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Judaism

Dr. King quotes a statement from Joseph Klausner's book "From Jesus to Paul" regarding Judaism. Joseph Klausner was a Jewish historian.

Letter from Andre Katz to MLK

Wednesday, January 3, 1968
GHANA, Chicago, IL

Andrea Katz, editor of Quadrangle Books, informs Dr. King about a book titled, "Where to, Black Man?" It is a diary of an African American man, Ed Smith, who traveled to Africa to reaffirm his American identity.

Letter from Charles R. Bell Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, November 23, 1966
California (CA)

Mr. Bell inquires about a prisoner who was beaten to death in his home state of Alabama.

MLK Sermon: Non-Conformist

Sunday, January 16, 1966
Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM, CHINA, FRANCE, Geneva, Switzerland, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King delivers this sermon at Ebenezer Baptist church in Atlanta, Georgia. He references the statement Representative Julian Bond made regarding the Vietnam War and discusses the responsibility of Christians to be morally noble instead of socially respectable. He references multiple biblical figures and explains the importance of not conforming to society.

Telegram from Reverend Fred L Shuttlesworth to MLK

Friday, July 20, 1962
Cleveland, OH, Albany, GA, Cincinnati, OH, Ohio (OH), Georgia (GA)

Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy assures Dr. King that the nation extends their congratulations and prayer for his success. Reverend Abernathy asserts that as soldiers of freedom, they must "win this battle" for their country and that there "can be no retreat" in the movement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Bill Green

Friday, August 2, 1963
Tennessee (TN), Chattanooga, TN

Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Bill Green that Dr. King is on an extended lecture tour at the moment. She ensures Mrs. Green that the letter and poem sent will receive his attention upon his return.

Telegram from Robert L. Green, Floyd McKissack and Roy Wilkins to MLK

Atlanta, GA, Michigan (MI)

Mr. Wilkins, Mr. Kissack and Mr. Green express their viewpoint regarding restrictive racial policies towards the Negro, more specifically towards Negro women by members of the Women's City Club of Detroit. The author encourages a dismembership from the club based on their findings.

Letter from Ernestine Lee to MLK

Thursday, December 7, 1967

A fourteen-year-old child, inspired by Dr. King's speeches, sends a small contribution and a prayer to the King family.

Letter to MLK from F.D. Patterson regarding Differences of Opinion

Monday, April 17, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

The president of Phelps-Stokes Fund writes to encourage Dr. King to meet annually with other Negro leaders for a discussion on their differences of opinion.

War and Pacifism

New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King examines War and Pacifism. He determines that absolute pacifism is not acceptable, but neither is war. He cites several different philosophies of pacifism and nonviolence set forth by such figures as Nels Ferre, John H. Hallowell, A. J. Muste and Mahatma Gandhi.

Letter from Clarence G. Petersen to MLK

Thursday, August 25, 1966
Illinois (IL)

Clarence G. Petersen tells Dr. King that he should avoid marching in the city of Cicero. Petersen describes Cicero as a slum with old houses and an oppressive, industrial atmosphere. While Petersen supports Dr. King's campaign, he believes it'd be best if the city were avoided for Dr. King's safety.

Letter to Mr. R.C. Firestone

Sunday, January 22, 1967
Albany, GA, Ohio (OH)

An unknown author writes to Mr. R. C. Firestone stating how delightful it is to hear that the Firestone Company plans to build a new plant in Albany, Ga.

Citizens Crusade Against Poverty: Policies and Programs

Tuesday, October 13, 1964
New York, NY

This booklet outlining the priorities, policies, and programs of the Citizens Crusade Against Poverty.

Annual Report by MLK

Friday, October 2, 1964
Virginia (VA), Richmond, VA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, New York (NY), New York, NY, Maryland (MD), California (CA), San Francisco, CA, EGYPT, Montgomery, AL, Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Texas (TX), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Albany, GA, North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King illustrates in his annual report the innovative changes that have occurred within the country, as well as the world. He also expresses the Republican stand point on civil rights and the constant concern of racism.

The Deep South in Social Revolution

Nashville, TN, Tennessee (TN), Tallahassee, FL, Florida (FL), New Orleans, LA, New York, NY, New York (NY), Kentucky (KY), Louisville, KY

The Deep South in Social Revolution was the theme for the 1961 SCLC Annual Meeting.

Telegram from MLK to Jack Greenberg

New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King informs Jack Greenberg that he agrees with a plan to dissolve the Leadership Conference.

Letter from Mr. Matthias Mirschel to MLK

Saturday, June 10, 1967
Berlin, Germany

In this letter Mr. Matthias Mirschel of Kirchliche Hochschule Berlin expresses commitment to Dr. King's stance against American intervention in Vietnam as well as integration for colored citizens. "We ask you not to cease with your endeavors...many people in the USA and all over the world hear your voice and support your campaign," writes Mr. Mirschel.

John P. Gallagher of the Community Renewal Society, Letter to Dr. King 1967

Chicago, IL

John Gallagher is writing to Dr. King to promote the initiative of the Community Renewal Society. The society is piloting a project titled Toward Responsible Freedom. The program targets slum areas of Chicago and wants to collaborate with private enterprises to improve the conditions of the environment.

Letter from MLK to President Johnson on Greenville Air Base

Wednesday, August 10, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes to President Johnson proposing the conversion of the Greenville Air Base to a center for training and housing for poverty-stricken Negro citizens of the Mississippi Delta. He urges that the program be coordinated by federal officials and representatives, that action be taken to provide decent housing and nondiscriminatory training programs, and that clear-cut procedures for evaluation be established.

SCLC Newsletter: Of Riots and Wrongs Against Jews

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL, Mississippi (MS)

This draft of an article for the July-August 1964 edition of the SCLC newsletter discusses recent riots in New York City and Rochester, New York. The riots are a disappointment not only because they deviate from the path of nonviolence, but also because the rioters looted many Jewish-owned businesses. The article closes by listing examples of Jews helping in the fight for racial equality in the United States.

Letter from W.J. Hurt to MLK

Sunday, August 13, 1967
Oklahoma (OK), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

W.J. Hurts thanks Dr. King for his tireless efforts to call for an end to the Vietnam war. He notes that although he doesn't agree with Dr. King on most things, he definitely can stand with him on his position regarding Vietnam.

Letter from Paul P. Martin to MLK

Monday, March 26, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA)

The Erie Branch of the NAACP invites Dr. King to be the principal speaker at its Freedom Rally.

Letter from Peter Manniche to MLK

Tuesday, December 31, 1963
DENMARK

Peter Manniche, Chairman of the Scandinavian Executive Committee invites Dr. King to the Scandinavian nations to make public, radio, and television speaking appearances. Mr. Manniche is hopeful the Dr. King's presence in Eastern Europe will garner support for the civil rights cause in America.

Man (Divided Against Himself)

Referencing the liberal German historian Friedrich Meinecke, Dr. King describes a philosophy on politics as it relates to humanity and one's morals.

Letter to Dr. King from Mrs. Beckler

Connecticut (CT), Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Beckler encloses five dollars in a support letter to Dr. King, wishing the best for his health and asking for an autographed copy of one of his books.

Letter Requesting Help From MLK

Wednesday, April 20, 1966
North Carolina (NC)

An unidentified North Carolina man writes Dr. King requesting urgent assistance involving his brutal arrest by a state trooper. According to the man, the trooper physically assaulted him during detainment and ended up breaking two ribs. However, his other peers, mainly Negro, are too afraid to speak up about this police brutality case.

Supererogation

Dr. King defines supererogation.

Letter from MLK to Victoria Gist

Dr. King apologizes for a belated reply and says he hopes the State Youth Congress meeting was successful. King was invited to be banquet speaker.

Fiercely Upward and Other Newspaper Articles

Mississippi (MS), California (CA), New York, NY, JAMAICA, Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, CANADA, Virginia (VA), New Jersey (NJ), Indiana (IN)

This document contains a combination of two poems by a principle in Brooklyn, N.Y., and two articles highlighting significant upcoming events of 1963 and 1964. The first article announces the third printing of Dr. King's book "Strength to Love" as well as information regarding the release of his forthcoming work "Why We Can't Wait." The second article reports on Mrs. Medgar W. Evers' speaking tour slated to take place in the fall of 1963, just a few months after her husband, the NAACP leader, was slain.

Letter from Students of Southern Africa to MLK

Thursday, July 15, 1965
SOUTH AFRICA, New York (NY)

Students from South Africa write Dr. King to express their concerns regarding the United States' diplomatic relations with the Republic of South Africa.