The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"California (CA)"


Dr. King quotes Thomas Aquinas' "The Summa Theologica."

House Resolution 12962

Monday, September 18, 1967

This is a copy of House Resolution 12962, passed by the Ninetieth United States Congress in 1967. This resolution called for the establishment of a Commission on Negro History and Culture.

Letter from Robert Johnson Smith to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1961
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Mr. Smith invites Dr. King to be a special guest at the Annual Men's Day at Salem Baptist Church. He also asks Dr. King to recommend Herbert C. Nelson for appointment as a federal judge.

The Limitation of Experience

Dr. King discusses the three sources of authority in religion: the church, the Bible, and experience. Dr. King cites the philosophical perception of an experience from Immanuel Kant's description. In addition, Dr. King compares different persons to associate the difference between age and experience.

Telegram from MLK to Reverend N. C. Burtenshaw

Wednesday, March 27, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King sends his condolences for the death of Archbishop Paul Hallinan.

Congress of Racial Equality Proposal: Recommended Program for School Desegregation

New York (NY), New York, NY, Texas (TX), Maryland (MD)

The Congress of Racial Equality recommends a program to end school segregation that includes forming race-neutral curricula and allowing open enrollment in schools.

Letter from S. Keith Graham to MLK

Thursday, January 13, 1966
Utah (UT)

Skyline High School invites Dr. King to attend their annual dance sponsored by the Associated Men of Skyline. The dance is entitled, "The Southern Queen," and may include additional prominent leaders such as President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Letter from Viva O. Sloam to CORE Members

Tuesday, June 19, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY, Kentucky (KY), Michigan (MI), West Virginia (WV)

Viva O. Sloam, sends a letter to members of the Congress for Racial Equality regarding integration in a Kentucky neighborhood.

Letter from Sy Sadinoff to MLK

Thursday, May 14, 1964
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

After speaking to Jackie Robinson and asking him how Beacon Looms, Inc. can best help the movement for Negro equality, Sy Sadinoff writes to Dr. King enclosing a $100 donation for the Mount Olive Building Fund.

Letter from MLK to Robert Lewis Jr.

Wednesday, July 19, 1967
Ohio (OH)

Dr. King expounds on Mr. Lewis' experiences and how they directly correlate with the effects of the racial divide. Dr. King further explicates the emotional stress that one faces as a child of both Africa and America.

Letter from Frances L. Lucas to MLK

Monday, July 23, 1962
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, New York (NY), Albany, GA

Frances L. Lucas writes Dr. King concerning the actions taken to end segregation in a community in Albany, Georgia. Lucas also apologizes for not responding to Dr. Kings formal letter.

Telegram from Washington CORE to MLK

Wednesday, July 14, 1965
Washington, D.C.

The Washington CORE asks Dr. King to clear up the apparent misunderstanding that Dr. King approves of Coleman for the fifth circuit.

Letter to Dr. Abernathy from Rev. Parker

Wednesday, May 1, 1968
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Rev. Ralph Abernathy, President of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, received this correspondence following the assassination of Dr. King. In this letter, Rev. Richard Parker of the St. Cross Episcopal Church in California, highlighted his interest in a television interview of Mrs. King, shown on the day of Dr. King's funeral.

Method of Ex Abstraction

Dr. King writes notes regarding philosopher Alfred Whitehead's theory of extensive abstraction.

Address Given by Vice President Nixon in Asheville, North Carolina

Wednesday, June 5, 1957

This is the text of an address given by Vice President Richard Nixon before the sixty-sixth annual convention of the General Federation of Women's Club. He discusses the differences in countries dealing with Communism and America being a democracy.

The Danger of Misguided Goodness

Under the title, "The Danger of Misguided Goodness," the central message in these sermon notes is the need for all individuals to be morally conscientious.

Letter from Hosea Williams to SCLC Field Staff

Tuesday, March 5, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Baltimore, MD, Chicago, IL

Hosea L. Williams writes project leaders and field staff focused on mobilizing field operatives for the Poor People's March on Washington 1968. Williams sets the procedures and guidelines for all fundraising activity.

Letter from Theodore E. Brown to Conference Participants

Friday, November 25, 1966
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., ZAMBIA

In this letter, Director Theodore E. Brown notifies the conference participants of the rescheduling for the Third National Biennial Leadership.

Letter from MLK to Chris Folker of Sweden

Wednesday, April 20, 1966
Stockholm, Sweden

Dr. King expresses gratitude for Chris Folcker's support and hospitality during his trip to Sweden. He also shares his satisfaction with the unique reaction of Mr. Folcker's organization.

Brochure: "Some Important Fiscal Facts about the SCLC"

This document contains information about SCLC's administration, role, duties, and actions that its staff fulfills with the money donated to the organization.

Letter from John and Eva Fillion to MLK about Moral Support

Thursday, March 14, 1968
Michigan (MI)

This letter dated March 14, 1968 was written to Dr. King from John and Eva Fillion. In this letter they thank Dr. King for promoting the cause of freedom and tell him how grateful they are for all of his work in the fight for justice.

Telegram From Avanta Williams to MLK

Monday, October 24, 1960
Brooklyn, NY, Atlanta, GA

Avatna Williams, family and friends send their thoughts and prayers to Dr. King when they heard that he would serve a year in jail.

Letter from Cleonia and Frank to MLK

Tuesday, February 23, 1960
Montgomery, AL

Cleonia and Frank, of Montgomery, Alabama, convey their support to Dr. King and the civil rights movement.

Telegram from MLK to Berry Gordy

Wednesday, April 12, 1967
Detroit, MI

Dr. King congratulates Berry Gordy, Jr. for being awarded the Business Achievement Award from the Interracial Council for Business Opportunity.

Newspaper Article on MLK

Sunday, August 9, 1964
Florida (FL)

In this article from the Miami Florida Herald, the writer summarizes a portion of the book "Why We Can't Wait", written by Dr. King.

Letter from Charles Wallace to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Texas (TX), California (CA)

Charles Wallace, a retired white high school teacher from California, offers his support to Dr. King for the implementation of the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. Wallace emphasizes that he has been a faithful supporter and participant in the civil rights movement. Wallace proposes to assist in the mobilization efforts to structure the campaign.

Letter from Thomas Elliott Huntley to MLK

Sunday, November 1, 1964
Missouri (MO), Atlanta, GA

Thomas Elliott Huntley, member of the Minnesota House of Representatives, congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize.

SCLC Tenth Anniversary Convention Banquet Featuring Sidney Poitier

Monday, August 14, 1967
New York (NY), California (CA), Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Maine (ME)

This document contains speeches given at the SCLC's Tenth Anniversary Convention Banquet. Sidney Poitier, a Bahamian American actor, gives the keynote address. He makes a very compelling statement during his address asserting, "to change the world we must change men." Also featured are brief speeches by Dr. King, Andrew Young, and Dorothy Cotton.

Statement Concerning Skin Color Differences


The author expounds on the color differences of eyes, plants, and animals to identify the faulty logic of bigotry in America.

Out of Segregation's Long Night

Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King addresses the crisis of race relations in America by asserting that there would not be a crisis if blacks accepted inferiority and injustice. He also discusses the physical and spiritual harm that segregation and slavery has caused for blacks and the effect that violence has on the community. Dr. King closes with remarks regarding nonviolence and what it truly represents.