Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Chester, PA"

Letter from Dorothy Cotton to Mrs. E.A. Johnson

Thursday, April 5, 1962
North Carolina (NC)

Educational Consultant Dorothy Cotton writes workshop attendee Mrs. E.A. Johnson concerning the importance of citizenship education, particularly in getting Negroes to vote. She addresses a concern of Mrs. Johnson's involving a young man invited to attend a citizenship workshop. Ms. Cotton informs Mrs. Johnson that Dr. King will speak with Attorney General Robert Kennedy in addressing the young man's situation.

Letter from Bill Bennett to MLK

Wednesday, January 5, 1966
New Jersey (NJ), BERMUDA

William Bennett offers the suggestion that the phrase "dark skinned" be used to describe people of color. Bennett encountered the phrase while on a trip in Bermuda, and realized he should enforce the idea that skin color does not determine American citizenship.

Letter from Henry Duerksen to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965
Kansas (KS), Atlanta, GA, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

Duerksen sends a brief letter showing his support and pride for Dr. King's work and dismissing negative statements toward Dr. King.

Telegram from Robert M. Ball to MLK

Monday, February 7, 1966
Baltimore, MD, Atlanta, GA

Mr.Ball, Social Security Administration Commissioner, invites Dr. King to participate in an information session concerning a proposed medicare program. The meeting will be held in Baltimore, MD.

Letter from Donna Dlugos to MLK

Saturday, March 16, 1968
Missouri (MO)

Donna Dlugos of Fontbonne College asks Dr. King about receiving information for Time Magazine's 'Choice 68' campaign.

Time

Dr. King quotes St. Augustine’s “Confessions.”

The Modern Negro Activist

Montgomery, AL, GHANA, NIGERIA, KENYA, CONGO / ZAIRE, Alabama (AL), California (CA), Cambridge, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King profiles the emergent young Negro civil rights activist who is college-educated, creative, brave and committed to the discipline of non-violence. He attributes the activist's diligence to a keen awareness that they inhabit a world on the cusp of positive social change and that they will have the privilege to direct that change. They are no longer to be an imitator of his white counterpart, but rather an initiator and leader in this new age.

Letter from Lee Tishler to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, San Francisco, CA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM

Ms. Lee Tishler gives support and praise to Dr. King for speaking out against the conflict in Vietnam.

Letter from Harry G. Boyte to Leon R. Martin

Monday, August 12, 1963
Michigan (MI)

SCLC Director of Research and Information Harry Boyte communicates with Leon Martin to thank him for the thoughtful words made in response to Dr. King's article in "The New Leader." Boyte tells Martin that Negroes in America are at a place where they will no longer be forced to wait for equality. Boyte asserts that only the complete participation of Negroes in every part of life in America will "suffice at this juncture in history."

Letter from D. G. Amaron to MLK

Thursday, December 17, 1964
Washington, D.C., CANADA

The National Newspaper Awards of the Toronto Men's Press Club requests Dr. King as the keynote speaker for their dinner honors.

Letter from MLK to Wesley Fisher

Wednesday, February 27, 1963
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the kind letter from Mr. Fisher. He also informs him that Aaron Henry has been absent and will probably reply about some donated clothing upon his return.

Letter from William Stuart Nelson to MLK

Thursday, July 15, 1965
Washington, D.C., INDIA

William Stuart Nelson writes Dr King prompting him to take into consideration a request from Mr. G. L. Mehta as will as to visit Africa. Nelson comments on the importance of the non-violence concept being propagated across India and Africa.

Letter from Harper and Row, Inc to MLK

Monday, February 5, 1968
New York, NY

In this letter, Laura Paull, from the Religious Books Department of Harper and Row, Publishers Inc., requests Dr. King's opinion on the publication "In the End God" by John A. T. Robinson.

Letter from Franklin I. Gamwell with Enclosed Copy of the Interracial News Service Newsletter

New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Arkansas (AR), Virginia (VA), Louisiana (LA), Connecticut (CT), Washington, D.C., South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN), North Carolina (NC), Maryland (MD), Texas (TX), Mississippi (MS), Florida (FL), UNITED KINGDOM, Memphis, TN

Franklin I. Gamwell, of the Student Interracial Ministry, requests if Dr. King would like to have an intern student at Ebenezer Baptist Church for 1963.
Interracial News Service describes the experiences of many Student Interracial Ministry participants and the pastors of the churches they spent the summers with.

Letter from Ms. Dora McDonald to Mrs. Epworth about an Invitation

Friday, January 12, 1968
Atlanta, GA

Here, Ms. McDonald offers a belated reply to Mrs. Epworth regarding an invitation for Dr. King and his family to dine with the Epworth family. Dr. King does not decline the invitation, but instead takes a raincheck due to an unpredictable schedule.

Letter from Asbury Howard to MLK Regarding Union Merger

Monday, November 21, 1966
Denver, CO, Arizona (AZ)

Mr. Howard, Vice President of International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, informs Dr. King of negotiations for the merger of his organization's union and the United Steelworkers of America. If successful, this merger would strengthen the civil rights and labor movements in the South.

Letter from Bo Wirmark to MLK

Wednesday, February 28, 1968
Atlanta, GA, SWEDEN, Chicago, IL

Bo Wirmark writes Dr. King to clarify the misconception behind Vilgot Sjoman's film "I Am Curious (Yellow)," and explain how his interview is being used in the film. Wirmark also extends an invitation for Dr. King to visit Uppsala, Sweden.

Notecard titled Person (From a Theological Standpoint)

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on what a person is from a theological standpoint. This is an example of one of many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Dynamics

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's definition of "dynamics" from his book Systematic Theology.

Letter from the Chairman of the Martin Luther King Fund to MLK

Thursday, August 1, 1963
New York (NY), CANADA

The Chairman of the Martin Luther King Fund informs Dr. King that they have distributed copies of the Letter from Birmingham Jail. Those who read the letter were impressed and described it as a "masterful job." The organization contributes to the SCLC for lobbying the passage of the President's Civil Rights Bill.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964
Oslo, Norway, EGYPT, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, NORWAY, CHINA

In this lecture delivered the day after he received the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King describes the major evils of the world as racial injustice, poverty and war. He presents a vision of a World House in which people learn to transcend differences in race, culture, ideas and religion and learn to live together in peace.

Letter from Rev. John B. Morris to MLK

Wednesday, October 19, 1960
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Rev. John B. Morris writes Dr. King while he is in the city jail in Atlanta, Georgia. Morris asserts that Dr. King's stay in jail will "renew strength to the student movement."

The Negro

Atlanta, GA

This poem describes the strength and perseverance of the Negro during difficult times.

Brightman's Idea of God

Dr. King references philosopher and theologian Edgar Brightman's idea of God. According to Brightman, God is finite and "powerful enough to lead the work toward higher and higher levels."

Letter from John Harrigan Jr. to MLK

Saturday, May 20, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

John Harrigan, Jr. describes his education and work experience to Dr. King, and explains his desire to transition to the social revolutionary movement. He offers his services to Dr. King, stating his reimbursement requirements. He ends his letter by outlining a four step process to solve poverty in the United States.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter from Joan Daves, Dr. King is informed that a check for $24.96 is enclosed. The check represents the permission fee for the use of an extract from "Stride Toward Freedom" by Macmillan Company.

Letter from Gerald G. Fenn to MLK

NEW ZEALAND, SWEDEN, PHILIPPINES, INDIA, JAPAN, AUSTRALIA, UGANDA, ISRAEL, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, Montana (MT), Ohio (OH), Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Geraldine Fenn described the many ventures that occurred the previous year. Her main focus was on 4-H and combining agriculture with race relations. She felt that by understanding and respecting people from different backgrounds, it could then lead to a collective of peace and love.

Letter from Helen Hickey to Mrs. King

Monday, April 8, 1968

In this letter Helen Hickey sends her sympathy to Mrs. King pertaining to the loss of her husband. She also comments on the personal characteristics that she admired most about Dr. King.

Man

Dr. King quotes a line from Homer's epic poem "The Iliad."

Revised School Desegregation Policies Under Civil Rights Act of 1964

Thursday, December 1, 1966

This document, published by the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, gives revised policies for school desegregation. The list of areas covered includes unequal programs and facilities, desegregation of staff and dismissals.