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MLK Statement on Voter Registration

Dr. King urges the African American community to register and vote. He outlines the importance of voting by making historcial references relevant to the community.

Letter from Harry H. Wachtel to General James M. Gavin

Friday, March 29, 1968

Harry H. Wachtel, confidant and legal counsel to Dr. King, writes to General James M. Gavin, regarding a previously postponed meeting with Dr. King. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss the necessity of Dr. King's Poor People's Campaign.

Letter from Thein Wah to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967

Thein Wah expresses appreciation to Dr. King for his efforts in leading peace marches in New York, New York and San Francisco, California.

Restorationism

Dr. King defines restorationism.

Telegram from Rev. Phillip J. Bailey to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958

Rev. Bailey, on behalf of the Interdenominational Ministers Meeting of Greater New York, wishes Dr. King well in his recovery.

Letter from Rosa Lockett Reodus to MLK

Sunday, January 30, 1966

Reodus invites Dr. King to speak at the Progressive Community Church in Chicago and offers a small donation from the church in support of his cause.

Telegram from Harold Willens to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 10, 1968

Mr. Willens forwards a telegram to Dora McDonald that he had previously sent to Andrew Young. Willens invited Ralph D. Abernathy to be a guest on "Issues and Answers." Abernathy initially declined the invitation only later to accept, which lead Willens to inform him of the potential "impact and consequences."

Letter from Amelia Jones to MLK and the SCLC

Friday, February 18, 1966

The Toldeo NAACP Branch invites Dr. King to be their keynote speaker. Amelia Jacobs Jones, representing the NAACP, requests that suggested dates regarding Dr. King's availability be forwarded to her.

Letter from Prins Gunasekara to MLK

Sunday, December 5, 1965

A member of the Ceylon, Colombo Parliament sends Dr. King two books for inspiration. He encourages Dr. King to continue in the struggle for freedom and hopes that reading the books will renew Dr. King's commitment.

Black Power

In the article, Dr. King address the emerging Black Power movement. He feels that this movement will only promote Black extremism and supremacy which would be following in the steps of the White oppressor. Dr. King believes that the tactic of nonviolence is the only way to move through civil injustice and that everyone must collectively work together to achieve the common goal.

Letter of Support to MLK

Tuesday, January 18, 1966

Alphia Ganaway and Katherine Oakley send a check as a token of appreciation following Dr. King's appearance in South Bend, Indiana three years earlier. A member of the NAACP and other civic organizations, Ganaway led the effort that brought Dr. King to South Bend on October 18th, 1963.

Letter from Wallace Terry to MLK

Monday, April 8, 1963

The Washington Post anticipates Dr. King's presence as their speaker for the Public Lecture Series "One Hundred Years of Freedom." However, the coordinator of the event, Wallace Terry, understands that Dr. King's imprisonment in the Birmingham jail might prevent Dr. King from appearing. Terry suggests that the Reverends Fred Shuttlesworth, Ralph Abernathy or Wyatt Walker could serve as a substitute. Lastly, Terry pledges to collect an offering for the SCLC.

Schleiermacher (The Social Implication of Religion)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter from C. Anderson Davis to MLK

Wednesday, May 13, 1964

C. Anderson Davis, Editor of "The Sphinx" and member of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, requests Dr. King make an appearance and give an address at the traditional Negro Greek Letter fraternity's general convention.

Telegram to MLK from Medgar Evers

Friday, May 23, 1958

Mississippi Civil Rights leader Medgar Evers sends a telegram to confirm his presence at the upcoming SCLC meeting in Clarksdale on May 29, 1958.

Letter from Birt Waite to MLK

Sunday, November 6, 1966

Mr. Waite writes to Dr. King explaining the difficulties that have arisen with trying to give the SCLC his 1958 Rambler.

Cyprian of Carthage

Dr. King briefly outlines the life of Saint Cyprian of Carthage.

Immortality

"Immortality" is the title of this handwritten note card by Dr. King, who documents a story of Socrates and the harp as an analogy to man.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Benjamin E. Mays

Monday, May 4, 1964

Wyatt Tee Walker informs Benjamin E. Mays that an advance copy of Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait," is being sent in appreciation of Dr. Mays' support.

What Are We Fighting For?

This outlines the sermon "What Are We Fighting For" into three components: the past, the present, and the future.

Letter from Joseph Derman to MLK

Tuesday, March 16, 1965

Joseph Derman sends Dr. King a financial contribution to "the great cause." He sends the contribution in memory of the civil rights workers who have passed away.

Letter from Glenn M. Dunkle to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967

Glenn Dunkle, Senior Planner for the City of Richmond, Virginia, requests a copy of a bill proposed by Dr. King that addresses slums and housing clearance. The bill will be used by the Richmond City Planning Commission as it studies "methods of stimulating urban redevelopment and new low income housing."

Statement by the President of the Montgomery Improvement Association

Thursday, December 20, 1956

As the President of Montgomery Improvement Association, Dr. King elaborates on the past twelve months and the city's efforts to fight against racial injustice through the bus boycott. Their journey concluded victoriously with the acknowledgment of the Supreme Court that invalidated segregated transportation. Dr. King informs the Montgomery community that they are to "return to the buses" on a "non-segregated basis."

Letter from MLK to Peter Mansfield

Wednesday, November 3, 1965

Dr. King accepts the invitation extended by Peter Mansfield, Acting President of the National Union of South African Students, to give the opening address for the organization's 41st Annual Congress at the University of Natal in South Africa.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Roy Wilkins writes Dr. King requesting that Southern Christian Leadership affiliates overflow senators with messages promoting support.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1967

This royalty statement reflects the amount earned for the Japanese edition of "Stride Toward Freedom".

Letter from Paul Rosing to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Dr. King is notified by Paul Rosing of the Borromeo Seminary College that he has been placed on the mock ballot for their "Choice 68" campaign. He asks that Dr. King submit any type of potential campaign literature, speeches and etc.

SCLC Supporter Paul Anderson Scolds MLK

Mr. Anderson expresses his concerns about Dr. King's upcoming Washington D.C. demonstration. He believes that, if the demonstration is successful, lower income citizens will have to pay higher taxes.

Letter from John and Elfriede Kallpelz to MLK

Sunday, November 24, 1963

John and Elfriede Kallpelz send Dr. King a financial contribution in honor of the late President Kennedy. Mr. Kallpelz, a native of Atlanta writing from Germany, explains the closeness he feels to Dr. King's work.

The Crisis in America's Cities

Tuesday, August 15, 1967

Dr. King provides an analysis of "social disorder" and a plan of action against poverty, discrimination and racism in Urban America. Dr. King states that, "If the soul is left in darkness, sins will be committed."