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Letter from Stiv Jakobsson to MLK

SWEDEN, FINLAND

Stiv Jakobsson expresses his wishes for Dr. King's well being due to the recent attacks against him. Various organizations in Sweden are engaging into an annual conference and are confirming Dr. King's acceptance to speak at the event.

Letter from George Garabedian & Co. to MLK

Saturday, August 6, 1966
Atlanta, GA, JORDAN, SYRIA, SWITZERLAND

George Garabedian writes Dr. King, pleased that he will be able to accommodate him and his group on their pilgrimage to Jerusalem.

The Purpose of Religion

Dr. King argues that the purpose of religion is not to "perpetuate a dogma," but to create witnesses to the power of God. He also considers whether salvation comes from upholding a particular creed or whether it comes from an individual reconciling with God.

Letter from Hal Mason to MLK

Monday, March 18, 1968
North Carolina (NC), Atlanta, GA

Hal Mason, campaign chairman for Choice "68, requests that Dr. King send any materials pertaining to Dr. King's potential candidacy.

Letter from Mr. Weston to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Mr. Weston writes Dr. King offering him advice regarding the Civil Rights Movement and how to seek peace between whites and blacks.

Memorandum from Opal C. Jones to MLK Regarding

Friday, April 7, 1967
Los Angeles, CA

In this letter, Opal Jones informs Dr. King of an address change for the Neighborhood Adult Participation Project.

MLK Makes Request About Bill Stein

Monday, November 21, 1966
New York, NY

Dr. King requests that the Protestant Episcopal Church of New York allow Bill Stein to continue his work with SCLC programs.

Invitation to John F. Kennedy Funeral

Saturday, November 23, 1963
Washington, D.C.

This telegram sent from The White House in Washington, invites Dr. King to participate in the funeral services for President John F. Kennedy.

MLK Sermon About Courage and Cowardice

The document is a single draft page from Dr. King's larger work "Strength to Love," with annotations handwritten by Dr. King. On this page, he discusses courage and self-affirmation.

Letter from Mr. John W. Hall to MLK

Friday, September 30, 1966
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

Mr. Hall of Pomona, California shows his support for Dr. King and the SCLC through an ongoing monetary contribution.

Statement by Dr. Robert W. Spike on the Mississippi Seating Challenge

Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Reverend Dr. Robert W. Spike writes a statement concerning a plan to dismiss a seating challenge in the U.S. House of Representatives. Reverend Spikes discusses the political inadequacies concerning the denial of the Mississippi residents right to vote. Following the seating of the delegation, an investigation commenced to ensure the political legitimacy.

Letter from Robert L. Pino to MLK

Monday, August 13, 1962
New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Albany, GA

Mr. Pino, Chairman of the Local Union 2603 Civil Rights Committee of Lackawanna, New York, praises Dr. King's efforts in Albany, Georgia.

Letter from Reginald Holmes to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968
Chicago, IL

Reginald Holmes, a fifth grader at Our Lady of Perpetual Help School, asks Dr. King for information about his church and his role as spiritual leader.

Dr. Paul Arthur Scilpp Speech in Illinois

Illinois (IL), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL

In this address delivered before the National Assembly for Progress in Equality of Opportunity in Housing, Dr. Paul Arthur Schilpp speaks about equality between races, "pure" race, and voting rights for Negroes.

Vietnam Peace Parade Flyer

New York, NY, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, New York (NY)

This flyer, issued by the National Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, advertises to New Yorkers to head to D.C. for an anti-war demonstration on October 21st and 22nd. Calling for citizens to 'Confront the Warmakers in Washington,' this flyer features a young boy with a sign reading "Lyndon - I'm too young to die."

Letter from Miriam Ottenberg to MLK

Friday, October 30, 1964
Washington, D.C., Oslo, Norway

Miriam Ottenberg, President of the Women's National Press Club, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and asks if he would address a luncheon for the Club. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Letter from FLING Unifie to MLK

Wednesday, January 17, 1968
SENEGAL, GAMBIA, PORTUGAL

Mauricio Gregorio Okatha describes to Dr. King the harsh conditions and struggles of the people in Portuguese, Guinea in their fight for freedom. Mr. Okatha requests the SCLC’s assistance in sending medication and clothing for their soldiers, who are wounded and fighting in rags.

Letter from Carey Preston to MLK

Tuesday, May 5, 1964
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Philadelphia, PA

Carey B. Preston, Administrative Secretary for Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc., urges Dr. King to re-examine his schedule in order to address their convention during the summer of 1964.

Poor People's Campaign

Sunday, March 17, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, CA, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King is touring the nation to meet poor people in an effort to expose their living conditions. He also wants them to join the campaign to fight for better housing and jobs.

Telegram from Curtis W. Harris to Dora McDonald

Monday, April 5, 1965
Virginia (VA), Baltimore, MD, Atlanta, GA

Curtis Harris, President of the Virginia State unit of the SCLC, asks Miss McDonald to confirm some scheduled dates that have been previously discussed with Dr. King.

Letter from Hermine I. Popper to MLK

Wednesday, January 25, 1967
New York (NY), JAMAICA

Hermine Popper writes Dr. King regarding his manuscript on "Black Power" for his upcoming book.

Mystery

Dr. King records a quote on mystery from Robert Flint's "The Philosophy of History."

Letter to Mr. Otwell from Dr. King Regarding the Request for an Article for the Chicago Sun-Times

Monday, March 30, 1964
Chicago, IL

Dr. King informs Mr. Otwell that, due to prior obligations, he will not be able to write the article for the Sunday edition as requested. However, he assures Mr. Otwell that he will look into the possibility of editing a section of "Why We Can't Wait" to be published instead.

Letter from Nancy and Bill Brodie to Mrs. King

Thursday, April 11, 1968

Nancy and Bill Brodie write Mrs. King to express their sympathy regarding Dr. King's assassination. As a method to comfort Mrs. King, Nancy includes a poem that she wrote for her father when he died.

President's Committee on Government Contracts

California (CA), Texas (TX)

In 1953 President Dwight D. Eisenhower established the President's Committee on Government Contracts. This organization was created to ensure anti-discrimination compliance with any organizations affiliated with government contracts. This report highlights "Five Years of Progress" within the organization.

Letter from Joseph M. Hendricks to MLK

Monday, September 10, 1962
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Joseph M. Hendricks writes Dr. King requesting a copy of the speech Dr. King gave at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.

Report to Agenda Committee

Tuesday, July 5, 1966

Junius Griffin sends Bill Berry a report and tentative program regarding summer events in Chicago during the 1966 Civil Rights Campaign.

Letter from Helga Gulbrandsen to MLK

Monday, December 7, 1964
Oslo, Norway

Helga Gulbrandsen responds to a previous letter from Dr. King and congratulates him on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. Gulbrandsen expresses regret concerning the Reverend's unavailability for a lecture in the Oslo Group.

Manuscript by MLK dated 2/3/62 entitled "People in Action"

Saturday, February 3, 1962
Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL, New York, NY

In this 1962 draft for his column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King emphasizes that school desegregation and the Rosa Parks incident are crucial turning points in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Raphael Gould to Coretta Scott King

VIETNAM

Mr. Gould of the Fellowship of Reconciliation sends Mrs. King a compilation of writings about and by Phan Thi Mai, a Vietnamese student who self-immolated on May 16, 1967 in an appeal to end the war in Vietnam. Mai "decided to burn herself to make her voice heard by the war."