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Strength to Love

Sunday, August 11, 1963
New York, NY, New York (NY), London, England, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This is the printer?s proof of Strength to Love, Dr. King?s book of sermons that was published in 1963. He drafted three of the sermons while serving a fifteen-day jail term in Albany, Georgia. Although his editors lauded the first draft, they later deleted strong phrases about segregation, colonialism and capitalism and many of his statements against war. The collection includes some of Dr. King's most popular sermons, including: Loving Your Enemies, Paul?s Letter to American Christians, A Knock at Midnight, A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart, and Three Dimensions of a Complete Life.

Letter from Thomas C. McGarth to MLK

Wednesday, September 22, 1965
Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Congressman Thomas C. McGarth writes to Dr. King concerning recent challenges surrounding the seating of the Mississippi Congressional Delegation. McGarth discusses his involvement with the voting process.

MLK: New Year Hopes

In this draft of an article for the New York Amsterdam News for January 5, 1963, Dr. King refers to the near-disaster of the Cuban missile crisis and says it?s time for the nation to work on agreements on nuclear testing and disarmament and its United Nations goals. Domestic issues that demand attention are education, medical care for the aged and new civil rights legislation.

Letter from Wilfred Laurier Husband to John B. Oakes of the New York Times

Friday, April 7, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Los Angeles, CA

Wilfred Husband writes John Oakes, Editorial Page Editor of the New York Times, regarding an article. As a consistent reader of the Magazine, Husband expresses his displeasure with an article that refers to the civil right movement's attention to the war in Vietnam as "wasteful and self-defeating." Husband explains how war and civil rights are inseparable and that stating anything in opposition hurts the cause of the movement.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Friday, July 13, 1962
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General of the Dept. of Justice, responds to Dr. King's telegram requesting a Federal investigation concerning an incident involving Mr. Toomes Clendon and Sheriff W. E. Hammond. In closing, Marshall assures the Reverend that appropriate action will be taken should a violation be involved.

March on Washington to End the War in Vietnam

Saturday, April 17, 1965
Mississippi (MS), Minnesota (MN), California (CA), Cambridge, MA, New York (NY), Nebraska (NE)

Thousands of students from across the nation collectively organized a March on Washington to end the war in Vietnam. The students were attempting to voice their disapproval of the war and asked that conscientious individuals join them.

Is It All Right To Break The Law?

Monday, August 12, 1963
New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, New York, NY, Alabama (AL)

Excerpts from Dr. King's 1963 "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" are used to establish an affirmative answer to the question, "Is It All Right to Break The Law?"

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Norman Seldes

Thursday, August 20, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA)

In this carbon copy of a letter to Mrs. Norman Seldes, Dr. King sends his appreciation for response to a letter of recent date.

Lawyer Fined $50 in Inquiry Ouster

Saturday, August 20, 1966
Washington, D.C., New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY)

New York lawyer, Arthur Kinoy, was carried out of the courtroom by authorities for disorderly conduct. Mr. Kinoy made history as this had never happened before in the legal system.

Letter from Rev. William M. Brooks to MLK

Tuesday, September 13, 1966
Chicago, IL, Indiana (IN)

William Brooks, Executive Director of the Gary Neighborhood House, requests Dr. King's permission for his staff to visit the SCLC Chicago office to observe their work being done in the slum areas.

New Harassment: The Lunacy Test by MLK

Saturday, June 23, 1962
Louisiana (LA), Shreveport, LA, Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King identifies events that demonstrate the absurd actions of the racist opposition during the Freedom Movement in the South.

Letter from Hubert H. Humphrey to Mr. Alan F. Westin

Monday, March 21, 1966
Washington, D.C., New York, NY

Vice President Hubert Humphrey congratulates Professor Alan Westin for the creation of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties.

Affidavit of Captain G.V. Evans

Wednesday, April 10, 1963
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

G.V. Evans, a captain in the Police Department of the City of Birmingham, confirms a series of sit-ins and marches that took place in Birmingham. The nonviolent actions, called Project C, was headed by Wyatt Tee Walker. Captain Evans believes that this conduct will result in serious injury to the police department and the demonstrators.

Telegram from Thomas Kilgore to MLK

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York, NY, New York (NY)

Thomas Kilgore, on behalf of Friendship Baptist Church, offers support to Dr. King concerning the downfall of discrimination and segregation.

The Weaknesses of Liberal Theology

In this paper from his Crozer Seminary days, Dr. King discusses his thoughts regarding liberal theology, which he thinks is the most logical theology that exists. There are weaknesses, however, one being that it often loses itself in higher criticism.

The Christian Year

Dr. King records a quote from William D. Maxwell's "An Outline of Christian Worship Its Developments and Forms." The quote describes how the Christian year came to be formed.

Letter from Wiley Bell to MLK

Friday, June 28, 1963
Texas (TX), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Inspired by Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham City Jail," Wiley Bell thanks Dr. King for the "heart warming and heart rending article." Bell tells Dr. King that his letter has inspired his studies as a fellow clergyman.

The Christian Way of Life in Human Relations

Wednesday, December 4, 1957
Little Rock, AR, Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL, Arkansas (AR), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Missouri (MO)

Dr. King makes a speech to the National Council of Churches regarding the issue of American race relations. After school integration ... has noticed a radical change in the attitudes of African-Americans, ultimately giving birth to this mental and figurative notion of the "new Negro". He solicits the assistance and leadership of the nation's churches to take a firm stand against the rampant inequalities afflicting blacks are facing in America.

Evil

Dr. King references the religious philosopher William Ernest Hocking regarding the topic of evil.

CIC Press Release: Hilliard to Head Catholic Testimonial for MLK

Wednesday, September 23, 1964
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

The Catholic Interracial Council releases a statement announcing Raymond M. Hilliard as the Chairman of the 1964 John F. Kennedy Award Dinner. During the event, Dr. King will be honored for his leadership and dedication to the civil rights struggle. Hilliard, whom President Johnson named to the National Citizens Committee for Community Relations to advise on the implementation of civil rights legislation, called Dr. King's work "inspired and truly Christian" and said that the CIC was honored to celebrate him.

Letter from H. D. Bollinger to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, October 28, 1964
Nashville, TN

H.D. Bollinger is honored to have Dr. King as a speaker for their Eighth Quadrennial Methodist Student Movement Conference at the Municipal Auditorium. Mr. Bollinger communicates with Dora McDonald the details of Dr. King's trip. He also informs her that they will cover the travel expenses for Dr. King's assistant and have received the items he requested. In an additional letter a month later, the director of the conference notifies Miss McDonald that they are in need of five additional photographs and the address of Dr. King.

Letter from Barbara Austin to SCLC

Monday, June 26, 1967
New Jersey (NJ), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Mrs. Austin writes the SCLC concerning Dr. King's views on Vietnam. She encloses a contribution to the organization because of Dr. King's courage to speak out against the war.

Letter from Sharon Judith Bresler to SCLC

California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Sharon Bresler encloses a check to the SCLC and requests that they write Rabbi Sanford Shopero from the Congregation of Temple Emmanuel to inform him that the gift was made in his honor.

Letter from MLK to Robert H. Gates

Monday, November 25, 1963
Missouri (MO), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King thanks Robert Gates for his contribution to the SCLC. King encloses an official receipt and expresses that his contribution will assist in their work in Birmingham and throughout the South.

Letter from Paul Rene of KYAC to MLk

Thursday, May 26, 1966
Washington (WA)

Paul Rene, the Public Relations Director and News Editor of KYAC Radio requests to interview Dr. King on voter registration.

American Education: Segregation, Northern Style

Arkansas (AR), Little Rock, AR, Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA, Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, New Jersey (NJ), Connecticut (CT), Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Massachusetts (MA), Indiana (IN)

This article from American Education focuses on the problem of de facto segregation in Northern and Southern cities that results from discrimination in housing and contributes to further housing discrimination and minority unemployment. De facto segregation is as detrimental as legalized (de jure) segregation. The author provides an overview of efforts around the country to eliminate segregation in public schools and some of the difficulties encountered.

Address to the National Bar Association

Thursday, August 20, 1959
Wisconsin (WI), Milwaukee, WI, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Little Rock, AR, Virginia (VA)

Dr. King shares with the National Bar Association of Milwaukee, the history of segregation and why African Americans fight for equality.

Letter from Daniel B. Brewster to MLK

Monday, July 20, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Senator Brewster thanks Dr. King for his kind letter and encloses a copy of the speech he delivered on the Senate floor before the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was passed.

SCLC Memo on the Washington Campaign

Wednesday, January 10, 1968
Washington, D.C.

Tom Offenburger announces a meeting concerning publicity for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign.

Letter from Sylvia Walters to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967
New York (NY)

Sylvia Walter writes Dr. King commending him on his strong statements and expresses that he has given many the strength to continue in fight for civil rights and peace.