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Address by MLK at 47th NAACP Annual Convention

Wednesday, June 27, 1956
San Francisco, CA, Montgomery, AL, INDIA

Dr. King addresses the audience at the 47th NAACP annual convention in San Francisco, California. King begins with background information of slavery and its physical and mental effects on Africans, then tells the "Montgomery Story." This story begins with a mental transformation among blacks, which led to the Montgomery boycott. As a result of the boycott, blacks were empowered and began fighting injustice and seeking changes in unfair legislation.

Suffering

Dr. King writes that the view of suffering in Job 20 is fallacious.

Letter from Theodore R. Britton Jr. to MLK

Saturday, February 24, 1968
San Francisco, CA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Theodore R. Britton promotes the candidacy of Dr. King for the pastorship of Riverside Church throughout this letter. Britton also asserts that New York is in need of Dr. King's leadership and sermons.

Revolution In The Classroom

Friday, March 31, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Selma, AL

Dr. King addresses the Georgia Teachers and Education Association about the education of children in the South.

Unity

These notes, prepared by Dr. King, were for a sermon entitled "Unity." This sermon, believed to be composed during the time of 1948-1954, was never delivered.

Schleiermacher (The Social Implication of Religion)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter from Diane M. Monk to Dora McDonald

Friday, August 16, 1963
Illinois (IL)

Ms. Monk, a student, thanks Miss McDonald for her assistance with a school report. Monk also suggests that other students be instructed to read Dr. King's books, particularly "Stride for Freedom," for valuable information.

Letter from Floyd Haynes to MLK

Friday, October 23, 1964
Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA

Floyd Haynes, Editor of the black-owned "Buckeye Review," invites Dr. King to speak at a civic forum. The event is a joint effort of the newspaper and the Interdenominational Ministerial Fellowship of Youngstown, Ohio. Haynes also congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Ellen Bandler to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, September 11, 1962
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Ellen Bandler writes Miss McDonald about a letter that was received on September 10, 1962 concerning the publication of Mr. Killens' book being postponed until January 1963.

Letter from Leila Robins to MLK

CANADA, VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Mrs. Robins thanks Dr. King for his stance against the Vietnam War. She and her fellow Canadians who object to their government supplying the United States with arms are particularly glad to hear him speak out against the war.

The Danger of Misguided Goodness

Under the title, "The Danger of Misguided Goodness," the central message in these sermon notes is the need for all individuals to be morally conscientious.

Letter from George Overton to MLK

Wednesday, August 4, 1954
Connecticut (CT)

George Overton sends Dora McDonald a letter thanking her for the calendar of Dr. King's family. He also requests some photographs and expresses his support of Dr. King.

Transcendentalism

Dr. King provides background information on Ralph Waldo Emerson's theory of transcendentalism.

Letter from Dale Rickmon to Rev. Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Michigan (MI)

This letter of condolence is addressed to the Reverend Abernathy as the succeeding head of the SCLC. It accompanies a memorial poem written in dedication to Dr. King.

Letter from Thomas Elliott Huntley to MLK

Sunday, November 1, 1964
Missouri (MO), Atlanta, GA

Thomas Elliott Huntley, member of the Minnesota House of Representatives, congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter to Participants in Team Ministry to Southern Cities from Jack Sisson and Oscar McCloud

Friday, May 12, 1967
Birmingham, AL, Jacksonville, FL, South Carolina (SC), Atlanta, GA

Subsequent to the collective participation in the Team Ministry to Southern Cities, the members formed a consensus that a mandatory urgent meeting was necessary. The meeting will entail the regrouping of Team Ministry, community conflict, Project Equality, and the follow-up plans in three southern locations.

Letter from Ms. Bernice Gutman to The Public Review Advisory Commission

Thursday, March 30, 1967
Chicago, IL

This document is a letter to the Public Review Advisory Commission from a union concerning a scholarship and additional information for applicants.

Letter from W. Maxfield Garrott

Friday, October 16, 1964
Tennessee (TN), JAPAN, Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA, Richmond, VA

W. Maxfield Garrott, president of the Seinen Jo Gakuin Baptist School in Japan, invites Dr. King to make an appearance if he ever visits Japan. Garrot also congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from E. H. Singmaster to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967
Florida (FL)

E.H. Singmaster informs Dr. King that they should "hang together" and not separate in war and peace. He advocates that those involved in the military are "improved," regardless of color or gender.

Letter from Mildred R. Morris to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, August 27, 1963
Cincinnati, OH

Mildred R. Morris acknowledges receipt of a letter from Dora McDonald. She expresses her excitement regarding the possibility of meeting and informs McDonald about her new rates as a Professional Placement Counselor.

MLK Supports New York City Teachers

Wednesday, September 13, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King sends telegram of support to the United Federation of Teachers backing them in their efforts to create better conditions to work and educate students.

The Negro In America: What Must Be Done

Monday, December 4, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

In a full page of letters to the editor, civil rights advocates praise the Newsweek cover issue on the Negro in America for its analysis of the racial crisis and editorial recommendations for an emergency national program of action.

Social Ethics

Dr. King's references a chapter and verse from the biblical Book of Zephaniah. He notes that the passages concerning social phenomena such as infidelity, pride, selfishness and oppression are still "entirely up to date."

Letter from MLK to Arline Young

Thursday, March 22, 1962
Jackson, MS, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King informs Arline Young that he has given her information to Jack O'Dell, SCLC Acting Director of Voter Registration, and Dorothy Cotton, SCLC Citizenship School Director. One of the staff members will provide her with assistance with the cause that Dr. King says "means so much to us all."

Letter from A Republican to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1968
Iowa (IA)

Signing as "A Republican," the writer informs Dr. King that the draft for the war is the Democrats' method of using blacks for involuntary servitude. This information is to serve as support of the writer's belief that the Democrats will "return the negroes to slavery."

Wedding Ceremony Invitation

Sunday, August 16, 1959
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

This document is an invitation to the wedding ceremony of Bertha Sue Alford and Mr. Charles A. Pinkston.

Telegram to Dr. King Regarding "Camp In At the United States Senate"

Friday, October 27, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Lucious President share his opinion about Dr. King's actions at the Senate. "A massive camp in at the United States Senate is contrary to God's teaching. You will not have God on your side."

Draft of Showdown for Nonviolence

Monday, April 1, 1968
Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), South Carolina (SC), North Carolina (NC), Virginia (VA), Baltimore, MD, Boston, MA, Detroit, MI, Cleveland, OH, Philadelphia, PA, New York, NY, Washington, D.C., California (CA)

This is a draft, with Dr. King's revisions, of the article "Showdown for Nonviolence" for Look Magazine. The article was published posthumously on April 16, 1968.

Letter to MLK concerning nonviolent approaches

Friday, August 12, 1966
New York (NY)

Mrs. Ettinger offers Dr. King advice on a alternative approach to advance human rights. She also explains how it is up to blacks within the communities to make a better effort towards equality.

Speech in Jackson, Mississippi

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
Jackson, MS, Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Greenwood, MS, Memphis, TN, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), New Hampshire (NH), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, California (CA), Tennessee (TN)

Dr. King addresses supporters in Jackson, Mississippi during his statewide tour for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. He speaks of his excitement about the number of blacks in Mississippi that participated in the last congressional election. He emphasizes that the Poor People's Campaign cannot be successful without a strong coalition of organizations that see the need to combat poverty. King would be assassinated in Memphis two weeks after making this speech.