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Letter of Condolence to Mrs. King from Deborah Easton

Friday, April 5, 1968

This handwritten letter of condolence was composed the day after Dr. King's assassination by a young student, Deborah Easton.

Letter from Leon Lowry to the King's

Saturday, December 8, 1962

A. Leon Lowry invites the Kings to speak at Beulah Baptist Institutional Church in Florida for their Men's and Women's services.

Letter from Robert Lee Hill to MLK

Robert Lee Hill writes to inform Dr. King of the discrimination taking place in the United States Post Office. He then requests the help of the Reverend to put an end to it.

Man (Divided Against Himself)

Referencing the liberal German historian Friedrich Meinecke, Dr. King describes a philosophy on politics as it relates to humanity and one's morals.

Money

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson's "The Principles of Christian Ethics."

The Bill of Rights Poem

Monday, July 30, 1962

Dr. Alfred G. Suarez writes a poem regarding the necessity of the Bill of Rights.

Telegram from Rev. M Moran Weston Rector to MLK

Rev. Rector writes to Dr. King extending his support for the Poor Peoples Campaign. He also invites Dr. King to speak at their church to rally support for the campaign.

Looking Forward: The Montgomery Improvement Association, Inc.

This pamphlet outlines the ten points the Montgomery Improvement Association uses to promote healthy race relations.

American Journal: Let Justice Roll Down

Monday, June 6, 1966

Carey McWilliams writes to Dr. King to inform him his article, "Let Justice Roll Down," was included in the American Journal, a publication by the US Information Service aimed at representing opinions and current subjects of interest in the United States. This edition, published in 1965, was he 5th year in a row Dr. King had contributed an article describing the tempo of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.

Introduction to an Educational Program on Nonviolence

Monday, September 26, 1966

This document explains the purpose of an educational program on nonviolence. The document then goes into specific details on the curriculum taught in the workshops for nonviolence.

Letter from E. Z. Graves to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

E. Z. Graves adversely compares Dr. King, Stokely Carmicheal and Adam Clayton Powell to manure. Mr. Graves attaches an article entitled, "King and Carmicheal Maps Strategy for Summer Attacks on Big Cities."

Letter from Archie Crouch to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967

Archie R. Crouch, of the Office for Communications, sends a personal letter to Dr. King using the United Presbyterian Church letterhead. He expresses his support for Dr. King's leadership against the Vietnam War and states that he meets many people that stand in opposition to the war. Crouch encloses recent issues of the publications New and Motive, which highlight the anti-war efforts taking place in the Presbyterian Church.

Royalty Statement for Japanese Edition of Stride Toward Freedom

Friday, May 19, 1967

Joan Daves details royalty earnings for the Japanese edition of Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," including the number of copies sold in 1966.

Addition to "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence"

This augmentation was intended to be included in Dr. King's "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence" essay published in the Christian Century on April 13, 1960. In the appendage, Dr. King discusses the personal afflictions he has endured as a result of his civil rights work including death threats, bombings of his home, and a near fatal stabbing. He states that suffering has a "redemptive quality" and discusses how he transformed his personal suffering into a "creative force" instead of reacting with bitterness.

Letter from Margie Edmondson to MLK Regaring a Speaking Engagement

Thursday, February 10, 1966

In this letter, Margie Edmondson of Chicago, Illinois invites Dr. King to speak to local youth at a bi-monthly meeting of the Junior Christian Inter-Racial Commission.

Letter from MLK to Benjamin E. Mays

Thursday, December 19, 1963

In this letter to Dr. Mays, Dr. King mentions a letter of recommendation written on the behalf of William Herbert Gray Jr.

Letter from William S. Stein to MLK

Friday, May 6, 1966

William Stein informs Dr. King that the Executive Council of the Episcopal Church will be contributing to SCLC.

Memorandum from Benjamin F. Payton Regarding Meredith Mississippi March

Benjamin F. Payton, Executive Director of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, constructs this document as a debriefing on the Meredith Mississippi March. It is evident that the march is symbolic of the nation's struggle with racial conflict and aims to dismantle fear among African American voter registration. James Meredith, Mississippi citizen and first African American to desegregate the University of Mississippi, had organized and led the march.

Letter from MLK to Paul Madsen

Friday, November 29, 1963

Dr. King informs Reverend Paul O. Madsen that he does not have availability to work for the Home Missions Societies of the American Baptist Convention because he is very busy with the civil rights struggle.

Royalty Statement from Harper & Row Publishers

Here Harper and Row Publishers itemize the royalties from Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom" for a total of $689.44.

Man (A Fatalistic View)

Dr. King includes a quote from the Persian philosopher Omar Khayyam.

Letter from E.E. Adams to MLK

E. E. Adams relates his thoughts about the constitutionality of urban renewal.

"Dr. King Warns Against the Riots"

Tuesday, June 27, 1967

Eugene Patterson, of the Atlanta Constitution, transcribed his analysis of Dr. King's final publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Mr. Patterson evaluated Dr. King's views on riots and agreed that riots did not produce any solid improvements to solve the problems in the Negro community.

Action Among Nations: International Planned Parenthood Federation

This publication highlights collaborative efforts to support and expand the International Planned Parenthood Federation. The document highlights statistical data demonstrating the organization's successes in "voluntary fertility control," and references Planned Parenthood's conference scheduled in autumn 1966.

God

Dr. King quotes Karl Barth regarding the nature of God. In addition, Dr. King provides bibliographical information for the quote.

Stride Towards Freedom Royalties

Sunday, July 25, 1965

This document serves as a financial receipt from Laurence Pollinger Ltd. Royalties for Dr. King's book Stride Towards Freedom are included in the statement.

Letter from Wyatt Walker to Hy Resnick

Friday, December 8, 1961

On behalf of Dr. King, Wyatt Walker thanks Hy Resnick and the Mount Vernon YM & YWHA for their efforts to raise money to aid the civil rights movement. He then suggests a number of entertainers that might be useful through Harry Belafonte's associations.

Letter from Milton R. Young to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

Republican North Dakota Senator Milton Young thanks Dr. King for a recent telegram expressing his views on pending voting rights legislation.

Hegel's Social Ethics

Dr. King writes notes on Hegel's social ethics. He quotes, "The principle triad here consist of law in the sense of abstract right, morality, and social ethics." According to Hegel, abstract right may be defined as being a person and respecting other people, while morality refers to one's conscience and social ethics regards another triad, being family, civil society, and the state.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Sylvester Webb

Monday, January 17, 1966

Dora McDonald writes Sylvester Webb of Edward Gideon Public School on behalf of Dr. King. McDonald states that Dr. King is honored that an oil portrait of himself is being presented at the school, but he regrets that he cannot be present during the ceremony. Dr. King is sending the Director of the Washington bureau of the SCLC, Reverend Walter Fauntroy, to represent him in his absence.