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Letter from Anonymous Sender to MLK

A critic writes Dr. King defending President Johnson regarding his decisions for the Civil Rights Movement and African-Americans.

Mass Letter from Mr. Maurice A. Dawkins, OOEE

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

This letter from Maurice A. Dawkins, a representative from the Office of Economic Opportunity, accompanies materials that encourage the reader to take action "in pledging to beat swords into plowshares," namely transferring funds spent in the Vietnam conflict to domestic endeavors.

Term Paper Notes

During Dr. King's matriculation through Crozer Theological Seminary, he writes a term paper that contains results of a historical study on Mesopotamia and Egypt.

Letter from MLK to Brothers-in-Christ

Friday, February 28, 1964

Dr. King requests the participation of those receiving the letter. He encourages members of congregations to attend the Freedom Rally and urges churches to partake in Freedom Sunday.

Letter from Miss D. McDonald to The Rev. Julian J. Keiser

Monday, June 22, 1964

Miss McDonald, on behalf of Dr. King, assures Reverend Keiser that Dr. King's recent trip to Los Angeles was a pleasnt experience. Miss McDonald conveys Dr. King's hope that his "appearance, in some way, proved helpful."

MLK Address - The Association of The Bar of the City of New York

Wednesday, April 21, 1965

Dr. King gives an address to the Association of The Bar of the City of New York at the Hilton Hotel in New York. He praises lawyers for using their knowledge to aid the Civil Rights Movement. He states that Negro lawyers bring wisdom and a determination to win to the courtroom. Dr. King also defines an unjust law as a law that is "out of harmony with moral law of the universe."

Telegram from Nathaniel Tillman Jr. to MLK

Thursday, February 28, 1963

The Washington, D.C. chapter of Morehouse College Alumni invites Dr. King to speak at its first annual Public Affairs Forum. The organization suggests a topic of "The Negro 100 Years After Emancipation."

Letter from Ralph M. Holdeman to MLK Pertaining to a Speaking Invitation

Tuesday, February 21, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Holdeman of the National Council of Churches of Christ, requests that Dr. King speak at the Ecumenical Evangelism Conference in Wisconsin.

Messianic Age

Dr. King reviews a bible verse that discusses the rule of the Messiah.

Letter from Lawrence Friedman to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968

The former president of the Los Angeles Theatre Arts Foundation, Lawrence J. Friedman, writes Dr. King to inform him of a letter concerning the Kennedy assassination, which was written on an unauthorized piece of stationery. The letter is dated January 29, 1968, but The Los Angeles Theatre Arts Foundation was dissovled under the laws of the State of California on May 16, 1966. The letter was signed by Donald Freed. Lawrence P. Friedman wishes to make it clear that he had no knowledge of the letter being sent.

Atheism

Dr. King writes on the topic atheism.

Letter from Waltraud Feller to MLK

Thursday, February 29, 1968

Waltraud Feller writes Dr. King requesting his autograph and any other information that he can provide.

Auguste Comte

Dr. King writes of Comte's views of the relationship between the theological, the metaphysical and the scientific worlds.

Letter to Ms. Dora McDonald from Solomon Mendelson

Wednesday, January 17, 1968

Mr. Solomon Mendelson informs the SCLC and Ms. Dora McDonald that CBS will not be televising Dr. King's "I have a Dream Speech."

Letter from Henry Darby to Edward Brooke

Friday, January 25, 1985

Henry Darby, a student at Atlanta University asks for information about Dr. King's involvement in the Vietnam War.

A Resolution for Dr. King from the Church Women United in Atlanta

This is a resolution honoring Dr. King's life and work upon his untimely death.

Letter from MLK to Vincenso Lapiccirella

Thursday, January 14, 1965

Dr. King thanks Dr. Lapiccirella for his invitation to participate in a program in Florence, Italy.

Letter from Executive Director of Catholic Interracial Council to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967

The following document is a cover letter of enclosed letters John A. McDermott sent seventeen Negro state legislators "congratulating them on their fight for fair housing".

Letter from Mrs. King to Ms. Dixie Lee Kisor Regarding Home Helper Position

Saturday, June 22, 1963

In this letter dated 6/22/63, Mrs. King informs Ms. Kisor of her decision not to employ her as a home-helper. She and Dr. King believe it would be in the best interest of the children to have someone who would be available on a permanent basis.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. Lamm

Friday, October 30, 1964

Joan Daves corresponds with a German citizen regarding a recent request to submit Dr. King's book Why We Can't Wait to a German publisher.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Monica Wilson

Saturday, April 3, 1965

Dora McDonald, on behalf of Dr. King, responds to Monica Wilson at the University of Cape Town in acceptance of her invitation to speak at the institution. McDonald closes requesting confirmation of a date for Dr. King, as well as accommodation information.

Letter from Maj Palmberg to MLK

Thursday, February 3, 1966

Maj Palmberg, Cultural Secretary for Abo Akademi University in Finland, inquires about Dr. King's availability to speak to students regarding the Civil Rights Movement. Palmberg suggests raising funds in an effort to further Dr. King's nonviolent endeavors in America. Palmberg wrote Dr. King invitations to speak on numerous occasions.

Invitation to Ghana's Independence Celebration

Dr. and Mrs. King were the recipients of a series of invitations to attend celebratory ceremonies to celebrate the independence of Ghana.

Program - SCLC Presentation of Mahalia Jackson

Sunday, December 1, 1963

This SCLC program is for Miss Mahalia Jackson's concert benefitting the organization.

Segregation and Political Allegiance

Dr. King addresses segregation calling it "a house of prostitution built to perpetuate an illicit intercourse between injustice and immortality." He references James Meredith, the African American student who was prohibited from enrolling at the University of Mississippi because of his race, and encourages the Federal Government to exercise the force of the Constitution. He also asserts that African Americans must recognize the importance of voting and uniting with allies whose "interests are common with our own."

Telegram from Nobel Committee to MLK

Wednesday, October 14, 1964

The Nobel Committee of Norwegian Parliament notifies Dr. King that he will be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for 1964.

Financial Breakdown on the Basis of Individual Contributions

Dr. King illustrates the financial breakdown of individual financial contributions over the course of a year, broken down by number of people and amount per person.

Letter from Lucille Banta to MLK

Thursday, October 27, 1966

In addition to a financial contribution, Lucille Banta sends Dr. King a proposal for the civil rights and peace movements to oppose the Vietnam War. She suggests that they work together to "plan and organize a nationwide United Peace and Freedom Parade to Washington."

School of Youth for Social Service

The School of Youth for Social Service in South Vietnam aided in immediate war relief, as well as a long range of programs such as rural health & sanitation, agriculture, and illiteracy.

Letter from Charles E. Blackburn to MLK

Monday, February 12, 1968

Charles Blackburn shares with Dr. King a mutual passion for change. Blackburn expresses that his concern is not with the "American Negroe's revolt against hypocrisy," but with the hypocrisy as it applies to the young white generation.