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Letter from Harold Swank to Helen Brooks Regarding Financial Assistance

Friday, August 6, 1965

Harold O. Swank, director of the State of Illinois Department of Public Aid, writes Helen Brooks regarding her request for financial assistance and housing.

Draft of Statement "Vote No on State Question 409" by MLK

In this draft of a statement, Dr. King discusses the misnomer of 'right-to-work,' stating that the law is against Civil Rights as it is anti-union.

Letter from MLK to James Duckrey

Thursday, March 19, 1964

Dr. King responds to a request to serve as the speaker at Cheyney State College's 1964 Commencement ceremonies. He informs the college's president that he has another commitment on the same day that renders him ineligible to accept the invitation.

Invitation to President Kennedy's Inauguration Reception

The Distinguished Hospitality Committee of the Inaugural Committee invite Dr. and Mrs. King to attend a reception preceding the inauguration of President-elect John F. Kennedy and Vice President-elect Lyndon B. Johnson.

Telegram from Hosea Williams to President Johnson

Tuesday, August 3, 1965

Hosea Williams writes to President Lyndon B. Johnson requesting an investigation of the Andy Whatley murder.

Crusade for Citizenship Memorandum

Tuesday, February 4, 1958

Dr. King creates an outline that entails the purpose and goals for the Crusade for Citizenship. Dr. King will deliver this information in a mass meeting to clarify the aims of the SCLC's "crusade." The dual purpose for this sector of the SCLC is to increase the number of Negro voters and to liberate all Southerners. Dr. King further elaborates on the intricacies of the movement.

Letter from a Weary Taxpayer to MLK

A weary taxpayer writes Dr. King informing him that a 15 million dollar bond issue was passed to pave roads in Cobb County; however, blacks cannot buy property in the area. The writer is angered because Negroes still have to help pay off the bond through taxes and asserts that the case must be taken to federal court.

Letter from Arthur L. Baney to the SCLC

Thursday, June 24, 1965

Arthur Baney writes the SCLC on behalf of Eastman Dillon, Union Securities & Company regarding five shares of General Electric Company stock that was gifted to the SCLC by Mary Cushing H. Niles.

On Being a Good Neighbor

Dr. King tells the Biblical story of the "Good Samaritan on the Road to Jericho," in which a traveler has been robbed, beaten and left for dead. Dr. King connects this story to the Declaration of Independence and offers an analysis of the modern era. Following the example of the "Good Samaritan," he encourages looking beyond "race, religion and nationality" to help those wounded by injustices.

Non-Violence Takes Courage: King's Wife

Friday, March 29, 1968

Mrs. Coretta Scott King elaborates on her commitment to nonviolence, referring to it as "the best instrument of change," throughout her involvement in the Civil Rights and Peace Movements.

SCLC Executive Staff Meeting Agenda

This executive staff meeting agenda for the S.C.L.C. provides a list of topics to be discussed as well as some organizational strategies for the organization.

Youth in the World of Work

Daniel H. Kruger describes many aspects of current labor trends in regards to automation, education and employment ratios in the United States.

Memorandum on direct Action in Alabama Cities

Dr. King writes a Direct Action plan for the Alabama cities of Birmingham, Danville and Montgomery. He believes that these cities need to focus on the emergence of violence and recommends the integration of Negroes into the police force.

Operation Breadbasket: A Statement by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Tuesday, December 12, 1967

Dr. King announces an agreement made with Pick-n-Pay Supermarkets that will open numerous jobs for the Negro community. The

Telegram from Richard J. Daley to MLK

Friday, July 16, 1965

Mayor Richard J. Daley discusses the issue of human rights in Chicago and the initiation of new programs. The mayor suggests a visit with Dr. King to acquire his intellect on this progressive plan. In addition, Mayor Daley informs Dr. King that he will be attending the National League of Cities Conference.

Poor People's Campaign

Sunday, March 17, 1968

Dr. King is touring the nation to meet poor people in an effort to expose their living conditions. He also wants them to join the campaign to fight for better housing and jobs.

For Healing of The Nations

Sunday, February 14, 1954

The National Council of Churches of Christ in the USA publishes this brochure on peace and race relations, calling Christians into action with the responsibility of making brotherhood a reality. Guidelines are presented for individual Christians and Churches to follow in order to create a world full of love and free of racial turmoil.

Crusade For Citizenship

"Crusade For Citizenship," an initiative of the SCLC, illustrates the importance of Negro voters in the South. The brochure incorporates important facts to implement emphasis on how imperative the cause is.

Telegram from Marion Barry and Edward Biking to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1960

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee extends gratitude to Dr. King for his deep commitment to the concept of nonviolence and a free society while he is incarcerated in the Dekalb County Jail.

Letter from MLK to Robert D. Rasmussen

Monday, December 13, 1965

Dr. King writes Robert Rasmussen to express his regret for his inability to attend a Leadership Conference with the officials of the American Baptist Convention at the Interdenominational Theological Center in Atlanta, Georgia.

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to President Lyndon Johnson

Tuesday, July 18, 1967

A. Philip Randolph, the President of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (an AFL-CIO affiliate), writes to President Johnson to urge him to convene a small group of national civil rights leaders to advise local leaders and businessmen on how to deal with the escalation of riots occurring all over the country.

Excerpts of Letters Written About Vietnam War

This document includes excerpts from letters written by Mary Agnes Blonien, sister of an American nurse at the Minh Quy Hospital at Kontum, South Vietnam. Moved to the point of tears, the nurse shares her thoughts and gives a vivid account of the war conditions in Vietnam, and expresses empathy for both Americans and Vietnamese.

Letter from MLK to Attorney General Robert Kennedy

Tuesday, March 31, 1964

Dr. King writes to Attorney General Robert Kennedy requesting an investigation in Williamston, NC to relieve the Negro community from violence and "unconstitutional police action."

MLK's Address at the University of the West Indies

Sunday, June 20, 1965

Dr. King spoke at the Valedictory Service of the University of the West Indies in Mona, Jamaica in 1965. On his topic "Facing the Challenge of a New Age," Dr. King addresses the international movement towards peace and equality, stating that "the wind of change is blowing all over the world."

Communism

Dr. King quotes a statement from Jacques Maritain's "True Harmonism" regarding communism. Jacques Maritain was a famous French Catholic philosopher.

Telegram to MLK from John Jacobs

John Jacobs accuses Dr. King of being associated with Communists. He proclaims that Negroes learned raping, robbing and relief with Dr. King's training.

MLK Sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church

Sunday, January 16, 1966

As pastor of Ebenezer, Dr. King delivered this particular sermon to his congregation in January of 196. He begins by referencing representative-elect Julian Bond's statement against war and against America's involvement in Vietnam, and he commends Mr. Bond for being courageous enough to speak his mind. He uses quotes from historical figures and biblical passages to support his claim that humans should be men of conviction and not of conformity. Dr.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Makola

Dr. King thanks Mr. Makola for reminding him of the "injustices and inequalities" Negroes face both in the United States and South Africa. Dr. King asserts that the issues Negroes face are symptoms of a deeper issue involving foreign policy and that his current focus is on the Vietnam War.

The Irish Echo: Ann Daly's Corner

Saturday, June 15, 1963

Ann Daly, a writer for the Irish Echo newspaper, reviews Dr. King's "Strength to Love" and recommends that her readers get a copy of it. She notes that the Irish community should be sympathetic to the plight of Negroes in Alabama because their Irish ancestors also endured oppression. She also gives her opinion on a Gaelic society publication, a book for teenage boys, and recent Irish cultural events.

The Emergency Civil Liberties Committee Defends the Constitutional Rights

Friday, February 16, 1968

ECLC writes to ask for assistance with their efforts to criminalize governmental draft tactics. As staunch supporters of the Bill of Rights and the Constitution, ECLC argues that the Draft is a violation of citizen's constitutional rights. Furthermore, they have dedicated their services to protecting the rights of youth, arguing that the draft is economically discriminatory in "student deferments". The organization challenges other civil liberties organizations to join them in this fight.