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Letter from Ann Raynolds to MLK

Monday, February 19, 1968
Vermont (VT), Washington, D.C., Cleveland, OH

Ann Raynolds writes Dr. King informing him of her support for the upcoming Poor People's March to Washington. She also encloses a contribution.

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, January 22, 1964
Washington, D.C., JAPAN

Attorney General Robert Kennedy invites Dr. King to be interviewed as part of an oral history program on issues and decisions of the Kennedy Administration.

L. Seyler's Report on Emil Brunner

L. Seyler from Christian Social Philosophy at Crozer Theological Seminary writes this paper on Emil Brunner, Swiss Protestant theologian. Written around February 20 - May 4, 1951, the paper contains subject matter regarding the crisis of contemporary culture.

SCLC's Eighth Annual Convention Resolution

Friday, October 2, 1964
Georgia (GA)

This SCLC Resolution for the 8th Annual Convention, outlines the plan to encourage churchmen across the country to vote in the light of religious faith and conviction.

Recommendation Letter for Mrs. Lillie Hunter from MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1966
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King drafts a letter of recommendation for a former employee, Lillie Hunter.

This is SCLC

New Orleans, LA, Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA), Memphis, TN, Mississippi (MS), Virginia (VA), Louisiana (LA), Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Tennessee (TN)

This SCLC brochure highlights the organization's mission, organizational structure, and initiatives, such as voter registration drives, Citizenship Schools, and the Leadership Training Program.

Memo on Food Crisis in India

Monday, March 20, 1967
New York, NY, INDIA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Rodney H. Clurman, Executive Secretary of the World Food and Population Crisis Committee, writes this memorandum to committee members. Clurman sends this status report on the state of food affairs in India. He references a letter received from John Taylor who lives in Bihar, India and works for the Ford Foundation.

Letter from Gitta Gossman to Dora McDonald

Friday, February 26, 1965
New York, NY

Gitta Gossman forwards Ms. McDonald two copies of the contract for the Dutch-language edition of "Why We Can't Wait" for Dr. King's signature.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Friday, September 21, 1962
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Benjamin E. Mays offers celebratory wishes to Dr. King on the sixth anniversary of the Southern Christian Leadership Conferece. Mays offers words of support and encouragement for the great work Dr. King has done in the fight for equality and justice.

Letter from Marion Hoyt to MLK

Friday, May 26, 1961
Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), Montgomery, AL

Marian Hoyt, manager of the Winsor School's Senior Play, writes Dr. King, providing him a donation on the behalf of the school in Boston. The writer cites specifically appreciation for Dr. King's "work in Montgomery."

Memo from S. Leiss to MLK

Monday, June 7, 1965
JAPAN

S. Leiss encloses payment from Gakashu Kenkju Sha for a Japanese-language digest of "Why We Can't Wait" that was published in "Fair Lady."

Letter from Trude B. Feldman to Mrs. King

New York, NY

In this letter Trude Feldman sends Mrs. King a copy of a "piece" on Sammy Davis from "Ebony" and asks that it be returned after review.

Letter from Frank Jones to MLK

Tuesday, August 14, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Albany, GA

Reverend Frank Jones sends Dr. King a letter expressing his concern about the recent occurrences in Albany, Georgia.

Schleiermacher (Definition of Theology)

Dr. King quotes and interprets Friedrich Schleiermacher's definition of dogmatic theology in "The Christian Faith."

Religion

This document is a notecard titled "Religion," in which Dr. King expounds on John Dewey's definition of religion in "A Common Faith" as a "purely ethical meaning" of religion.

Papal Encyclicals by George W. Lawrence

Boston, MA, New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Massachusetts (MA)

George W. Lawrence elaborates on the traditions and methodologies of the Catholic Church. Lawrence clarifies the Social Doctrines and states that men are governed by four laws located in "the Natural," "the Eternal," "the Human," and the "(positive) Divine laws." Furthermore, Lawrence discourses additional political relations to the Catholic Church.

Chapter IV - Weiman's Conception of God

Dr. King professes his ideas and viewpoints as they relate to Henry Nelson Wieman's theology on God. Wieman, an American philosopher of Naturalistic Religion, believed that God was a natural process rather than a supernatural entity.

Letter from Congressman Herman Toll to MLK

Wednesday, February 19, 1964
Washington, D.C., Pennsylvania (PA)

Pennsylvania Democratic Congressman Herman Toll thanks Dr. King for his letter and assures Dr. King that he will continue to seek strong civil rights legislation.

Can You Live Where You Want to Live?

New York (NY), New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ), Pennsylvania (PA)

George and Eunice Grier write regarding the topic "Can you live where you want to live?" This article discusses discrimination and segregation in housing. The Griers assert that integration in jobs and public places is advancing, but segregation in housing still plagues many people in America.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Charles B. McConnell

Thursday, October 31, 1963
New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King thanks Rev. McConnell for his words of encouragement and financial contribution following the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King explains that Americans of all races and ethnicities must join together in this common cause to achieve American community.

Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. Edward Lamb Toledo to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967
Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C.

In this telegram, Mr. and Mrs. Toledo offer support to Dr. King, Ralph Abernathy, A.D. King, and Wyatt Walker.

Publicity Plans for Pilgrimage Tour

New York (NY)

This document describes a request for Dr. King to become involved with the Pilgrimage Tour in New York.

Letter from Elmer A. Rovang to MLK

Thursday, April 13, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Missouri (MO), VIETNAM

Elmer Rovang expresses disdain for Dr. King's views on foreign policy and space exploration. Rovang even threatens to vote for George Wallace as President in order to counter Dr. King's "destructive" ideology.

Hegel

Dr. King outlines principles of Hegel's philosophy regarding rationality and reality.

Telegram from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Wednesday, October 19, 1966
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Bayard Rustin invites Dr. King to join other civil rights leaders for a meeting that will be held in New York, NY.

Southern Presbyterian Church Donation to SCLC

Friday, October 27, 1967
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

John Randolph Taylor informs Dr. King of a donation from "A Fellowship of Concern" and members of the Presbyterian Church U.S. to the SCLC.

Letter from Robert Finley to President Johnson

Wednesday, February 14, 1968
California (CA), Washington, D.C.

Robert Finley proposes a federal gasoline tax increase of at least fifty cents to relieve the burden of property owners. He enumerates the benefits that would be achieved.

Letter from Josephine Baker to MLK

Tuesday, October 20, 1964
New York, NY, FRANCE, Atlanta, GA

Dancer, singer, and actress Josephine Baker writes Dr. King to share her views on the current political climate of the United States of America. Her belief is that the best chance of retaining and continuing the progress made by John F. Kennedy is to re-elect Lyndon B. Johnson for President and Robert Kennedy as a New York Senator.

Letter from MLK to Robert Maloney

Monday, March 4, 1963
Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA

Robert Maloney encloses a picture to Dr. King that he took of a young Virginia Boy Scout troop. Maloney was surprised that all the boys in the troop were African American.

Letter from Mrs. E. A. Johnson to Mrs. Cotton

Saturday, March 31, 1962
North Carolina (NC)

A young male civil rights activist and participant in demonstrations experienced police brutality after he was targeted for his involvement in the Monroe Race Riot story. E. A. Johnson provides Mrs. Cotton with the legal details of the case surrounding the young man.