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Letter from Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall to MLK

Monday, June 17, 1963
Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA)

Assisrtant US Attorney General Burk Marshall informs Dr. King that the allegations of police misconduct in Danville, Virginia are being investigated by the Department of Justice and assures him that the appropriate actions will take place "with respect to any violations of federal law."

Letter from Emily Ann Fortson to MLK

Wednesday, June 29, 1966
JORDAN, New York, NY, New York (NY)

Emily Fortson, of Concreta Tours, informs Dr. King of the developing proposal related to his upcoming Holy Land Pilgrimage.

The American Dream

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The is a draft outline of Dr. King's "The American Dream" speech delivered at many colleges, universities and churches throughout the country. Dr. King urges Americans to abandon practices of discrimination in order to protect the American dream and the proliferation of the nation.

Letter from Ronald Segal to MLK

Sunday, October 10, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), London, England, South Africa

Mr. Segal expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's willingness to sponsor the International Conference on South Africa. He also requests that Dr. King prepare a short paper to deliver at the Conference.

Statement from Walter E. Fauntroy Regarding the Progress of Urban Renewal and Redevelopment

Pittsburgh, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C.

Walter E. Fauntroy, chairman of the Housing and Urban Renewal Committee of the Interdenominational Ministers' Alliance, makes a statement regarding the progress of urban renewal and redevelopment in Washington, D.C. He discusses five steps for a unified approach to meeting the communities housing problems. Two notable steps include full and effective citizen's participation in all community plans, and adequate and humane solutions in rehousing all families.

Letter from Nancy Claytor to MLK

Friday, December 2, 1966
Nashville, TN

Nancy Claytor requests Dr. King's permission to use lines from "Letter From Birmingham City Jail" for the publication "The Methodist Student V-VI."

Fleeing From God

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "Fleeing From God." King references the biblical scripture Jonah 1:3 as the foundation of his sermon, asserting that one cannot flee from God or His will.

Letter from Elder A. S. Grant to MLK

Monday, November 1, 1965
JAMAICA, New York (NY), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Elder A.S. Grant, a member of The West Indies Laymen National Christian League Church and State, writes a letter to Dr. King. Grant states the need for solidarity among global Black leaders, both church and state. He requests monetary donations that would go towards a headquarters for his organization.

Letter from Yousuf Karsh to MLK

Wednesday, October 21, 1964
CANADA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Yousuf Karsh congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize Award. In addition, Mr. Karsh informs Dr. King that his wife attended Antioch College at the same time as Mrs. King.

Speakers Bureau Contract for MLK

Tuesday, March 21, 1967
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Wisconsin (WI), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

This contract outlines the details of a speaking engagement for Dr. King on May 12, 1967 at the University of Wisconsin, Marathon County Center.

Outline of Sincerity Is Not Enough

This partial sermon outline in Dr. King's handwriting focuses on the subject "Sincerity Is Not Enough", based on the text Romans 10:2.

Voting Rights and Terrorism in the South

The author places the success of the Voting Rights Bill of 1965 in the hands of the Federal Government. It is stated that the only way the Negros will truly feel the effects of the bill is if the government does its part to enforce it.

SCLC News Release - MLK Statement on Continued Racial Violence in Alabama

Tuesday, February 22, 1966
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

This 1966 SCLC news release contains a statement from Dr. King concerning further racial violence in Birmingham, Alabama and the need for prompt action.

No, Mr. King: Your Ad in the Times is Not Clear!

Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA)

This anonymous author writes Dr. King expressing dissent in his viewpoint on riots.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Advance

Monday, December 19, 1966
New York, NY

In this letter, J. Campe encloses advance payment from Harper & Row for Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here."

Letter from William Gurland to MLK

Wednesday, May 6, 1964
Brooklyn, NY

William Gurland, chairman of the speakers committee at Adelphi University, invites Dr. King to address the student body at Adelphi University in Garden City, New York. Gurland understands that Dr. King is busy with other responsibilities, but hopes that Dr. King will consider his invitation.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Saturday Review

Monday, May 11, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves, literary agent to Dr. King, wrote Dr. King to gain insight on his preference for a sentence revision to appear in his book "Why We Cant Wait."

Worship

Dr. King defines worship.

Nationalism

Dr. King cites a biblical scripture from the book of Isaiah where it is asserted that "God's house is to be a house of prayer for all people."

Letter from William A. Geoghegan to MLK

Wednesday, March 10, 1965
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

William A. Geoghegan, US Department of Justice Assistant Deputy Attorney General, writes Dr. King acknowledging his previous telegram recommending L. N. D. Wells, Jr. to the U. S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.

Dexter Echo: February 3, 1960

Wednesday, February 3, 1960
FRANCE, London, England, Montgomery, AL, New York (NY), Johannesburg, South Africa

This issue of the Dexter Echo honors Dr. and Mrs. King's final day at the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church.

Social Justice in Modern Society

In the following document, Dr. King comments on the "social stagnation" of the world, despite impressive advances in science and technology. He believes that without moral character and social justice, civilization will self-destruct.

Interview of MLK to Appear in PLAYBOY

Thursday, January 11, 1968
New York, NY

On behalf of Dr. King, Secretary Dora McDonald responds to Thomas A. Johnson of The New York Times. She goes on to say that Dr. King accepts the invitation for an interview, that would appear in an upcoming issue of PLAYBOY Magazine.

Telegram from MLK to Jack Greenberg

New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King informs Jack Greenberg that he agrees with a plan to dissolve the Leadership Conference.

Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK 7/25/1967

Tuesday, July 25, 1967
New York, NY

Cass Canfield, of Harper & Row Publishers, drafted this correspondence to Dr. King. Mr. Canfield was delighted to inform Dr. King of the impressive sales of his last book. He acknowledged that reorders for Dr. King's book came to an amazing $1,020, the best in comparison to bestsellers and wholesale stores. The book being referred to, in this document, would be Dr. King's most prophetic, entitled, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Memorandum from Theodore E. Brown Regarding 1968 Trip to Nigeria

Tuesday, February 27, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY, NIGERIA

Theodore E. Brown, the director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, reports the results of his recent trip to Nigeria to members of the Call Committee.

Sin

Dr. King quotes Blaise Pascal's "Pensees."

NAACP Presents to the City Commission

Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL

This list was presented by the St. Augustine branch of the NAACP to the City Commission.

Chicago Daily News: Operation Breadbasket

Monday, August 8, 1966
Chicago, IL

The Chicago Daily News posts an article highlighting Operation Breadbaskets success in opening up two hundred and twenty four jobs in Chicago's dairy industry for Negroes.

SCLC Press Release About a Mississippi Political Rally

Thursday, February 8, 1962
Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

This press release describes a political rally of Negro voters in Clarksdale, Mississippi at which Dr. King spoke. It declares the need for voter registration and the possibility for Mississippi to have as many as five African-American congressmen in Washington.