Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Connecticut (CT)"

Biographical Sketch of Andrew Young

AUSTRIA, SWITZERLAND, New Orleans, LA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Hartford, CT, Albany, GA, St. Augustine, FL

This document outlines the education, pastoral, and vocational experience of Andrew J. Young, Executive Director of the SCLC.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Wyatt Tee Walker, executive assistant to Dr. King writes a response letter to Eugene Cook, the Attorney General of Georgia. Walker asks the Attorney General to provide his office with a list of questions that he would like answered. He also informs Cook that he will release the contents of this letter to the news media to make sure their is a level of transparency.

Letter from the Brith Abraham Fraternal Order to MLK

Monday, August 21, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, ISRAEL

Representatives of the Brith Abraham Fraternal Order write Dr. King in response to anti-semitic statements made by members of SNCC. They ask that Dr. King provide a statement that condems SNCC's statement due to the fact the Jewish community has strongly supported the civil rights movement.

Vote of Confidence for Negro Leader

Wednesday, January 24, 1968

In this editorial, a study of 300 negro in 13 cities, was conducted to determine the public attitude towards Dr. King.

Statement from Grace H. Giles

Baltimore, MD

Grace H. Giles writes Reverend Ralph Abernathy and requests that he share a vision with her. She also includes several meaningful words and acronyms that she created.

March on Washington Address by Eugene Carson Blake

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C., Illinois (IL), Virginia (VA)

Rev Dr. Eugene Carson Blake, Vice Chairman of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, addresses the March on Washington. He states that if all the clergy and church members he represents and all of the Roman Catholics and Jews in America were marching for jobs and freedom for Negroes, the battle for civil rights would be won. Despite the pronouncements of the religious community, the churches and society are still segregated. “Late, late we come,” he says, and in a repentant and reconciling spirit.

Letter from A. Dale Fiers to MLK

Saturday, January 15, 1966
Indiana (IN), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Texas (TX), Dallas, TX

A. Dale Fiers, Executive Secretary for the International Convention of Christian Churches, informs Dr. King of the order of events to take place at the Dallas Assembly of the International Convention on September 25, 1966.

Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

Saturday, March 25, 1967
New York, NY

Rodney Clurman requests that Dr. King attend a ten-day trip supporting various people and organizations.

SNCC Annual Conference Program 1960

Sunday, October 16, 1960
Atlanta, GA

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee concludes their annual conference with a rally featuring prominent student leaders. This program outlines the itinerary for the last event of the three day conference and includes SNCC's Statement of Purpose.

Letter from Benjamin Singleteary to MLK

Thursday, December 16, 1965
Indiana (IN)

Benjamin Singleteary, a student at Shortridge Junior High School in Indianapolis, requests Dr. King's autograph and other information for a class project on outstanding people.

Letter from MLK to Dwight Campbelll

Friday, September 11, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Methodist Youth Fellowship to speak in Philadelphia.

Letter from Corinne B. Hill and Harold Stassen to Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 12, 1967
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

Harold Stassen correspond with Dora McDonald expressing gratitude for a letter sent a few days earlier. The letter involves a book to be written by Dr. King.

MLK's Statement on Birmingham Jails

Monday, May 6, 1963
Birmingham, AL

During a broadcast, Dr. King states that the witness and determination of those incarcerated in Birmingham, will break down the barriers of segregation.

Note from Mrs. Phyllis J. Sundquist to MLK

Oregon (OR)

Mrs. Phyllis Sundquist encourages Dr. King to continue his stance against the Vietnam War for the betterment of the United States.

MLK Address Regarding the Negro Family

Thursday, January 27, 1966
Virginia (VA), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

In this address, Dr. King discusses the struggles of the Negro family. He states that the Negro family's life determines the individuals' capacity to love. Dr. King also discusses how American slavery has impacted the Negro family.

New York Mayor Wagner Remarks at Reception

Thursday, December 17, 1964
New York, NY, New York (NY), Oslo, Norway, NORWAY

New York Mayor Robert F. Wagner honors Dr. King at a reception following a ceremony where he was presented the Medallion of Honor of the City of New York after receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. The Mayor especially commends Dr. King for his courageous leadership in nonviolence and the spirit of love, goodwill, and peacemaking that he brings to the struggle for racial justice.

Telegram from Dover Beale and Theodore Patterson to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958
Baltimore, MD, New York, NY, Maryland (MD), New York (NY)

Dover Beale and Theodore Patterson send well wishes and hopes for a full recovery to Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Douglas A.C. Davis

Friday, December 13, 1963
CANADA

Dr. King informs Douglas A. C. Davis that due to his current commitments, he will be unable to accept Davis' invitation to speak at the University of Western Ontario during the current academic year.

MLK Address to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King gives an address to the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. He discusses his recent conviction for marching in Albany, the economic status of the Negro, racial issues, communism, the church, and the practice of nonviolent resistance. He states that the church is the most segregated institution in America. Dr. King also states that racial issues are a national problem and that the goal of the Negro is freedom.

Letter from MLK to Rev. H. Edward Whitaker

Tuesday, April 3, 1962
New York (NY)

Dr. King responds to a letter from Rev. Edward Whitaker, regarding Whitaker's desire to be a college minster. He expresses to Whitaker that his experience should serve him well for such a responsibility. Dr. King and Rev. Whitaker were classmates at Crozer Theological Seminary.

Letter from Ms. Dora McDonald to Mrs. Epworth about an Invitation

Friday, January 12, 1968
Atlanta, GA

Here, Ms. McDonald offers a belated reply to Mrs. Epworth regarding an invitation for Dr. King and his family to dine with the Epworth family. Dr. King does not decline the invitation, but instead takes a raincheck due to an unpredictable schedule.

Letter from Chester Sims to MLK

Monday, December 5, 1966
Chicago, IL

Chester Sims of the Chess Record Company, recommends Charles Souder to Dr. King. He attests that Mr. Soulder is a dedicated man who showed loyalty during his service with SCLC.

An Edition of the SCLC Newsletter

Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

This April/May 1964 SCLC newsletter highlights the recent accomplishments of the SCLC and its members. Some of the topics discussed are the 50-mile march from Selma to Montgomery, Ben Hooks' recent judicial appointment, and Dr. King being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

How My Mind has Changed in the Last Decade

Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL, INDIA

Dr. King writes notes on how his mind has changed in recent years. King states that while his main focus was on theology and philosophy, he also focused on social ethics. According to Dr. King, segregation is a tool that exploits the Negro and poor whites. He saw similarities with the liberation of India's people from Britain and asserts that his trip to India cultivated his ideologies on nonviolence.

Letter from Mr. Richard V. Healy to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967
Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA, Massachusetts (MA), Georgia (GA)

In this 1967 letter Richard Healy, a student at the Boston University of Law, asks Dr. King for an interview "to conduct research into criminal responsibility of a subculture--the urban Negro."

Letter from Gus C. Zucco to MLK

Friday, October 12, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA)

Gus Zucco writes Dr. King regarding the changes of his schedule in hopes that he will be able to speak in Pennsylvania.

Thank You Letter from MLK to Anne Eaton

Friday, May 5, 1967
Ohio (OH)

In this letter Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Mrs. Eaton's contribution of $500 to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Dr. King emphasizes the importance of such financial support in maintaining the organization's efforts.

Letter from Lova Delabarre to MLK

Sunday, July 10, 1966
Washington (WA), Atlanta, GA

Washington state native Lova Delabarre informs Dr. King that her church youth group is studying on the subject of nonviolence. As a white person, Delabarre extends her full support to Dr. King in his efforts for equality and justice. She humbly states, "I pray that some day we will live as one. May God help and guide you in your work."

Letter from Phyllis Light to the NAACP

Monday, June 17, 1963

Mrs. Light argues that the goals of the NAACP are too low. She compares the efforts of the movement to those of Hitler, Mussolini, Napoleon, and Caesar. Because of these comparisons, Mrs. Light promotes segregation amongst the races and accuses educated African Americans of abandoning their culture.

Letter from Mrs. Raphael Demos to Mrs. Coretta Scott King

Monday, February 10, 1958
Massachusetts (MA), Alabama (AL), Boston, MA, Montgomery, AL

Mrs. Demos thanks Mrs. King for her Christmas card and expresses congratulations on the birth of Martin Luther III. Mrs. Demos goes on to provide Coretta with various updates occurring in her own life.