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Letter from Judith D. Greenberg to MLK

Saturday, March 23, 1968

Judith Greenberg of the Stern College for Women asks Dr. King about material for a report concerning Choice '68.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

This outline to Dr. King's sermon "A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart" focuses on the premise that being a tough minded individual involves making critical decisions. The sermon emphasizes that those who possess a soft mind tend to be gullible and strictly follow the status quo. According to Dr. King, "We must come to the realization that life demands a tough mind."

Letter from MLK to Mr. Arthur Flemming

Monday, January 30, 1967

Dr. King is writing to express his deep appreciation for Mr. Flemming's contribution to the SCLC. He states that because of the contributors continuing support, the initiatives of the SCLC can persist forward.

Monotheism

Dr. King cites passages in the sixth century BCE Second Isaiah (chapters 40-55) as the first clear evidence of monotheism.

Letter from Beryl Bugatch to MLK

Sunday, July 25, 1965

Beryl Bugatch of the University of Pennsylvania asks Dr. King to speak on "the governments role in enforcing racial morality."

Interview about Refusal to Seat Julian Bond

Wednesday, January 12, 1966

This is transcript of a question and answer period following a news conference at which Dr. King made a statement regarding the Georgia State Legislature's refusal to seat Julian Bond after Bond announced his support of a Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) news release opposing the Vietnam War. King led a protest rally to the state house.

Letter from Taconic Foundation to MLK

Monday, February 4, 1963

Stephen Currier, President of the Taconic Foundation, invites Dr. King to attend a meeting about the development of a new program. Currier lists other individuals who have been invited to serve as consultants and who will provide "an evaluation of Negro gains up to the present."

People in Action: Albany Justice

Dr. King discusses numerous injustices in Albany, a pacifist movement to Cuba, and police brutality against Negroes.

Mass Letter from Mr. Maurice A. Dawkins, OOEE

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

This letter from Maurice A. Dawkins, a representative from the Office of Economic Opportunity, accompanies materials that encourage the reader to take action "in pledging to beat swords into plowshares," namely transferring funds spent in the Vietnam conflict to domestic endeavors.

Address on Anti-Poverty by Jerome P. Cavanagh

Monday, August 22, 1966

Jerome P. Cavanagh, Mayor of Detroit, delivers this speech before the Office of Economic Opportunity Urban Areas Conference, Great Lakes Region. The conference is dedicated to sharing experiences in the War on Poverty and taking a realistic assessment on the issues in urban areas. Inadequate education, food, housing, and disjointed welfare systems are major problems of concern. Cavanagh encourages the analysis of programs addressing these situations. He also advocates an understanding of federal aid cutbacks and connects insufficient funds to the Vietnam War and space exploration.

Susan Julien Offers Service to MLK

Susan Julien responds to a SCLC circulation letter sent by Dr. King. As a student with no income, Susan offers her service to help further the cause for "democratic change." She has dedicated Saturdays to contribute to the movement and asks if there is a SCLC branch near her home in New York.

Letter from Grace Graham to MLK

Tuesday, June 18, 1963

Grace Graham, Chairman in the School of Education extends an invitation for Dr. King to give a series of lectures at several colleges in the Northwest. In addition to the University Oregon, other colleges include Montana State and Portland State.

Letter from Congressman Edward R. Roybal to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

California Congressman Roybal responds to a message from Dr. King regarding the seating of the Mississippi delegation. Roybal reminds Dr. King of his record on matters related to civil rights.

Vietnamese Student's Appeal for Peace

This document reveals that a Vietnamese student burned herself as an appeal for peace. The document also states that some of the writings that she left behind have been translated.

MLK's Statement Regarding Civil Rights Activists' Murders

Friday, December 11, 1964

This statement by Dr. King was written regarding the lynching and murders of three civil rights activists: James Cheyney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner. When Mississippi officials refused to pursue the prosecution of those involved, national outrage prompted the ensuing major federal intervention.

Telegram from ABC Network to Ralph David Abernathy

Monday, April 22, 1968

A correspondent from the American Broadcasting Company Network in Washington D.C. contacts Reverend Ralph Abernathy attempting to continue an interview previously scheduled with Dr. King before his death.

Letter from H. D. Bollinger to MLK

Wednesday, November 27, 1963

H.D. Bollinger requests Dr. King's appearance at the Eighth Quadrennial Conference at the Methodist Student Movement in Nebraska. Mr. Bollinger informs Dr. King that the students are "very anxious" to have him as a principle speaker. The theme of the conference will be "The Church in the World." The church is aware of Dr. King's hectic schedule and ensures him that they will provide an honorarium if he were to accept this speaking engagement.

Telegram from Mirzo Tursun Zade to MLK

Thursday, October 10, 1963

Mirzo Tursun Zade, Chairman of the Soviet Afro-Asian Solidarity Committee, assures Dr. King that Jews enjoy equal rights with individuals of other nationalities living in the Soviet Union.

Mastering Our Fears

Dr. King discusses fear, the healthy and unhealthy fears humanity has, the need to overcome fear, and steps in mastering fear.

Letter from David Ben-Gurion to MLK

Friday, January 20, 1967

Mr. Ben-Gurion, founder and first prime minister of Israel, congratulates Dr. King on his decision to lead a mass pilgrimage to Israel and Jordan. He also informs King that he is planning a trip to the US and looks forward to the opportunity of meeting in person. The pilgrimage, scheduled for November 1967, did not take place because of the Six Day Arab-Israeli War that June.

Telegram from Supporters to MLK

This telegram of support was sent to Dr. King while incarcerated in the Bessemer County Jail.

Letter from E. Douglas to MLK

Wednesday, August 10, 1966

E. Douglas takes pride in a $60 contribution to the SCLC.

The Method of Personalism

Personalism is a philosophical thought that attempts to understand the unparalleled identity of human's in relation to nature. Dr. King references this ideology with a handwritten note.

MLK at the Jefferson County Armory

Tuesday, August 23, 1960

In this outline, Dr. King discusses voting and the importance of citizenship. One of the important points, in Dr. King's outline, states: "Political Parties Must Deliver on Their Promises."

Letter From Joan Daves to Hermine Popper

Thursday, July 20, 1967

Joan Daves informs Hermine Popper of an issue regarding writing credit for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go from Here."

Dr. King Sermon Outline

The document, shown here, contains an outline for a sermon given by Dr. King. The sermon was entitled, "The Fellow Who Stayed at Home." According, to the outline, Dr. King breaks down two types of sin: Sins of Passion and Sins of Disposition.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King cites W. K. Wright's "A Student Outline of Philosophy of Religion."

Letter from T.Y. Rogers to MLK

Friday, January 6, 1967

T. Y. Rogers, an assistant to Dr. King at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery writes the Reverend expressing his interest in traveling to Israel to tour the country with him. In addition, Rogers offers to assist with funds if necessary.

Post Card to MLK from Benjamin Mays, Morehouse College

Monday, September 12, 1966

This 1966 post card from Benjamin Mays, Morehouse College, is a thank-you note to Dr. King and "the Morehouse men" who made alumni contributions.

Letter from MLK to Bernard Fixler

Friday, December 8, 1967

In this correspondence to Mr. Bernard Fixler, from Dr. King, he thanks Mr. Fixler for the contribution made to the SCLC.