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Letter from Mrs. Forest Dana to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967

Mrs. Forest Dana writes Dr. King to express her displeasure in his outspoken stance against the Vietnam War. She acknowledges the withdrawal of her support and feels that he has done a disservice to Negroes in America. She believes he should focus on civil rights and not interfere with the war.

Letter from Juanita McKinly to MLK

Thursday, February 24, 1966

Juanita McKinly requests Dr. King visit her home to evaluate the less than standard living conditions of the building. As a key figure for addressing social ills, many people sought the help of Dr. King in relation to individual concerns.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Hugh Morrow

Monday, June 25, 1962

Wyatt Tee Walker writes to Hugh Morrow expressing his grievance for the attack of Governor Rockefeller.

A Call To Action-Lucis Trust

Lucis Trust wrote this "Call To Action" about the vast greivances that were occuring in America, as it related to the issue of race. He identified that African Americans were "condemned to an inferior way of life and excluded as a human being." Trust conveyed that a remedy must be provided for the ongoing injustice. The remedy he proposed is that the attitudes of White Americans needed to change, not only on a non-discriminitory basis, but by creating an atmosphere of inclusivism and goodwill.

People to People: The Law is Majestic

Saturday, July 31, 1965

Dr. King pays homage to the numerous lawyers of the Civil Rights Movement and asserts that the one unifying belief among lawyers is the idea that "law is majestic and the judicial process is supreme." Dr. King supports this claim with a story about his Negro lawyers successfully winning a case in Birmingham with an all-white jury.

Letter from Robert L. Green to Dora McDonald

Thursday, February 9, 1967

In this letter, Robert L. Green, Professor at Michigan State University, requests a signature of approval from Dr. King. This signature would grant permission for Social Scientists to have involvement with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Man, a Being of Becoming

Dr. King documents ideas regarding the philosophy of man. Using the metaphor of a "flowing stream," he addresses man's experience from infancy through adulthood.

Letter from Mr. & Mrs. Mills to Rev. Abernathy

Saturday, April 27, 1968

This letter from a couple in Austin, Texas is a "message of encouragement" to Rev. Ralph D. Abernathy, recently appointed as the head of the SCLC in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination.

An Evening of Negro Culture and History

This booklet, entitled "Black is Beautiful and It's So Beautiful To Be Black," contains information from an SCLC event held August 16, 1967 that sought to explore Negro culture and history.

Anonymous Postcard to MLK

Monday, September 18, 1967

Postcard has a photo entitled "Training Schools for Communists". American Opinion claims the photo was taken at the Highlander Folk School over Labor Day weekend 1957. Dr. King is depicted as one the attendees. Postcard was stamped with an Abraham Lincoln postage stamp (One of the guiding forces to Dr. King and his efforts)

Letter from Mrs. Thomas Walsh to Dr. Roy Enquist

Monday, June 5, 1967

Mrs. Thomas Walsh writes to Dr. Roy J. Enquist regarding an invitation for Dr. King to speak at St. Mary's University, St. Edward's University and the Texas Lutheran College.

Letter from Richard A. Russell to MLK about Integrated Housing

Tuesday, November 22, 1966

In this letter to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Mr. Russell inquires about the Federal Housing Administration's decision on the requirements of housing integration.

Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Gates

Wednesday, July 24, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mr. and Mrs. Robert Gates for their donation to the SCLC. He also tells them that the SCLC supports the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund's "Committee of 100."

School of Youth for Social Service

The School of Youth for Social Service in South Vietnam aided in immediate war relief, as well as a long range of programs such as rural health & sanitation, agriculture, and illiteracy.

Telegram to MLK from Medgar Evers

Friday, May 23, 1958

Mississippi Civil Rights leader Medgar Evers sends a telegram to confirm his presence at the upcoming SCLC meeting in Clarksdale on May 29, 1958.

Letter from Marguerite Munson to MLK

Wednesday, September 14, 1966

Mrs.Munson writes Dr.King to ask for his assistance in finding a lawyer that is not corrupted by the government.

Servetus, Michael

Dr. King writes biographical notes about Michael Servetus, a citizen of Spain known for his study of medicine and theology. Servetus was burned at the stake because of his anti-Trinitarian views.

Reservation for Official Inaugural Book

This is the reservation form for the 1965 Official Inaugural Book in honor of Lyndon Baines Johnson and Hubert Horatio Humphrey.

Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

This sermon is one draft of Dr. King's "Three Dimensions of a Complete Life." It was first delivered by Dr. King to the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama.
Another version is entitled, "The Dimensions of a Complete Life." The first dimension is concerned with the well-being of the self. The second dimension is concerned with the well-being of others. The last dimension is concerned with reaching towards God.
As Dr. King implies, if all of these dimensions are equal, then a complete life will be obtained.

Letter from Anderson Davis to MLK

Thursday, October 3, 1963

Mr. Davis invites Dr. King to speak at West Virginia's Emancipation Proclamation centennial celebration. Mr. Davis informs Dr. King that the event is an opportunity to collect contributions for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Mr. Burke Marshall to MLK Regarding Political Opinion

Thursday, September 15, 1966

In this document, Mr. Mashall writes to Dr. King regarding issues surrounding the National Advisory Commission on Selective Service. He requests that Dr. King writes on behalf of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference on matters further outlined in Section 2.

MLK Mail Log: February 19

Monday, February 19, 1968

This mail log for February 19, 1968 lists incoming mail for Dr. King. Correspondences include invitations, reports, financial and article requests, contributions, offers of service, and general unread letters.

High School Seniors in Chicago Request Conversation with MLK

Friday, January 28, 1966

Edward Foreman, on behalf of the senior class at J.H. Bowen High School in Chicago, Illinois, invites Dr. King to lead a discussion regarding the issues that brought about Dr. King's adventure to Chicago.

Letter from Miss McDonald to Rev. J. Martin England

Friday, May 5, 1967

In this letter, Dora McDonald tells Rev. England that Dr.King spent a few days in the hospital. She asks for Rev. England to send the insurance forms for Dr.King to complete.

Letter from Esther Thompson to MLK

Wednesday, November 10, 1965

Esther Thompson inquires if Dr. King and his church could be of assistance with helping her blind husband see again.

Letter from Peare E. Hardney to MLK

Peare E. Hardney, a postal employee in Chicago, reports to Dr. King that her supervisor assaulted her and that African-Americans do not get fair treatment in Chicago. Furthermore, she would like to share her story with someone on Dr. King's staff.

Letter from Jackie Robinson to MLK

Tuesday, October 9, 1962

Jackie Robinson writes Dr. King to accept a position of responsibility with the SCLC.

Letter from Minerva Moreno to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Minerva Moreno, a New York City student, offers her sympathy to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Standing By The Best in an Evil Time" E

Sunday, August 6, 1967

In this sermon, Dr. King addresses the evil in the world and suggest to his congregation that they counter this by being strong and steadfast in the Lord. Dr. King also touches on the current issues in society and how to continue the use of nonviolence as means to for peace and social justice.

Freedom and Destiny

Dr. King discusses the topics of freedom and destiny as it relates to man.