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Abelard on Universals and theMethod of Descartes

Dr. King references Peter Abelard, medieval French philosopher and theologian. He discerns that universals cannot be things or words. Rather, the universal is a concept. King maintains that this quandary is relevant to "Schoolmen" and particularly the dogma of the Church. He continues by also noting philosopher Rene Descartes, and that "he was at fault in overemphasizing mathematical method."

Job

Dr. King reflects on the purpose of suffering in the Book of Job and how Job deals with it.

Telegram from Washington CORE to MLK

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

The Washington CORE asks Dr. King to clear up the apparent misunderstanding that Dr. King approves of Coleman for the fifth circuit.

Testament by Martin A. Watkins

Wednesday, June 14, 1967

Martin Watkins covers an array of topics in his expression of poems entitled "Testament." With great admiration, Watkins presents this book of poetry to Dr. King. In the preface, Watkins explains his purpose of publishing these poems during the Korean War. He further elaborates on his admiration of the Negro, his preoccupation with death, and the identification with Christ.

MLK Norway Radio Interview

Monday, November 9, 1964

Dr. King addresses the importance of the Chicago Adult Education Project and the impact it would have on the Lawndale community. Issues of discrimination, segregation, racism, and oppression have lead to constant riots and violence in this densely populated area. Dr. King submits the idea that, to cure the issue of the "ghetto", Americans and the government must work to eradicate the causes by offering better education, better housing, and fair wages instead of "anti-riot" legislation.

Letter from Rene Golcochen to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Rene Golcochen offers condolences to Mrs. King following the death of Dr. King.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Geraldine Fones

Friday, January 12, 1968

Ms. McDonald informs Ms. Fones that Dr. King will not be able to speak to the Oxford Union Society in London due to commitments in the United States around the same time frame.

People In Action: The School Boycott Concept

Saturday, April 11, 1964

Dr. King expounds on the effectiveness of school boycotting to combat the issues of de facto segregation. Initially, Dr. King sought boycotting as a creative nonviolent approach to intolerable racial conditions, but he expresses some concern with children involvement in "adult issues" such as civil rights. However, Dr. King states children are affected and since they are the next generation, should partake in the improvement endeavors of the society. The article further details ideologies and methods surrounding the school boycotts.

Letter from MLK to Leslie Dunbar

Monday, August 22, 1966

Dr. King writes to Dr. Leslie Dunbar to assure her that the SCLC was indeed ready and able to administer CEP Grant Funds for that school year.

Note to MLK from Mrs. Ed Brooke

This note from Mrs. Ed Brooke is extremely negative towards Dr. King, accusing him of inciting riots and calling him names.

Letter of Support from James Duren to MLK

Thursday, July 21, 1966

James Duren informs Dr. King that he was impressed by his speech at the Chicago Rally and requests a copy. He closes the letter with an inquiry about SCLC activity in Milwaukee.

Letter from Claudia Harris to MLK

Claudia Harris informs Dr. King that Dana College is participating in "Choice 68." She also requests material on Dr. King's position regarding the Vietnam War, civil rights, the urban crisis and the federal budget.

Apocalyptic Religion

Dr. King quotes John Oman's "the Natural and The Supernatural."

Letter to Coretta Scott King from Diana Melendez

Friday, April 5, 1968

Diana Melendez, a student at New York City's M.E.S. 146, wrote this letter to Coretta Scott King following a school assembly that announced the death of Dr. King. Melendez offers her condolences and writes that Mrs. King was truly lucky, as she "married a brave man."

Money

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson's "The Principles of Christian Ethics."

Rutgers Professor Liberties Advocate

Thursday, August 18, 1966

Arthur Kinoy, a civil rights lawyer, was arrested in House Un-American Activities Committee hearings. During the few minutes he was in jail, Kinoy spent his time offering free advice to the other inmates.

Statement for "Stride Toward Freedom"

This is a financial statement for Dr. King's book "Stride Towards Freedom".

Letter from K. Natwar Singh to MLK

Thursday, October 1, 1964

K. Natwar Singh requests an appearance by Dr. King for the upcoming non-profit event honoring the late Prime Minister of India, Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru. With the publication of the memorial, Singh requests that Dr. King also write a tribute. Attached to the letter is an example entitled "I Too Have Seen."

Telegram from MLK and Wyatt Walker to Burke Marshall

Monday, July 2, 1962

Dr. King and Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker send a urgent request to Burke Marshall of the United States Department of Justice. The two ministers seek a federal investigation in the brutal beating of an SCLC Voter Registration worker in Georgia.

Letter from Adam C. Powell to MLK

Tuesday, November 16, 1965

Minister Powell commends Dr. King on his recent message at the 157th Anniversary of Abyssinian Baptist Church. He also encloses a donation to the SCLC.

Dorothy Cotton's Notes

Dorothy Cotton's compilation of notes includes topics such as the advantages of urbanization, diversity, automation, the "purpose of human effort," Denmark, community mobilization, the democratic method, the behavior of a responsible citizen and the "greatest prize" for mankind. Dorothy Cotton was the SCLC's Education Director and one of the organization's highest ranking female members at the time.

Review of "Why We Can't Wait"

A preview of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait," appearing in TIPS, highlights specific reasons why the American Negro is so unwilling to accept the system of gradualism as a way of obtaining his rights.

Fifty-five Facts about Morehouse

This pamphlet discusses fifty-five important facts about Morehouse College and its distinguished alumni.

Letter to MLK from Carl Fuqua

Friday, February 1, 1963

Rev. Carl Fuqua writes a letter to Dr. King expressing regret that he could not attend the NAACP meeting due to a sudden virus.

The Blame in Birmingham

The article, "The Blame in Birmingham", discusses the situation in Birmingham where four little girls were killed during a Sunday school class when a bomb was detonated. Governor Wallace's reaction and the consequences of the actions are mentioned in the article.

Our God is Able

This is a chapter draft of the sermon for Dr. King’s book Strength to Love. Using Jude 1:24 as his text, Dr. King expounds on his belief that there is a God of power that is able to sustain the universe, conquer the evils of history, and give us the interior resources to face the trials of life. He speaks of his own experience of turning to God when he was exhausted and overcome with fear after a telephone death threat. His inner peace restored, he was able calmly to accept the news three days later that his home had been bombed.

Gandharva Mahavidyalaya 18th Anniversary

Saturday, August 2, 1958

This pamphlet highlights an event being held at the Fine Arts Theater for an 18th Anniversary celebration of the "Gandharva Mahavidyalaya" music and dance ballet. Also included is a list of the board members responsible for the event, as well as information pertaining to the organization itself.

Letter from Canadian Friend's Service Committee to MLK

Tuesday, February 2, 1965

Murray Thomson invites Dr. King to attend an annual conference of world diplomats in Ontario, Canada. Some of the major topics of discussion include the future of military alliances, the growing role of the United Nations, and preventing the spread of nuclear weapons.

Letter from Mrs. Aaron Oliver to MLK

Thursday, July 9, 1964

Mrs. Aaron Edgar Oliver writes Dr. King to give thanks for his efforts to try and lead the Republican convention in its choice of a candidate.

A Look to 1964

This is a draft of the article "A Look to 1964" written by Dr. King. Published on January 1, 1964 in the New York Amsterdam News. In the article, Dr. King addresses the strides the African American people have taken towards the struggle for equality.