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Letter from SCLC to Lizzie Williams

Tuesday, August 17, 1965

A representative of the Citizenship Education Program, an initiative of the SCLC, informs Mrs. Willis of recent travel plans to Dorchester, GA. Dorchester academy played a vital role in the struggle for voting and civil rights.

The Cold War: The Insanity of Deterrence

This brochure depicts a child asking "mommy, what's an H bomb?" and serves as anti-nuclear war propaganda.

Letter from MLK to Reverend M.C. Williams

Monday, February 26, 1962

Dr. King writes to Reverend Williams of New Hope Baptist Church confirming receipt of a recent donation. He expresses gratitude for his continued support in the struggle for freedom.

Letter from Edgar E. Evans to MLK

Edgar E. Evans communicates with Dr. King to discuss stocks regarding the Farm and City Enterprises, Inc. Mr. Evans further informs Dr. King of the Negro Citizen's lack of confidence within the corporation. He continues to expound on the financial inconsistencies within the organization.

Letter from MLK to Vice President Richard Nixon

Wednesday, January 11, 1956

Dr. King and fellow clergymen commend Vice President Nixon on his work bringing attention to the suffering Hungarian refugees in Austria. They urge him to take a similar trip to the South and meet with the thousands of victims of racial oppression.

Letter from MLK to Knights of Peter Claver, Ladies' Auxiliary Members Expresing Thanks for Their Contribution

Monday, January 30, 1967

Dr. King thanks the Knights of Peter Claver, Ladies' Auxilary Members for their generous contribution to S.C.L.C. Dr. King acknowledges the impact of such support on improving race relations throughout the nation.

Letter from Lars Andr. Larssen to MLK

Wednesday, February 23, 1966

The Fredskontoret (Peace Bureau) of Norway invites Dr. King to speak in Oslo, with proceeds from the broadcast of his speech going towards the Civil Rights Movement.

Statements on Jobs and Poverty

Friday, November 6, 1964

Dr. King explains the relationship between violence and the lack of employment among young people. Dr. King also speaks of the Thanksgiving Fast for Freedom and its efforts to end poverty and hunger.

Letter from H. Melvin Lieberstein to MLK

Sunday, May 14, 1967

H. Melvin Lieberstein thanks Dr. King for the personal letter Lieberstein received. Lieberstein adds quiet support to Dr. King, stating that in his chosen career field he regrets an inability to provide more active support.

Letter of Appreciation from MLK to Carolyn W. Ferriday

Wednesday, July 20, 1966

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Carolyn Ferriday for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

MLK's Statement Regarding Civil Rights Activists' Murders

Friday, December 11, 1964

This statement by Dr. King was written regarding the lynching and murders of three civil rights activists: James Cheyney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner. When Mississippi officials refused to pursue the prosecution of those involved, national outrage prompted the ensuing major federal intervention.

Letter from MLK to Maurine B. Neuberger

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Oregon Senator Maurine B. Neuberger to express gratitude for her support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Messianic Age (Haggai)

Dr. King makes reference to the Biblical governor Zerubbabel. The specific passage to which Dr. King refers reads, "On that day, says the Lord of Hosts, I will take you Zerubbabel, son of Shealtiel, my servant, and wear you like a signet ring; for it is you whom I have chosen. This is the word of the Lord of Hosts" (Hag. 2:23).

Press Statement by MLK About President Johnson's Address on Selma

Tuesday, March 16, 1965

Dr. King lauds President Johnson's speech to a joint session of Congress, which he describes as an eloquent, unequivocal and passionate plea for human rights. This statement and the President's address occurred during the height of the Selma voting rights campaign.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Arthur Flemming

Monday, January 30, 1967

Dr. King is writing to express his deep appreciation for Mr. Flemming's contribution to the SCLC. He states that because of the contributors continuing support, the initiatives of the SCLC can persist forward.

The Self

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman's book "The Source of Human Good."

Letter from MLK to Mary Gaston

Tuesday, August 29, 1967

In this lette,r Dr. King offers his gratitude to Mary Gaston for her contribution to the SCLC. He also explains how such funds help the SCLC achieve their cause.

Call to Survival

Sunday, November 5, 1967

This advertisement offers a "realistic appraisal" of the Vietnam situation and offers possible solutions.

The Atlanta Board of Education

Friday, September 15, 1967

The Atlanta Board of Education neglects to solve educational issues in the Negro community. There are protests and demonstrations from those who object to the disdain of action. Julian Bond purposes a course of action designed to educate, convince, and force action from the board.

Letter from Dolores H. Autuore to MLK

Thursday, September 28, 1967

Mrs. Autuore encloses some checks that were misplaced temporarily while offering her gratitude to Dr. King for his visit to Pine Island.

Draft of I Have a Dream

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

This version of Dr. King's famous "I Have a Dream" speech reveals important changes to ideas and phrases that Dr. King chose either to alter or omit completely the day he addressed the throng gathered before the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. Dr. King's argument against the "normalcy" of bigotry remained a key message on the day he took the podium.

Thank you from SCLC to donor Dr. Jerry Flint

Monday, March 25, 1968

Dr. King is writing to express his deep appreciation for the generous contribution made by Jerry Flint. He acknowledges the importance of the continuous support of the contributors so that the fight for social justice and peace can continue.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Cantor Solomon Mendelson

Tuesday, December 20, 1966

In this response letter to Cantor Mendelson of Congregation Beth Sholom in New York, Miss McDonald explains that Dr. King will make all efforts to attend the "I Have a Dream" musical performance.

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Friday, April 28, 1967

Robert F. Kennedy writes to Dr. King regarding his recent trip to Mississippi. Kennedy tells of his engagement with the Department of Agriculture and the Subcommittee on Employment in efforts to help relieve the present hunger crisis. The focus is "to provide more and better food" to people with low income or no income at all. He also wants the committee and Congress to pay close attention to this subject and encourages an analysis of the food stamp system.

Letter from MLK to Thomas Harten

Monday, July 15, 1963

Dr. King writes to Rev. Harten of the Holy Trinity Baptist Church to thank him and his organization for the donation of one thousand dollars. He explains how the money will be used throughout the SCLC and the importance of having support from organizations who help contribute to the Civil Rights Movement.

Notecard Regarding Freedom

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his insights on the concept of freedom.

Letter from MLK to W. M. Jones

Monday, September 9, 1963

Dr. King writes Bishop W. M. Jones of Israel of God's Church expressing his gratitude for their generous contribution to the SCLC.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Agenda

Friday, August 16, 1963

This document is a strategic outline for the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Letter from Congressman Paul H. Todd to MLK

Monday, October 11, 1965

Florida Democratic Congressman Paul Todd explains to Dr. King why he voted against seating five congressman of the Mississippi Freedonm Democratic Party. Todd based his decision on an earlier precedent, which dismissed a previous claim "because it was brought by a party not legally a candidate for the contested seat."

School Desegregation 10 Years Later

Thursday, May 7, 1964

Dr. King says that there have been few strides made in school desegregation. He says that schools that comply with the desegregation laws do it at an appalling slow pace. Lastly, he says that although there needs to be more progress in both the north and the south, he has hope for the future.