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Statement by Albert Raby Responding to Attack on MLK by Ernest Rather

Albert Raby responds to questions by Ernest Rather about Dr. King's statistics related to Negro housing conditions. He explains that Dr. King's facts were taken from the 1960 census, which he contrasts with statistics from the Department of Urban Renewal.

Letter from Jim E. Hansen to MLK Regarding Support for Presidency

Tuesday, April 2, 1968
Utah (UT)

Jim Hansen, Campus Coordinator for Choice '68, a Time-Life sponsored national presidential primary at the College of Southern Utah, wrote to MLK in support of Dr. King as a presidential candidate. He requested materials for the April 1968 event which took place on the college's campus.

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
CONGO / ZAIRE, SOUTH AFRICA, BELGIUM, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, MEXICO, PUERTO RICO, VIETNAM, SOUTH KOREA, TAIWAN, THAILAND, Chicago, IL, CHINA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, Cleveland, OH, JAPAN, FRANCE, ZIMBABWE, New York (NY)

Dr. King's address to the Hungry Club highlights an array of issues that relate to America's "Moral Dilemma." Dr. King explains the three major evil dilemmas that face the nation: war, poverty, and racism.

Young Americans Newsletter

Washington, D.C.

This Young Americans newsletter covers topics such as: The Vietnam War, Young Americans for Freedom, and the usage of violence for a good cause.

Letter from Dudley Babcock to MLK

Saturday, October 14, 1967
Virginia (VA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CAMBODIA, THAILAND, BURMA / MYANMAR, GERMANY, VIETNAM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

Dudley P. Babcock writes to Dr. King to assure him he supports his civil rights leadership but questions his involvement in the Vietnam War protests. Babcock reminds Dr. King that there are always pacifists who might need to accept war in order to prevent more war, citing the example of Neville Chamberlain and the escalation of violence in World War II.

Suffering

Dr. King writes that the view of suffering in Job 20 is fallacious.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes from D. Miall Edwards’ “The Philosophy of Religion.” Miall is misspelled on the note card.

Telegram from MLK to Attorney General Kennedy

Thursday, January 25, 1962
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Dr. King writes to Attorney General Robert Kennedy regarding the safety of Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth during his 90 day jail sentence.

Letter from Mose Pleasure, Jr. to MLK

Saturday, January 27, 1968
Memphis, TN, Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Mr. Pleasure writes Dr. King to inform him of his decision not to accept employment with SCLC. He refers to an earlier visit with Dr. King and friends in Atlanta, and comments that the group's enthusiasm bodes well for the upcoming Poor People's March on Washington.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Heussenstamm to MLK about a Humanity Button

Friday, March 1, 1968
California (CA), Washington, D.C.

In this letter Mr. and Mrs. Heussenstamm enclose a button called the "Pentagon of Humanity," which the Heussenstamm's also sent to the President and the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Accordingly the symbol represents “love, unity and wisdom—the community of man.”

Nobel Peace Prize Congratulations 1/7/1965

Wednesday, January 6, 1965
Brooklyn, NY

In this letter, George Fish is congratulating Dr. King on his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize.

Shattered Dreams

SPAIN, INDIA, PAKISTAN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL), Washington, D.C., New York, NY, New York (NY), London, England, ITALY

In a sermon entitled "Shattered Dreams", Dr. King opens with a passage from Romans 15:24. The Reverend continues with the expansion of hopes and the contrast of shattered dreams. Delivering this message from a theological vantage point, Dr. King closes with "Christian faith makes it possible for us nobly to accept that which cannot be changed, to meet disappointments and sorrow with an inner poise..."

Letter of Support to MLK

Tuesday, January 18, 1966
Indiana (IN)

Alphia Ganaway and Katherine Oakley send a check as a token of appreciation following Dr. King's appearance in South Bend, Indiana three years earlier. A member of the NAACP and other civic organizations, Ganaway led the effort that brought Dr. King to South Bend on October 18th, 1963.

Letter from MLK to Adolph Held

Friday, September 29, 1967
New York, NY, Chicago, IL, ISRAEL, Illinois (IL)

Dr. King writes Adolph Held, President of the Jewish Labor Committee, in response to his inquiry regarding SCLC's position on anti-semitism. Dr. King clarifies a number of distortions produced by the media, and presents the facts of the Chicago Conference of New Politics event throughout the letter.

Letter from FLING Unifie to MLK

Wednesday, January 17, 1968
SENEGAL, GAMBIA, PORTUGAL

Mauricio Gregorio Okatha describes to Dr. King the harsh conditions and struggles of the people in Portuguese, Guinea in their fight for freedom. Mr. Okatha requests the SCLC’s assistance in sending medication and clothing for their soldiers, who are wounded and fighting in rags.

May 17 -- 11 Years Later

Saturday, May 22, 1965
New York (NY)

Dr. King discusses the eleven years since the Supreme Court ruled that segregated schools were not constitutional in Brown v. Board of Education. He explains that it was not until the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that people began to understand the harms of segregation.

Letter from Edith Green to MLK

Monday, September 20, 1965
Washington, D.C., Oregon (OR)

Representative Edith Greene writes Dr. King concerning his previous telegram about the Mississippi challenge. Green concludes by agreeing with Dr. King's stance for a delegate vote in Mississippi.

Letter from MLK to Ernest Gruening

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Ernest Gruening, a United States Senator from Alaska, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from John Bolt Culbertson to MLK

Saturday, May 30, 1964
South Carolina (SC)

After great success with the first one, John Bolt Culbertson is sponsoring a second mass rally at the Greenville Municipal Auditorium and requests that Dr. King serve as the speaker for this event.

SCLC Minutes

This undated and unsigned memorandum functions essentially as minutes for an SCLC strategy session.

Letter from Daniel B. Brewster to MLK

Monday, July 20, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Senator Brewster thanks Dr. King for his kind letter and encloses a copy of the speech he delivered on the Senate floor before the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was passed.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. R. Elliot

Wednesday, February 21, 1968
New York (NY)

This letter is in response to an inquiry made by Mr. R. Elliot, on February 8th, 1968, in regards to housing development plans for the Ebenezer Baptist Church.

A Gift from Mr. and Mrs. Digioia to MLK

Thursday, April 21, 1966
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Michigan (MI)

Greta B. Digioia expresses how she and her husband have come to know Dr. King as a "symbol" of his race. She then offers Dr. King a one-of-a-kind gift.

MLK's Crawfordville, Georgia Speech

Monday, October 11, 1965
Georgia (GA), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King rallies the people to keep pushing forward with nonviolent actions to gain freedom and dignity as human beings.

Acronym: B.L.A.C.K. P.O.W.E.R.

This is a detailed acronym for the term "Black Power."

God - II Kings

Dr. King cites II Kings 5:15 as as affirmation of monotheism.

The Tri-City Chapter of C.O.R.E. Invites MLK to Appear.

Sunday, December 13, 1964
Washington (WA)

Wallace Webster, Vice President of the Tri-City Chapter of C.O.R.E., writes Dr. King inviting him to appear in the Tri-City community.

Justice

Dr. King provides his views regarding the concept of justice.

Letter From Bessie G. White to MLK

Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Bessie G. White writes to Dr. King, highlighting the strife that she feels Dr. King will continue to go through while fighting for civil rights in the south.

A Look To The Future

Monday, September 2, 1957
Tennessee (TN), EGYPT, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

For the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Highlander Folk School, Dr. King delivers the speech "A Look To The Future." He uses a timeline to explain the adversities African Americans endured to gain recognition as American citizens. He also points out the efforts of the Ku Klux Klan and the White Citizens Councils to make African Americans second class citizens. Lastly, Dr. King points out that America should be more maladjusted in order to avoid failing to cope with the demands of the normal social environment.