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Letter from MLK to George Murphy

Tuesday, October 9, 1962
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King thanks Rev. Murphy for giving witness in Albany, Georgia. Dr. King also comments on an upcoming vote and the role of churches in race relations.

Letter from MLK Regarding Atlanta University Center

Atlanta, GA

Dr. King writes to a woman concerning what he calls "the best Negro colleges in the South." He discusses the Atlanta University Center, which consists of Spelman College, Morehouse College, Clark University and Morris Brown College.

Poor People's Campaign 1968

Washington, D.C.

This pamphlet produced by the Southern Christian Leadership Council promotes the Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D. C. for the spring of 1968.

Highlander Center Press Release

Tennessee (TN)

This press release details the Highlander Center, an adult education center for people who come to learn how to deal with problems affecting their lives and communities, which was under investigation. The investigation was being conducted to determine if the Highland Center was integrated as stated in its charter.

Check from New York Times Company to MLK

Saturday, March 13, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA)

The New York Times company presents Dr. King with a $400 check for his article on civil rights.

Letter from Rev. Andrew T. Denholm to MLK

Wednesday, March 17, 1965
CANADA, Atlanta, GA, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

Rev. Andrew Denholm of St. Paul's United Church in Paris, Ontario send Dr. King a financial contribution and inquires about the need of northern whites for the march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. He also inquires about the possibility of a civil rights worker addressing a group of people in his town.

New York City's Salute to MLK

Thursday, December 17, 1964
New York (NY)

Upon return to the US after receiving the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King was awarded the City of New York Medallion of Honor by Mayor Robert Wagner. This document is a program from the event, "Salute to Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." It lists the featured speakers and entertainment.

Statement by Norman Truesdell About Selma-Montgomery March

Monday, April 26, 1965
Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Iowa (IA)

Norman Truesdell refutes Congressman William Dickenson's speech before the United States House of Representatives in which Dickenson claimed Reverend Truesdell left the Alabama Freedom March due to the immoral conduct of the marchers. Reverend Truesdell asserts that he left due to his studies at Wartburg Theological Seminary.

Letter from Ms. Katherine Livermore to MLK

Thursday, March 7, 1968
Texas (TX), KENYA, UGANDA

Ms. Livermore criticizes Dr. King for his alleged association with the Communist Party. She also makes several historical and contextual references to slavery and the current plight of the Negro race. She concludes with a warning, "be careful this summer."

Telegram from Lawrence F. O'Brien to MLK

Thursday, August 5, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Lawrence O'Brien, Special Assistant to President Johnson, invites Dr. King to the signing of the Voting Rights Act in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Bella McGregor to MLK

Tuesday, October 17, 1961
Georgia (GA), New Jersey (NJ)

Bella T. McGregor asks Dr. King for a copy of his sermon titled "St. Paul's Letter to American Christians."

Letter from a Disillusioned Supporter to MLK

Tuesday, July 26, 1966
Chicago, IL, Cleveland, OH, New York, NY, Nebraska (NE), Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY), Illinois (IL), Ohio (OH), Pennsylvania (PA)

An anonymous author, who identifies himself as a "white Jew," explains his decision to withdraw financial support from Negro organizations and causes. The reasons for his lack of support include the death of two Jews in Philadelphia, who died aiding the Negro cause, and the rioting in cities.

People to People: The Law is Majestic

Saturday, July 31, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King pays homage to the numerous lawyers of the Civil Rights Movement and asserts that the one unifying belief among lawyers is the idea that "law is majestic and the judicial process is supreme." Dr. King supports this claim with a story about his Negro lawyers successfully winning a case in Birmingham with an all-white jury.

Letter from Mark Staib to MLK

Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Mark Staib, a debater at John Carroll University, requests that Dr. King sends information on the debate topic: "Resolved: that the federal government should guarantee a minimum annual cash income for every citizen."

Annual Report of The President: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Ohio (OH), Chicago, IL, Jackson, MS, North Carolina (NC), EGYPT, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In the SCLC's Annual Presidential Report, Dr. King chronicles a decade of organization's activities to eliminate segregation. The report was delivered at the Tenth Anniversary Convention of the SCLC.

Letter from Bob Detterick to MLK

Monday, April 1, 1968
New Mexico (NM), Atlanta, GA

Bob Detterick, chairman for "Choice '68" organization at Western New Mexico University, requests that Dr. King send poster, pictures, pamphlets to promote him as the next presidential candidate.

We Return to Birmingham Jail to Bear Witness

Birmingham, AL

On his way to turn themselves in to Birmingham jail again in 1967, Dr. King writes this article in longhand, asserting the purposes of the civil rights activists' civil disobedience. Their unjust incarceration, he states, will allow them to bear witness to an unjust justice system, from Bull Connor's dogs to the US Supreme Court. The Court had just issued a decision supporting Connor's injunction forbidding the protests of the Birmingham campaign, which had led to his first incarceration there in 1963.

Letter from Duane Brown to MLK

Duane Brown requests an autograph of Dr. King because of his appearance on the cover of Newsweek Magazine.

Letter from Kenneth Barney to MLK

Monday, August 22, 1966
New York (NY)

Dr. Kenneth R. Barney sends this letter of support to Dr. King. Barney expresses his appreciation for King's interpretation of "black power" and admires his wisdom on the country's current state of affairs. He urges Dr. King to keep a "broad perspective" on the problems of American society and civilization. Barney believes that domestic and foreign policies can no longer be considered separately.

Gift from the Jersey City Chapter of the American Jewish Congress to MLK

New Jersey (NJ)

The Jersey City Chapter of the Women's Division of the American Jewish Congress made a donation to the Louise Waterman Wise Youth Center in Jerusalem in Dr. King's name. They sent him this note, wishing him a very speedy recovery and good luck.

Letter from H. D. Everett to Dr. King

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Montgomery, AL

A proposition letter expressing an economic idea to establish business enterprises owned and operated by negroes.

Conference on Strengthening the New Politics

Monday, December 20, 1965
Washington, D.C., California (CA), Chicago, IL, Cleveland, OH, Detroit, MI, Boston, MA, New York (NY)

Paul Albert forwards this letter to all individuals invited to and interested in the Shoreham Conference, in which Liberals address the shortcomings of American politics.

Memorandum from Stanley Levison Regarding Congressman Powell

Monday, September 19, 1966
New York, NY

This memorandum from Mr. Levison concerns legal issues regarding Congressman Adam Clayton Powell. His position is that those issues, valid or not, need examination in the overall context of "the real issue...the undemocratic nature of the congressional system."

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Harris to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1968
Memphis, TN

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Harris write Dr. King expressing their appreciation for his role as a Civil Rights leader. They were moved to write to him after hearing him speak at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, Tennessee and request to meet with him the next time he visits.

Life Magazine: Why We Can't Wait

Friday, May 15, 1964

This excerpt, taken from Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait," appears in an issue of Life Magazine. King parallels the experience of handicapped people to the social handicap of the Negro. Comparing instances of governmental aid, he notes that there has been "countless other measures of compensatory treatment that the nation has accepted and approved as logical and moral." King continues the segment by referencing the stance of three American presidents that he has engaged conversation on the subject of civil rights.

Letter from H. W. Brown to MLK

Wednesday, October 24, 1962
BAHAMAS, London, England

H. W. Brown, a pastor at Bethel Baptist Church and proponent of Bahamas' Progressive Liberal Party, writes to Dr. King, asking him to be their honored speaker at a pre-election rally. Brown asks if Dr. King would also deliver the sermon at his church the morning of the rally.

Letter from Arthur L. Kinsolving to MLK

Tuesday, September 19, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

Arthur Kingsolving sends his thanks to Dr. King for remembering him and sending a copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Letter from Everett C. McKeage to MLK

Thursday, July 15, 1965
San Francisco, CA, Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CHINA, FRANCE, VIETNAM, INDONESIA

Mr. McKeage writes to Dr. King expressing his satisfaction and appreciation for his position on Vietnam relations. He encloses a monetary donation to assist Dr. King's work.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Ernest J. Foster

Saturday, July 25, 1964
Los Angeles, CA, Albany, GA, St. Augustine, FL

Dr. King thanks Dr. Ernest Foster for his financial contribution to the SCLC. He informs Dr. Foster of the distribution of the proceeds from a previous reception and discusses the significance of supporters to the movement. Dr. King also encloses a copy of his recent book, "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Anderson Davis to MLK

Thursday, October 3, 1963
West Virginia (WV), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Mr. Davis invites Dr. King to speak at West Virginia's Emancipation Proclamation centennial celebration. Mr. Davis informs Dr. King that the event is an opportunity to collect contributions for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.