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Pragmatism

Dr. King documents a J.B. Pratt quote from "What is Pragmatism."

Article Written by the Spring Mobilization Committee To End the War in Vietnam

The following article written by the Spring Mobilization Committee illustrates the growing international support for ending the Vietnam War. It specifically highlights the Union of Vietnamese Students in France, an organization seeking to cooperate with American students in order to promote peace in Vietnam.

Suffering (Illustration)

Dr. King uses a Lily Dougall story from “God and the Struggle for Existence” as an example of suffering.

Royalty Statement: Why We Can't Wait

Monday, April 3, 1967

This royalty statement details Dr. King's earnings for the book "Why We Can't Wait" over a six month period.

Letter From Leslie W. Dunbar

Wednesday, September 13, 1961

Leslie Dunbar outlines information regarding a grant and various agency protocols from the Southern Regional Council for voter registration.

Letter to Harry J. Cargas from Dora McDonald

Monday, December 9, 1963

Ms. McDonald responds to Mr. Cargas' letter which included an enclosure of the December issue of "The Queen's Work,"a publication of The Sodality of Our Lady society. Ms. McDonald tells the sender that Dr. King is out of town, and the package will be brought to his attention upon his return to Atlanta.

Letter from Joan Daves to Ms. Dora McDonald

Thursday, July 16, 1964

Joan Daves tells Dora McDonald that she had tentatively spoken to Dr. King about accepting the invitation to speak at The University Settlement award ceremony. She asks Ms. McDonald if she would keep the date for the engagement should he be able to attend. Daves also requests a copy of Dr. King's itinerary.

Royalty Statement from Harper & Row, Publishers Incorporated to MLK and Joan Daves Regarding "Stride Toward Freedom"

Tuesday, December 31, 1968

This document outlines the royalty statement for "Stride Toward Freedom".

Power Black or White and Christian Conscience

Monday, August 1, 1966

This document is an enclosure that belongs with a letter from Gayrund Wilmore, Isaiah Pogue, Leroy Patrick, Elder Hawkins, and Bryant George to MLK. The writers seek to raise the conscientiousness of Christians in both the black and white communities, and address an existing dilemma between race and power with the hope of bringing about reconciliation.

Letter from Ronald Kessebring to SCLC

Friday, March 30, 1962

Ronald Kessebring sends a contribution along with a letter of support to the SCLC. As a former resident of Atlanta, Mr. Kessebring witnessed what the organization provided for the community and the country at large.

Letter from John Bolt Culbertson to MLK

Attorney John Bolt Culbertson writes Dr. King to inform him of the upcoming "Negro Spiritual Singing Convention" in Greenville, South Carolina. Mr. Culbertson explains that the previous occasion was so successful that he has decided to sponsor a similar event with the aspiration that it will be bigger than the last. He requests Dr. King's help in advertising for the Convention and indicates in postscript that he would appreciate it if Dr. King could send a representative as he did before.

Letter from Frank S. Gotshall to MLK

Friday, March 1, 1968

Frank S. Gotshall compliments Dr. King's as a "fine champion," but he asserts that the problem of race relations in America is worsening. To prevent race mixing, Gotshall proposes that each race be given its own area in which it can live.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dwight Campbell

Monday, September 28, 1964

Miss McDonald regretfully informs Mr. Campbell that Dr. King is unable to attend the October 7th Methodist Youth Fellowship engagement.

Sermon at The Washington Cathedral

Sunday, March 31, 1968

In a sermon written by Dr. King and addressed to an audience at the Washington Cathedral, the Reverend expounds upon the problem of poverty and war. In describing a projected human revolution, Dr. King states, "Somewhere we must come to see that human progress never rolls in on the wheels of inevitability." This is just one of the many passages in this inspirational sermon encouraging hope and freedom for all.

Correspondence to Dr. King from Chuck Wallis, 11/15/1962

Thursday, November 15, 1962

Chuck Wallis, of Keuka College in New York, wrote to Dr. King at the request of Melvin Arnold an executive at Harper and Rowe Publishing Company. In the letter Wallis informs Dr. King of his editing responsibilities for a forthcoming book project highlighting Dr. King's sermons and requests a face to face meeting to discuss revisions.

God - II Kings

Dr. King cites II Kings 5:15 as as affirmation of monotheism.

Letter from MLK to Mr. P. H. Waldraff

Dr. King shares his views of the American military presence in Vietnam and America's moral obligation to social justice.

Letter from Mrs. Robert Hall to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Mrs. Hall suggests a letter writing campaign for young people as a more effective and less intimidating means of demonstrating than petitions and marches.

Jesus: Divinity and Missions

In this series of note cards, Dr. King documents various biblical passages from the New Testament that discuss Jesus' divinity. The passages are abbreviated and listed with their biblical citations.

Telegram from Ebenezer Baptist Church to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

Ebenezer Baptist Church offers support to Dr. King during his incarceration in the Birmingham Jail.

Letter from John A. Clark to MLK Regarding Scriptures, Spiritual Advice and Prayer

Friday, June 9, 1967

In this letter, Reverend John A. Clark provides spiritual advice, scripture and prayer for Dr. King during hard times as well as for preparation of the future. Reverend John A. Clark also mentions starting a revival and revisiting Washington to D.C. to preach for a cause.

Letter from Darlene Wentz to MLK

Wednesday, March 14, 1962

Darlene Wentz, a Senior at Streeter High School, request pamphlets on the social and economic conditions of African Americans.

Letter from Gerold Newmark to MLK

Monday, April 10, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Newmark requests a copy of the speech Dr. King delivered in New York City on Vietnam.

Statement by MLK Regarding His Five-Day Jail Sentence in Birmingham

Monday, October 30, 1967

Dr. King releases a statement regarding his return to Birmingham, Alabama to serve a five-day jail sentence. He states that he is happy to serve the sentence, but sad that the Supreme Court did not "uphold the rights of individual citizens." He also questions why the United States' resources are being used to fund the Vietnam War rather than to help the poor.

Marx

Dr. King references German philosopher Karl Marx regarding his teachings. King states, "Marx teaching resolves into three principal elements: a philosophy of history, and economic theory, and a practical program for the realization of a new social order."

The Categories

Dr. King contemplates the fourth level of ontological concepts, which focus on the categories of thought and being. Referencing Paul Tillich, King notes the categories that are most relevant to theology.

Lawler Daniels Thanks MLK

Monday, July 10, 1967

Lawler P. Daniels, Jr., President of Sleinad Enterprises, Inc., expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's invitation to the SCLC 10th Annual Convention.

Letter from Telly H. Miller to MLK

Tuesday, November 15, 1966

Telly H. Miller, a graduate of the Morehouse School of Religion of the Interdenominational Theological Center and pastor in a West Virginia church, invites Dr. King to their Centennial. Pastor Miller requests that Dr. King deliver the Centennial sermon and explains that his coming will be a "great help" to the community.

Newsday: Poor Listeners

Tuesday, November 15, 1966

The writer issues an indictment of the current Presidential administration for its failure to listen to others' views of the situation in Vietnam.

God (Isaiah)

Here Dr. King references Isaiah, Chapter 44 in discussing monotheism and the "utter folly of idol worship."