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Letter from Christa Beer to MLK

Monday, October 25, 1965

Christa Beer, a student at the English Institute of Frederick-Schiller University of Jena in East Germany, informs Dr. King that she is writing her final paper on his works in civil rights. She explains the lack of resources at her university and asks that he send her information to aid her in her research.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

Tuesday, March 7, 1967

Theodore Brown, Executive Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, writes Dr. King to invite him to a meeting with members of the British Parliament to discuss the developing racial crisis in their country. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Letter from Anonymous Sender to MLK

A critic writes Dr. King defending President Johnson regarding his decisions for the Civil Rights Movement and African-Americans.

Telegram from the Faculty of Howard University School of Law to MLK

The faculty of Howard University's Law School offers to assist Dr. King in the fight against social injustice in Alabama.

Letter from Rayphil Clark to MLK

Wednesday, September 29, 1965

Michigan inmate Rayphil Clark urges Dr. King to assist him with receiving fair treatment during his incarceration. Clark lists multiple situations where Negro employees and inmates are intimidated by white prison officials. Most importantly, Clark feels that he is constantly being singled out and subjected to horrible treatment. According to Clark's description of prison officials, "they are more concerned with racial vengenaude then they are re-habiliation."

SCLC Resolution on Afro-American Unity

Thursday, August 17, 1967

In this resolution approved at its Tenth Annual Convention, SCLC affirms the need for Afro-American unity. The organization commits to conduct regional unity conferences involving all sectors of the Negro community, hold Identity Workshops on history and culture, and develop economic and political power so that Negroes can own and control their own communities. The resolution concludes by affirming the importance of black spiritual power, economic power, and political power.

Sin

Dr. King quotes Isaiah 9:17, a passage from the Bible concerning sin.

Mind

Dr. King writes on Herbert Spencer's interpretation of the mind.

Letter from MLK to Bernard Fixler

Friday, December 8, 1967

In this correspondence to Mr. Bernard Fixler, from Dr. King, he thanks Mr. Fixler for the contribution made to the SCLC.

Meet the Press

Sunday, August 21, 1966

This transcript of a special 90-minute edition of NBC’s Meet the Press features Dr. King and other prominent Negro civil rights leaders discussing the topics of war, nonviolence, integration, unemployment and black power. The program was aired on radio and television.

Letter from MLK to Arline Young

Thursday, March 22, 1962

Dr. King informs Arline Young that he has given her information to Jack O'Dell, SCLC Acting Director of Voter Registration, and Dorothy Cotton, SCLC Citizenship School Director. One of the staff members will provide her with assistance with the cause that Dr. King says "means so much to us all."

Letter from Omer Allison to MLK

Saturday, August 19, 1967

Mr. Allison expresses dissatisfaction with Dr. King's representation of the Negro race, the church and the Kingdom of God.

Letter from James Scheuer to MLK

Monday, February 26, 1968

In this letter to Dr. King, Congressman Scheuer asks Dr. King to testify at a hearing of the Select Subcommittee on Labor of the House Committee on Education and Labor about House Resolution 12962. This bill focused on creating a Commission on Negro History and Culture.

Telegram from Artis Abrham to MLK

Friday, March 11, 1966

Artis Abrham asks Dr. King's assistance regarding the Freedom Festival. Abrham reports that he has delivered posters and sold tickets to the festival, but the financial secretary still wants him to purchase his own ticket to attend the event.

Capitalism

Dr. King illustrates a relationship between capitalism and anarchism.

People to People: The Law is Majestic

Saturday, July 31, 1965

Dr. King pays homage to the numerous lawyers of the Civil Rights Movement and asserts that the one unifying belief among lawyers is the idea that "law is majestic and the judicial process is supreme." Dr. King supports this claim with a story about his Negro lawyers successfully winning a case in Birmingham with an all-white jury.

Letter from T. Jansma to MLK

Monday, July 26, 1965

The General Secretary of the Baptists in the Netherlands praises Dr. King for receiving an honorary degree from Vrije Unversiteit in Amsterdam and inquires if he is available to deliver any speeches in the Netherlands during the same time period.

Letter from Pat Mutzberg to Dora McDonald Regarding Meeting

Friday, June 9, 1967

Pat Mutzberg of the Atlanta Committee for International Visitors writes Miss McDonald to confirm Dr. King's upcoming appointment with Nigerian visitors.

School Desegregation 10 Years Later

Thursday, May 7, 1964

Dr. King says that there have been few strides made in school desegregation. He says that schools that comply with the desegregation laws do it at an appalling slow pace. Lastly, he says that although there needs to be more progress in both the north and the south, he has hope for the future.

God (Evil)

Dr. King quotes Anicius Severinus Manlius Boethius, from "De Consolatione Philosophiae" (Consolation of Philosophy).

Letter from John Lawton to MLK

Monday, May 22, 1967

John Lawton, the Chairman of the Speech Department at Boston College, informs Dr. King about his program of student speakers who discuss various controversial issues with different organizations in New England. The objective of his program is to inform the community of civil rights issues involving education and employment. Furthermore, Mr. Lawson requests a conference with Dr. King to review the program concept.

Letter from Malsenia Armstrong to MLK

Wednesday, September 6, 1967

Miss Malsenia Armstrong writes to Dr. King requesting help with a "Legislative Action Project" pertaining to Southern Displaced Teachers.

Letter from Fernando DeEquidazu to MLK

Tuesday, February 16, 1965

Students from Spain write Dr. King, showing their appreciation for his leadership to the Civil Rights Movement, and asks if Dr. King can supply them with articles for magazines in Spain.

Letter from SCLC to Lizzie Williams

Tuesday, August 17, 1965

A representative of the Citizenship Education Program, an initiative of the SCLC, informs Mrs. Willis of recent travel plans to Dorchester, GA. Dorchester academy played a vital role in the struggle for voting and civil rights.

Letter to the Honorable Jerome Cavanagh from Gloria Fraction

Tuesday, June 7, 1966

Miss Gloria Fraction drafted this response to a correspondence, sent from the Honorable Jerome Cavanagh, Mayor of Detroit, Michigan. Miss Fraction took the role as an additional secretary for Dr. King, while the SCLC underwent a major Open Housing Campaign Movement in Chicago in 1966. At the time this letter was written, SCLC operated out of their headquarters in Atlanta and their temporary offices in Chicago.

Letter from Harper & Brothers to MLK

Monday, June 19, 1961

This letter from Harper & Brothers expresses concerns for the completion of a forthcoming book.

Letter from MLK to Earl T. Jefferson

Monday, January 15, 1968

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for Jefferson's contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and briefly describes the organization's principles and efforts.

Letter from Berenice Wiggins to MLK

Monday, September 18, 1967

In this letter, Ms. Wiggins encloses a contribution to the SCLC. She also requests that Dr. King puts out an announcement so that listeners can tune into his radio broadcast on WLIB.

Annihilationism

Dr. King defines annihilationism as a belief regarding the death of the wicked.

Letter from Reverend Charles G. Adams to a Fellow Minister about the Concord Towers Campaign

Monday, March 25, 1968

In this letter, Rev. Charles G. Adams requests financial donations to be used for the Concord Towers Campaign in Boston, which is a campaign to benefit certain families currently living in substandard dwellings.