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Letter from Joan Daves to Clarence Jones

Friday, October 30, 1964

Joan Daves writes to Dr. King's attorney to discuss her receipt of the Martin Luther King Treasury published by the Educational Heritage. Impressed with the volume, Daves proceeds to give details on its organization and content. Raising the issue of whether certain material is in the public domain, Daves offers to expedite the copyright assignment process.

Autograph Request

Friday, August 19, 1966

James McInerney requests that Dr. King add to his autograph collection of "the most prominent leaders in the nation."

Letter from Peare E. Hardney to MLK

Peare E. Hardney, a postal employee in Chicago, reports to Dr. King that her supervisor assaulted her and that African-Americans do not get fair treatment in Chicago. Furthermore, she would like to share her story with someone on Dr. King's staff.

Social Ethics

This biblical scripture, deriving from the book of Deuteronomy, suggests that people who assist the poor will be blessed.

Letter from Maryknoll College to MLK

Thursday, March 14, 1968

Patrick J. Ryan, the Campaigning Committee Coordinator at Maryknoll College, requests that Dr. King provide materials such as his political views, stickers, posters and more to support his political campaign and bring political consciousness to the student body.

Terminated Employee Asks for a Meeting with the SCLC Board

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

Meredith Gilbert writes to William Rutherford regarding her termination in January 1968 from employment with SCLC.

Levels of Love

Sunday, May 21, 1967

Dr. King describes five levels of love, from lowest to highest: utilitarian love, friendship, romantic love, humanitarian love, and agape. The last he refers to as Christian love, the love of God operating in the human heart. The first four, he states, are love for one’s own sake. The fifth is love for another person for their sake. This sermon was delivered by Dr. King on May 21, 1967 at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

Letter from Jan A. Hatch & Norman A. Bacon to MLK

Tuesday, February 23, 1965

Jan Hatch and Norman Bacon, white citizens of Athol, Massachusetts, write Dr. King inquiring about how they can contribute to the fight for racial equality. They inform him of the non-existent Negro population in Athol and request information on how to join the NAACP if it is conducive to their movement and financial limitations.

"University Plans 'Liberties' Program"

Monday, February 21, 1966

Experts at Columbia University plan to adopt a program that will make the meaning of American liberties more relatable to students.

Financial Document-Receipt from Ramparts Magazine

Wednesday, May 17, 1967

This note references a check sent to Dr. King by Ramparts Magazine for monies received for the use of his Riverside Church Speech.

Letter from MLK to Jessie Treichler

Friday, September 7, 1962

Dr. King writes Jessie Tresichler to inform her that he and his wife will be unable to accept her invitation to Antioch College. He explains that his calendar will not allow him to accept any more speaking engagements and that Coretta is an expecting mother.

Letter from Congressman John Conyers to MLK

Friday, October 8, 1965

Congressman Conyers thanks Dr. King for his telegram regarding the Mississippi Challenge and gives him details regarding the vote in Congress.

A. N. Whitehead

Dr. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's view of the philosophy of science in The Concept of Nature.

Problem of Evil

Dr. King writes about the problem of evil according to the 10th chapter of Proverbs.

Letter from the Knox's Church to MLK

Friday, January 24, 1964

The Knox's Church of Canada expresses their excitement to see Dr. King's image in Time Magazine for 'Man of the Year.' The author asserts that after all John F. Kennedy may have not died "in vain." Robert A. Jackson expounds on the societal issues in Canada and how they experience some aspects of segregation in cities. Mr. Jackson invites Dr. King to the Knox church upon his availability.

Current Magazine

Thursday, August 1, 1963

This Current Magazine issue on racism in the U.S. features an article "Is Direct Action Necessary" by Dr. King, as well as pieces by James Meredith, James Reston, and others.

Letter from Christine Schulty to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Christine Schulty offers condolences to Mrs. King after the assassination of Dr. King.

God in the Book of Psalms

Dr. King references Bible verse Psalm 71:19. He outlines why the idea of a finite God is incongruent with the "theistic absolutism" found in the Old Testament.

Letter from Maude Ballou to MLK

Friday, September 26, 1958

Maude Ballou, Dr. King's personal secretary at the Montgomery Improvement Association, writes to Dr. King during his recovery at Harlem Hospital in New York, after being stabbed a few days before. Ms. Ballou provides Dr. King a detailed report of pending correspondences awaiting his attention.

SCLC Confab Boasts Galaxy of Civil Rights Stars

The SCLC has chosen Birmingham, Alabama as the place for their Sixth Annual Convention. It includes the Annual Freedom Dinner, that will honor the top personalities identified with the Negro struggle. The convention also includes presentations from major authorities on nonviolence.

Employment Testing Disenfranchises Minority Groups

Monday, March 11, 1968

The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights releases a report revealing the frequency and impact of employers' discriminatory hiring procedures. Staff Director of the Commission William L. Taylor emphasizes the improper use of employment testing greatly undermines "the goal of providing equal employment opportunities for minority group members."

Letter from Randolph Blackwell to Greene, Ayers, Swigert & Cluster

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Randolph T. Blackwell responds to the gentlemen of Greene, Ayers, Swiger & Cluster concerning a previous issue.

Letter from MLK to Don Blaine

Friday, November 26, 1965

Dr. King shows delight in Mr. Don Blaine's idea of promoting a "peace caravan" to travel around the United States. He requests that Blaine further develop the idea and contact heads of various peace organizations to assist in the endeavor. Dr. King also displays his willingness to participate in the caravan.

Letter from MLK to Society of Brothers

Tuesday, October 5, 1965

Dr. King thanks the Society of Brothers for its recent donation to the SCLC and explains why the donation is important to the work and needs of the SCLC.

Draft of the Position Paper on Community Re-Creation

Saturday, April 1, 1967

This document drafts a set of intentions aimed at improving communities in America and uplifting individuals out of poverty. Proposed fundamental goals of achieving this include, a secure and adequate income, a proportionate share of decision making power, and access to the full range of human services.

Letter from Herbert Jones to MLK

Wednesday, June 5, 1963

Mr. Jones informs Dr. King of a grassroots civil rights organization (STOP) that seeks to implement a "stay at home" protest nationwide. Mr. Jones seeks Dr. King's assistance to make that happen.

Letter from Kenneth B. Keating to MLK

Tuesday, July 7, 1964

Senator Kenneth B. Keating responds to Dr. King's previous message by providing him with a copy of a statement he delivered before the Senate passed the Civil Rights Bill.

Letter from Clifford P. Case to MLK

Monday, July 20, 1964

Senator Clifford P. Case, U. S. Senator from New Jersey, writes Dr. King regarding the Civil Rights Act being passed. Case encloses a copy of the bill as it passed, with an explanation of "the major changes from the House version."

Flight Schedule for Coretta Scott King and Party

Tuesday, December 1, 1964

The Henderson Travel Service provides a detailed schedule of suggested flights for Coretta Scott King and others traveling to witness Dr. King receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

The Task of Christian Leadership Training for Education in the Local Community

This undated manuscript was used as the basis for a speech Dr. King gave at the National Sunday School and Baptist Training Union Congress in Atlantic City, New Jersey in 1944. Dr. King defines community, lists three current problems within the community and explains the role of Christian leaders and education in a community. Dr. King identifies the most pressing problems as the economy, divisions within Christianity and race relations.