The Archive

Search results for:

A Southern Point of View

Eliza Paschall writes this article to express her feelings toward the Georgia legislature's willingness to close down the schools rather than integrate them. Paschall states that "segregation is a disease that infects all parts of a being, human or political." The time for action is now, so that equality can be achieved by all.

MLK Sermon Outline

Dr. King's sermon outline references the Biblical text in Ezekiel 22:30.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1962

Saturday, September 1, 1962

Dr. King discusses the terrible cost of securing voting rights for blacks, especially in Leesburg, Georgia, where the Shady Grove Baptist Church was bombed and burned following the SNCC's use of the space to register voters.

SCLC Newsletter: Of Riots and Wrongs Against Jews

Monday, July 27, 1964

Presented here, is a draft of an article published in the July-August 1964 edition of the SCLC Newsletter. The article highlights the discontentment of the author in relation to acts of violence against Jewish citizens.

Draft of MLK's An Open Letter to Negro Youth

In an open letter to Negro Youths, Dr. King urges them to stay committed to the nonviolent principles of social change in their plight to gain broad access to education and employment.

Letter from MLK to Sara Mitchell

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Mitchell, a representative from the Atlanta Board of Education, for her recent letter acclaiming his book "Where Do We Go From Here." Dr. King states that the lack of material on Negro History and culture in America's public schools is "appalling" and children from all races will benefit from learning about another aspect of American culture and history.

SCLC Fund Appeal from MLK

Dr. King discusses SCLC's continued priority work in the South. the Los Angeles riots and the need for ongoing voter registration. He makes the point that, "contributions are more than money - they are affirmations of confidence and dedication to democratic change."

Telegram from Reinhold Niebuhr to MLK

Friday, March 19, 1965

Theologian Reinhold Niebuhr regrets that a stroke prevents him from accepting Dr. King's invitation to participate in the Selma-to-Montgomery March and hopes there will be "massive" support.

God: Hosea

Dr. King explores God as it relates to the book of Hosea.

Invitation from Frederick Williams to MLK

Wednesday, June 16, 1965

Frederick Williams, Director of the New York City Board of Education, asks Dr. King to appear as a guest speaker on the board's new television station, WNYC-TV.


Dr. King refers to Jeremiah 1:5, explaining that this passage represents a departure from nationalism toward a more universal emphasis.

Letter of Resignation Rachel Davis DuBois to MLK

Wednesday, November 2, 1966

Rachel Davis DuBois resigns from the staff of SCLC to help the organization during a time of financial difficulties. Dr. DuBois offers her services in the future whenever needed without compensation.

Letter from Sampson Oliver to MLK

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

Sampson Oliver writes Dr. King expressing his feelings concerning the immoral notion of Vietnam War.

Order Form: These Are Our Children

This order form depicts a photograph of children of varying races at the 1960 White House Conference on Children and Youth.

Letter from Tony Schrader to MLK

Tuesday, April 2, 1968

Tony Schrader informs Dr. King that his college is sponsoring a primary on campus for Choice '68. Schrader requests "any free campaign materials or statements of policies of Dr. King."

Letter from Jesse Thomas to MLK

Saturday, April 1, 1967

Jessie Thomas is writing to Dr. King to promote the development of a new urban community in the Rockdale area of Atlanta. Mr. Thomas states that the development would be revolutionary and a model for other cities if it were to be approved by the housing authorities. He urges Dr. King to support the project and help in the planning of producing this new area.

Invitation from Susan Rowland to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967

Susan Rowland invites Dr. King to the University of Western Ontario to give an address during the spring of 1968. During his visit he is expected to speak on the topics of civil rights and the Vietnam conflict. Although these are the areas of focus, Ms. Rowland explains that the exact nature of the talk is up to Dr. King's discretion.

Eartha, Verbal Tempest, Flies to Los Angeles

This article references statements made by entertainer Eartha Kitt during a White House luncheon for women. Kitt expressed her concerns about the impact of the Vietnam War on American families and their sons.

Statement Before the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee

Saturday, August 11, 1956

Dr. King addresses the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee on the issues of civil rights, segregation, and voters registration. He urges the party to join the crusade for social justice and equality for all.

SCLC Switchboard Schedule

This schedule lists the names, dates, and time of SCLC's switchboard operators.

People In Action: Nothing Changing Unless

Sunday, January 28, 1962

In his regular column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes in support of a 435 million dollar job training bill that would "salvage a segment of the unemployed and potentially employable."

Transcripts of Speeches And Statements Along The Meridith March

Thursday, June 16, 1966

Dr. King discusses the recent violent challenge faced by the Negro and the SCLC in which they have experienced a "threat of murder." This issue has motivated Dr. King to continuously press for social change and maintain the responsibilities in Mississippi.


Dr. King notes poet Algernon Charles Swinburne's ideology of man and his capabilities.

Letter from H. C. Whitley to MLK

Friday, September 27, 1963

H. C. Whitley invites Dr. King to the St. Giles' Lectures during Holy Week, preceding Easter of 1964. The cathedral has experienced some notable leaders and would like to continue their caliber of speakers through Dr. King's appearance.

Telegram from MLK to Sargent Shriver

Friday, May 12, 1967

Dr. King commends Mr. Shriver and the Office of Economic Opportunity for funding the Southwest Alabama Farmers Cooperative Association. Dr. King asserts that this decision is a positive step in the War on Poverty that will directly affect countless numbers of impoverished people.

Letter from John B. Morris to Alfred Hardman

Wednesday, July 3, 1963

The Executive Director of the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity writes the Lovett School Board of Trustees regarding the decision not to accept Negroes. Reverend John Morris informs Reverend Alfred Hardman that the church does not agree with the decision and will protest it. Dr. King's son, Martin Luther King III was one of the students not admitted into the school.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Charles Szolyvai

Sunday, July 26, 1964

Ms. McDonald responds to Mr. Szolyvai's request for a meeting with Dr. King. She informs him that Dr. King is unsure of the next time he will be in New York, however she says they will keep his letter in mind.

Letter from Student Suzi Breece to MLK

Cuba, Missouri High School freshman Suzi Breece asks Dr. King to send a letter about why civil rights are important to everyone. She hopes to use his statement as part of a class project.

Notecard- Barth

In this notecard, Dr.King outlines his views on Barth.

Letter from MLK to Saul S. Sherman

Monday, January 3, 1966

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Mrs. Saul S. Sherman for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He writes how monumental the change for Negroes in the South has been in the last ten years and how revolutionary the future will be thanks to her generous donation.