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SCLC 10th Anniversary Dinner


This formal invitation to the Tenth Anniversary Dinner of the SCLC shows Sidney Poitier as the guest speaker and indicates a ticket price of $10.00. It is requested that all invited guest confirm their reservation prior to the event.

Telegram from C.K. Steele to MLK

Saturday, October 22, 1960
Tallahassee, FL, Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Rev. Steele expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's career and assures Dr. King that he is not walking alone.

Letter from James McKee to Dora McDonald Concerning MLK's Antioch Commencement Address

Friday, April 2, 1965
Ohio (OH)

James McKee, Chief of the Yellow Springs Police Department, writes Dora McDonald regarding security arrangements for Dr. King's visit to Yellow Springs, Ohio for Antioch College's Commencement.

Confessions - Prayer

Dr. King documents a passage from St. Augustine's autobiographical work regarding confessions and prayer.

Letter from Andrew Young to Reverend B. J. Cameron

Wednesday, June 14, 1967
Mississippi (MS), California (CA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Andrew Young, acting as Executive Assistant to Dr. King, responds to Rev. Cameron's letter regarding SCLC's involvement in Grenada, Mississippi. He assures Rev. Cameron that the SCLC has not forgotten about Grenada and discusses plans to see him in the future.

Biographical Sketch of Dr. Ralph David Avernathy

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, GHANA, HOLY SEE (VATICAN CITY STATE), NORWAY, Oslo, Norway, SWEDEN, FRANCE

This biographical sketch of Dr. Abernathy outlines his positions, recognitions, education, travel experience and personal life. Dr. Abernathy served as President of the SCLC after Dr. King's death and also served as a member of the NAACP, and Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.

The Church Says No on Proposition 14

California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Thie Council of Churches in Northern and Southern California argues against the goals of Proposition 14. This 1964 ballot proposition sought to amend the California consitution by nullifying the Rumford Fair Housing Act. Prop 14 would go on to pass, but two years later the California Supreme Court deemed it unconstitutional.

Letter from W. Russell Smith to MLK

Tuesday, September 26, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

On behalf of the Interfraternity Council of Lehigh University, W. Russell Smith invites Dr. King to present his views on civil rights.


Dr. King outlines concepts of existentialism as viewed through the doctrine of French existentialist writer Jean Paul Sartre.

MLK Remarks at the NAACP's Civil Rights Rally

Sunday, July 10, 1960
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King addresses the NAACP in regards to the equality of the school systems for Negro students. He urges the crowd to "employ only the highest weapons of dignity and discipline" while continuing to fight against segregation.

Letter from Joan Daves Regarding International Travel

Tuesday, September 15, 1964
GERMANY, ITALY, London, England, Madrid, Spain, SPAIN, Berlin, Germany

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she telephoned Mr. Smeaton regarding lodging arrangements in London and Berlin.

Letter from Martin Sargent to MLK

Tuesday, September 14, 1965
London, England, FRANCE

Martin Sargent expresses his and the American Church in Paris' appreciation for Dr. King's attendance and participation.

Letter from Seabury Press to MLK

Wednesday, August 30, 1967
New York, NY

Alda Lee Boyd, publicity director for the Seabury Press, asks Dr. King if he would write a statement that can be used to promote "The Jon Daniels Story." The book is about an Episcopal seminary student, Jonathan Daniels, who was killed while working in Mississippi following the Selma to Montgomery March.

War and Pacifism

New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King examines War and Pacifism. He determines that absolute pacifism is not acceptable, but neither is war. He cites several different philosophies of pacifism and nonviolence set forth by such figures as Nels Ferre, John H. Hallowell, A. J. Muste and Mahatma Gandhi.

Letter from C. Alexander Brown to MLK

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

C. Alexander Brown requests that Dr. King and the SCLC conduct an investigation on the conditions of black prisoners in American jails. After reading about cruel conditions in an Arkansas prison, Brown questions how many innocent black prisoners are confined.

"I, Too" by Jerry Peace

Alabama (AL)

This document displays the poem "I, Too" by Jerry Peace


Dr. King cites the political philosopher Montesquieu on his ideology of the weakness of laws. He further details the comparison of coexistence and consecutive social status. Dr. King concludes with the elaboration of Montesquieu's use of facts.

New Attack on Highlander Folk School

Tuesday, July 16, 1963
Tennessee (TN), New Orleans, LA

The Southern Conference Educational Fund distributed this "Action Memo" to generate support for Highlander High School in a fight against the State of Tennessee.

Letter from Bret Harte Junior High School to MLK

Tuesday, October 3, 1967
California (CA)

The eighth grade class from Bret Harte Junior High School writes to Dr.King to inquire about his opinion on race relations. The students expressed that they believed that Negros deserve equal rights.

Letter from MLK to R. B. Taylor

Wednesday, October 13, 1965
Oklahoma (OK)

Dr. King thanks Dr. R. B. Taylor for his generous contribution to the SCLC. King discusses how the funds are allocated to assist with voter registration, education and finding jobs for blacks.

Letter from William H. Gray, Jr. to Congressman James A. Byrne

Monday, June 5, 1967
Philadelphia, PA

Prominent offical and businessman William H. Gray, Jr. writes United States Congressman James Byrne in regards to discrimination issues related to Negro students and the Selective Service System. Gray communicates with Congressman Byrne to intervene in a discriminatory matter involving a young Philadelphia native. Dr. King is forwarded a copy of this correspondence.

1967 Geneva Convocation

Monday, May 29, 1967

Dr. King provides introductory remarks to participants of the Pacem In Terris II Convocation held in Geneva, Switzerland. He addresses several moral and political concerns as it relates war and Vietnam.

Letter from MLK to George Murphy

Tuesday, October 9, 1962
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King thanks Rev. Murphy for giving witness in Albany, Georgia. Dr. King also comments on an upcoming vote and the role of churches in race relations.

Letter from Alma Szatmary to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

Alma Szatmary writes Dr. King concerning his stance on the Vietnam war. Szatmary writes that it should be prohibited for Puerto Ricans and African Americans to serve as oppressors in Vietnam when they are the ones being oppressed here at home.

SCLC Newsletter: November-December 1963

Friday, November 1, 1963
Mississippi (MS), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King writes about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy and how it affected the citizens of the United States. King asserts that Kennedy handled international and national issues "with a depth of concern, a breadth of intelligence, and a keen sense of history." Dr. King says that while the question of who killed Kennedy is important, one should ask "what killed him" instead.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Gladys Foreman

Friday, February 15, 1963
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Dora McDonald thanks Ms. Gladys Foreman for her contribution of stamps.

Letter from Sargent Shriver to MLK

Monday, August 2, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Florida (FL)

Sargent Shriver, Director for the Office of Economic Opportunity, regretfully informs Dr. King that he will not be able to meet with SCLC's delegates in Birmingham for their convention.

Letter from Harry B. Henderson Jr. to MLK

Sunday, April 23, 1967
New York (NY), VIETNAM

Harry Henderson writes Dr. King in support of Dr. King's stance on Vietnam. Henderson expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's "clearout and moving" speech regarding the United State's presence in Vietnam and he feels that only clergymen can take an effective stance. He also discusses how the Vietnam War is used as a scapegoat to keep the government from having to deal with discrimination issues in America.

Letter from W. C. Dobbins to MLK

Wednesday, May 29, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL), Birmingham, AL

W.C. Dobbins, of the Pensacola Council of Ministers, follows up with Dr. King to request his presence at a mass meeting to be held in either September or October.


Dr. King quotes two verses from the book of Leviticus.