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Soul

Dr. King quotes Ephesus of Heraclitus' thoughts on soul.

Letter from D. McDonald to Prafulla Chandra Das

Monday, March 6, 1967
INDIA

In this response letter regarding a request for a prefatory message from Dr. King, Miss Dora McDonald, Dr. King's personal secretary, cites his extensive obligations in conveying regrets. It became increasingly common for Dr. King to decline such requests as his work and mission progressed.

Letter from Edna Hedrick to MLK

Sunday, November 8, 1964
Michigan (MI)

Edna Hedrick, writing on behalf of the Ypsilanti, MI, branch of the NAACP, congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Reverend C. William Billingslea to MLK

Tuesday, July 24, 1962
Chicago, IL, Albany, GA

Reverend C. William Billingslea notifies Dr. King that the Northern Christian Leadership Conference wants to assist the movement through mass rallies, speeches, fund-raising, etc. Reverend Billingslea also asks Dr. King to provide a Freedom Fighter to come and speak to the organization.

Letter from Stuart Nelson to Dora McDonald

Thursday, December 29, 1966
Washington, D.C.

The Vice President of Howard University writes to Dora McDonald, inviting Dr. King to visit the school while he is in town for the presentation of the Gandhi statue.

Congratulations Telegram from Nelson Rockefeller to MLK

Tuesday, January 14, 1964
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Governor Nelson Rockefeller extends best wishes to Dr. King on his birthday and congratulates him for being honored as the Man-of-the Year.

Letter from Walter Gibson to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967
VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Mr. Gibson writes to Dr. King concerning his political position on the Vietnam War. He believes that the war is a just war because the end is to help the South Vietnamese halt the spread of communism.

Perceiving God (Wieman)

Dr. King summarizes Henry Nelson Wieman's article "Can God Be Perceived" that appeared in The Journal of Religion (1943).

Operation Breadbasket: A Statement by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Tuesday, December 12, 1967
Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH

Dr. King announces an agreement made with Pick-n-Pay Supermarkets that will open numerous jobs for the Negro community. The

Who Are We?

Saturday, February 5, 1966
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Florida (FL), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, VIETNAM

In this sermon Dr. King contemplates "who are we?" and "what is man?". He differentiates between the pessimistic attitudes of the materialistic understandings of man and the optimistic attitudes of humanistic definitions of man. King also states that man is neither all good nor all bad, but a combination. Man is both an everlasting miracle and mystery.

A Memorandum Regarding the Cooperative Housing and Rehabilitation Program

Chicago, IL

In this memorandum from James P. Twomey, executive director of the Community Renewal Foundation Inc., writes to Mr. Donald Jordan of the Federal Housing Administration in regards to the building of cooperative housing and rehabilitation centers. The memorandum address certain issues such as the mortgage for the homes as well as the architects and attorneys

God

Dr. King expounds on "the eternality of God" by using the Book of Psalms.

MLK's Remarks at the World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964
EGYPT, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS)

This is a draft of remarks made by Dr. King to the World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon of the NAACP's Legal Education Defense Fund. The event took place at the Americana Hotel in Arlington, Virginia. Dr. King states that human rights involve two elements: recognition and opportunity. Dr. King proposes that the United States launch a Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged.

MLK Remarks on Negro Press Week

Monday, February 10, 1958
FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, ALGERIA

In this transcribed radio address, Dr. King describes how future generations will remember the 20th century as a time where righteous people fought for social, economic, and political freedom. Dr. King also states that the African-American fight for true citizenship is not only a part of American heritage, but also the story of people everywhere who struggle for dignity and freedom. Dr. King made this radio address for Negro Press week a the request of Louisville Defender Editor and National Newspaper Publishers Association board member Frank Stanley.

Modern Day Samson

Wednesday, August 2, 1967
South Carolina (SC), Orangeburg, SC

Radio Station WDIX in South Carolina broadcasts an editorial answering the question, "Why does the Negro attack his white neighbor?" Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" serves as the primary reference, alluding to the discrimination reflected in the proportion of whites who would not support interracial relationship and any efforts of integration.

Immortality

Dr. King quotes a scripture from the Old Testament book of Job regarding immortality and the "affirmation of the mortality of man."

Six Lessons from Red China

Wednesday, August 1, 1951
CHINA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, NORTH KOREA, SOUTH KOREA

The author discusses six lessons that readers can learn from Communist China concerning America and the church. The first lesson being on corruption, if uncontrolled, leads to tyranny. The second and third lessons focus on change. The forces in the world during that time (namely Communism) and the methods they used exceeded what people thought was possible in history.

Emancipation Proclamation Dinner Program

New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King speaks at a dinner engagement honoring the centennial anniversary of The Emancipation Proclamation.

Letter from Gladys Bilcher to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967
California (CA)

Gladys Bilcher writes Dr. King expressing her enjoyment of one of Dr. King's speeches. This particular speech denouncing the war in Vietnam was given exactly one year before Dr. King's assassination on April 4, 1968.

Letter from Peter Mullin to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Peter Mullin of the Gold Key Society of Boston College writes Dr. King informing him of being awarded the Gold Key Award.

Letter from David E. McGuire to All Members of First Westminster Presbyterian Church

Wednesday, April 10, 1968
New York (NY)

The Session of the First Westminster Presbyterian Church, Yonkers, NY urges a "write-in" campaign to federal, state, or municipal legislators requesting action in the areas of open housing, equal employment opportunities and civil rights.

Letter from MLK To W. H. Jackson

Tuesday, April 24, 1962
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dr. King responds to a letter from W. H. Jackson, regarding the Chicago Sunday Evening club. Mr. Jackson receives information on the possible effects his previous letter may have on Dr. King's white friends.

Statement to SCLC Board About Alabama Boycotts

Friday, April 2, 1965
Baltimore, MD

In this statement, Dr. King explains the need for a boycott of the state of Alabama because of extreme violence and police overreaction, which he calls "totalitarian."

Letter from MLK to Artist Committee for SCLC

Friday, May 5, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

This letter expresses Dr. King's regards and deep appreciation to the Artist Committee for their generous contribution. He communicates gratitude on behalf of so many who benefit from the work made possible from their support. Additionally, Dr. King communicates the continued strength and effectiveness of the SCLC in promoting negro-white unity, non-violence, justice and equality.

Letter from John Madigan to MLK

Tuesday, June 20, 1967
Chicago, IL

In this letter, Mr. Madigan writes to Dr. King thanking him for his participation in a CBS Television program "At Random." He invites Dr. King to participate in another program entitled "Target: News."

An Address by MLK at the 53rd Convention of the NAACP

Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Chattanooga, TN, Tennessee (TN), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King makes an address at the 53rd Convention of the National Association for the Advancement of Color People in Atlanta disputing the myths of the civil rights movement. In addition to expressing appreciation for the organization's work, Dr. King apologizes for the prejudice the NAACP had to endure in making accommodations for the conference in Atlanta.

Letter from Hosea Williams to Project Leaders and Field Staff

Tuesday, March 5, 1968
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Louisville, KY, Kentucky (KY), Tennessee (TN), New York (NY), Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), North Carolina (NC), Virginia (VA), Baltimore, MD, Maryland (MD), New Jersey (NJ), Pittsburgh, PA, Cincinnati, OH, Ohio (OH), Milwaukee, WI, Wisconsin (WI), Chicago, IL, South Carolina (SC), Detroit, MI, Cleveland, OH, Washington, D.C.

Hosea Williams, Director of National Mobilization for the Washington Poor People's Campaign, informs each project leader of their immediate supervisors of mobilization.

Telegram from MLK regarding OEO

Monday, October 30, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King sent this telegram to several members of the House of Representatives urging them to approve a vote on the Office of Economic Opportunity and the War on Poverty.

MLK Accepts Nobel Peace Prize

Thursday, December 10, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Philadelphia, MS, Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, South Africa

In his acceptance speech at the Nobel Peace Prize Ceremony in Oslo, Norway, Dr. King dedicates his award to the nonviolent struggle necessary for overcoming the oppression and violence afflicting American Negroes.

Letter from A. Bohdan to MLK

Wednesday, April 14, 1965
AUSTRALIA, New York, NY, New York (NY)

A. Bohdan, catering manager of Sydney, Australia's Chevron Hotel, writes Dr. King in request of his favorite meal to include on a special menu featuring dishes of other "famous personalities in Politics, Industry, and Art."