Handwritten notes are written in the margins to indicate future amendments. Dr. King states that he experiences this moment of acceptance for himself and "those magnificent devotees of nonviolence who have moved so courageously against the ramparts of racial injustice."

Telegram from Mr. Aubrey Williams to MLK

Sunday, October 23, 1960
Nashville, TN, Atlanta, GA, New Orleans, LA, Tennessee (TN), Louisiana (LA), Georgia (GA)

Members of the Board of The Southern Conference Educational Fund write to Dr. King and express their admiration for the stand he has taken.

Letter from Max Tak to MLK

Tuesday, February 28, 1967
NETHERLANDS, New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Mr. Tak requests a statement for the Elseviers Weekblad cover story titled, "Is Satan Still Alive?" from Dr. King.

The Boston Sunday Globe: The Road to Loyalty

Sunday, August 28, 1966
Boston, MA

Justice Felix Frankfurter is quoted by the Boston Sunday Globe to discuss the lack of liberty in history due to repulsive individuals. The American Civil Liberties Union is accused of being communist as well as Jefferey Gordon, a member of the pro-Peking Progressive Labor Party. The article expounds on various organizations and quotes surrounding their political perspective.

Chicago Tribune: Man's Struggle for Freedom

Sunday, June 25, 1967
Illinois (IL)

Clarence Seidenspinner writes this review for the Chicago Tribune regarding Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" His evaluation centers around Dr. King's progression from using nonviolence as strategy in Montgomery, to his focus on international affairs. He further explains Dr. King's first uneasy experience with the Black Power slogan and its effects.