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Anonymous Letter to MLK

Birmingham, AL

The anonymous author details some of the hardships of his life and expresses his desire to incarcerate Dr. King permanently.

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

Dr. King uses a statement by Mahalia Jackson and the philanthropy of Sir Alfred Nobel to encapsulate the purpose of the Civil Rights Movement. Jackson refers to the racial problems in America as "family business," but Dr. King believes that in order for man to become a brotherhood, society has to search for truth like Alfred Nobel.

Letter Requesting Help From MLK

Wednesday, April 20, 1966
North Carolina (NC)

An unidentified North Carolina man writes Dr. King requesting urgent assistance involving his brutal arrest by a state trooper. According to the man, the trooper physically assaulted him during detainment and ended up breaking two ribs. However, his other peers, mainly Negro, are too afraid to speak up about this police brutality case.

Letter to MLK from The Adult Education Council of Greater Chicago

Thursday, March 31, 1966
Chicago, IL

Emma Kramer, the Secretary of the Speakers Bureau, writes to Dr. King to negotiate the details of his presentation at the University of Illinois.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK about Selections from "Strength to Love"

Friday, December 30, 1966
New York, NY

In this letter, Campe encloses payment for the rights of an English-language textbook to reprint five selections from Dr. King's "Strength to Love".

Entering 1964: Toward Full Emancipation

Tuesday, December 17, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Philadelphia, PA

In this draft of an article for the NY Amsterdam News, Dr. King asserts that the thrust of the Negro will increase toward full emancipation as they began the year 1964. Dr. King highlights the March on Washington where both Negroes and whites collectively demonstrated the need for self-respect and human dignity in the United States. He also elaborates on the technique of "selective patronage" to broaden the economic and employment opportunities for the African American community.

News from the Southern Conference Educational Fund

Tuesday, November 23, 1965
New Orleans, LA, Virginia (VA)

The Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. discusses the allegations and trials of Thomas Carlton Wansley.

Letter from MLK to Senator Edward V. Long

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses appreciation for Senator Long's support in the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Advertisement for Ku Klux Klan Segregation Meeting

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This advertisement invites every white person who supports segregation to attend an upcoming meeting sponsored by the Ku Klux Klan.

Hegel

Dr. King outlines principles of Hegelian Philosophy regarding the ideal German State.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to MLK

Sunday, April 18, 1976
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Philadelphia, PA

Ernest Shaefer writes Dr. King relaying detailed information regarding Dr. King's travel to Philadelphia International Airport and his speech at Unionville High School in Pennsylvania.

Bill of Complaint: City Board of Education of Birmingham, Alabama

Friday, May 10, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS)

The City Board of Education of Birmingham, Alabama accuses several civil rights leaders and organizations of discouraging Negro students from attending public schools.

Letter from a Lithuanian American to MLK

California (CA), LITHUANIA, VIETNAM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, HUNGARY

In this letter to Dr. King, a Lithuanian immigrant to the United States writes that he agrees with the campaign for Negro rights and believes that all U.S. citizens should be treated equally.

Request to Use "I Have a Dream" Speech in a Musical Composition

Wednesday, September 18, 1963
New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY)

Classical composer Irwin Heilner requests Dr. King's permission to sample the "I Have a Dream" speech in a musical work. Heilner specifies his plans to send the song to musicians in order to get it published, and outlines the terms of the royalties if it is successful. The notes at the bottom of the letter indicate that Dr. King referred Heilner to attorney Clarence Jones regarding use of the speech.

Letter from William Connor to MLK

Saturday, August 12, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

William Connor encourages Dr. King to continue his efforts to speak the truth and practice Christianity. He emphasizes that there is no need to ignore the important issues of our time. Connor states, "Now, we've either got to put up, or shut up-as the saying goes."

Note - Leewellyn Daniel

The note, shown here, was written by Leewellyn Daniel, of Chicago, Illinois. The handwriting simply states, "Legal action concerning being arrested." However, the addressee of this note and the date it was written is unknown.

Telegram From MLK to Dr. L. Frances Griffin and Dr. Milton Reid

Richmond, VA, Virginia (VA)

Dr. King offers this inspirational message to Drs. Griffin and Reid for their outstanding leadership in the advancement of public education.

Letter from Dana McLean Greeley to MLK

Monday, April 4, 1966
Boston, MA

Dana McLean Greeley, President of the Unitarian Universalist Association, asks Dr. King to lend his name to a letter addressed to President Lyndon Johnson. The letter, which was drafted at the request of the Inter-Religious Peace Conference, requests an interview with President Johnson. Dr. King's handwriting appears on the top right of this letter, saying that he would be happy to allow them to use his name in this context.

Notes - Dr. King's Rough Draft of a Response to Mr. Walter Harding

This document is a rough draft of Dr. King's thank-you letter to Mr. Harding for a book he dedicated in part to Dr. King.

New York Times: The Case Against Tokenism

Sunday, August 5, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

In this article for the New York Times, Dr. King writes of his experiences in an Albany, GA jail. Furthermore, he submits the idea that a delayed response to integration and equality for all is no longer acceptable due to the Negro having a "new sense of somebodiness."

Mystery

Dr. King records a quote on mystery from Robert Flint's "The Philosophy of History."

Letter from Martin Shepard to MLK with Citizens For Kennedy/Fulbright Pamphflet

Thursday, April 27, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. Martin Shepard, co-chairman of Citizens for Kennedy/Fullbright 1968, wrote this letter to Dr. King after reading the Dr. King felt Robert F. Kennedy would be the best Democratic Presidential nominee in 1968. Dr. Shepard writes that they "share the same feelings about President Johnsons and his insane war in Vietnam" and encourages Dr. King to read the enclosed pamphlet and join their efforts.

Letter from MLK to Glenn Greenwood

Wednesday, October 23, 1963
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Dr. King responds to Glenn Greenwood's letter thanking him for his suggestion regarding the Pentagon directive "in relation to Armed Forces personnel participation in civil rights demonstrations."

Letter from John W. Vannorsdall to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, August 1, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

John W. Vannorsdall, Chaplain of Gettysburg College, invites Dr. King to come speak at the college located in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

Letter from Jim Robert Davis to MLK

Chicago, IL

Jim Robert Davis tells Dr. King how his presence in Chicago's Lawndale community have caused many of his fellow neighbors to clean their neighborhood. He pens a small but inspriational poem under the subject "The Glory of Blackmen."

Letter from Richard Sand to MLK

Tuesday, August 8, 1967
New York, NY, VIETNAM

In this letter, Mr. Richard Sand, of the New York Vietnam Summer, requested that Dr. King forward autographed photographs to the New York office.

The Tri-City Chapter of C.O.R.E. Invites MLK to Appear.

Sunday, December 13, 1964
Washington (WA)

Wallace Webster, Vice President of the Tri-City Chapter of C.O.R.E., writes Dr. King inviting him to appear in the Tri-City community.

Fundamentalism

Dr. King cross-references fundamentalism with authoritarianism.

Letter from G. Mansfield Collins to MLK

Monday, January 4, 1965
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

G. Mansfied Collins outlines Dr. King's travel arrangements to a Christian Conference held in Southern California, in which Dr. King is urged to discuss unemployment.

B.F. Randolph

South Carolina (SC)

B.F. Randolph, African American preacher and member of the South Carolina Legislature, is honored in this statement for his work against racial discrimination. The documents states that Mr. Randolph fought for the words 'irrespective of race and color,' to be included in the Bill of Rights.