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Letter from Dora McDonald to Sandra Durlauf

Thursday, October 29, 1964
California (CA)

Dora McDonald encloses Dr. King's biographical information to help aid Sandra Durlauf in her studies. She also refers Mrs. Durlauf to read Dr. King's books "Stride Toward Freedom," "Crusader Without Violence," and "Strength to Love."

MLK Accepts Nobel Peace Prize

Thursday, December 10, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Philadelphia, MS, Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, South Africa

In his acceptance speech at the Nobel Peace Prize Ceremony in Oslo, Norway, Dr. King dedicates his award to the nonviolent struggle necessary for overcoming the oppression and violence afflicting American Negroes.

Invitation from The European Baptist Federation to MLK

Friday, March 6, 1964
London, England, Atlanta, GA, UNITED KINGDOM

A representative from the European Baptist Federation writes Dr. King thanking him for accepting the invitation to speak at their fifth conference. Dr. King will be a guest of honor and speak among Europeans of all denominations.

Letter from Juanita Epps to MLK

Tuesday, March 23, 1965
New York (NY)

Juanita Epps sends Dr. King a check on behalf of the People's Community Church of Queens, New York. Epps acknowledges that their church doesn't have a huge congregation but they wanted to make their contribution towards justice and equality.

The Time for Freedom Has Come

Montgomery, AL, Cambridge, MA, California (CA)

Dr. King discusses the evolution of Negro students partcipating in the movement. This article was published by in the New York Times Magazine on September 10, 1961.

Letter from Nicholas Katzenbach to MLK

Tuesday, August 30, 1966
South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS)

U.S. Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach writes to Dr. King acknowledging his suggestion of using the Greenville Air Force Base to help alleviate the economic problems of Negro families in the Mississippi Delta. Katzenbach states that most of the land is no longer leased by the U.S. government but that Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1965 would apply to any educational programs.


Dr. King cites a quote that exemplifies the necessity of understanding human connection. Emphasizing brotherhood, he notes man's inherent dependence on others.

Right & Wrong

Dr. King quotes James Martineau’s “Types of Ethical Theory, Volume II.”

Letter from Time Magazine Publisher Bernhard Auer to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1963
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Bernhard Auer communicates his disappointment that Dr. King will be unavailable to attend the 40th Anniversary Dinner of Time Magazine.

Letter from Frank S. Gotshall to MLK

Friday, March 1, 1968
Maryland (MD)

Frank S. Gotshall compliments Dr. King's as a "fine champion," but he asserts that the problem of race relations in America is worsening. To prevent race mixing, Gotshall proposes that each race be given its own area in which it can live.


Dr. King records notes regarding how one should treat a stranger by citing the book of Leviticus.

Highlander Folk School April 1961 News Release

Monday, April 3, 1961
Tennessee (TN), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), South Carolina (SC)

The Citizen Education Program efforts and past accomplishments are outlined in this document.

Letter from Kate Krautheimer to MLK

Friday, September 10, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA), New York, NY

Kate Krautheimer informs Dr. King of an invitation from the University of Pennsylvania requesting that he address the undergraduate student body.

Why We Can't Wait Title

New York, NY

This document is a portion of a newspaper that contains the title "Why We Cant Wait" by Martin Luther King Jr.

Brief for the Petitioners

Saturday, October 1, 1966
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Wisconsin (WI), Kentucky (KY), California (CA), Connecticut (CT), Texas (TX), Louisiana (LA), New Hampshire (NH), South Carolina (SC), Rhode Island (RI), Maryland (MD), Virginia (VA), New York, NY, Florida (FL), Minnesota (MN), Georgia (GA)

This brochure illustrates questions as well as events pertaining to petitioners during the Civil Rights Movement. Important petitioners, such as Dr. King and Ralph David Abernathy, were convicted and charged with Contempt of Court in violation of the First and Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution.

Letter from Joan Daves to Pierre Servais

Friday, November 20, 1964
Oslo, Norway, BELGIUM

Joan Daves writes to Pierre Servais in Belgium, thanking him for requesting the presence of Dr. King at the launching of a new edition of Strength to Love. She informs Mr. Servais that Dr. King's itinerary has not yet been set and that he will receive more information at a later date.

A Request for a Yearbook Statement

Monday, December 12, 1966
Washington (WA), Montgomery, AL

Carolyn Olson, the co-editor of the South Kitsap High School year book staff, requests a statement from Dr. King to include in the school's year book. Olson informs Dr. King that the yearbook's "Stand Up and Be Counted" theme is intended to encourage "independence and individualism" among the student body by implanting new ideas in students' minds and challenging old stereotypes. The sender asks that Dr. King join other public figures in writing a statement regarding how young people can "Stand Up and Be Counted."

Letter from Eleanor A. Lofton of the Pittsburgh Courier to MLK

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
Pittsburgh, PA

Eleanor Lofton, Acting Publisher for the Pittsburgh Courier, asks Dr. King to include a message for the "Brotherhood" edition of their publication. Lofton explains that they are seeking "all men of goodwill" to be a part of the edition and that they will be anticipating his timely response.

Letter Envelope from MLK, Addressed to Mrs. Ernest Erber

New Jersey (NJ), Atlanta, GA

This envelope is addressed to Mrs. Ernest Erber from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from MLK to Ruby Brown

Monday, April 4, 1966
Detroit, MI, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King writes Ruby Brown of Detroit, Michigan to thank her for her letter regarding the civil rights struggle.

Letter from MLK to Reverend W.E. Gardner

Wednesday, February 28, 1962
New York, NY

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for a gift given to the SCLC on behalf of the First Baptist Church in Long Island, New York.

Cloudy Summit

Sunday, January 15, 1967
New York (NY)

In this article, Mr. Randolph organizes a conference of Negro leaders to take action in the suspension case of Rep. Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from Mary Brown to MLK

Sunday, October 31, 1965
New York, NY

Mary Brown, a student at Seward Park High School, asks for Dr. King's assistance in her presentation of a discussion on the challenges of the "Civil Rights workers."

Program of the Chicago Freedom Movement

Friday, July 1, 1966
Chicago, IL

This program outlines the prevalent social and economic disadvantages of the Negro population of Chicago. The authors give detailed accounts on the presence of impoverished areas and ghettos that systematically oppress African American opportunities for education, housing, and employment. In the past, Negroes have begged, pleaded, and reasoned with white city officials to change community conditions.

The Student Movement and You

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

This handbill calls for a boycott on Rich's and A & P in response to their discriminatory practices in employment and services to the Negro population of Atlanta, Georgia.

Letter from Beresford Hayward to MLK

Thursday, October 14, 1965

Mr. Hayward sends Dr. King a brief note on what has been keeping him so busy and hopes that while Dr. King is in Pars, they will be able to meet.

Letter from MLK to Teamsters President Jimmy Hoffa

Monday, April 12, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks James Hoffa, President of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, for his organization's $25,000 contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the current works and beliefs of the SCLC and also stresses the importance of supporters like the Teamsters.

Letter from Anwar Katib to MLK

Sunday, January 22, 1967

Anwar Katib, Governor of Jerusalem, writes Dr. King regarding his planned pilgrimage to the Holy Land. Katib assures Dr. King that he will be well-taken care of and shows sincere appreciation that he plans to visit Jerusalem.

Telegram from Josephine Jones to MLK

New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Ms. Jones, President of the Metropolitan Community Leaders, writes to Dr. King about Albert Shanker's stance on African American education.

Letter from Monica Wilson to MLK

Friday, November 12, 1965

Monica Wilson invites Dr. King to deliver the T.B. Davie Memorial Lecture at the University of Cape Town. She explains that they do not have a large budget but are willing to pay for travel and hotel expenses.