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Malcolm X Statement by MLK

Monday, March 16, 1964

Dr. King responds to Malcolm X's break with Elijah Muhammad of the Nation of Islam by calling Malcolm’s program of “reciprocal bleeding” regrettable. This is more an indictment of a society whose racial ills produce a Malcolm X than of the man himself. The national community is now challenged to support full citizenship for Negroes while they still accept nonviolent leadership.

Letter From Mae P. Godfrey

Monday, December 4, 1967

Mae P. Godfrey requests monetary assistance to support her family during the upcoming Christmas holiday.

People In Action: A Profound Moral..Continued

Saturday, August 3, 1963

Dr. King challenges the Negro church and its leadership to uphold the morals of the community. He insists that clergymen must speak out guardedly to obtain support.

God

Dr. King cites Ludwig Andreas Feuerbach's work "Das Wesen der Religion," in which Feuerbach illustrates his perception of God.

Telegram from Rev. Ralph Abernathy to President Johnson

Wednesday, December 22, 1965

Rev. Abernathy urges President Johnson to meet with a group of poverty-stricken people from Syracuse, New York at Johnson's Texas White House.

Chapter IV - Weiman's Conception of God

Dr. King professes his ideas and viewpoints as they relate to Henry Nelson Wieman's theology on God. Wieman, an American philosopher of Naturalistic Religion, believed that God was a natural process rather than a supernatural entity.

Letter from F. N. Campbell to Ralph David Abernathy

In this letter F. N. Campbell commends Abernathy for his dignified and effective handling of the first phase of the People's March in Washington, DC. It is his hope to utilize the climate of response following Dr. King's assassination. To this end, he proposes the establishment of a foundation in memory of Dr. King.

Letter from Stewart Udall to MLK

Secretary Udall grants permission to the SCLC to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation at the Lincoln Memorial.

Telegram from Rev. Andrew J. Young to Mrs. Rosa M. Mcghee

Monday, August 9, 1965

Rev. Andrew Young sends this telegram to Mrs. Rosa Mcghee apologizing on behalf of the SCLC for neglecting to invite the officials and members of the American Federation of Teachers.

MLK Interview with Associated Press on Operation Breadbasket

Friday, July 28, 1967

This document contains the questions asked and responses given by Dr. King during an interview with the Associated Press regarding SCLC's Operation Breadbasket. Operation Breadbasket was a program geared towards securing jobs and economic development in Negro communities. At the time of this interview, Operation Breadbasket had been in existence for five years in Atlanta and 15 months in Chicago with much success.

Letter from MLK to Burke Marshall of the US Justice Department

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General in the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, expressing gratitude for Marshall's leadership in guiding the Civil Rights Act of 1964 through both houses of Congress.

Letter from Donald Keys to MLK

Tuesday, August 31, 1965

Donald F. Keys writes to Dr. King about Dr. King's invitation to speak at a planned Washington Mobilization on Vietnam. Keys also tells Dr. King that he may have to go to Africa at the time of the meeting, and requests that Mrs. King deliver his address in his absence.

Dr. King Sermon Outline

The document, shown here, contains an outline for a sermon given by Dr. King. The sermon was entitled, "The Fellow Who Stayed at Home." According, to the outline, Dr. King breaks down two types of sin: Sins of Passion and Sins of Disposition.

The Dan Smoot Report: Communism in the Civil Rights Movement

Monday, June 1, 1964

This issue of the Dan Smoot Report explores communism in the Civil Rights Movement. He shows how Dr. King and his secretary, Bayard Rustin, are Communist personalities involved in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Jodi Moses to MLK about TAC Rally

Thursday, May 26, 1966

The Community Relations Committee of the Tenant's Action Council (TAC) writes this letter to Dr. King asking him to speak at a rally being held at the Olivet Community Presbyterian Church in Chicago, Illinois.

MLK Announces New Appointment

Dr. King announces the immediate appointment of Jesse Jackson as the Director of Special Projects and Economic Development for SCLC. The new department will focus on "stimulating the development and expansion of Negro businesses and services."

Letter from Pierre Servais to MLK and Joan Daves

Tuesday, November 10, 1964

Pierre Servais writes to Dr. King on behalf of the publishing company that will soon be translating "Strength To Love" in French. Servais would like to know, among other things, if Dr. King will be able to make a stop in Paris or Brussels while he is in Europe. Servais would like to hear from Dr. King as soon as possible concerning a meeting because he would like to launch the French version of "Strength To Love", while Dr. King is in Europe.

L. A. Dotson Attempts to Speak with MLK

Saturday, August 19, 1967

L. A. Dotson has made several attempts to speak with Dr. King on a personal matter. Unfortunately, Dr. King has not responded. L. A. Dotson forwards contact information to Dr. King and has taken residence at the Regency Hyatt room 226.

Letter from George T. Altman to MLK

Monday, September 12, 1966

Attorney George Altman informs Dr. King of a US District Court order preventing him from taking Dr. King's deposition concerning whether or not people of color should have the same military service requirements as whites. Altman presents the case that people of color were colonial subjects rather than citizens, but the District Court ruled against his position. Altman plans to fight this ruling in an appeal the following month.

Post Card from Archie Brest to MLK

The author argues that the Civil Rights Movement joining the Peace Demonstrators will aid America's enemies and prolong the Vietnam war.

Truth

Dr. King quotes Marcus Tullius Cicero’s “De Natura Deorum,” providing references from William Wallace’s “The Logic of Hegel.”

Tallahassee's Inter-Civic Council, Inc. Presents MLK

Sunday, April 19, 1964

This document contains a program for Tallahassee's Inter-Civic Council's mass planning meeting for a three-day workshop on nonviolence at Bethel Baptist Church. Also included in this document are lyrics to "Lift Every Voice and Sing," and "We Shall Overcome."

Letter from MLK to Robert Lewis Jr.

Wednesday, July 19, 1967

Dr. King expounds on Mr. Lewis' experiences and how they directly correlate with the effects of the racial divide. Dr. King further explicates the emotional stress that one faces as a child of both Africa and America.

Letter from N. M. Nel to MLK

Thursday, March 17, 1966

N. M. Nel writes to inform Dr. King that his visa application for South Africa has been denied.

Letter from Senator Hubert H. Humphrey to MLK

Tuesday, July 7, 1964

Minnesota Senator Hubert Humphrey thanks Dr. King for his praise regarding Humphrey's role in the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Humphrey would become Vice President later that year.

Invitation from Susan Rowland to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967

Susan Rowland invites Dr. King to the University of Western Ontario to give an address during the spring of 1968. During his visit he is expected to speak on the topics of civil rights and the Vietnam conflict. Although these are the areas of focus, Ms. Rowland explains that the exact nature of the talk is up to Dr. King's discretion.

Letter from Mrs. Florence W. Lee to MLK

Friday, September 15, 1967

National Secretary of the Ladies' Auxiliary, Knights of Peter Claver, Florence W. Lee, encloses a check for one hundred dollars to further SCLC's numerous endeavors.

Location & Situation

Dr. King compares the meanings of "location" and "situation."

Entering 1964: Toward Full Emancipation

Tuesday, December 17, 1963

In this draft of an article for the NY Amsterdam News, Dr. King asserts that the thrust of the Negro will increase toward full emancipation as they began the year 1964. Dr. King highlights the March on Washington where both Negroes and whites collectively demonstrated the need for self-respect and human dignity in the United States. He also elaborates on the technique of "selective patronage" to broaden the economic and employment opportunities for the African American community.

Letter from Stephen Holden to MLK

Monday, May 22, 1967

Stephen Holden, staff editor for the American Peoples Encyclopedia, wrote this letter to Dr. King to request an article for inclusion in the publication's 1968 edition.