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Letter from John Moody

Thursday, February 22, 1968
New Orleans, LA, Washington, D.C., California (CA), Maryland (MD)

Mr. Moody discusses his hopes of creating an event that will demonstrate the phenomenon of Harumbe, with hopes of it becoming a National holiday. The proposed name of this day is "Harumbe", a Swahili term meaning Let's Get Together. Moody suggests May 19, the birthday of Malcolm X, as the date for this event to occur. Additionally, Moody provides an outline for the festivities, and requests that Dr. King contribute his suggestions after reviewing the proposal.

Telegram to MLK from W.E. Gardner

Thursday, August 16, 1962

Rev. Gardner organizes a board meeting to plan for a Southern Christian Leadership Conference Convention.

Letter from MLK to Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks Senate Minority leader Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen (R-Illinois) for his role in helping to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Dirksen was one of a handful of Republican Senators that helped break a southern Democratic filibuster designed to prevent the passing of this legislation.

Book payment to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968
New York (NY)

This cable from Dr. King's agent accompanied a royalty payment for the Japanese language edition of "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Symbolism and the Cross

Dr. King records notes on symbolism as the expression of spiritual truths.

Photograph Outline for "Why We Can't Wait"

Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C., Cleveland, OH

This draft outlines the images and captions used in Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait." Some of the material incorporated includes images and descriptions of Dr. King at the 1963 March on Washington, the Birmingham Campaign, other heavily involved civil rights leaders, and Dr. King's family.

Mississippi Project

Mississippi (MS)

The Mississippi Project is developed by SNCC which rooted from the evident white supremacy in this state. The organization sought to take action to eradicate the societal restrictions of the American Negro. The summer project will involve voter registration, freedom schools, community centers, and many more sectional projects.

Judith Ann Jones Writes Mr. Ralph Helstein Inquiring About Consideration for a Scholarship.

Tuesday, March 28, 1967
California (CA), Chicago, IL

College Student Judith Ann Jones writes Ralph Helstein, President of United Packinghouse, Food and Allied Workers, about the Russell H. Bull Scholarship. She explains how she plans to use the scholarship to further encourage others to be more racially tolerant.

Letter from John Yungblut to MLK

Monday, January 16, 1961
Atlanta, GA, New Orleans, LA

John Yungblut writes to Dr. King to confirm his ability to lead a seminar for the Atlanta Meeting's Quaker House on the Philosophy and Practice of Non-violence.

Letter from Thomas Wilkins to MLK

Monday, April 5, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

Thomas Wilkins suggests that Dr. King consider pursuing an initiative against taxation in Alabama. He proposes that any Negro who is refused voter registration should not pay any taxes in the state.

Belafonte

Wednesday, September 27, 1961
Nashville, TN

This program details a 1961 Harry Belafonte concert sponsored by the SCLC.

Letter from Harry J. Cargas to MLK Regarding The Queen's Work

Tuesday, November 19, 1963
Missouri (MO)

The editor of "The Queen's Work," a publication of The Sodality of Our Lady society, sends Dr. King a copy of the December issue. The editor informs Dr. King that the magazine goes out to twenty thousand Catholic high school students around the nation, and this issue's focus on interracial justice should interest Dr. King.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Elisabeth Babcock

Tuesday, April 27, 1965
New York (NY), Boston, MA, Los Angeles, CA, Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA

Dora McDonald responds to a request from Elisabeth Babcock regarding the possibility of Dr. King visiting her in New York. Unfortunately, the hectic schedule in Dr. King's travels will not allow him such an opportunity. She conveys their gratitude for the "moral and financial support" Babcock has made for the betterment of the movement.

Sin (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman’s “Normative Psychology of Religion.”

School Desegregation 10 Years Later

Thursday, May 7, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), Indiana (IN)

This statement was released by Dr. King ten years after the Supreme Court's decision, Brown versus Board of Education, which made segregation in public schools unconstitutional. The Reverend states, "The naive might believe great strides have been made in school desegregation over the past decade, but this is not at all true."

Letter from MLK to Clara Graves

Monday, October 21, 1963
Illinois (IL)

Dr. King responds to Clara Bell Graves thanking her for the encouraging letter. Dr. King states, "please be assured that we welcome with grateful heart such letters as the one you directed to me."

Telegram from Congressman Seymour Halpern to MLK

Friday, February 5, 1965
Selma, AL, Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C.

In this telegram to Dr. King in Selma jail, Congressman Seymour Halpern expresses his regret that he is unable to travel to Mississippi.

Letter from Jack Egle to MLK

Tuesday, April 12, 1966
FRANCE, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Jack Engle, European Director of the Council on Student Travel, thanks Dr. King for intervening during the "Nuit des Droits Civiques" in Paris. He also informs Dr. King that the ad hoc committee formed for the event will be disbanded at an upcoming meeting.

Letter from A. Dolezalek to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968
GERMANY

A. Dolezaler, director of a German library, requests a copy of a poster published by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He would like to add the poster to a collection about social, political movements.

Letter from Brigitte Horburger to MLK

GERMANY

Brigitte Horburger sends Dr. King a photograph of a black child and white child playing the piano together. Under the photograph it states, "To produce real harmony you must play both the black and white keys."

Letter from John Moorman to MLK

Friday, June 9, 1967
North Carolina (NC), Washington (WA)

John Moorman, President of the Student Christian Association at Guilford College, invites Dr. King to be the speaker for their Religious Emphasis Week in April of 1968. Moorman discusses details of the arrangement, including Dr. King's honorarium and travel expenses.

Political Cartoon: Nourishing the Enemy

Thursday, April 20, 1967
Tennessee (TN), Nashville, TN, VIETNAM

This political cartoon satirizes various elements of antiwar protesters regarding Vietnam. The inference is that events and positions originating from those elements are in essence aid and comfort to the enemy. "King Speeches" is prominently displayed.

Letter from MLK to Senator Jennings Randolph

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses gratitude to the Honorable Jenning Randolph, US Senator from West Virginia, for supporting passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Wyatt Tee Walker, executive assistant to Dr. King writes a response letter to Eugene Cook, the Attorney General of Georgia. Walker asks the Attorney General to provide his office with a list of questions that he would like answered. He also informs Cook that he will release the contents of this letter to the news media to make sure their is a level of transparency.

Letter from Myles Horton to Friends of Highlander

Friday, December 8, 1967
Tennessee (TN), Kentucky (KY), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS)

Myles Horton, the co-founder of the Highlander Research and Education Center, explains that he has been working on a program for the Appalachian area. He also mentions that the Center sponsors voter registration, political education programs and a series of workshops to help Negro candidates run for local and state offices.

Letter from John Reevs Calloway III to the SCLC

Friday, April 5, 1968
GERMANY

Mr. Galloway sends his condolences to the SCLC for the untimely death of Dr. King.

Who They are and Why They Struck

South Carolina (SC)

This article stresses the unfair treatment of twenty-two Claussen Bakery workers. This article also addresses why the workers went on strike.

Address at a Conference of Religious Leaders Under the Sponsorship of the President's Committee on Government Contracts

Monday, May 11, 1959
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King addresses a delegation of religious leaders at a conference hosted by the President's Committee on Government Contracts. In this pivotal speech, Dr. King outlines the responsibilites of clergymen and government officials in combating poverty and economic discrimination. He stresses the need for lay leaders and representatives of government to bodly speak out against the vestiges of discrimination that continuously hinder the economic and social progress of Negroes in America.

Letter from Ellen Bandler to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, September 11, 1962
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Ellen Bandler writes Miss McDonald about a letter that was received on September 10, 1962 concerning the publication of Mr. Killens' book being postponed until January 1963.

Letter from Frank Clarke to MLK

Tuesday, June 22, 1965
Berkeley, CA, California (CA), Washington, D.C.

Frank Clarke requests a letter of recommendation from Dr. King. Mr. Clarke seeks to obtain the position of the Assistant Press Secretary to the President.