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Letter from Margaret Long to MLK

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Margaret Long asks Dr. King to reconsider his plans for the demonstration in Washington, D.C. She expresses that though she understands why Dr. King advocates for demonstrations, she does not believe it will be advantageous.

Detroit Council for Human Rights: Walk To Freedom

Sunday, June 23, 1963

The Detroit Council of Human Rights adopted a declaration for Detroit, Michigan on May 17, 1963. In the declaration, the Council decided to stand in solidarity against the injustices that plague the city's African American population. This program is from the yearly demonstration that the Council holds to commemorate their pledge to combat the "inequality of this country."

SCLC Mail Log: February 23, 1968

Friday, February 23, 1968

This is a one-day mail log for incoming mail addressed to Dr. King and other SCLC associates. As an organizational tactic, the log kept track of the high volume of correspondence that came through the office.

Letter from Evelyn Rawley to Billy Mills

Friday, March 3, 1967

Evelyn E. Rawley writes Billy Mills, chairman of the Democratic County Central Committee, to express distaste for Mills' choice of colleagues, political activity, and lack of reason. Rawley affirms that Mill's irresponsible actions are an obstacle to democratic practices.

Statement by the Leadership Conference Executive Committee on the Kerner Commission Report

Tuesday, April 2, 1968

This statement put forth by the Leadership Conference Executive Committee addresses the results of the Kerner Commission Report, in which the author stresses that without creating viable and integrated communities in our cities "we shall have no cities".

Letter from John C. Hall to MLK about a March

Thursday, February 8, 1968

In this letter John C. Hall informs Dr. King of his desire to participate in the upcoming march to Washington D.C. and requests any information regarding such.

Letter from Aubrey Brown Jr. to MLK

Monday, June 26, 1967

Aubrey Brown Jr., Editor of "The Presbyterian Outlook," asks Dr. King to provide a statement regarding the obligations American voters have to choose "officials who have high personal moral standards." The statement will be used in the publication's annual "Going to College" Handbook.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Elizabeth Thornton

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

Dr. Kings thanks Mrs. Elizabeth Thornton for her and Mr. James Peterson's contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Telegram from MLK and Wyatt Walker to Burke Marshall

Monday, July 2, 1962

Dr. King and Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker send a urgent request to Burke Marshall of the United States Department of Justice. The two ministers seek a federal investigation in the brutal beating of an SCLC Voter Registration worker in Georgia.

The Atlanta United Negro College Fund Inter Alumni Council Flyer

This flyer, from the Atlanta United Negro College Fund Inter Alumni Council, announces its Annual UNCF Statewide Recognition Banquet.

Letter from Norma Perez to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Norma Perez sends her condolences to Mrs. King after Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from David Mocine to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967

David Mocine writes on the economic disparity in the United States regarding African Americans in relation to their percentage of the population.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Thursday, September 10, 1964

Joan Daves sends Dr. King an advertisement for "Why We Can't Wait", which will appear in the Washington Afro-American. The advertisement has also been published in Ebony magazine.

Manuscript by MLK dated 2/3/62 entitled "People in Action"

Saturday, February 3, 1962

In this 1962 draft for his column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King emphasizes that school desegregation and the Rosa Parks incident are crucial turning points in the Civil Rights Movement.


Dr. King cites a quotation from the book entitled "War and Peace" by Leo Tolstoy. Mr. Tolstoy includes a dialogue between two characters in the book that discuss immorality. One character references "Hender's Theory" to expound upon the reality of life and death.

Letter from Philip Harnden to MLK

Friday, February 16, 1968

After reading Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait," Philip Harnden, a sophomore at Wheaton College, writes Dr. King expressing his newly changed insight on the Negro struggle. Mr. Harnden inquires about Dr. King's nonviolent approach and the black community beginning to abandon nonviolence by adopting more aggressive means to achieve their goals.

Letter from Oxford JACARI to MLK

Saturday, June 6, 1964

Frank R. Parker, Vice-Chairman of the Oxford Joint Action Committee Against Racial Intolerance (JACARI) extends yet another speaking invitation to Dr. King, emphasizing his eagerness to hear the message of non-violent resistance.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to MLK

Monday, January 15, 1968

Harry Wachtel gives Dr. King a monetary birthday gift that he tells Dr. King to use on a much needed vacation.

Youth, Nonviolence, and Social Change

The conference on "Youth, Nonviolence, and Social Change" at Howard University contains various speakers deriving from various academic disciplines. Dr. King participated in the lecture and discussed how nonviolent methods impacted individuals, especially the youth.

Letter from Dr. and Mrs. C. E. Woodruff to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967

Dr. and Mrs. C. E. Woodruff praise Dr. King for his stance on the Vietnam War and enclose a check for the SCLC.

Letter from Myles Horton to Friends of Highlander

Friday, December 8, 1967

Myles Horton, the co-founder of the Highlander Research and Education Center, explains that he has been working on a program for the Appalachian area. He also mentions that the Center sponsors voter registration, political education programs and a series of workshops to help Negro candidates run for local and state offices.

Letter from Debbie Steiner to MLK

Sunday, May 17, 1964

Debbie Steiner of Willburn, New Jersey tells Dr. King how she was moved by his article in Life magazine, which she calls "a realistic summary of why the Negro can not wait." She explains her discontent with prejudice and inquires about how young people can influence change.

Letter from Genevieve Young to Joan Daves Regarding MLK Manuscript

Thursday, March 9, 1967

In this letter, Genevieve Young informs Joan Daves of the notes created for the manuscript of Dr. King's book and questions about the sources of some of Dr. King's facts.

Congressional Record: The President's Housing Bill, or, How To Succeed in Politics Without Really Trying

Senator Charles Percy forwarded this article, published in the Congressional Record, to Dr. King. The article discusses President Johnson's attempted housing referendum, known as the Fair Housing Bill, in March of 1968.

Letter from M. L. Teer Regarding Housing Conditions

M. L. Teer writes a letter to Senator Robert F. Kennedy on behalf of her nephew, Robert Williams of Chicago, IL.

Letter from James E. Bristol to Coretta Scott King

Monday, August 5, 1957

Mr. Bristol responds to a previous invitation to attend the SCLC's Tenth Annual Convention. He informs Mrs. King of his inability to attend due to a prior engagement but trusts that the convention will make a significant impact.

Biographical Sketch of Andrew Young

This document outlines the education, pastoral, and vocational experience of Andrew J. Young, Executive Director of the SCLC.

Unitarian Universalist Statement of Consensus on Racial Injustice

Friday, May 20, 1966

The Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association listed several laws adopted by the association. Some of the laws incorporate civil rights, demonstrations, voting rights, equality, civil disobedience, and discrimination in employment and housing.

Letter from Louise M. Meriwether to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

Louise M. Meriwether requests an endorsement from Dr. King in protesting the filming of the book "The Confessions of Nat Turner" written by William Styron.

Third Level (Cont.)

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich’s “Systematic Theology.” He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”