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Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK 7/25/1967

Tuesday, July 25, 1967

Cass Canfield, of Harper & Row Publishers, drafted this correspondence to Dr. King. Mr. Canfield was delighted to inform Dr. King of the impressive sales of his last book. He acknowledged that reorders for Dr. King's book came to an amazing $1,020, the best in comparison to bestsellers and wholesale stores. The book being referred to, in this document, would be Dr. King's most prophetic, entitled, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Letter from Annie Grace to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967

Thirteen-year-old Annie G. Miller expresses her admiration for Dr. King.

Malcolm X Statement by MLK

Monday, March 16, 1964

Dr. King responds to Malcolm X's break with Elijah Muhammad of the Nation of Islam by calling Malcolm’s program of “reciprocal bleeding” regrettable. This is more an indictment of a society whose racial ills produce a Malcolm X than of the man himself. The national community is now challenged to support full citizenship for Negroes while they still accept nonviolent leadership.

God (Dewey)

According to Dr. King's understanding of Dewey's interpretation, God is the connection between the ideal and the actual.

John Scotus Eriugena

Dr. King quotes philosopher John Scotus Eriugena.

The World's March Toward Human Rights

Thursday, May 28, 1964

Dr. King addresses the issue of Equal Justice Under the Law at a convocation of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.

Letter from Fred Warren to MLK

Tuesday, January 30, 1968

Fred Warren, Professor of Music at the University of California at Berkeley writes to Dr. King saddened that he will not be able to come to the University. Professor Warren encloses a brochure describing the department's program on Africa, music, and its related arts.

Letter to Senator Abraham Ribicoff from Earl Whitted Jr.

Wednesday, December 21, 1966

In this reply to Sen. Ribicoff, Earl Whitted endorses the idea of a guaranteed fixed annual income for the poor, under certain stipulations. It is proposed that a Federal Housing Project area would also provide various economic services to the underprivileged. This program would accomplish education and self-sustainability for those that have been politically and economically disadvantaged.

Letter from Alan S. Traugott to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

Mr. Traugott contributes a check to SCLC indicating his grateful endorsement of Dr. King's position on civil rights and peace.

Letter from Don DuMont to MLK

Sunday, October 24, 1965

Mr. DuMont expresses his disapproval of Dr. King's leadership of the negro race and the association of the movement with Christianity, because he seeks proof that Dr. King's movement is not "Communist-inspired." Dumont was an evangelist who ran unsuccessfully for a variety of political offices.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, August 4, 1964

Joan Daves requests confirmation of a possible press conference, subsequent luncheon, and speaking engagement made by Dr. King. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Letter from Rev. David Bentley to MLK

Sunday, January 22, 1967

Rev. David Bentley, resident and missionary from Amman, writes Dr. King inviting him to visit Jordan. Bentley wants Dr. King to see the displacement and maltreatment of the citizens of Jordan.

By-Laws of the SCLC

This document outlines the by-laws of the SCLC, which includes the organization's purpose, duties and responsibilities of members, and procedures governing officers and committees. The purpose of the SCLC is to "organize and maintain Christian guidance" to aid in improving cultural conditions.

Proposal for a Conference on Democratic Planning in America

This proposal highlights a conference that is focused on creating an understanding of democratic development, economic planning, civil rights and peace movements.

The Third Level of Ontological Concepts

Dr. King writes notes regarding the third level of ontological concepts, which "expresses the characteristics of being which are conditions of existence."

Holiday Card from the King Family

This is a holiday card from the King Family.

Letter from Charles Henry to Ralph David Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

Mr. Henry chastises Rev. Abernathy for an adverse comment he made towards White people. As a negro, he urges that the only way to get White people to stop name calling names is for Negroes to do the same.

Letter from Robert R. Janks to MLK

Monday, October 14, 1963

Robert R. Janks writes Dr. King admiring his leadership during the fight for equality. Janks also recommends two additional quotes that Dr. King should use in his future speeches.

Letter from Mr. Raymond F. Gregory to MLK

Wednesday, February 28, 1962

In this letter dated 2/28/1962, Mr. Raymond F. Gregory of a New York City law firm writes to Dr. King regarding legal considerations for the "Ghandi [sic] Foundation."

Letter from J. DeWitt Fox to MLK Regarding Smoking

Tuesday, February 21, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Fox writes to Dr. King requesting a picture, a biographical sketch, and a brief statement promoting good health amongst teenagers while also discouraging smoking. Mr. Fox would like to include Dr. King’s statement in the book “Why Not Smoke.”

Letter from J. L. Richard to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965

Reverend J. L. Richard, from Evergreen Baptist Church, sends prayers for Dr. King and the Negro race. Richard also sends a monetary contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Sarah Harvey

Tuesday, January 9, 1962

Dr. King expresses gratitude for the financial and moral support provided by Sarah Harvey. Dr. King states he is sending a copy of "Stride Toward Freedom" as a token of his appreciation.

Letter from S. Leiss to MLK

Saturday, March 6, 1965

The Joan Daves Agency sends Dr. King a check from Oxford University Press for royalties associated with the reprint of "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" in Alpheus T. Mason's "Free Government in the Making."

Barth - The Epistle to the Romans

Dr. King quotes Karl Barth's "The Epistle to the Romans."

Levels of Love

Sunday, May 21, 1967

Dr. King describes five levels of love, from lowest to highest: utilitarian love, friendship, romantic love, humanitarian love, and agape. The last he refers to as Christian love, the love of God operating in the human heart. The first four, he states, are love for one’s own sake. The fifth is love for another person for their sake. This sermon was delivered by Dr. King on May 21, 1967 at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

Letter from Homer Jack to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

Homer Jack, Director of the Unitarian Universalist Association's Department of Social Responsibility, communicates his support for Dr. King's stance against the Vietnam War. Jack, co-founder of CORE and active participant in the civil rights movement, encloses a report that includes a statement made to the US Inter-Religious Committee on Peace and discusses the courage of Buddhist monks in South Vietnam. He also congratulates Dr. King for his public address made at the United Nations regarding his opposition to the war.

Letter from President of Yugoslav Baptist Union to MLK

Tuesday, January 3, 1967

The President of the Yugoslav Baptist Union writes excitedly as he finds out Dr. King will be in his country. He requests that Dr. King stop by the church or his home during his short visit.

Letter from John C. Hall to MLK about a March

Thursday, February 8, 1968

In this letter John C. Hall informs Dr. King of his desire to participate in the upcoming march to Washington D.C. and requests any information regarding such.

Letter from Philip Harnden to MLK

Friday, February 16, 1968

After reading Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait," Philip Harnden, a sophomore at Wheaton College, writes Dr. King expressing his newly changed insight on the Negro struggle. Mr. Harnden inquires about Dr. King's nonviolent approach and the black community beginning to abandon nonviolence by adopting more aggressive means to achieve their goals.

Worship

Dr. King defines worship.