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Letter from MLK to Mr. Johnson

Dr. King responds to Mr. Johnson's request for a recommendation by writing that he is honored by the request, but he does not believe that he can write a proper recommendation given the absence of their acquaintance. Dr. King makes suggestions for alternative recommendations and offers his "encouragement and support."

Letter from MLK to Rev. John Papandrew

Wednesday, October 10, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), New Hampshire (NH), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King thanks Rev. John Papandrew of New Hampshire for giving witness during the Albany Movement. Dr. King explains that, through the events in Albany, the world is now aware of the situation in the South.

Proposal for Black Independence

Al Shabazz writes up a program for Black independence. The proposal suggests two program options for leaders to choose from. Once the program has been decided the leader would go out and gather the opinion of the masses. Next, the program would implement unconventional education along with employment and survival skills. The program also promotes an independent nation with alliances from those of all races. The program promotes black revolution and the demise of the elite White Supremacist.

Letter from Erica Smith to MLK

Monday, August 20, 1962

Erica Smith writes Dr. King to express her dismay for the people who are against the Civil Rights Movement. Ms. Smith is in full support of Dr. King's fight for social justice and prays for his continuing journey.

Letter from Mayor El-Khatib of Jerusalem to MLK

Tuesday, January 24, 1967
ISRAEL

Rouhi El-Khatib, the Mayor of Jerusalem, Jordan, welcomes Dr. King to the city in advance of a pilgrimage planned for November 1967. At the time of this letter, East Jerusalem was part of Jordan and West Jerusalem was Israeli territory. During the 1967 Six-Day War, Israeli occupied and annexed East Jerusalem, but that annexation is not recognized by the international community.

Letter from John Olson to MLK

Friday, January 8, 1965
Oklahoma (OK), Los Angeles, CA

John F. Olson, a fellow graduate of Boston University School of Theology, inquires about Dr. King's availability to speak at Oklahoma City University.

Letter from Louis Braun to MLK

Thursday, July 29, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY)

The National Chairman of the Campus Americans for Democratic Action reminds Dr. King of an earlier letter in which Dr. King was invited to serve on the organization's advisory board. Braun also lists individuals who have agreed to serve on the board.

Letter from MLK to James L. Hicklin

Monday, February 25, 1963
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dr. King expresses gratitude for being considered for a position on the National Board of Governors for the Freedom For All Foundation, but he declines due to commitments to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and other pastoral duties.

Letter From Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, August 4, 1964
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Berlin, Germany

Joan Daves writes Dr. King to inform him of her meeting, in Germany, with publishers before the Frankfurt Bookfair.

Letter from Katherine Kasper to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968
Chicago, IL

Katherine Kasper, a Chicago collegiate junior, requests the political opinions of Dr. King in anticipation of the 1968 Presidential Elections.

Letter from Richard Chapin to S.C.L.C Board of Directors

Thursday, April 11, 1968
Michigan (MI)

The East Lansing Human Relations Commission writes to express their heartfelt sorrow over the tragic loss of Dr. King. They vow to continue the work of advancing freedom with renewed effort.

Anti-Poverty Bill

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

This document outlines and provides the status of the Anti-Poverty legislation in Congress.

Kant Critiques Other Philosophers

Dr. King contemplates Immanuel Kant's critique of other philosophers. Kant finds limitations in the ideologies of Hume, Leibniz, and Locke. He believes Hume and Leibniz to fall short on their understandings of knowledge. Kant further reproaches Hume and Locke as ignorant for viewing the senses as a viable explanation of consciousness.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Henry R. Luce

Friday, February 15, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dora McDonald writes to Henry Luce, of Time & Life, in response to his prior correspondence to Dr. King.

A Christian Movement in a Revolutionary Age

Tuesday, September 28, 1965
New York (NY), Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Mississippi (MS), Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Los Angeles, CA, Los Angeles, California, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, VIETNAM, CONGO / ZAIRE

In this address, Dr. King fuses the philosophies in the Old and New Testament regarding revolutionary social change. He argues that the most creative and constructive revolutionary force for change is one that combines the Old Testament’s “righteousness and justice that flow down like a mighty stream” with the New Testament’s call to love one’s enemies and bless those who persecute you. He asserts that God has been working actively since the time of Moses for the freedom and perfection of people and society. Dr.

Publication on Civil Disobedience

Saturday, January 1, 1966
Washington, D.C.

This document on civil disobedience is an occasional paper that includes articles from the legal, philosophical, historical and political science perspective. Throughout the paper there are pieces on Gandhi, Thoreau and Martin Buber; all of whom influenced Dr. King.

Letter from Leonard Chadwick to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Berkeley, CA

Chadwick, a student at Lincoln school of Berkeley, California, offers encouragement to Dr. King and his continuous efforts for social good.

Pride of Achievement

Dr. King quotes II Chronicles 26:15 regarding King Uzziah and cites Ralph Sockman’s “The Higher Happiness.”

Telegram from MLK to Mrs. H. H. Hubbard

Friday, September 15, 1967
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King sends his condolences to Mrs. H. H. Hubbard following the death of her husband. Dr. King also mentions the importance of Dr. Hubbard's contributions to the Montgomery bus boycott.

The Student Movement and You: Strength in Unity

Tennessee (TN), Nashville, TN, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

The Committee on Appeal for Human Rights in Atlanta, Georgia issued this handbill to illustrate the results of a boycott successfully conducted by African American students in Nashville, Tennessee.

Letter from MLK to Rev. John A. Clark

Tuesday, July 11, 1967
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

Dr. King expresses his agreement with Reverend Clark regarding the church's lax position on "racial justice and brotherhood among men." Although he cannot participate in Reverend Clark's suggested campaign, Dr. King encourages the minister to move forward with his plans of establishing a revival campaign to preach "the message of Our Lord at every opportunity."

Letter from Mae Martin to MLK

Thursday, August 3, 1967
Little Rock, AR, Arkansas (AR)

Mae Martin of Little Rock, Arkansas, writes to Dr. King in response to one of his public statements. She speaks about race relations in her city and points out that there is good and bad within both the white and black communities.

Birmingham Manifesto

Birmingham, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Birmingham Manifesto was formulated as a testament to explain the reasons why efforts were being made to desegregate Birmingham. According to the Manifesto, broken promises were made by city and state officials, which led to plans of direct action.

KCLS Radio Editorial about MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967
Arizona (AZ), Washington, D.C.

James C. Garchow, of KCLS Radio, sent Dr. King a transcript of an editorial to comply with the Fairness Doctrine of the F.C.C. that mandates an opportunity to reply to such commentary.

Letter from V. W. Shepard to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967
Alabama (AL), Tuskegee, AL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

V. W. Shepard admonishes Dr. King for joining the anti-Vietnam War Movement. He explains that prior to Dr. King's joining the movement he considered the Reverend to be "one of the greatest living Americans."

Dialogue: A Search for Reconciliation

Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA)

Through the power of dialogue, the SCLC seeks to bring diverse cultures together for the purpose of removing barriers and achieving meaningful communication. This brochure outlines six programs of action designed to achieve this goal including group conversation, community dialogue, dialogue of faith, campus dialogue, dialogue round tables, and dialogue with self.

SCLC Commemorative Booklet Support Letter from MLK

Dr. King requests financial support for the development of SCLC's 10th Anniversary Commemorative Booklet.

SCLC Board Meeting Agenda

Tuesday, September 24, 1963
Richmond, VA

This document is a proposed agenda for an SCLC board meeting, which includes Dr. King's notes of additional agenda items.

Letter from Mrs. David Bowen to MLK

Georgia (GA)

Mrs. David Bowen suggests that SCLC start a poor people's campaign. She says that they should focus on a specific group of people instead if just problems in general. She also says that she and others will be willing to help when they know how to find the people who truly need it.

Letter from Mrs. Willie Mae White to SCLC

Tuesday, December 5, 1967
Georgia (GA)

Mrs. Willie Mae White requests help from SCLC. She explains that she has fifteen children and would like to provide Christmas dinner and gifts, but does not have the financial means to do so. As a poor family in Scottsdale, Georgia, her family struggles, living without many basic necessities. Mrs. White also appeals to the members of SCLC, imploring them to send any available household ware, such as curtains, sheets, clothes, and kitchen utensils.