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Letter from Morton M. Brooks to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

Morton Brooks writes Dr. King to check his availability for April, May, or June of 1965 to speak at Mt. Zion's Sunday morning church service. Brooks expresses that he is aware of Dr. King's busy schedule, but would appreciate his consideration.

Letter from Rev. Thomas S. Maloney to MLK

Wednesday, April 27, 1966
ITALY, Louisville, KY

Thomas Maloney asks for assistance in preparing his dissertation on Dr. King's philosophy of nonviolence for the Gregorian University in Rome. He requests clarification on Dr. King's definition of violence, nonviolence, agape and justice, as well as how the four principles relate.

Letter from William Du Val to MLK

Tuesday, May 28, 1963
FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, New York (NY), New York, NY

As a Regional Secretary for the United Presbyterian Church, Dr. King about his planned trip to Moscow. Du Val informs Dr. King that the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the U.S.A. sponsors a chaplaincy in Moscow and would like Dr. King to stop by for a visit.

God

Dr. King expresses the power of God as being infinite beyond comprehension of man.

Public Affairs Memorandum

Monday, December 27, 1965
Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL, Pittsburgh, PA, Connecticut (CT), Ohio (OH), Detroit, MI, Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), Boston, MA, New Jersey (NJ)

Vice President Humphrey is quoted as saying, "This is a pragmatic program - what's best is what works", in describing the Office of Economic Opportunity program. This public affairs memorandum details the efforts of the organization as it pertains to the anti-poverty movement.

Letter from Fred Bennette to MLK

Friday, April 7, 1967
New York, NY, South Carolina (SC)

Director Reverend Bennette requests that Dr. King increase the telephone allowance for Operation Breadbasket, stating that frequent phone calls must be made in order to keep the program active.

Letter from Evelyn Rawley to Billy Mills

Friday, March 3, 1967
California (CA), BAHAMAS, FRANCE

Evelyn E. Rawley writes Billy Mills, chairman of the Democratic County Central Committee, to express distaste for Mills' choice of colleagues, political activity, and lack of reason. Rawley affirms that Mill's irresponsible actions are an obstacle to democratic practices.

Mastering Our Fears

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

Dr. King discusses fear, the healthy and unhealthy fears humanity has, the need to overcome fear, and steps in mastering fear.

"Negro Leader Looks Down Road Ahead"

Sunday, June 25, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

The Augusta Chronicle wrote this extensive review on Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" In this document, the review places special emphasis on Dr. King's views on the War on Poverty, the Black Power Movement and the state of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Mrs. Glenn Durbin to MLK

Monday, February 19, 1968
New York, NY, Ohio (OH), Washington, D.C.

Mrs. Glenn Durbin writes to Dr. King expressing her opposing views on Communism.

Selma to Montgomery Commemorative Rally Suggestion

Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

This outline features a tentative agenda, statement of purpose, and key logistical information pertaining to the commemorative rally celebrating the completion of the 1965 Selma to Montgomery March.

Letter to MLK from Philip L. Estrada about Operation Breadbasket Milwaukee

Milwaukee, WI

Phillip Estrada, the editor of the Milwaukee Star News, request Dr. King's presence in support of the Breadbasket Operation. Estrada describes this growing organization as one that has made an impression on Milwaukee. He hopes that Dr. King will deliver words of encouragement to keep the morale up and to show his support.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Article Fee

Thursday, November 19, 1964
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Ms. Daves encloses Dr. King's fee for his article in the "Saturday Evening Post" and discusses issues concerning future reprints of this particular work.

Letter from Clarence Jones to MLK

Friday, May 15, 1964
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

Clarence Jones writes Dr. King requesting commentary concerning "The World March Towards Human Rights: Luncheon on May 28, 1964."

Letter from MLK to James L. Hicklin

Monday, February 25, 1963
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dr. King expresses gratitude for being considered for a position on the National Board of Governors for the Freedom For All Foundation, but he declines due to commitments to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and other pastoral duties.

Eisenhower - Views on the Racial Question

Dr. King notes General Dwight D. Eisenhower's justification of racial segregation during Eisenhower's 1948 testimony before a Senate subcommittee.

Affidavit of Captain George Wall

Wednesday, April 10, 1963
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

George Wall, Captain of the Police Department for the City of Birmingham, submits an affidavit. The document states that a group of thirty-two Negroes led by Charles Billups and Fred Shuttlesworth were arrested for marching without a permit.

Letter from Richard Allen to MLK

Wednesday, June 7, 1967
Montgomery, AL

Reverend R. Allen requests Dr. King's written contribution for a special issue of "The Leader" on race relations. "The Leader" is a Christian newspaper that is distributed in different parts of England.

Invitation to Emergency Convocation: The Urban Coalition

Saturday, August 12, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

This letter from Andrew Heiskell and A. Philip Randolph invites Dr. King to attend the Emergency Convocation of the Urban Coalition, to address the issue of violence in 104 cities. The goals set forth in the letter include an emergency work program, a major expansion of the private sector for job provision and training, and establishment of a long-range program for the physical and social reconstruction of American cities.

SCLC Citizenship Workbook

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA, Mississippi (MS), Virginia (VA), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), INDIA, UNITED KINGDOM, Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), New York (NY), Washington, D.C., South Carolina (SC), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), North Carolina (NC), Florida (FL)

This workbook is an extension of the SCLC Conference Citizenship program "designed to acquaint citizens with the way in which our government is run and to help them meet voting requirements." This resource tool features a number of vocabulary-building, arithmetic, reading comprehension, and spelling exercises to better equip voters with the knowledge to "fight against prejudice and loss of human rights in education."

MLK Remarks on Negro Press Week

Monday, February 10, 1958
FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, ALGERIA

In this transcribed radio address, Dr. King describes how future generations will remember the 20th century as a time where righteous people fought for social, economic, and political freedom. Dr. King also states that the African-American fight for true citizenship is not only a part of American heritage, but also the story of people everywhere who struggle for dignity and freedom. Dr. King made this radio address for Negro Press week a the request of Louisville Defender Editor and National Newspaper Publishers Association board member Frank Stanley.

Letter from Ossie Davis to MLK Regarding Malcolm X Assassination

Friday, October 1, 1965
New York (NY)

In this letter, Ossie Davis asserts to Dr. King that it is true that there is one law for whites and another for blacks. Ossie continues by expressing his feelings on Malcolm X's assassination. He closes his letter by asking for Dr. King's signature and monetary donation for an ad.

We Have No Government

Tuesday, February 1, 1966
Mississippi (MS), South Carolina (SC), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This is a transcription of a press conference held on behalf of the poor people in Mississippi. Leaders and participants discussed alternatives to government aid to help rectify poverty related concerns.

Letter from MLK to a Young John Lewis

Tuesday, March 5, 1963
Nashville, TN, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King writes John Lewis, the future activist and U.S. Congressman, to thank him for a previous letter and to offer financial assistance. He discusses the possibility of Mr. Lewis joining his staff in Alabama.

God - His Imminence

Dr. King takes notes on the immanence of God and quotes Victorian poet Alfred Tennyson's "The Higher Pantheism."

Letter from MLK to Murray Thomson

Thursday, November 9, 1967
CANADA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King regretfully informs Murray Thomson he will not be able to speak at the upcoming conference in Portland, Ontario due to commitments for the Civil Rights Movement in the US and his pastoral duties for Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

Thirty-nine Articles

Dr. King writes notes regarding the "basic doctrinal formula of the Anglican Church."

Telegram from Robert L. Lucas to MLK

Wednesday, August 11, 1965
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Robert L. Lucas, the Chairman of the Chicago branch for the Congress On Racial Equality, invites Dr. King and his staff to return to Chicago, Illinois to assist in the struggle for quality integrated education.

The Bible

Dr. King records his views of Scott regarding "The Bible." Scott believes that beyond being an "anthology of the noblest religions," the Bible is also an account of history. Even though there is the ambiguity that comes with history, there is also an unambiguous message of the purpose of God and the destiny of man.

The False God of Money

Sunday, July 19, 1953

This sermon titled "The False God of Money" was preached by Dr. King on July 19, 1953. Dr. King raised a question to his congregation stating, "Will you serve the transitory god of money which is here today and gone tomorrow or will you serve the eternal God of the universe who is the same yesterday, today and forever?"