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Letter from John Lewis to MLK Regarding the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party

Thursday, July 15, 1965
Atlanta, GA

In this letter, John Lewis encourages Dr. King to start a letter writing campaign to prevent the illegal election of Representatives from Mississippi. Lewis offers Dr. King assistance from the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

In the Battle for Desegregation

Tuesday, September 1, 1964

Francis Keppel, U.S. Commissioner of Education, expresses his thoughts on the solution for desegregation. Keppel believes the best way to end segregation is through education, providing children with an education and outstanding teachers.

Letter from Mr. Levison Regarding U.S. Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.

Monday, September 19, 1966

Mr. Levison expresses his support for Representative Powell during the controversial House of Representatives committee chairmanship and ethical dilemma. Levison goes on to defend the suggestion of race being the determining factor of his criticism by volunteering his support of any review of congressional systems.

MLK's Crawfordville, Georgia Speech

Monday, October 11, 1965
Georgia (GA), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King rallies the people to keep pushing forward with nonviolent actions to gain freedom and dignity as human beings.

Letter from Jean Rand to MLK

Tuesday, April 4, 1967
San Francisco, CA, California (CA)

Jean Rand writes Dr. King requesting a copy of his speech regarding peace in Vietnam and sends him a monetary contribution.

Letter to MLK from Angry Citizen of Detroit

Friday, July 14, 1967
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

A bothered citizen of Detroit writes Dr. King, who is referred to as the "negro champion," to express personal views on the status of the Negroes in the city.

Letter from President Johnson to MLK on Voting Rights

Thursday, March 18, 1965
Washington, D.C.

President Johnson offers his gratitude to Dr. King for supporting his advocacy before Congress of legislation guaranteeing universal voting rights.

Letter from Maryknoll College to MLK

Thursday, March 14, 1968
Illinois (IL)

Patrick J. Ryan, the Campaigning Committee Coordinator at Maryknoll College, requests that Dr. King provide materials such as his political views, stickers, posters and more to support his political campaign and bring political consciousness to the student body.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

Sunday, August 30, 1959
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

An early foreshadowing of his nonviolent philosophy, Dr. King advises Negroes of a particular course of action they should adhere to in order to properly equip themselves to combat racial injustice. Seeking to avoid both complacency and hostility, he challenges those who desire self-satisfaction, as well as those who seek to pacify their oppressors, by proposing the idea of one having both a tough mind and a tender heart.

The Church Says No on Proposition 14

California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Thie Council of Churches in Northern and Southern California argues against the goals of Proposition 14. This 1964 ballot proposition sought to amend the California consitution by nullifying the Rumford Fair Housing Act. Prop 14 would go on to pass, but two years later the California Supreme Court deemed it unconstitutional.

Letter from Mary Bull to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968
Washington, D.C., Selma, AL

Mary Bull writes Dr. King expressing her sentiments towards the concept of racial separatism, and how it causes detriment to the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Jean Tisdale

Thursday, April 5, 1962
California (CA), Alabama (AL)

Miss McDonald informs Miss Tisdale that the information she requested may be found in Dr. King's book, Stride Toward Freedom, or Dr. Lawrence Reddick's book, Crusader Without Violence.

Letter from Canary McKay to MLK

Friday, February 4, 1966
Chicago, IL

Canary McKay shows her appreciation to Dr. King for the progress made as a result of the Civil Rights Movement. She also extends an invitation for King to speak at her church.

Letter from MLK to Rev. J. M. Lawson Jr.

Friday, October 25, 1963
Memphis, TN, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King writes Rev. Lawson to express his appreciation for the financial contribution to the SCLC from Protestant missionaries. Dr. King states that they will seek to make sure that a student involved in a recent tragedy in Birmingham, Alabama benefits from the contribution.

Letter from Dora McDonald to MLK

Thursday, December 7, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., GERMANY, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, North Carolina (NC), Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Ohio (OH)

Miss McDonald writes Dr. King regarding his recent mail and messages. Included are numerous invitations and missed telephone calls.

Letter from MLK to Arthur Stanley

Tuesday, December 26, 1967
Indiana (IN), Chicago, IL

Dr. King thanks Arthur Stanley for raising funds to defray the salary expenses for David Wallace. He also expresses delight that Mr. Stanley will be attending the Operation Breadbasket meeting.

CORE List of 33 Lunch Counters With Unchanged Policies

Monday, February 20, 1961
Alabama (AL), North Carolina (NC), Arkansas (AR), South Carolina (SC), Florida (FL), Tennessee (TN), Georgia (GA), Texas (TX), Louisiana (LA), Virginia (VA)

This document is a CORE list of cities where lunch counter demonstrations have been ineffective.

God

EGYPT

Dr. King writes about God, according to Isaiah 31:3.

Letter from J. D. Williams to MLK

Monday, November 7, 1966
Utah (UT)

Professor Williams requests a phone interview with Dr. King concerning the studies of a select group of Honors students at the University of Utah.

Letter from MLK to Frank B. Lowell

Monday, October 14, 1963
Georgia (GA)

Dr. King acknowledges the receipt of Frank Lowell's letter regarding the SCLC's current mission. Dr. King briefly explains the nonviolent philosophy, the beliefs of the SCLC, and race relations in America.

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "Horace Bushnell"

This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from MLK to Anna Frank

Monday, May 7, 1956
New York, NY

Dr. King informs Mrs. Frank, assistant to Dr. Chalmers, of his travel arrangements to New York where he is set to speak at the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund dinner.

Letter from Thomas Scroth to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King receives an invitation to the Forum Committee dinner in Washington, DC. This correspondence provides details of the format and location of the event.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Nagle

Dr. King comments on a Supreme Court ruling that outlaws prayer and Bible reading in public schools. He asserts that the decision is consistant with the Constitution and is meant to keep any single religion from dominating the government.

Letter from Isaac Foster Regarding a Scholarship

Tuesday, March 28, 1967
New York, NY

Isaac Foster, a student at Queens College, informs his reader of reasons why he should be awarded a scholarship.

Letter from Clara Urquhart to MLK

Monday, November 2, 1964
UNITED KINGDOM, London, England, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, NORWAY, Oslo, Norway

Clara Urquhart invites Dr. King to speak at the Human Right Day Commemoration, sponsored by Amnesty International, on November 9, 1964.

News from the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc.

Thursday, February 9, 1961
New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA)

The Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. announces their recent involvement with President John F. Kennedy.

Letter of Appreciation from MLK to Carolyn W. Ferriday

Wednesday, July 20, 1966
New York, NY

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Carolyn Ferriday for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Harriet C. Kelley to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1962
Indiana (IN)

Ms. Kelley explains to Dr. King why she cannot send a contribution to him. She is on a limited income and already donates both to the NAACP and the United Negro College Fund.

Outline Written in MLK's Handwriting Entitled: Be Ye Perfect

The document, shown here, is a combination of a handwritten outline and notes for the preparation of a sermon. Under the title, "Be Ye Perfect", Dr. King described Jesus, in relation to rational and moral perfection.