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Catholic Interracial Council Newsletter Honoring MLK

Sunday, March 7, 1965

This 1965 newsletter from the Catholic Interracial Council honors Dr. King with the Pacem in Terris Peace and Freedom Award.

MLK's Mandate for White Christians Review

Thursday, December 2, 1965

Dr. King provides a review for Kyle Hazelden's book, "Mandate for White Christians." In his review he gives an overview of the book's content, along with his opinion on its value.

Letter from MLK to Johnnie McKinney

Thursday, May 13, 1965

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in Cheyenne, Wyoming "under the auspices of the NAACP."

Letter from Genevieve Young to Joan Daves

Wednesday, January 4, 1967

Genevieve Young expresses her opinion about the outline for Dr. King's upcoming book "Where Do We Go From Here?" She offers some suggestions and strategies to Joan Daves to help narrow the scope of the manuscript.

God (I Chronicles)

Dr. King interprets I Chronicles 16:14 as implying monotheism.

Semi-Arianism

Dr. King records a definition of semi-Arianism.

Telegram from Ruth Peggy and Cheri Bryant to MLK

Saturday, December 23, 1967

Ruth Peggy and Cheri Bryant express their gratitude for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's assistance.

Sermon Notes of Dr. King

The document, seen here, contains sermon notes written by Dr. King. The tittle of this sermon is listed as "The Jungles of Life", with the scripture passage coming from Jeremiah 12:5.

A Christian Movement in a Revolutionary Age

Tuesday, September 28, 1965

In this address, Dr. King fuses the philosophies in the Old and New Testament regarding revolutionary social change. He argues that the most creative and constructive revolutionary force for change is one that combines the Old Testament’s “righteousness and justice that flow down like a mighty stream” with the New Testament’s call to love one’s enemies and bless those who persecute you. He asserts that God has been working actively since the time of Moses for the freedom and perfection of people and society. Dr.

Letter to MLK from Joan Daves about New Publication

Wednesday, September 2, 1964

In this letter Joan Daves reports to Dr. King a proposal for a French edition of "Strength to Love" based on a specified advance and royalty.

Letter from Clarence E. Pickett, Dorothy M. Steere, and George C. Hardin

The Religious Society of Friends, which consists of 17,000 Quakers, decides to send its members to spread a message of "love and goodwill" to both whites and Negroes of Philadelphia.

Letter from Marc Steel to Rev. R.D. Abernathy about a Term Paper

Saturday, April 27, 1968

Marc Steel, a high school sophomore from Maryland, wrote to Rev. Ralph Abernathy, requesting information on his role in the Civil Rights Movement. This student sought to acquire a narrative of Rev. Abernathy and his goals for SCLC, in order to complete a term paper.

The Danger of A Little Progress

Monday, February 3, 1964

This focuses on the issue of short term progress within the Civil Rights Movement because it does not offer long term lasting solutions.

Ebenezer Project Bill

Citizens Trust Company reminds the SCLC of an upcoming payment related to the "Ebenezer Project."

Evil

Dr. King writes about evil, according to Jeremiah 44: 23.

Invitation to the 16th Annual Convention for the Synod of Toronto and Kingston Presbyterian Young People'e Society

Wednesday, January 13, 1965

Jack Green and David Powell invite Dr. King to speak at the 16th Annual Convention for the Synod of Toronto and Kingston Presbyterian Young People's Society. The theme of the convention is "First They Gave Themselves." CBC National Television Network has offered to televise Dr. King's speech.

Letter from Hersel Lillard to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Lillard writes to Dr. King from the United States Public Health Service Hospital in Lexington Kentucky in hopes that Dr. King will help him because he feels the Court was prejudice against him. He hopes to prevent his injustice from happening to others in his situation. He also mentions two other men, Mulloy and Pratt, about to stand trial and in need of assistance.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to the Mapp and Welch Families

Thursday, February 2, 1967

Dr. and Mrs. Coretta Scott King express their condolences to the Mapp and Welch Families, and the West Hunter Street Baptist Church.

Letter from MLK to Leonard Smalls

Wednesday, July 24, 1963

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at The Fifty-Ninth Street Baptist Church due to preaching responsibilities at his own church. He also thanks Rev. Smalls for the offer to fundraise for the SCLC.

On Being a Good Neighbor

Dr. King tells the Biblical story of the "Good Samaritan on the Road to Jericho," in which a traveler has been robbed, beaten and left for dead. Dr. King connects this story to the Declaration of Independence and offers an analysis of the modern era. Following the example of the "Good Samaritan," he encourages looking beyond "race, religion and nationality" to help those wounded by injustices.

Newark Evening News: King's Standing Grows

Wednesday, August 24, 1966

This 1966 Newark Evening News article outlines the history and progression of Dr. King's leadership during an SCLC initiative addressing discriminatory living practices in Chicago.

Discrimination in Operations of Interstate Motor Carriers of Passenger

Wednesday, December 20, 1961

Harold McCoy, Secretary of the United States Interstate Commerce Commission, proposes that passenger tickets should include a non-discrimination notice.

Letter from W. Daniels to MLK

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

W. Daniels corresponds to Dr. King regarding an invitation to speak in Montreal at the Grand Master's Banquet on August 13, 1968.

Letter from Frank McRedmond to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

Frank McRedmond suggests that Dr. King consider using the term "the economic defenseless" rather than "the poor," in order to gain support from the white community.

Telephone Log: January 22

This memo from the desk of Dr. King includes several missed telephone calls noted for his later response.

Letter from Vice President Johnson to MLK

Friday, June 15, 1962

Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson writes to express his regrets that Dr. King could not attend the White House's Community Leaders Conference. Johnson continues that he and the Equal Employment Opportunity Committee were thrilled with the support Dr. King provided to the conference despite his absence.

Advertisement for "Why We Can't Wait"

Monday, May 25, 1964

Under the Additional Listings section of this magazine is a review about Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter From Walter R. McCall to MLK

Tuesday, January 3, 1967

Morehouse School of Religion Director Walter McCall asks Dr. King for a contribution to purchase a piano that will be presented to Morehouse School of Religion.

MLK Sermon About Courage and Cowardice

The document is a single draft page from Dr. King's larger work "Strength to Love," with annotations handwritten by Dr. King. On this page, he discusses courage and self-affirmation.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Publicity Directors of Harper and NAL

Monday, May 18, 1964

In this letter, Joan Daves asks Dr. King about his availability for the Publicity Directors for Harper and NAL. Joan Daves also reminds him about Stuart Harris and Jay Tower's desire to meet him.