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Letter from Pauline Lee to MLK

Monday, January 9, 1967

Pauline Lee withdraws her support from Dr. King due to his failure to withdraw support for Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from Henry Morgenthau to MLK

Thursday, July 18, 1963

In this letter Mr. Morgenthau of WGBH Radio thanks Dr. King for his for participation in "For Freedom Now."

Letter from Mrs. Frank Summers to SCLC

Monday, April 9, 1962

Mrs. Frank Summers sends contribution to SCLC and wishes to pass on the March SCLC Newsletter.

Letter from Richard P. Heath to MLK

Monday, November 29, 1965

Richard P. Heath expresses his distaste for Dr. King's method of attaining equal rights and freedoms. He posits, "In order to have rights and freedoms, we must be responsible for our actions."

American Foundation on Nonviolence

Friday, October 1, 1965

As Honorary Chairman of the American Foundation on Nonviolence, Dr. King presents a draft letter in which he calls for individuals to tackle the issues of voter registration, non-violence training, and protection of civil rights leaders by joining the organization and serving on its Board of Directors. Dr. King himself pledges $25,000 of his Nobel Peace Prize funds to the American Foundation on Nonviolence.

Letter from Peter Sevetnyk to MLK

Wednesday, June 22, 1966

Peter Servetynk, a former Roman Catholic Priest from Canada, invites Dr. King to speak at a massive gathering in Toronto. He further thanks Dr. King for his charitable works and wishes there were more people of his stature.

Barth

Dr. King writes about Karl Barth's theology regarding revelation.

Letter from MLK to John Conyers

Friday, February 19, 1965

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for Congressman John Conyers' visit to Selma, Alabama. Dr. King requests Congressman Conyers' support for passing federal legislation that will eliminate the barriers to a free voting process for African American citizens.

SCLC News Release - MLK Statement on Continued Racial Violence in Alabama

Tuesday, February 22, 1966

This 1966 SCLC news release contains a statement from Dr. King concerning further racial violence in Birmingham, Alabama and the need for prompt action.

Statement to Confront the Conflict in Harlem

Monday, July 27, 1964

Dr. Arthur C. Logan, Chairman of the Board of Directors for HARYOU-ACT, Inc., writes this statement addressing the conflict in Harlem. According to Logan, "the present conflict in the Harlem community is a consequence of a long-standing feeling of powerlessness and its resultant frustrations." Specifically, the unrest in Harlem is attributed to the unreasonable behavior and inadequate training of the Police Department. This statement includes a list of recommendations to help confront the crisis.

Immortality

Dr. King takes notes regarding immortality. In his notes, he references Johann Fichte's definition of ethics. He also discusses human duty as it relates to immortality.

Letter from Rabbi Byron T. Rubenstein to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964

Rabbi Rubenstein writes to congratulate MLK on the Nobel Peace Prize and recounts his experience while working with the SCLC in St. Augustine, Florida.

Letter from David S. Tillson MLK

Friday, May 5, 1967

Dr. Davis S. Tillson congratulates Dr. King on his statement regarding foreign policy.

Letter from George D. Kelsey to MLK

Saturday, October 31, 1964

Dr. and Mrs. Kelsey applaud Dr. King on his nomination and receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize. Kelsey was Professor of Christian Ethics at Drew University.

Publicity Plans for Pilgrimage Tour

This document describes a request for Dr. King to become involved with the Pilgrimage Tour in New York.

News Clipping Pertaining to Job Corp March

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

The article references a series of hostile altercations between the trainees at a local Job Corps and the residents of Battle Creek.

Albany Movement Statement

Sunday, July 1, 1962

This statement is written on behalf of people of faith who have come to support the Albany Movement. The ills experienced by the Negro community in Albany are rooted in racial separation, it says. The document requests a meeting with the City Commission to review their response to peaceful protest, clarification of the City’s position on an ICC ruling on segregated buses, and establishment of a bi-racial commission to make recommendations on desegregation.

Negroes Are Not Moving Too Fast

In this article, Dr. King attempts to refute allegations that Negroes are moving too fast and expect special favors. He states, "the Negro is not going nearly fast enough."

Letter from Stephen Siteman to MLK

Monday, September 11, 1967

In this letter to Dr. King, Stephen Siteman encloses a letter that Norman Thomas wrote for the New York Times.

Letter from Eleanor Hicks Johnson to MLK

Thursday, August 4, 1966

Ms. Hicks informs Dr. King of land available for sale in Randolph County, Alabama. Ms. Hicks and her family desire to keep the land's ownership and rehabilitate it for families to live.

Thank you letter to MLK from Major

Major thanks Dr. King for a good meeting and some great plans. He apologizes for his tardiness due to a delay in Washington.

Letter from Frank Elliot to MLK

Friday, January 18, 1963

This letter is discussing the manuscript and galley proofs that will be sent to Dr. King before his trip to the West Indies. Frank Elliot suggest to Dr. King to search for the references in the galley proof, since no foot notes will be provided. He also request that Dr.King proof read "Antidotes of Fear" and provide a preface if he has spare time to do so.

Anonymous letter to MLK

Sunday, June 26, 1966

An anonymous individual expresses their concern with the methods and efforts Dr. King is using to achieve his goals through the Civil Rights Movement.

Schedule for Oslo Visit

This document outlines Dr. King's twelve-day travel schedule to Oslo, Norway to receive the Nobel Peace Award. The itinerary includes various banquets, speaking engagements and meetings with individuals including the leaders of the British Council of Churches and the mayor of Oslo.

Letter from United States Congress to MLK

Friday, September 22, 1967

Joseph McDade writes Dr. King to solicit his views regarding the affects of organized crime on the plight of the urban poor.

Letter from Bo Wirmark to MLK

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

Bo Wirmark writes Dr. King to clarify the misconception behind Vilgot Sjoman's film "I Am Curious (Yellow)," and explain how his interview is being used in the film. Wirmark also extends an invitation for Dr. King to visit Uppsala, Sweden.

A Southern Point of View

Eliza Paschall writes this article to express her feelings toward the Georgia legislature's willingness to close down the schools rather than integrate them. Paschall states that "segregation is a disease that infects all parts of a being, human or political." The time for action is now, so that equality can be achieved by all.

Letter from Harper & Row to Joan Daves regarding "Why We Can't Wait"

Monday, May 11, 1964

Harper & Row informs Joan Daves about the receipt of the quote on Dr. King from Harry Golden, Editor of the Carolina Israelite.

Letter from Edmond Melis to MLK

Saturday, January 23, 1965

Edmond Melis asks Dr. King to write a forward for an international police association magazine. He also expresses an interest in helping end discrimination in the United States.

MLK Advocates Registering to Vote

Dr. King urges individuals to join the "march to Freedom" by becoming a registered voter. Dr. King asserts that voting will help educate children, obtain a minimum wage law, and create the opportunity for better medical care.