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Letter from Sarah Harvey to MLK

Saturday, December 9, 1961
UNITED KINGDOM

An "English Quaker" thanks Dr. King for his letter and references an impending donation. The contributor informs Dr. King that she intends on communicating with her bank to find out if she can transfer the whole sum and promises to have definite news soon.

Letter from Clarence Long to MLK

Friday, August 27, 1965
Washington, D.C., Maryland (MD)

Congressman Long writes Dr. King delighted to inform him of his full support regarding home rule for the District of Columbia.

Letter from Dr. King's Secretary, Maude L. Ballou

New York (NY)

In this standard response letter, Dr. King's personal secretary highlighted the progress made in his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in Harlem. It also notes that Dr. King would respond to his many "well wishes", once he had been cleared by his physicians.

Letter from Catherine Enge to MLK

Wednesday, February 17, 1965
NORWAY, INDIA

Catherine Enge, on behalf of the Bergens Kristenruss, asks Dr. King to write a newspaper article that will be distributed to approximately 12,000 Norwegians.

Telegram from Lavinia Underwood to MLK

Friday, April 16, 1965
Boston, MA

Lavinia Underwood writes Dr. King to discourage the possibility of a march that could strain relationships with white people.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Agenda

Friday, August 16, 1963
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

This document is a strategic outline for the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Telegram from Vice Chancellor Newcastle University to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
Atlanta, GA

The Vice Chancellor of Newcastle University states that they "regretfully understand" Dr. King's inability to attend their engagement due to his current imprisonment.

Letter from Jimmie Johnson to MLK

Jimmie Johnson writes to Dr. King to say that while he is a Negro, he does not believe in integration. Johnson does not think there will ever be enough jobs in America for Negroes, and therefore argues for segregation. He asks Dr. King to share this view in his upcoming meeting with President Johnson.

Letter from Marlyn Roach to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

Marlyn Roach requests an interview in hopes of a job with SCLC, as she is disillusioned with the antipoverty programs on which she has been working. She cites the cause of the "total failure" of the program to be the difference between the Negroes' and the state and federal government's objectives.

MLK - Notes on Ranke

Dr. King discusses history and the power of man having " made voyages, extended commerce, founded cities, and established great universities."

Invitation from the Council on Human Relations of Greater Atlanta Dinner Meeting

Monday, January 8, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

On behalf of the Council on Human Relations of Greater Atlanta, Chairman Mrs. John W. Stanley extends an invitation to an upcoming dinner meeting where Mrs. Eliza Paschall, Executive Director of the Community Relations Commission of the City of Atlanta, will be honored. Morehouse College President Emeritus Dr. Benjamin E. Mays is scheduled to discuss "Black Power versus White Power" with the attendees.

Telegram from Mrs. King on Meaning of Christmas

Thursday, December 19, 1968
Florida (FL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Mrs. King expresses sadness that the United States is launching a new dimension in its space program, but spends so little on eliminating poverty, hunger, disease, war and racism.

Letter from Helen F. Gallagher to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968
New York (NY)

Helen Gallagher is addressing the national issues in the United States as it relates to the war. She suggests to Dr. King a personal tax that could possibly go toward initiatives that Americans feel are important. Gallagher feels that this is a way to for Americans to represent themselves when they are unsatisfied with their congressional representatives.

Apocalyptic Religion

Dr. King quotes John Oman's "the Natural and The Supernatural."

Seventh Annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture

Sunday, November 6, 1966
Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Chicago, IL

Howard University presents Dr. King as its primary speaker for their seventh annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture in 1966. Dr. King traces the slow but meaningful progress society has made from slavery to the current civil rights movement. However, he notes that the present challenges in achieving equality involve not only the silence of individuals of good will but also the conditons that keep the Negro inferior.

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty

New York (NY), New York, NY

The Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Commission on Community Activity and Organization lists various members from different organizations.

Knowledge of God

Dr. King references religious philosopher Henry Nelson Wieman regarding his views on science and knowing God. In part of this eight card series, Dr. King records Wieman's belief that "It is probable he can never be known completely; but we can increase our knowledge of Him by contemplation... and form scientific methods on the other."

March on Washington Transportation Information

New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

This is a form sent to each organization participating in the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, requiring information regarding transportation arrangements.

The People Speak

Tuesday, December 20, 1966

The neighborhood residents initiate a self-reliant program entitled, "Self-Help Policy-67 Model", due to the inadequacies within the federal government's Anti-poverty Program and the War on Poverty Program. These individuals are considered "The New Breed" and are working to cease their economic disparities. They correlate the biblical story of Nicodemus to associate the promised land of economic freedom.

Alabama Council Newsletter

Washington, D.C., South Carolina (SC), Florida (FL), Virginia (VA), Michigan (MI), Alabama (AL), New Hampshire (NH)

Amidst a battle between federal and states' rights, Reverend Hughes discusses the arrival of the Commission on Civil Rights and its intended purpose in the state of Alabama.

Time

Dr. King quotes St. Augustine’s “Confessions.”

The Dilemma of The Negro

Saturday, January 29, 1966
Tuskegee, AL, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King provides an outlook on the social and political plight of the contemporary Negro. He claims "The challenge is the fact that society expects, indeed demands, that the Negro be as productive, as resourceful, as skillful and as responsible as his white brother who is not handicapped by oppression". He urges Negro citizens to capitalize on current opportunities for advancement. "The negro must not wait until the dawn of absolute emancipation...".

Telegram from Norwegian Student Association to MLK

NORWAY

The Norwegian Student Association inquires if Dr. King will be available to give a lecture on Human Freedoms.

May 1963, Letter from William M. Kunstler to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. requesting television interview

Wednesday, May 15, 1963
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

William M. Kunstler "Bill" writes to inform Dr. King of the National Educational Television's interest in doing a series of programs on the American Negro. Henry Norgenthau would like to interview Dr. King for the series.

Letter from Joseph L. Kapica to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967
Connecticut (CT), Atlanta, GA, Minnesota (MN), Boston, MA, CANADA, Chicago, IL

Joseph Kapica, a freelance writer from Connecticut, requests special commentary from Dr. King regarding the issue of interracial adoption. Kapica writes about interracial adoption based on findings from the Child Welfare League of America.

MLK Address Regarding the Negro Family

Thursday, January 27, 1966
Virginia (VA), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

In this address, Dr. King discusses the struggles of the Negro family. He states that the Negro family's life determines the individuals' capacity to love. Dr. King also discusses how American slavery has impacted the Negro family.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to David Hunter

Wednesday, November 2, 1966
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Mr. Wachtel expresses gratitude for a grant awarded by the Stern Family Fund to the American Foundation on Nonviolence and the SCLC.

The Martin Luther King Column

GERMANY

Dr. King addresses his concerns about the rise of anti-Semitism in Germany.

Letter from Hans-Luder Temmen to MLK

Sunday, July 10, 1966
Atlanta, GA, GERMANY

This document contains a request for Dr. King's autograph from Mr. Temmen in Germany.

Letter from Thomas Maloney to Dora McDonald

Saturday, May 22, 1965
ITALY

Rev. Maloney thanks Miss McDonald for her assistance and the materials that she sent.