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"CONGO / ZAIRE"

Western Union Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. Count Basie to Dr. King

Famous jazz musician, Count Basie and his wife Catherine, sent Dr. King this Western Union telegram, following Dr. King's nearly fatal 1958 stabbing in Harlem. The Basie family, offered Dr. King any assistance he may have needed during his recovery.

Letter to Kenneth Gibbs from Dora McDonald

Monday, September 30, 1963

Ms. McDonald sends Mr. Gibbs a letter of thanks for his kind letter of support and encloses an autographed cover of TIME magazine on behalf of Dr. King.

Letter from David Sutton to MLK

Wednesday, June 16, 1965

The associate director of Alumni Relations at Drexel Institute of Technology invites Dr. King to speak at the newly formed Downtown Luncheon Club. Mr. Sutton mentions that the alumni of Drexel revere Dr. King's philosophy and principles of nonviolence. He also informs Dr. King about the confirmed attendance of Pulitzer Prize winner James Michener.

Letter from Harry H. Wachtel to Charles W. Englehard

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Harry Wachtel writes Charles Englehard thanking him for his payment of $5,000 toward a $15,000 pledge to The American Foundation On Nonviolence. He states that his initial contribution was extremely helpful in registering African Americans in Mississippi and other southern states.

Letter Dated 12/4/62 from MLK's Secretary to Melvin Arnold

Tuesday, December 4, 1962

In this correspondence to Mr. Melvin Arnold, Miss Dora McDonald, at the request of Dr. King, informed Mr. Arnold that Dr. King was still working on his sermons for publication. She also stated that Dr. King had a meeting later that afternoon on December 12, 1962 and would like to scheduled a meeting with Rev. Wallis for earlier that day.

SCLC Pamphlet- Why?

This brochure highlights the various forms of discrimination African Americans faced in Alabama, primarily the legal right to vote. Housing, unemployment, and police brutality are other key topics discussed. There is also a call to action on solutions for these problems.

Recommendations to Committee on Future Program

Tuesday, October 27, 1959

Dr. King outlines several initiatives of the SCLC and other civil rights leaders.

Letter from Leon Despres to MLK

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

Leon M. Despres, Alderman of the Fifth Ward of Chicago, welcomes Dr. King to the city. Despres expresses his appreciation for King's visit and encourages as much help as possible to help rid Chicago of their current system of segregation.

Newsmakers Interview with MLK

Saturday, July 10, 1965

Los Angeles' Channel 2 interviews Dr. King for its Newsmakers program. Topics include King's call for a negotiated settlement in Vietnam and the resulting criticism by other civil rights leaders, plans for mass demonstrations in Los Angeles on the poverty bill, King's position on the armed group called the Deacons and his commitment to nonviolence, and how he responds to the personal threats on his life.

Letter from Mary Ann Quilter to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Ms. Quilter informs Dr. King of a political event taking place on campus and asks him for any campaign literature he can provide and a picture of himself.

Letter from MLK to James K. Shipman

Friday, November 17, 1967

Dr. King thanks James Shipman, Chairman of the Organization Committee of the Ohio Association of Community-Junior Colleges, for an invitation to speak at Cuyahog Community College. Dr. King regretfully declines the invitation due to schedule demands related to planning for the first four months of 1968.

Original Sin

Dr. King writes a definition of original sin.

Letter from Midsouth Management's Ardin Hartman to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967

Ardin Hardin writes to Dr. King thanking him for the invitation to the SCLC's convention, but informs him that he will not attend because he does not agree with Dr. King's views on the Vietnam War.

Telegram from Mrs. Adams and Son to MLK

Sunday, September 21, 1958

Mrs. Adams and her son wish Dr. King a "speedy recovery."

Letter from MLK to Michael Swann

Thursday, September 21, 1967

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at St. Giles Cathedral in Edinburgh, Scotland on selected dates in 1967 and 1968. He assures the recipient of the letter that he is grateful for the invitation, however, he states that he already has commitments on the proposed dates.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Friday, January 13, 1967

Ernest Shaefer, the Executive Secretary of Hadley Executive Committee, attempts to reschedule an event previously canceled by Dr. King. Shaefer informs Dr. King's secretary, Ms. McDonald, of the hundreds of people that purchased tickets to attend the event and their desire to have it rescheduled.

Letter from Clarence D. Coleman to MLK

Wednesday, November 11, 1964

Director of the Southern Region of the National Urban League, Clarence D. Coleman, congratulates Dr. King for receiving the 1964 Nobel Piece Prize. Coleman extends his very best wishes to Dr. King and the SCLC on behalf of the staff of the Southern Regional Office of the National Urban League and the officers and members of the Atlanta Summit Leadership Conference.

Pledge Card: Get Rid of Wallace

This adverse advertisement published by the SCLC encourages Negro residents of Alabama not to vote for Governor George Wallace.

Old Bull, The Great Violinist

Dr. King relates the mishap of a great violinist, during a concert, to the general act of overcoming obstacles in life.

Why Negroes Are Still Angry

Friday, July 1, 1966

American journalist Victor Bernstein details for Redbook why Negroes are still angry in the face of the apparent success of the Civil Rights Movement. He points out that the Movement has enabled many whites to see that integration and equal rights are right, but still knowingly choose to behave as if they are wrong.

Letter from Robert M. Hatch to MLK

Friday, April 9, 1965

Rev. Hatch of the Diocese of Western Massachusetts responds to Dr. King's request for "financial assistance" on behalf of SCLC. Rev. Hatch cheerfully tells Dr. King that the Diocesan Council has agreed to answer the request favorably, and he references an enclosed check for two thousand dollars.

Letter from William A. Geoghegan to MLK

Wednesday, March 10, 1965

William A. Geoghegan, US Department of Justice Assistant Deputy Attorney General, writes Dr. King acknowledging his previous telegram recommending L. N. D. Wells, Jr. to the U. S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.

Letter from Amnesty International to MLK

Tuesday, April 20, 1965

On behalf of Denmark's chapter of Amnesty International, Mr. Bent Ostergaard writes Dr. King extending a speaking invitation. He is hopeful that Dr. King will return to Europe and accept the invitation to speak to youth and instill in them the significance of justice.

Birmingham Manifesto

This document boldly declares the stance of the oppressed Negro population of Birmingham, Alabama. Critiquing the validity of democracy, this manifesto speaks to the unjust treatment of the Negro as a second class citizen, including being "segregated racially, exploited economically, and dominated politically."

Nature

Dr. King writes notes regarding the topic of nature.

Mobilizer: February 1967

Monday, February 6, 1967

This February 1967 issue of the "Mobilizer: To End Mass Murder in Vietnam" focuses on James Bevel's direct action anti-war demonstrations. As National Director of the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, Bevel outlines his strategy to launch a national movement involving community churches, students, labor groups, and others. The initiative is designed around a march to be held on April 15, 1967 in San Francisco and New York.

Letter from Mr. Richard V. Healy to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967

In this 1967 letter Richard Healy, a student at the Boston University of Law, asks Dr. King for an interview "to conduct research into criminal responsibility of a subculture--the urban Negro."

Sin

Dr. King cites a quote from Reinhold Niebuhr regarding sin.

Letter from MLK to Joyce Armstrong

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Dr. King responds to Joyce Armstrong, a student at Central High School, regarding her concerns on equality. Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation and states, "it is gratifying to us to know that so many young people are dedicated to the cause of Freedom."

Letter from Orville Freeman to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

The author informs Dr. King of the efforts being made to adequately address the issues pertaining to nutritional health in the country.