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Letter from James Hamilton and Frank Pohlhaus

Friday, March 31, 1967
Georgia (GA)

James Hamilton and Francis Pohlhaus offer the Leadership Conference Executive Committee a list of recommendations on school desegregation. They also provide information on reasons why goals toward equal education have not been progressing as needed.

News Release About Upcoming Lecture by Coretta Scott King

Georgia (GA), Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

This news release announces Coretta Scott King's upcoming lecture on the Crusade for Voter's Registration entitled "Free in 64-with 6,000 more."

Capitalism

Dr. King illustrates a relationship between capitalism and anarchism.

Letter from George W. Parker

Tuesday, June 19, 1962
GERMANY, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, INDIA, UNITED KINGDOM, Cincinnati, OH, Ohio (OH), New Jersey (NJ), Georgia (GA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CHINA

George Parker explains his theory of mind control as a "mass electronic psychological weapon." He also details how this weapon is currently being employed.

Letter from Peter A. Minthom to Ralph D. Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968
Oregon (OR), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Peter Minthom, an American Indian from Oregon, requests assistance in traveling to Washington D.C. for the Poor People’s March.

Letter from Jean Ward Wolff to MLK

Thursday, February 9, 1967
California (CA), San Francisco, CA

Jean Ward Wolff expresses her concern about Dr. King turning his back on truth and justice in the form of supporting Adam Clayton Powell.

Essay on Walter Rauschenbusch

This essay exams Walter Rauschenbushch views on the relationship between the Church and Society.

Statement Upon Return to Montgomery

New York, NY, Montgomery, AL

Dr. King reflects on his near death experience after Izola Ware Curry stabbed him with a letter opener at a book signing in New York City on September 20, 1958. Although Dr. King refers to Curry as a "deranged woman," he has "no bitterness towards her" and sees her actions only as a "reflection on the moral climate." Dr. King further states what he will remember most is the "vast outpouring of sympathy" that was received from all races and creeds.

Letter from Chauncey Eskridge to Reverend Allen L. Johnson

Monday, April 12, 1965
Jackson, MS, Chicago, IL

Chauncey Eskridge informs Reverend Johnson that he has sought information from Jack H. Young and R. Jess Brown regarding the posting of bond money.

A Promising Day for the City of Selma

Selma, AL

In this handwritten public statement, the author addresses the Negro citizens of Selma, Alabama by commending their efforts of non-violence during a one-thousand person demonstration for equal voting rights.

Letter from Ann and George Laringer to MLK

Friday, June 9, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), VIETNAM

George Levinger's extends his gratitude to Dr. King for his stand against Vietnam. Levinger states, "One can preach nonviolence at home and ignore the violence abroad."

Letter from Laurence Kirkpatrick to Dora McDonald

Thursday, June 24, 1965
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

The World Convention of Churches of Christ is requesting a photo and biography of Dr. King to use for publicity purposes at their Seventh Assembly where Dr. King will be in attendance.

Letter from MLK to the Bulstrode School Children

Friday, July 9, 1965
UNITED KINGDOM

Dr. King thanks the school children of Bulstrode in England for their SCLC contribution by means of their daffodil sales. Outlining the current work of the SCLC, he educates the young supporters on the measures being taken to secure voting rights via "Operation Breadbasket" and "Operation Dialogue."

John of Damascus

SYRIA

This notecard contains historical information regarding John of Damascus and outlines some principles of his religious philosophy.

Letter from Staughton Lynd to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Straughton Lynd, Chairman of the Greater Atlanta Peace Fellowship, informs Dr. King of his organization and asks to meet regarding "the nuclear test ban negotiation." Lynd also encloses the organization's purpose statement.

Telegram from Frederick Dennard to MLK

New York, NY, New York (NY)

Reverend Frederick Dennard, Executive Director of the Harlem Interfaith Counseling Service, invites Dr. King to speak at a fundraising banquet.

Letter from Concerned Citizen to MLK

Tuesday, March 12, 1968
California (CA)

A citizen writes Dr. King to express their disagreement and distaste for his work within the Civil Rights Movement. The citizen believes that Dr. King's work promotes more hatred and violence in the nation.

Letter from Constance Beitzell to MLK

Sunday, April 14, 1963
California (CA), Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Los Angeles, CA

In the aftermath of Dr. King's arrest in Birmingham, Constance Beitzell expresses her dissatisfaction with federal officials not putting an end to the intimidation against Negroes in Birmingham. Beitzell is perplexed at the fact that the United States promotes freedom but does not allow freedom for many of its citizens who happen to be Negro. According to Beitzell, "What man in a Christian nation can trample on the rights of a citizen because of his race?"

Unwise and Untimely?

Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, New Orleans, LA, New York (NY), Texas (TX), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

This pamphlet from the Fellowship of Reconciliation features a letter written from eight Alabama Clergymen to Dr. King. The Clergymen express their discontent with the movement and Dr. King brings forth a response. The response is later known as one of Dr. King's famous texts, "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." The pamphlet also includes Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech from the 1963 March on Washington.

List of SCLC Board Members

This document is a list of all board members of the SCLC.

Is Nonviolence Doomed To Fail?

New York, NY, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

Dr. King enumerates the accomplishments made in the fight for civil rights through nonviolent practices. Additionally, he utilizes this article in the Associated Negro Press to discredit the claim that nonviolence is losing shape in the United States.

Letter from the Holy Name College to MLK

Friday, October 11, 1963
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

The Holy Name College requests Dr. King's written contribution for a new section in their publication entitled Interest Magazine. Interest Magazine is an international publication dedicated to the understanding and appreciation of theology. Dr. King has been selected to focus on the issue regarding Christianity and the American Negro. The college provides Dr. King with the restrictions of his essay and assures him that they will print his written work without editing for authenticity.

MLK at a Communist Training School

Tennessee (TN), Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL

This document depicts prominent civil rights and political leaders allegedly at a communist training school. This anti-King document asks the question, "what kind of American are you?"

Newspaper Submissions on Race from U.S. Soldiers

This newspaper clipping features two submissions from U.S. Soldiers, both concerning racial issues.

Letter from Eugene Wolfe to MLK

San Francisco, CA, Atlanta, GA, Selma, AL

Eugene Wolfe, Executive Director of the Council for Civic Unity, forwards Dr. King a check for SCLC from various religious and civic organizations in San Francisco.

Interruptions: Man from Porlock

Sunday, January 21, 1968

Dr. King delivered this sermon, "Interruptions," on January 21, 1968 at Ebenezer Baptist Church. He describes how no one lives a life free of interruptions, and that the major problem of life is learning how to handle them.

Delegation of 11 from Local 237 Walk in Mourning March

Memphis, TN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This article explains the march that took place after Dr. King's assassination. Many people took part in the mourning march led by Coretta Scott King and Reverend Ralph Abernathy.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, writes to Dr. King regarding his "I Have A Dream" speech.

Letter from Hugh Gloster to MLK

Tuesday, October 24, 1967

Hugh Gloster, President of Morehouse College, sends a copy of the brochure "The Negro & Higher Education In The South", to Dr. King. He also mentions the Morehouse Board of Trustees meeting, in New York, Nov. 9th.

Man

Dr. King interprets Jeremiah 51:17 to mean that man compared to God is stupid and man's knowledge compared to God's infinite knowledge is nothing.