Themes

The Archive

Search results for:
"Columbus, OH"

Letter from William R. Rice to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1966

William Rice, editorial director for WLS radio in Chicago, offers Dr. King suggestions for Operation Dropout. Also enclosed in the letter is a statement on the reasons to stay in school.

Social Justice in Modern Society

In the following document, Dr. King comments on the "social stagnation" of the world, despite impressive advances in science and technology. He believes that without moral character and social justice, civilization will self-destruct.

Letter from MLK to the Bulstrode School Children

Friday, July 9, 1965

Dr. King thanks the school children of Bulstrode in England for their SCLC contribution by means of their daffodil sales. Outlining the current work of the SCLC, he educates the young supporters on the measures being taken to secure voting rights via "Operation Breadbasket" and "Operation Dialogue."

Letter from Robert A. Goldwin to MLK

Tuesday, March 12, 1963

Robert A. Goldwin informs Dr. King that he is enclosing four essays on "100 Years of Emancipation." Goldwin hopes Dr. King will enjoy reading the essays.

Problems of Esthetics

Dr. King writes class notes from his Problems of Esthetics course at the University of Pennsylvania around 1950-1951. He enrolled in the above class while attending Crozer Theological Seminary.

Relation Between Esthetics and Science

Dr. King writes notes regarding "The Relation Between Esthetics and Science." King cites several philosophers, psychologists, and scientists, and their different theories regarding science, mathematics, art, and esthetics.

Letter from Edward P. Blair to MLK

Monday, March 22, 1965

Mrs. Edward P. Blair, Executive Secretary for the Evanston Council of Churches, informs Dr. King that two enclosed checks totaling $298.78 is a contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from MLK to Robert F. Kennedy

Monday, October 14, 1963

Dr. King informs Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy that if the proposed Civil Rights Bill of 1964 is "weakened at any point" that civil disobedience will follow and it will be the fault of those that "watered down the bill."

Letter from MLK to Helen Anderson

Friday, February 9, 1968

This letter is in acknowledgement and appreciation of contributions to the SCLC from Mrs. Helen Anderson to Dr. King which was overlooked in the mail.

Letter from Irene Bryson to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

Mrs. Bryson introduces herself as a former neighbor of the King family on Auburn Avenue and recalls fond memories during those years. She compliments Dr. King "as a God sent preacher," and cites biblical scriptures for him to incorporate in his public speaking. Bryson states, teaching God's word "is what it is going to take to help this sin sick world we are living in."

Telegram from Sargent Shriver to Coretta King

Tuesday, November 14, 1967

Sargent Shriver, American statesmen, activist, founder of Job Corps and Peace Crops, expresses gratitude for Mrs. King's public endorsement of the war against poverty.

Newspaper Article "Negro Nation Ratified"

This article discusses a group of black nationalists who ratified a declaration of independence for a separate Negro nation. The new nation was named the "Republic of New Africa."

SCLC News Release

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference issues a new release stating Dr. King's demands that the Department of Justice act immediately to halt brutal treatment and intimidation of Negro school children and parents in the State of Mississippi. Dr. King cites several violent and near violent incidents that have occurred in Mississippi during the month of October.

Post Card from Critic to MLK

This unstamped post card comes from a writer who identifies himself as "Ole Dorky" and targets Dr. King and the American Civil Liberties Union as "Communist skum." The writer disagrees with the work of civil rights and believes that efforts are "making matters worse for negroes."

Letter from Rev. S. A. Owen to MLK

Friday, November 13, 1964

In this letter, Reverend S. A. Owen of the Tennessee Baptist M. & E. Convention congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from a Concerned Christian to MLK

Wednesday, January 22, 1958

This letter penned by "Concerned Christian" informs Dr. King of a change in the course of the Civil Rights Movement. The "Concerned Christian" makes note of the increased amount of violence in the city of Baltimore and reprimands Dr. King's "reduced faith in God."

Letter from A.J. de Witte to Roy Wilkins

Sunday, April 23, 1967

A.J. de Witte conveys his dissatisfaction to Roy Wilkins over the NAACP's criticism of Dr. King's opposition to the Vietnam War. De Witte withdraws his financial support to the NAACP, instead contributing to Dr. King, Stokley Carmichael of SNCC and Floyd McKissick of CORE.

Anonymous Adverse Letter to MLK

The author of this letter sends Dr. King a strong message to leave Chicago. According to the sender, Dr. King does nothing but "cause trouble from one place to another."

Letter from Edwin Fenton to MLK about permission to use Marchi on Washington speech

Tuesday, June 13, 1967

Edward Fenton, Co-Director, Social Studies Curriculum Development Center at Carnegie Institute of Technology writes to request permission to duplicate some excerpts from Dr.King's speech in Washington during the summer of 1963 without fee. Operating under a grant from the United States Office of Education, the Center is developing new courses of study and writing materials to teach social studies inductively to able students in grades nine through twelve.

Letter from Congressman James Roosevelt to MLK

Tuesday, February 25, 1964

Representative James Roosevelt thanks Dr. King for his words regarding Roosevelt's contribution to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from John Due Jr. to MLK

Mr. Due writes Dr. King to offer his services as a Field Representative for the SCLC. He provides a summary of his Civil Rights background along with a list of character references.

Telegram from MLK to Edward M. Kennedy

Dr. King expresses his gratification to Senator Edward M. Kennedy for sponsoring the amendment to abolish the poll tax in state elections.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Harold L. Sawyer

Friday, June 26, 1964

Miss McDonald informs Rev. Sawyer that he finds it difficult to schedule appointments more than three months in advance due to his hectic schedule, and cannot accept his invitation to speak at Hiram College at this time.

Note from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, September 4, 1963

A representative of Joan Daves is enclosing a check for $120 for the Spanish edition of the book "Stride Toward Freedom."

Is Dialogue Alien to Marxism?" (Polemics)

Czech philosopher Julius Tomin discusses the role of dialogue within Marxist discourse. Critiquing the position set forth by Milan Machovec in his text "Sense of Life," Tomin outlines the the definition of dialogue, the climate necessary for a dialogue to occur, and the role of dialogue in the humanization of men.

Letter from James H. Scheuer to MLK

Tuesday, September 21, 1965

James H. Scheuer, a representative of the United States Congress, informs Dr. King about the dismissal of the Mississippi challenge. Despite this action, Scheuer asserts that the attention received is a victory within itself. He concludes by stating "We must all work together to insure maximum enforcement of the Voting Rights Bill".

Barth on Dogmatics

Dr. King examines Karl Barth's view of dogmatics as an act of faith.

Letter from Congressman Charles Diggs to MLK

Monday, July 22, 1963

Michigan Congressman Charles Diggs returns the proposed plans for the August 28th, 1963 "March on Washington" to Dr. King.

Transcript of MLK's Rally Speech in Yazoo City, Mississippi

Tuesday, June 21, 1966

In this transcript of Dr. King's speech to the citizens of Yazoo City, he addresses the issues of poverty and racism within the state. He explains that while Mississippi is a in a "terrible state," it can be improved through the use of the principles of nonviolence to help bring about social change.

Letter from Carmen Baptista to MLK

Monday, December 27, 1965

Carmen Baptista of Caracas, Venezuela writes Dr. King after reading his letter in the Saturday Review. She expresses her concern with the struggle for civil rights and since she is unable to make a monetary donation, she sends Dr. King a recording of a song she composed in honor of the freedom workers called "Coming Down the Road."