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Revelation as a Way of Knowing

Dr. King quotes and discusses Henry Nelson Wieman’s view of revelation and knowledge as described in “The Source of Human Good.” He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”

The Three Stages of Life

This documents contains notes on the three stages of life.

Letter from Kenneth Ives to MLK

Monday, August 28, 1967
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

Kenneth Ives writes a letter and encloses his research that could be beneficial to Dr. King. Ives studied the effects of various social policy efforts on individuals and on society in general.

Letter from Frank Jones to MLK

Tuesday, August 14, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Albany, GA

Reverend Frank Jones sends Dr. King a letter expressing his concern about the recent occurrences in Albany, Georgia.

Letter from A. Dudley Ward to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Oregon (OR)

A. Dudley Ward, General Secretary for the General Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church, forwards an enclosed resolution to Dr. King.

Telegram from Ted Aretha to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967
Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), Alabama (AL), New York, NY

Ted Aretha sends words of encouragement to Dr. King during his time in the Birmingham City Jail.

Kansas City Star Drawing

This editorial cartoon from the Kansas City Star depicts Dr. King at a bar with two bottles labeled "Anti-Vietnam" and "100 Proof." A young girl representing the Civil Rights Movement pulls on his coat and asks him to come home.

Democracy

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Children of Light and the Children of Darkness" on the subject of democracy.

Telegram from R. T. Blackwell to MLK

Wednesday, March 29, 1967

R. T. Blackwell informs Dr. King that he will be unable to attend an upcoming board meeting due to issues with a farmers cooperative proposal and a funding crisis.

Letter from Chas. W. Bailey to MLK

Thursday, March 2, 1967
Illinois (IL)

Chas. Bailey comments on representative Adam Clayton Powell, asserting that he cannot call himself a Christian and that he only escaped investigation because of his race. Bailey also lectures Dr. King for defending Powell.

Letter from Fr. John McNamara to MLK

Monday, July 26, 1965
Louisiana (LA), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, St. Augustine, FL

Fr. McNamara, Catholic Chaplain at the Louisiana State Prison at Angola, writes Dr. King to extend congratulations on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Judaism

Dr. King highlights a quote regarding the distinction between Reform, Orthodox and Conservative Judaism.

Letter from John Saunders to MLK

Sunday, February 11, 1968
Washington, D.C.

A supporter from D.C. writes Dr. King to ask if he can work for him in the "coming campaign".

Letter from Ethel Love to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, May 9, 1961
Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA

Ms. Love, program chairman of Warren Business and Professional Women's Club, responds to Ms. McDonald's previous letter regarding Dr. King's availability to speak in Warren, Ohio. Ms. Love ask Ms. McDonald to respond with "an approximate estimate of the likely fee."

Letter from Jacob Hoffman to MLK

Monday, June 7, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA), Pittsburgh, PA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Jacob Hoffman, principal of M. Hall Stanton Public School, requests that Dr. King record on a tape a few inspirational words for the graduating sixth grade class. Mr. Hoffman, also, mentions a new project called the, "New Dimensions Project," which is to inspire students to achieve higher standards.

Letter from Ernestine Comegys to SCLC

Monday, April 5, 1965
New Jersey (NJ), Atlanta, GA

Ernestine Comegys writes the SCLC in hopes of obtaining commemorative plates of Dr. King containing his biography on the back. Comegys plans to sell the plates at her church.

Letter from MLK to Mr. John Lee Tilley

Tuesday, September 30, 1958
Norfolk, VA

Dr. King writes Mr. Tilley, the executive director of the SCLC, after nearly being stabbed to death at a book signing in Harlem, New York. He requests that Mr. Tilley attend to several organizational and book related matters.

Letter from Harry A. Blachman to MLK

Tuesday, June 20, 1967
Cleveland, OH, VIETNAM

Harry Blachman writes Dr. King supporting his stance on Vietnam. He also requests a meeting with Dr. King to discuss the possibility of creating low-cost housing for low-income groups.

The Mastery of Fear

This outline explains the direction of Dr. King's sermon entitled "The Mastery of Fear." In it, Dr. King explores the challenges and necessity of confronting fear.

Letter from Arthur C. Walter to MLK

Monday, November 18, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA)

Arthur Walter, Assistant Pastor at Park United Presbyterian Church, writes Dr. King regarding a boycott that will deny some African American children Christmas gifts. Walter inquires about how his church can use some of their funds to provide gifts for the children that will be affected by the boycott.

Letter from Terry J. Fox to MLK

Wednesday, August 2, 1967
New York (NY)

This letter, was written to Dr. King from Terry J. Fox. Terry J. Fox is the President of Iroquois Industries Inc. In this letter he attaches to Dr. King a copy of his company brochure.

Letter from Anonymous Critic to MLK

A critic sends Dr. King a series of newspaper clippings in order to communicate an adverse view about "negro people." The author brings special attention to an enclosed article about Stokely Carmichael and asks for his view. After accusing Dr. King of receiving money from the Communist Party, the writer states "I will never know why you was given the noble award."

Letter from Eunice Johnson to Coretta Scott King

Monday, October 12, 1959
NIGERIA, Georgia (GA), Ohio (OH), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Eunice Johnson, an African woman born in America but now living in Nigeria, writes Mrs. King in hopes of being able to meet her during her visit to America. She hopes that they can discuss Dr. King's nonviolent campaign.

Press Release - American Jewish Congress

Monday, March 4, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

Richard Cohen issues a statement on behalf of Murray A. Gordon, Dorothy Jones, and Arthur A. Wright. The statement denounces the article written by John F. Hatchett for the African-American Teachers Association Forum.

Telegram from Robert L. Lucas to MLK

Wednesday, August 11, 1965
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Robert L. Lucas, the Chairman of the Chicago branch for the Congress On Racial Equality, invites Dr. King and his staff to return to Chicago, Illinois to assist in the struggle for quality integrated education.

SCLC Agenda's

Monday, June 26, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Cleveland, OH, Kentucky (KY), Chicago, IL

This is the agenda set out to specific people within the SCLC.

King Assails Westmoreland, Praises Clay

Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, VIETNAM

This article discusses Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. Dr. King asserts that the US is on the wrong side of the war and denounces it during a speech at Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Telegram from Author William Peters to Coretta Scott King Regarding a Book Opportunity

New York (NY)

Peters was contracted to co-author the Myrlie Evers book by Random House. Random House then suggested he do the same with Coretta Scott King.

Racism in the United States

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), North Carolina (NC), Albany, GA

Dr. King discusses the issues of racism, Jim Crow and nonviolence in this edition of Current. He further explains that, without the tactic of nonviolence, Negroes can become hostile and bitter. Throughout this issue several other writers are featured including Leslie W. Dunbar, Langston Hughes and Fay Bennett.

Eulogy for the Four Girls Who Were Murdered in the Church in Birmingham

Sunday, September 15, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King eulogizes the girls killed in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church as "martyred heroines." He asserts that their deaths will serve a greater purpose: they will shed new light on Birmingham and the civil rights struggle.