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"Cambridge, MA"

Letter from J. Reynolds to MLK

J. Reynolds expresses his opinion on Dr. King's recent activism in Memphis and describes it as a "riot." Mr. Reynolds questions Dr. King's intentions and highlights the negative outcome of the demonstration.

Letter from Laverne Gobble to MLK

Monday, September 19, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Laverne B. Gobble encloses a publication entitled "Your Vote Makes a Difference," and informs Dr. King of the Votemobile schedule. She also expresses that if he is interested she can assist with educating members of his organization about voting.

Letter from William Woodall to MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968

Mr. Woodall relays instructions from God concerning Dr. King's next march.

Letter from Senator Charles Percy to MLK

Thursday, August 31, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Charles H. Percy informs Dr. King that the Senate Housing and Urban Affairs Subcommittee is proceeding to report a bill to the Senate that could become the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1967. The bill would assist lower income families and shrink the gap between white and black America, while expanding the economic opportunities for all.

A Realistic Look at Race Relations

Thursday, May 17, 1956
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King gives the three views one can take regarding the state of race relations: optimism, pessimism, and realistic. Dr. King argues for a realistic stance because America has accomplished much in race relations, but still has a long way to go. He further explains that he thinks segregation is in its last days.

Letter from Walter Mondale to MLK

Wednesday, July 26, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this letter Congressman Mondale writes to Dr. King asking for feedback on the bill he's trying to pass, which is intended to provide government assistance for home ownership.

Letter to MLK from Angry Citizen of Detroit

Friday, July 14, 1967
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

A bothered citizen of Detroit writes Dr. King, who is referred to as the "negro champion," to express personal views on the status of the Negroes in the city.

The Black Rose: Ruth Reese

Thursday, December 10, 1964

Ruth Reese, also known as "The Black Rose," thanks Dr. King for his support. This document includes a detailed biography of the vocalist, as well as, critic responses on her performances.

Letter from C. M. Johnson to MLK

Monday, April 17, 1967

Mrs. Johnson requests Dr. King's help in reinstating Congressman Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, September 8, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves provides the figures for royalties and advances of "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Harry H. Wachtel to General James M. Gavin

Friday, March 29, 1968
Cambridge, MA

Harry H. Wachtel, confidant and legal counsel to Dr. King, writes to General James M. Gavin, regarding a previously postponed meeting with Dr. King. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss the necessity of Dr. King's Poor People's Campaign.

John A. McDermott to MLK

Saturday, December 2, 1967
Chicago, IL, Indiana (IN)

Mr. MacDermott informs Dr. King of the John F. Kennedy Award Dinner and requests that he wire his "greetings" to those who will be honoring him.

Letter from Angie Elizabeth Shelton to MLK

Mrs. Shelton expresses her gratitude to Dr. King for renewing her faith. After reading one of Dr. King's books, she states that she felt herself beginning to believe. Mrs. Shelton has decided to buy and study "Civil Disobedience" thanks to Dr. King.

Memo from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, May 12, 1964
New York, NY

In this memo, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about the final payment for an excerpt from Life Magazine, titled "Why We Can't Wait."

God (Zephaniah)


Dr. King discusses the Book of Zephaniah which includes the perception of God and the people of Israel.

Letter from MLK to Robert F. Kennedy

Monday, October 14, 1963

Dr. King informs Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy that if the proposed Civil Rights Bill of 1964 is "weakened at any point" that civil disobedience will follow and it will be the fault of those that "watered down the bill."

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves' Office to MLK

Thursday, July 20, 1967

This letter from Ms. Daves' office to Dr. King is a breakdown of various foreign rights royalties to "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos Or Community?".


Dr. King comments on Plato's view of religion and records a quote from A.G. Keller's "Science and Society."

Retirement Speech from MLK to Dr. Benjamin E. May

Atlanta, GA

Dr. King honors Dr. Mays for serving as the President of Morehouse College as he enters into retirement.

Letter From William S. Minor to MLK

Tuesday, June 22, 1965
Illinois (IL), New York (NY), Selma, AL

William S. Minor writes Dr. King thanking him for responding to a personal invite regarding research on racial revolution.

Letter from Theo Roling to MLK

Tuesday, August 29, 1967
NETHERLANDS, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

Theo Roling writes Dr. King requesting an autographed photograph for his collection.

Letter from Sydney J. Chase to MLK

Wednesday, March 16, 1960
New York (NY)

Mr. Chase, a political science major at Hofstra College, has reached out to Dr.King inquiring about assistance with his term paper on "non-violence as a political force."

Letter of Inspiration from Dwight Church to MLK

Tuesday, January 10, 1967
New York (NY)

Dwight Church informs Dr. King that "actions count more than words." He further shares details about Clayton Powell and the progress of the Irish.

Letter from Mrs. Ray Mitchell to MLK

Monday, August 12, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Ray Mitchell constructs this thoughtful letter to Dr. King thanking him not only for sending her a copy of his book, "Strength to Love," but also for his diligence as a clergyman.

Letter from Amnesty International to MLK

Tuesday, April 20, 1965

On behalf of Denmark's chapter of Amnesty International, Mr. Bent Ostergaard writes Dr. King extending a speaking invitation. He is hopeful that Dr. King will return to Europe and accept the invitation to speak to youth and instill in them the significance of justice.

The Student Voice

Wednesday, March 1, 1961
Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C., Florida (FL), Georgia (GA)

SNCC's Newsletter, The Student Voice, updates readers on the progress of the civil rights movement throughout the United States. This issue gives details on incidents of discrimination throughout the South, boycotts, "Stand-Ins," and education opportunities for African Americans.

Telegram from Senator Phil Hart to MLK

Friday, June 21, 1963
Washington, D.C., Detroit, MI

Senator Phil Hart of Michigan sends this telegram to Dr. King expressing his optimism about the eradication of segregation in America.

Letter from Victor Carter to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965
California (CA)

Victor Carter writes a letter of support to Dr. King on behalf of he and his wife. The Carters are unable to attend the Selma to Montgomery march but enclose a check to aid in the civil right struggle.

Letter from Jameas Lucas to MLK Regarding Legal Help

Louisiana (LA)

Mr. Lucas requests Dr. King's legal assistance regarding a manslaughter trial against a white man.

SCLC 10th Anniversary Flyer

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Detroit, MI, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Michigan (MI)

The flyer highlights the 10th anniversary of the SCLC and outlines the speakers and events which will take place.