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SCLC Citizenship Workbook

This workbook is an extension of the SCLC Conference Citizenship program "designed to acquaint citizens with the way in which our government is run and to help them meet voting requirements." This resource tool features a number of vocabulary-building, arithmetic, reading comprehension, and spelling exercises to better equip voters with the knowledge to "fight against prejudice and loss of human rights in education."

Letter from MLK to Ann Patricia Herring

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

Dr. King congratulates Ann Herring on her new marriage and apologizes for misfiling her earlier letters asking him to perform her marriage ceremony. He assures her that if he had seen her letters, he would have made his best attempt to perform the ceremony.

Letter from MLK to Richmond M. Rudden

Wednesday, October 27, 1965

Dr. King defers an invitation to speak at Lafayette College until a later date.

MLK's Sermon Notes

Dr. King drafted the intro of this sermon to place emphasis on the pros and cons of despair. The place and date of where this sermon was preached is not known.

Letter from Martin J. McNamara to MLK

Monday, August 7, 1967

Martin McNamara, Special Counsel to the Vice President, informs Dr. King that the Vice President regrets that he is unable to accept an invitation to address the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from David Brandyberry to MLK

Thursday, June 20, 1963

David Brandberry, a student 16 years of age, informs Dr. King that he desires to voice his opinion about the racial issues in the south. Mr. Brandberry cannot comprehend the logical reasoning of racism and the motives of the "ignorant whites." Furthermore, the student discusses the issues of immigration and the political concept of communism. Mr. Brandberry states that he "wish he had been born a Negro" to he could be of more assistance in the movement.

Letter from Ernest Dale to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1968

In this letter, Professor Dale asks to reschedule an appointment with Dr.King. He had been unable to keep the original appointment because he was not in Atlanta.

Letter from Donald G. Brownlow to MLK

Friday, November 1, 1963

Donald G. Brownlow from Department of History invites Dr. King to speak with students on the current issues of today, especially race relations in the United States. Dr. King's handwritten note in the margin indicates, "Can't go this academic year...Southern struggle."

Newspaper Clipping - "In Memoriam" MLK, NY Amsterdam News

Saturday, April 13, 1968

This newspaper clipping is one of several full page "In Memoriam" dedications featured in various New York City newspapers following the assassination of Dr. King. The clippings accompany a letter from the Public Relations Director of the NAACP to the Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy, newly installed as the head of the SCLC in the aftermath of Dr. King's death.

Existentialism

Dr. King explains the philosophy of existentialism.

Moral Progress

Dr. King describes moral progress as endless struggle toward "an infinite goal," which will lead to "happiness."

Refinement by Fire

R. Elizabeth Johns describes the events surrounding voter registration in the South and tactics used by civil rights and opposition leaders.

Letter from Linda Gillies to MLK

Sunday, March 17, 1968

Chairman of the Choice '68 Steering Committee, Linda Gillies asks Dr. King about his stance on referendum issues. Topics that Dr. King was asked to respond to included King's opinion on what military action the U.S. should have in Vietnam, the course of action the US should pursue regarding bombing North Vietnam and governmental spending.

Letter from Annie Grace to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967

Thirteen-year-old Annie G. Miller expresses her admiration for Dr. King.

Letter from George Lucas to MLK

Wednesday, September 30, 1964

George Lucas writes Dr. King to follow-up on a telephone conversation confirming Dr. King's appearance in Dayton, Ohio. Lucas informs Dr. King that the event will take place at the Field House of the University of Dayton.

Correspondence from Maude L. Ballou to Miss Frehse - Apr 29, 1960

Friday, April 29, 1960

Here Maude L. Ballou is responding to Miss Frehse letter concerning questions about MLK's book "Stride Towards Freedom." Miss Ballou states that MLK's time schedule is too full to respond to her questions.

Letter from Jagdish Bhatt to MLK

Tuesday, November 9, 1965

South African resident Jagdish Bhatt writes Dr. King requesting an autograph picture of Dr. King. Bhatt notes that he has also collected other forms of memorabilia of Dr. King such as speeches and various recordings.

SCLC Newsletter: March 1964

Sunday, March 1, 1964

The March, 1964 SCLC newsletter reports many news items, including a voter registration drive in Alabama, the results of several legal cases, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, an article criticizing Judge Durwood T. Pye and the use of interracial primers in Detroit's public schools.

Letter from Floyd Mulkey to MLK

Saturday, December 16, 1967

Floyd Mulkey writes Dr. King a letter, commending him on his plans for the Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Royalties

Wednesday, October 5, 1966

In this letter, dated October 5, 1966, J. Campe encloses royalty payments for Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," "Why We Can't Wait", and "Strength to Love."

Note to MLK

Thursday, March 5, 1964

In a brief note, Joan Daves informs Dr. King of an enclosed British publisher's catalogue for his review.

God

Dr. King writes about Chapter 11 of the Old Testament Book, Hosea, concerning Israel.

Anonymous Letter to Mrs. King following MLK's Assassination

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

This letter was written anonymously to Mrs. Coretta Scott King following the televised funeral of Dr. King. The author questions the nerve of Mrs. King to be in mourning, stating that she is no Jackie Kennedy and calling the entire thing a farce. In addition to accusing "The Black King," presumably Dr. King, of planning to burn D.C. and then swoop in to save the city, the author states their desire for African American leaders to receive "a belly full of lead."

Telegram Request to MLK on the Kennedy Assassination

Thursday, December 5, 1963

This Western Union Telegram was sent to Dr. King from Tokyo, requesting commentary concerning John F. Kennedy's assassination for the magazine Midorikawa.

Jo Marks writes Harry Belafonte Regarding Civil Rights Help

Thursday, February 2, 1967

Jo Marks writes Mr. Harry Belafonte a lengthy letter about the civil rights situation in Houston and to request that he perform at the Astrodome.

Draft: The Time for Freedom Has Come

Tuesday, May 1, 1962

In this draft of Dr. King's article, "The Time for Freedom Has Come," he discusses the role of African American students in the Civil Rights Movement. He praises the commitment and determination of students and credits them with the desegregation of lunch counters. He also identifies with the students' frustration with the slowness of forward progress in the struggle for equality. The article was published in New York Times Magazine on September 10, 1961.

Letter from Frederick K. Arrington to MLK

Tuesday, February 16, 1965

Frederick Arrington of Third Street Bethel A. M. E. Church writes Dr. King on behalf of the male Ushers asking his permission to use a photo of Dr. King on key tags for a fundraiser.

Letter from Senator Hugh Scott to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

US Senator Hugh Scott, writes Dr. King expressing thanks for the Reverend's letter of recent date. In addition, Scott reveals that he sponsored the Civil Rights legislation long before the present act was introduced. Scott also expresses that he would enjoy speaking with Dr. King during his next visit in Washington, D. C.

Telegram from Muhammad Ali to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967

This message of support from Muhammad Ali was sent to Dr. King during his stay at the County Jail in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Shirley Leonard to MLK

Sunday, December 31, 1961

Shirley Leonard encloses a check for ten dollars to help Dr. King further integration.