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God Pronounces Judgement of America

Sunday, December 25, 1966

God Pronounces Judgment of America is allegedly a prophecy from God, through his servant Reverend R. G. Hardy, given on Christmas Day 1966. It reveals that a horrible earthquake and war are in the future.

Letter from Edinburgh University Debate Club to MLK

Thursday, May 20, 1965

James Douglas-Hamilton, the President of Debate Club at Edinburgh University, sends an invitation to Dr. King to speak at a debate against the motion "That Legislation cannot bring about Integration."

Letter from CB Gilless to MLK

Saturday, January 13, 1962

Mr. Gilless writes to Dr. King concerning a proposed petition to establish a 'World Government'. He beckons "Just how much better than the American free public do you think the world government will be?" He requests an immediate rebuttal.

Letter from Clarence E. Pickett, Dorothy M. Steere, and George C. Hardin

The Religious Society of Friends, which consists of 17,000 Quakers, decides to send its members to spread a message of "love and goodwill" to both whites and Negroes of Philadelphia.

People in Action: Our New President

Saturday, February 1, 1964

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes optimistically about the prospects for civil rights in the transition from President Kennedy to President Johnson. He believes that Johnson's Southern-ness may disarm the likes of George Wallace and that the President's proven commitment to civil rights and skills as Majority Leader in the Senate will aid in passing legislation.

Address for the Formation of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights

Thursday, May 17, 1962

This address was delivered by Dr. King at the Formation of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights event on May 17, 1962. Dr. King opens by discussing various anniversaries that coincide with the event and represent similar struggles for justice including the Supreme Court school desegregation ruling, the Emancipation Proclamation, and Henry David Thoreau's death.

Letter from MLK to E. D. Johnson

Monday, April 30, 1962

Dr. King responds to E. D. Johnson's letter expressing appreciation for encouragement by providing knowledge regarding the arrogance of Mr. Johnson's son. Dr. King stresses the importance of valuing the internal factors of self-respect, integrity and selflessness, opposed to the external factors of color, skin and wealth.

The Misuse of Prayer

Monday, July 17, 1950

In this sermon delivered at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, Dr. King elaborates on the proper uses of prayer and how it should be a supplemental asset.

Dr. King Notecard

In this notecard, Dr. King expresses his ideals and philosophical viewpoint pertaining to the doctrine of "Puritanism."

Nobel Foundation's Invitation to Dr. and Mrs. King

The Consul General of Sweden requests the presence of both Dr. and Mrs. King. The Kings are offered an invitation to meet the director of the Nobel Foundation and attend a reception in New York.

Minutes of the Council of United Civil Rights Leadership Meeting

Wednesday, March 23, 1966

These minutes from the meeting of the Council of United Civil Rights Leadership give a description of the topics discussed. Topics included: meeting with President Johnson, Office of Economic Opportunity memoranda, Inter-organizational conflict and fundraising.

Letter to Mrs. H.G. Smith from MLK

Wednesday, October 13, 1965

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Smith for her financial contribution to the SCLC. He briefly explains the current efforts of the SCLC and the importance of contributions.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK

Monday, April 13, 1964

Civil Rights Division Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall informs Dr. King that the Department of Justice is investigating the assault upon Reverend Paul Chapman.

Letter from P. M. Smith to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, June 30, 1964

P. M. Smith writes Dora McDonald thanking her on Dr. Ruden's behalf for a letter regarding Dr. King's visit to Amsterdam. Miss Smith references a previous correspondence from Dr. Ruden's informing Miss McDonald of the schedule for Dr. King's visit.

Social Philosophy Seminar Outline

Dr. King’s outline of key figures and their respective works for the Social Philosophy course he taught at Morehouse College during the 1961-1962 academic year.

Letter from MLK to Norman Baugher

Thursday, August 15, 1963

Dr. King conveys his support to Norman Baugher for the Church of the Brethren's past correspondence regarding publicizing the philosophy of nonviolence.

Letter from Mrs. Raphael Demos to Mrs. Coretta Scott King

Monday, February 10, 1958

Mrs. Demos thanks Mrs. King for her Christmas card and expresses congratulations on the birth of Martin Luther III. Mrs. Demos goes on to provide Coretta with various updates occurring in her own life.

Telegram from MLK to H. Rap Brown

Tuesday, January 9, 1968

In this telegram, Dr. King tells H. Rap Brown that he will undertake all measures to stop Brown being denied free movement and basic constitutional rights.

Letter from Lars Andr. Larssen to MLK

Wednesday, February 23, 1966

The Fredskontoret (Peace Bureau) of Norway invites Dr. King to speak in Oslo, with proceeds from the broadcast of his speech going towards the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from V.R. Hardy to MLK

V.R. Hardy lectures Dr. King regarding his methods of obtaining equality. He asserts that such methods will only result in a race of people wallowing in self-pity. Hardy cites the long-term oppression of Jews as a case in point of how to overcome the tragedies of the past.

It is Not Enough to Condemn Black Power...

Saturday, October 1, 1966

Dr. King addresses the "Black Power" movement in this two-page document. He also explains his thoughts and experiences relating to the tactics and goals of the Civil Rights Movement.

God (Definition)

Dr. King references Schleiermacher as he attempts to define God.

Statement Before the Credentials Committee by MLK

Saturday, August 22, 1964

In this statement before the Credentials Committee of the Democratic National Committee, Dr. King urges that the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party be seated and recognized at the convention. Dr. King declares that the Democratic Party in Mississippi itself is unjust and vows to keep black Mississippians off of the voting rolls. Dr.King uses the analogy of how can we as Americans preach "freedom and democracy" in Africa and Asia, yet refuse to provide its own citizens with such rights.

Letter from Edward Kirsch to Coretta Scott King

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

Edward Kirsch, Executive Director of The Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center extends warmest sympathies to Mrs. King during her time of bereavement. He writes, "Dr. King was greatly admired by all of us as an inspiring leader, a true humanitarian and an advocate of peace and justice for all people."

Letter from MLK to Robert F. Kennedy

Monday, October 14, 1963

Dr. King informs Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy that if the proposed Civil Rights Bill of 1964 is "weakened at any point" that civil disobedience will follow and it will be the fault of those that "watered down the bill."

Progress Report from Robert L. Green to SCLC Staff

Tuesday, September 12, 1967

Mr. Green sends this report to the SCLC staff concerning the Chicago Adult Education Project (CAEP). He writes of the problems and difficulties concerning black communities such as Lawndale, Illinois. He then goes on to describe what the major objective is and how the CAEP can help communities, like those in Lawndale. He proposes "to develop basic, needed educational tools to improve reading, writing, consumer and personal budget skills, and to provide the project with job-seeking skills."

Letter from L. K. Jackson to MLK

Wednesday, May 29, 1963

Rev. Jackson updates Dr. King on his recent activities, how hard he has been fighting for equality for all Americans, and regrets to inform him that he is ill.

Telegram from Wyatt Tee Walker

Saturday, July 28, 1962

Walker sends out this telegram to inform its recipients that Dr. King and Rev. Abernathy have been unjustly arrested in Albany, Georgia.

Letter from Kennon Brownlee to MLK

Thursday, October 12, 1967

Kennon R. Brownlee, a social science major at Bishop College, asks Dr. King for his opinion concerning the war in Vietnam.

Crisis of Culture

Dr. King refers to his note card on "morality" and cites an example of the crisis of culture.