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Letter from William Kivi to MLK

Thursday, August 10, 1967

William Kivi passes on information to Dr. King pertaining to public reaction regarding poverty spending in the state of California. He claims that state Republicans under the adminstration of Ronald Reagan have undermined the purpose of the federal aid designed to "allay undernutrition and malnutrition."

Letter from Elliot J. Groszek to MLK

Elliot Groszek sends his support to Dr. King after hearing his speech in which he proposed that President Johnson sponsor a program for employment. Groszek finds King to be a revo-lutionary leader and would like for him to run for President of the United States.

Letter from MLK to Mr. P. H. Waldraff

Dr. King shares his views of the American military presence in Vietnam and America's moral obligation to social justice.

Women's Response to the Rising Tide of Violence

Monday, February 21, 1966

Women's Response to the Rising Tide of Violence was a two day day conference in Philadelphia. The women who gathered agreed that violence was not a spontaneous action, but something that grows out of the environment. The way to combat such violence it enforce positive action with long-term solutions through social, economic, and political programs.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mary V. Leath

Tuesday, February 2, 1965

Dora McDonald informs Mary Leath of Dr. King's current incarceration in Selma, Alabama. McDonald also tells Leath that her request will be brought to Dr. King's attention upon his return.

Letter from Carleton L. Spier to MLK

Wednesday, January 11, 1967

Spier shares his disapproval of Dr. King's support of Adam Clayton Powell and his concern regarding Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Lars Andr. Larssen to MLK

Wednesday, February 23, 1966

The Fredskontoret (Peace Bureau) of Norway invites Dr. King to speak in Oslo, with proceeds from the broadcast of his speech going towards the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Jeffery Goldberg to MLK

Sunday, April 23, 1967

In this letter, Jeffery Goldberg comments on the Vietnam War and requests a copy of Dr. King's speech to Church Laymen.

Operation Breadbasket Sends Telegram Regarding Employment Discrimination

Friday, November 10, 1967

Representatives of SCLC's Operation Breadbasket address the discriminatory employment practices of the Atlanta Metropolitan Area Civil Defense Council.

Letter from Reverend L. H. Hendricks Jr. to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1962

Reverend L. H. Hendricks Jr. asks Dr. King and the Ebenezer Baptist Church for financial assistance to build his church.

Letter from Senator Hugh Scott to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

US Senator Hugh Scott, writes Dr. King expressing thanks for the Reverend's letter of recent date. In addition, Scott reveals that he sponsored the Civil Rights legislation long before the present act was introduced. Scott also expresses that he would enjoy speaking with Dr. King during his next visit in Washington, D. C.

The Business Card of the Honorable Al Shabazz (Malcolm X)

During the late 1950s, Malcolm X began going by Malik Al-Shabazz. Shabazz, according to the Nation of Islam, was a Black Nation in central Africa from which all human beings descended. While the date of this card is unknown, it is presumed to be circa the late 1950s to early 1960s, before Malcolm X split from the Nation of Islam in 1964.

Emotionalism in Religion

Dr. King records a quote from a book entitled "The Gift of Tongues, A Study in the Pathological Aspects of Christianity".

Letter from Milton A. Reid to Mahalia Jackson

Sunday, October 20, 1963

Milton A. Reid, candidate for the Eighth Senatorial District, invites Mahalia Jackson to come and sing at the oldest Negro Baptist Church in America.

Letter from Philip M. Segelin to MLK

Wednesday, July 29, 1964

Philip M. Segelin, Member of the Cleveland Heights-University Heights School Board, informs Dr. King that he has read Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" and that said publication has provided enlightenment on the issue of civil rights. He recommends that Dr. King look into having a paperback edition published to widen distribution.

Esquire Magazine: The Red Chinese American Negro

This segment of Esquire Magazine features an article discussing the militant activities of Robert F. Williams. Williams had returned home from military service and headed the Monroe, North Carolina branch of the NAACP. Frustrated by the inactivity of local legislation to reform segregation and aggravated by Klu Klux Klan attacks, Williams adopted more violent methodologies. The article also emphasizes his association with Chinese leader Mao Tse-tung and discusses Tse-tung's solidarity with racial goodwill policies.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Otto Fuerbringer of Time Magazine

Tuesday, February 18, 1964

Dora McDonald inquires about receiving additional copies of the Time Magazine issue that featured Dr. King as the Man of the Year. She informs Otto Fuerbringer that Mrs. King's relatives in her hometown of Marion, Alabama were unable to buy copies of the magazine.

Letter from Chip Hawkins to MLK

Monday, January 2, 1967

In this letter, Chip Hawkins questions Dr. King's affiliation with communist organizations and individuals. In addition, he requests that Dr. King publicly address the Communist accusations brought against him.

Letter of Support from Dorothy Hill to MLK

Saturday, July 1, 1967

Miss Dorothy P. Hill writes this letter to Dr. King thanking him for sending a copy of his book "Where do we go From Here: Chaos or Community?" As previous Director of the Summer Institute for Social Progress at Wellesley College, Hill learned that "skin color seems no bar to congeniality," and she knows of many others who have had similar positive experiences. Hill writes that she admires Dr. King for his principles and leadership ability.

U.S. Reds Fan Racist Flames To Stir Vietnam War Protest

William F. Buckley, a conservative columnist, decries the involvement of Negro leaders such as Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael n a recent Vietnam War protest. He compares Carmichael with members of the Ku Klux Klan, and he also alleges Communist involvement with the protest.

The New Frontiersmen

William Miller recaps the recent presidential elections and the important issues President John F. Kennedy will have to address. President Kennedy has proposed a new program called the New Frontier, which for many African Americans, is believed to be a part of the nonviolent Civil Rights Movement. Miller states that the Civil Rights Movement is not one that can be overlooked by the President and must be seriously addressed if he wants to stay true to his political platform.

Letter from MLK to Rev. C. V. Willis

Tuesday, February 20, 1962

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in Coatesville, Pennsylvania in support of the NAACP. He explains that his recent commitment to the SCLC Board to tour the South for a voter registration campaign prevents him from accepting any additional speaking engagements.

Letter from Ms. Bernice Gutman to The Public Review Advisory Commission

Thursday, March 30, 1967

This document is a letter to the Public Review Advisory Commission from a union concerning a scholarship and additional information for applicants.

Letter from Nina Brown of Penn State to Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 7, 1965

Nina Brown writes Dora McDonald in preparation for Dr. King's visit to speak at Pennsylvania State University. She further inquires about logistics pertaining to Dr. King's speech, publicity and members of his party.

Otherworldliness

Dr. King quotes the Epistle of Clement and Friedrich von Hügel's "Eternal Life."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Elisabeth Babcock

Tuesday, April 27, 1965

Dora McDonald responds to a request from Elisabeth Babcock regarding the possibility of Dr. King visiting her in New York. Unfortunately, the hectic schedule in Dr. King's travels will not allow him such an opportunity. She conveys their gratitude for the "moral and financial support" Babcock has made for the betterment of the movement.

Letter from Alan and June Fite to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967

In this letter dated April 19, 1967, Alan and June Fite commend Dr. King for his speech given at a peace demonstration on April 15 and request a copy of the speech.

Letter from Ralph D. Abernathy to Homer A. Jack

Thursday, September 2, 1965

Rev. Ralph Abernathy submits a check on behalf of the SCLC to Homer Jack of the Unitarian Universalist Association to be donated to the Jimmie Lee Jackson Memorial Fund. The money will be used to purchase a new home for Jackson's parents and to finance the education for Jackson's sister. Jimmie Lee Jackson was murdered by a Alabama State Trooper while trying to protect his mother and grandfather from a beating during a march melee in Marion, Alabama. Jackson's death initiated the push for a march from Selma to Montgomery.

Letter from Edwin Allaire to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

The writer, who identifies himself as a professor at the University of Michigan, encourages Dr. King to announce his candidacy for the Presidency.

Protest Against MLK Flyer

This flyer accuses Dr. King of being a traitor and calls for a protest rally when he appears at Grosse Pointe High School in Detroit