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"Chicago, IL"

War (Just War)

Dr. King cites Francisco Suarez's definition of a "just war" from his "Tractibus de. Legibus."

Editorial- "Lawlessness Means Bloodshed, End of Dreams"

Missouri (MO), California (CA)

In this article, light heavy-weight boxing champion Archie Moore discourages black Americans from resorting to "lawlessness" in their attempts to advance the cause of civil rights.

Envelope addressed to Coretta Scott King from the House of Representatives

Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

This envelope is addressed to Coretta Scott King and originates from Congress. Notable are the stamps denoting the date of the post mark and date of receipt, six and eleven days, respectively, after the day of Dr. King's assassination.

Letter to Mr. Otwell from Dr. King Regarding the Request for an Article for the Chicago Sun-Times

Monday, March 30, 1964
Chicago, IL

Dr. King informs Mr. Otwell that, due to prior obligations, he will not be able to write the article for the Sunday edition as requested. However, he assures Mr. Otwell that he will look into the possibility of editing a section of "Why We Can't Wait" to be published instead.

Letter from Asher Feren to MLK

Wednesday, February 2, 1966
Chicago, IL

Asher Feren writes to Dr. King to express his concerns for the Hyde Park High School Unity Plan.

Ethics

Dr. King writes on the topic "ethics," according to Proverbs 6: 17-19.

The Suffering Servant

ISRAEL

Dr. King writes that Isaiah 53 presents a different view of the servant from chapters 42, 49 and 50. The concept of God's servant evolved from that of Israel as a nation, to the spiritual or inner Israel, to an individual who would take up the work that the others would not. King concludes that the prophecy was fulfilled in Jesus of Nazareth.

Albany Movement Support Letter from MLK to Rev. Hugh Wire

Thursday, October 11, 1962
Massachusetts (MA), Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Reverend Wire for his participation in the Albany Movement.

Letter from Laurence V. Kirkpatrick to MLK

Tuesday, August 3, 1965
New York, NY, PUERTO RICO

This letter addressed to Dr. King highlights travel arrangements to a World Convention of Churches of Christ hosted in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Adverse Letter from J. H. Moore to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

J. H. Moore expresses his dislike for Dr. King's leadership style. He argues that Dr. King's efforts have stirred up hatred and discontent, even amongst black citizens.

Letter from Kate Krauthemier to MLK about a St. Louis Appearance

Monday, August 17, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Missouri (MO)

In this letter, Kate Krautheimer of the Artists and Speakers Bureau,urgently requests an appearance from Dr. King to St. Louis University.

Letter from Dr. David Tillson to MLK

Thursday, June 1, 1967
New York (NY), VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA

Dr. David Tillson writes Dr. King congratulating him on his stand for peace in Vietnam.

Conversion

Dr. King quotes Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy's book "What I Believe." Tolstoy asserts that when he came to believe in Christ's teachings his whole life and perception changed.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Paul J. Dolan

Wednesday, July 12, 1967
Maryland (MD), Washington, D.C.

On behalf of Dr. King, Dora McDonald grants Paul J. Dolan approval to use the "I Have A Dream" speech that Dr. King delivered at the March on Washington.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Dr. Benjamin Mays, President of Morehouse College, invites Dr. and Mrs. King to lunch after the Morehouse Board of Trustees Meeting.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. D.A. McGregor

Monday, September 25, 1961
New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King expresses delight in Mrs. D.A. McGregor's request for a copy of his sermon "Paul's Letter to American Christians." However, since he doesn't have a complete manuscript of the sermon at the time he receives the letter, Dr. King mentions that it will be published in his upcoming book of sermons. The book of sermons would eventually be named "Strength to Love."

Letter from Mrs. Aaron Oliver to MLK

Thursday, July 9, 1964
California (CA)

Mrs. Aaron Edgar Oliver writes Dr. King to give thanks for his efforts to try and lead the Republican convention in its choice of a candidate.

Letter from Carl Albert to MLK

Friday, October 20, 1967
Oklahoma (OK), Washington, D.C.

In this letter, U.S. Congressman Carl Albert offers his gratitude to Dr. King regarding a letter he sent to him about problems in the country.

MLK Speech at the Americana Hotel

Tuesday, October 23, 1962
New York (NY), Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA)

Dr. King compares the Maritimer Union's struggle for improved working conditions to the continuous fight for civil rights in the African American community.

Telegram from W. L. Battle to MLK

Alabama (AL), Minnesota (MN)

Apostle W. L. Battle offers to sponsor Dr. King in a "preaching extravaganza and conference."

Telegram from Rev. Harold Carlson to MLK

Thursday, September 19, 1963
California (CA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Reverend Harold E. Carlson sends words of encouragement to Dr. King. Carlson prays for continued strength and courage for King's "holy cause."

Letter from House Speaker John W. McCormack to MLK

Monday, May 15, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Massachusetts (MA), Washington, D.C.

Massachusetts Democratic Congressman and Speaker of the House John W. McCormack thanks Dr. King for a recent telegram and agrees with the views Dr. King expressed.

MLK Handwritten Draft Letter

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the letter he received providing insights to an unknown problem.

Star: "An Analysis of Black Power" 1967

Monday, June 26, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Paul Hathaway, of the Washington, D.C. Star newspaper, crafted a review of Dr. King's final publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" This extensive review of Dr. King's book focused, primarily, on his stance regarding the black power movement. According, to Dr. King, in the book, black power was something that was needed to achieve tangible goals such as: economic and political power. However, the use of the slogan carried a very volatile meaning that would alienate many allies in the movement, not of African American descent.

A Request for a Yearbook Statement

Monday, December 12, 1966
Washington (WA), Montgomery, AL

Carolyn Olson, the co-editor of the South Kitsap High School year book staff, requests a statement from Dr. King to include in the school's year book. Olson informs Dr. King that the yearbook's "Stand Up and Be Counted" theme is intended to encourage "independence and individualism" among the student body by implanting new ideas in students' minds and challenging old stereotypes. The sender asks that Dr. King join other public figures in writing a statement regarding how young people can "Stand Up and Be Counted."

Letter from MLK to Benjamin E. Mays regarding Contribution to Morehouse College

Monday, October 1, 1962
Atlanta, GA

In this letter, Dr. King pledges a donation in the amount of $225 to Morehouse College President, Dr. Benjamin E. Mays, for dormitory renovations.

Letter from Tommie Crockett to MLK

Tommie Crockett expresses his appreciation for the work of Dr. King. He explains that black people are getting tired of the nonviolence method and are beginning to embrace the term, "Black Power." He explains that blacks will no longer participate in peaceful civil rights demonstrations because, "we already done that."

Letter From Rabbi and Mrs. Gendler

New Jersey (NJ)

Rabbi and Mrs. Gendler sends their support and best wishes to the S.C.L.C, C.O.R.E, and S.N.C.C for their efforts towards violence, Vietnam, and human dignity.

Crusade for Citizenship

Friday, October 21, 1966
Atlanta, GA

This check was issued to Chauncey Williams for his assistance with the Crusade For Citizenship's voter registration campaign.

Letter from Clarence Jones to MLK

Friday, May 15, 1964
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

Clarence Jones writes Dr. King requesting commentary concerning "The World March Towards Human Rights: Luncheon on May 28, 1964."