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Letter from Claudine Shannon to MLK

Tuesday, December 7, 1965

Claudine Shannon, a member of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, asks Dr. King to officiate her wedding ceremony. She mentions that he married her brother several years ago and explains that the bridegroom will cover all of Dr. King's expenses.

MLK Interview with Glenn E. Smiley

Thursday, March 1, 1956

This early (1956) interview with Dr. King has as its center the Montgomery Bus Boycott, a seminal event in Dr. King's career and the Civil Rights Movement.

Telegram from MLK to Reverend F. D. Reece

Saturday, January 11, 1964

Dr. King congratulates Selma, Alabama Reverend F. D. Reese for demonstrating on behalf of teachers fighting injustice.

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

As Dr. King reflects on his acceptance of the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize, he draws a parallel to the American Negroes' nonviolent approach to civil rights and the people of India, Africa, and elsewhere throughout the world. King argues that "humanity's desperate need for peace and progress to move into the truly civilized world of the future" will ultimately derive from adherence to non-violence.

We Shall Overcome

Tuesday, September 24, 1963

This program serves as a memorial exercise for Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carol Robertson and Cynthia Wesley.

Burn Baby Burn: Problems of the Urban Ghetto

This letter from the Georgia Chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union announces a cocktail reception for Aryeh Neier at the Wit's End.

Letter from Froydis Kvaerk to MLK

Monday, August 29, 1966

Norwegian student Froydis Kvaerk requests a copy of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech in fulfillment of a class assignment on Dr. King and the civil rights struggle.

WRAL- TV Broadcast Transcript of Viewpoint show

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

WRAL-TV Viewpoint #1790 is a critical review of the efforts of Stokely Carmichael and Dr. King. The speaker claims Dr. King uses the threat of riots in cities to blackmail the United States Congress into doing the bidding of the Black Power Movement.

Letter from MLK to Miss Ethel Klemm

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

Dr. King takes time to write Miss Ethel Klemm and explain the reasons for the purpose of the Freedom Movement. He clears up the misconception that Negroes are just hastily trying to get their way by stating that Negroes have been patient for too long. According to Dr. King, "This is not a matter of gradualism in its most commonly accepted term, but it is a matter of morality."

Letter from Trude B. Feldman to Mrs. King

In this letter Trude Feldman sends Mrs. King a copy of a "piece" on Sammy Davis from "Ebony" and asks that it be returned after review.

53rd Annual NAACP Convention

Tuesday, June 5, 1962

Serving as an itinerary for the 53rd Annual NAACP Convention, this document outlines the schedule, location, and speakers of the seven-day event.

Telegram from MLK to President Kennedy

Thursday, June 13, 1963

Dr. King informs President Kennedy that he will not be in attendance at a meeting with religious leaders due to another commitment.

Letter from Thomas T. Krampf to MLK

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

New Jersey resident Thomas T. Krampf expresses support for Dr. King's leadership and viewpoints on race relations, morality, and equality. Krampf encloses a self-written story, "The Rosebuds," which speaks to the "'oneness' and the peaceful 'togetherness' of all humanity."

Letter from L. K. Jackson to MLK

Tuesday, January 22, 1963

Reverend L. K. Jackson commends Dr. King on his ongoing efforts in the Civil Rights Movement.

Location & Situation

Dr. King compares the meanings of "location" and "situation."

Letter from Berenice Wiggins to MLK

Monday, September 18, 1967

In this letter, Ms. Wiggins encloses a contribution to the SCLC. She also requests that Dr. King puts out an announcement so that listeners can tune into his radio broadcast on WLIB.

Letter from Armour G. McDaniel to MLK

Monday, March 20, 1967

Armour G. McDaniel, Director of the Small Business Development Center, writes Dr. King to alert him that government assistance to low-income individuals is at risk. Mr. McDaniel describes the Small Business Administration's initiative to assist poor Negroes and states that since the Economic Opportunity Act of 1966 was amended, not a single loan has been granted in Atlantic or Cape May Counties by the SBA.

Telegram from Al C. Hastings to MLK

Tuesday, October 31, 1967

Al Hastings expresses his concern during Dr. King's incarceration in the Jefferson County Jail.

Telegram from Charles Webber to MLK

Charles Webber, the AFL-CIO's representative for religious relations, sends this telegram of support to Dr. King during his incarceration.

Letter from Robert Powell to MLK

Tuesday, March 21, 1967

In this letter, Robert Powell protests Dr. King's participation in a demonstration against the Vietnam War. He also expresses his thoughts on Dr. King's perspective of the war as a "racist war."

Letter from Kendall Bryant to MLK

Sunday, October 27, 1963

A fourth grader from Germantown Friends School in Philadelphia writes Dr. King to inform him of a donation drive conducted by "Mrs. Magaziner's 4th grade class" for the rehabilitation of the 16th Street Baptist Church. The student requests a response letter from Dr. King to take back to the class.

Interview of MLK to Appear in PLAYBOY

Thursday, January 11, 1968

On behalf of Dr. King, Secretary Dora McDonald responds to Thomas A. Johnson of The New York Times. She goes on to say that Dr. King accepts the invitation for an interview, that would appear in an upcoming issue of PLAYBOY Magazine.

Letter from Senator Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Senator Robert Kennedy thanks Dr. King for a previous correspondence and expresses his aligned views regarding nonviolent reconciliation. Senator Kennedy believes in the preservation of dignity and freedom internationally without imposing "incessant military conflict" upon those with unaligned views. He references Dr. King's statement regarding the precedence of progress in America to that of other countries. He also wishes to hear Dr. King's reaction to a series of his speeches on "A Program for the Urban Crisis" that he has attached.

Letter from Rosa Lockett Reodus to MLK

Sunday, January 30, 1966

Reodus invites Dr. King to speak at the Progressive Community Church in Chicago and offers a small donation from the church in support of his cause.

Article Written by MLK for The Progressive

In this unfinished draft of an article for The Progressive, Dr. King writes about the social ills of America through the context of what he calls the two most important documents in American history: the Declaration of Independence and the Emancipation Proclamation.

Affidavit of Captain George Wall

Wednesday, April 10, 1963

George Wall, Captain of the Police Department for the City of Birmingham, submits an affidavit. The document states that a group of thirty-two Negroes led by Charles Billups and Fred Shuttlesworth were arrested for marching without a permit.

Letter from Amelia Jones to MLK and the SCLC

Friday, February 18, 1966

The Toldeo NAACP Branch invites Dr. King to be their keynote speaker. Amelia Jacobs Jones, representing the NAACP, requests that suggested dates regarding Dr. King's availability be forwarded to her.

Letter from MLK to Miss Read

In this handwritten draft letter, Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Miss Read's "interest in and support of our work and the American Negroes [sic] struggle for freedom and dignity."

Telegram from Thomas Kilgore to MLK

Thomas Kilgore, on behalf of Friendship Baptist Church, offers support to Dr. King concerning the downfall of discrimination and segregation.

Forgiveness

Dr. King writes on the topic of "forgiveness," as mentioned in Nehemiah 9:17.