Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"CUBA"

Letter from Dorris M. Roberts to MLK

Chicago, IL

Dorris Roberts, Chairman of the New Breed Committee, writes to Dr. King concerning inaccurate statements regarding her organization's participation in a recent march. Mrs. Roberts encloses a newspaper article regarding the march and also requests that Dr. King release a statement declaring that the New Breed Committee were supporters of the march and not protestors.

Telegram from Lawrence MacGregor to MLK

Wednesday, November 15, 1967

In this telegram, Lawrence J. MacGregor informs Dr. King that there will no longer be a memorial service for Rufus E. Clement.

Letter from Arthur Kinoy to MLK

Tuesday, September 19, 1967
New Jersey (NJ)

In this letter, Mr. Kinoy informs Dr. King of an article in Rutgers' Law Review, that contains Kinoy's and Bill Kunstler's ideas in civil rights litigation. Kinoy is a law professor at Rutgers The State University.

Letter from J. Saba to Clarence B. Jones

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

"In this the blackest hour of our nation...," J. Saba refers to the assassination of Dr. King. Saba speaks to the urgency to preserve the "American Dream", in light of Dr. King's untimely death. He offers two fitting suggestions: first to establish a MLK, Jr. Memorial Library on Non-Violence and Civil Rights and second to erect a MLK, Jr. Interfaith Chapel at Morehouse College.

Telegram from Danish Students Association to MLK

Dr. King is invited to an Amsterdam Conference by the Danish Students Association.

Letter from Robert Carter and D. John Heyman to MLK

Friday, March 8, 1968
New York, NY, New York (NY)

The National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing (NCDH) sends Dr. King a report, which examined "where the jobs are and where those who need them most now live." According to the NCDH, the study shows that jobs are not in the same geographic area where Negroes and other minorities live.

Letter from Jean Rand to MLK

Tuesday, April 4, 1967
San Francisco, CA, California (CA)

Jean Rand writes Dr. King requesting a copy of his speech regarding peace in Vietnam and sends him a monetary contribution.

Condolence Letter to Mrs. King from Maria Diaz

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student is one of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

A Journey of Conscience

VIETNAM, CHINA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, Washington, D.C., SOUTH AFRICA, ALGERIA

In this draft of his 1967 speech, "A Journey of Conscience," Dr. King provides the many reasons he so strongly opposes the war in Vietnam. He writes of how he first felt it was important to remain silent, but gradually felt compelled to speak out, as the US made no initiatives toward peace. He points at that the war abroad takes away our focus on our problems at home, and we must "combine the fervor of the civil rights movement with the peace movement."

Letter from MLK to Jan Helge Jansen

Tuesday, April 7, 1964
Oslo, Norway

Dr. King responds to an invitation to speak in Oslo, Norway in the fall of 1964. He informs the requester that the "present temper of events in this section of the country" has influenced him to adopt a policy of not accepting invitations more than two months in advance. He states, however, that he will keep the invitation on file and communicate with the sender in September regarding his eligibility to accept the invitation.

Letter from MLK to Frank B. Lowell

Monday, October 14, 1963
Georgia (GA)

Dr. King acknowledges the receipt of Frank Lowell's letter regarding the SCLC's current mission. Dr. King briefly explains the nonviolent philosophy, the beliefs of the SCLC, and race relations in America.

Letter from Lloyd Wilson to Roy Wilkins

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
Florida (FL), New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, INDONESIA, NEW ZEALAND, AUSTRALIA, PHILIPPINES, JAPAN

Lloyd Wilson affirms his support for Dr. King, but he cannot agree with Dr. King's recent statements concerning the Vietnam War. He lists a series of questions hoping to gain clarity from Dr. King or Mr. Wilkins.

Christianity

Dr. King finds agreement with Celsus, an opponent of Christianity, in a quote on the root of the Christian faith.

Letter from Walter P. Reuther to MLK

Monday, October 26, 1964
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Walter P. Reuther extends an invitation to Dr. King to serve as a member of the Executive Committee for the Citizens Crusade Against Poverty.

Homogeneous Thoughts & Heterogeneous Thoughts

Dr. King describes Alfred North Whitehead's distinction between homogeneous and heterogeneous thought in "The Concept of Nature."

A Country Called Corporate America

Sunday, July 3, 1966
New York (NY), California (CA), Illinois (IL), Pennsylvania (PA), Texas (TX), Ohio (OH)

New York Times Magazine writer Andrew Hacker writes about the growing problems caused by the "bigness" of corporate America. He says that large corporations are beginning to have so much power that they can damage the society without having to account for the consequences, as "corporate wealth buys corporate wishes." Some of the ways that they effect society are through their advertisements, their control of the labor market and education.

God

Dr. King cites Ludwig Andreas Feuerbach's work "Das Wesen der Religion," in which Feuerbach illustrates his perception of God.

Evil

Dr. King quotes the definition of evil and conceptualizes it as a "frustration."

Letter from Carson Lyman to MLK

Tuesday, February 4, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Carson Lyman, managing editor of U.S. News and World Report, encloses the transcript of an interview with Dr. King. Lyman asks Dr. King make any necessary changes to the transcript, but to make sure "to preserve the informality of the language."

Notecard Regarding Reviews on The Doctrine of God

On this notecard, Dr. King references reviews on Albert Knudson's book "The Doctrine of God." This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, definitions, bible verses, books and other publications.

Judgement or Justice

Dr. King quotes a book entitled "Sea Dreams," by Alfred Lord Tennyson, regarding judgement and justice.

Letter from William T. and Scottie Lee Ellis to MLK

Saturday, May 25, 1963
Alaska (AK), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

The Ellis family informs Dr. King about demonstrations in Alaska, while offering up words of gratitude for civil rights efforts in Birmingham.

Methodology (Wieman)

Dr. King outlines the methodology of religious philosopher Henry Wieman.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dwight Campbell

Monday, September 28, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Georgia (GA)

Miss McDonald regretfully informs Mr. Campbell that Dr. King is unable to attend the October 7th Methodist Youth Fellowship engagement.

MLK Notecard - "Revelation"

In this handwritten note card, entitled, simply, "Revelation," Dr. King quotes from Niebuhr's NDM, I, 127.

Letter from Paul D. Metzger to MLK

Tuesday, November 3, 1964
Philadelphia, PA

Paul D. Metzger, President of the Student Association at Central High School, writes Dr. King inviting him to speak at a forum concerning the issues of civil rights in America. Dr. King's response to this invitation is enclosed at the culmination of the letter.

Letter from Rev. E. C. Smith to MLK

Monday, November 26, 1962
Washington, D.C.

Rev. Smith informs Dr. King that the Testimonial Committee has made the assumption that Dr. King is unable to accept their previous invitation, so they have made other arrangements.

Letter from Dr. Herzl Ragins to MLK

Wednesday, March 1, 1967
New York (NY)

Dr. Herzl Ragins writes to Dr. King, denouncing him because of his support for Adam Clayton Powell.

Dr. King Sermon Outline

Dr. King prepares notes for the sermon "Three Levels of Fellowship" deriving from 1st Corinthians 1:2, 9.

Letter from MLK to Boldwen Collins

Monday, October 21, 1963
New York (NY)

Dr. King responds to a previous letter sent to him from Miss Boldwen Collins. He clarifies various points that were unclear to Miss Collins pertaining to the overall purpose of the civil rights movement and its effect on the nation. Dr. King explains that Negroes in the North and South want the same things as other human beings: freedom.