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Letter from Miriam Ottenberg to MLK

Friday, October 30, 1964

Miriam Ottenberg, President of the Women's National Press Club, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and asks if he would address a luncheon for the Club. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Telegram from MLK to President Kennedy

Thursday, June 13, 1963

Dr. King informs President Kennedy that he will not be in attendance at a meeting with religious leaders due to another commitment.

Letter from Pamela Schnida to MLK

Thursday, October 10, 1067

Pamela Schnida writes to Dr. King requesting information on the riots that occurred in 1967.

Letter from George W. Baker to MLK

George W. Baker encloses a check in support of Dr. King and his ongoing work towards peace in Vietnam.

MLK Addresses Riots and War

Sunday, October 1, 1967

Dr. King encourages friends to support nonviolence in order to avoid physical or moral destruction. He explains that the, "SCLC cannot support riots for moral and pragmatic reasons."

Letter from Mrs. Stitzinger to Martin Luther King Sr.

Mrs. Stitzinger asserts that the African American community is entitled to their rights but that it doesn't mean that white people have to acknowledge or accept them. She suggests that they create black owned restaurants, hotels, etc. solely so black people will not have to interact directly with the white race.

Transformed Noncomformist

Friday, November 1, 1957

Dr. King delivered this sermon in November 1957 while serving as the pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. In the sermon, Dr. King discusses the Christian dilemma of being "a citizen of two worlds: the world of time and the world of eternity." He situates the experience of black people in America within this dichotomy, and asserts that Christians must not conform to the world of mass opinion when it lacks Christian virtue, but must assume nonconformity.

Letter from Clifford L. Alexander to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968

Clifford L. Alexander, Chairman for the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, wrote to Dr. King to encloses some clippings from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission News Digest, the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and the Washington Post regarding the EEOC's hearings on white collar discrimination in New York.

Letter from G. Mansfield Collins to MLK

Monday, January 4, 1965

G. Mansfied Collins outlines Dr. King's travel arrangements to a Christian Conference held in Southern California, in which Dr. King is urged to discuss unemployment.

Why We Can't Wait Title

This document is a portion of a newspaper that contains the title "Why We Cant Wait" by Martin Luther King Jr.

Plea for the Poor to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

Signing as "A Poor Person," this author urges Dr. King to remember that poverty transcends race. The author requests that Dr. King help the poor of all races, with an emphasis on promoting voter registration for all poor people.

Letter from MLK to Colonel Harold C. Wall

Thursday, January 11, 1968

In a letter to Colonel Harold C. Wall, Dr. King writes to appeal the Selective Service case of Thomas E. Houck Jr. He has been classified as 1-A by Local Board #75, meaning he was available for unrestricted service. Dr. King wanted to change Houck's classification to 1-O based on Houck's moral devotion to peace.

Letter from Swedish Members of Parliament to MLK

Sunday, April 24, 1966

Two members of Parliament in Stockholm, Sweden hope to establish a fund among Christian Social Democrats and other Swedish organizations to support the SCLC. They request Dr. King's presence at a meeting in Gothenburg.

Cyprian of Carthage

Dr. King briefly outlines the life of Saint Cyprian of Carthage.

Letter from MLK to Adam Clayton Powell

Tuesday, January 2, 1968

Dr. King writes Adam Clayton Powell to seek advice on how to handle Powell's return from self-imposed exile in Bimini. Powell sought to publicize the event with a public announcement by Dr. King. However, Dr. King and Powell's lawyers suggest that they arrange a quiet, staged arrest with local officials to prevent public pressure from forcing a more lengthy arrest over the criminal contempt charges Powell faced for vacating his seat in Congress. Dr. King suggests more publicity could follow once Powell's lawyers free him on bond and begin the appeals process.

Reviews of Strength to Love

These reviews of Dr. King's "Strength to Love" illustrate King's use of theological beliefs in conjunction with the struggle for civil rights reform.

Letter from A. Dale Fiers to MLK

Saturday, January 15, 1966

A. Dale Fiers, Executive Secretary for the International Convention of Christian Churches, informs Dr. King of the order of events to take place at the Dallas Assembly of the International Convention on September 25, 1966.

Along This Way: The Violence of Poverty

Saturday, January 1, 1966

In his regular column of the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the rate of unemployment among Negroes. He states that 2/3 of all Negro families live in poverty. Dr. King argues that the administration needs to carry out the mandate of the Unemployment Act of 1945 and stimulate employment.

Draft of a Letter from MLK to Dr. Lawrence Alex Whitfield

This is a draft of a letter written by Dr. King to Dr. Lawrence Alex Whitfield. Dr. King indicates that he recieved a letter from Barbara Payne which suggested that Dr. Whitfield had expressed a desire to support the Freedom Movement and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter From Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, August 4, 1964

Joan Daves writes Dr. King to inform him of her meeting, in Germany, with publishers before the Frankfurt Bookfair.

Letter from the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Mr. Rutledge and Mr. Wood inform several civil rights activists of the practices of the New York City housing agencies to exclude African Americans and Puerto Rican Americans from upper level administrative posts.

Letter from Major J. Jones to MLK

Wednesday, October 9, 1963

Major J. Jones wishes to confirm Dr. King's speaking engagement at the Jobs and Freedom Conference in Chattanooga, Tennessee on November 13, 1963.

Letter from MLK to Gilbert J. Clark

Saturday, May 21, 1966

Dr. King informs Gilbert J. Clark, Chairman at the Law School Forum, that he is unable to speak in Edmonton under the auspices of the Alberta Law School Forum during his trip to Canada.

Dr. King Acceptance as an Honorary Member of Wellesley College

Dr. King often had delayed responses due to his strenuous schedule, traveling obligations, and completion of the necessary duties as the President of the SCLC. Dr. King's letter to Miss Knight provides an example of the unintentional unpunctuality as he accepts an award as an honorary member of Wellesley College class of 1966.

Gethsemane

Dr. King notes the Biblical story of Jesus' experience before his crucifixion. He uses the parable to speak to the human experience of pain and the faith one must have in God. Jesus went to Gethsemane to pray. He brought apostles John, James, and Peter and had them take watch while he prayed in the garden. When Jesus returned, his friends were sleeping. At this moment, Jesus realized their indifference to his agony. Though standing in pain and loneliness, Jesus used his faith in God to accept his situation as it was, with no efforts of escape.

Some Things We Can Do

In this series of note cards entitled "Some Things We Can Do," Dr. King provides several suggestions pertaining to the African American community.

Letter from Neil Sullivan to MLK

Thursday, May 25, 1967

In this letter, Superintendent of Schools Neil Sullivan writes about the complete integration of the Berkeley County Public Schools.

Letter from MLK to Spilman

Thursday, July 30, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Mr. and Mrs. Spilman for their monetary contribution to the SCLC. He acknowledges how such funds have been allocated to combat the civil injustices faced by Negroes in America. He concludes by addressing the future social and political agendas of the SCLC.

Telegram from the Nashville Student Movement to MLK

Wednesday, October 19, 1960

The Nashville Nonviolent Student Movement writes to Dr. King in jail commending him for his courageous act, while urging him to remain in jail for the cause.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes from D. Miall Edwards’ “The Philosophy of Religion.” Miall is misspelled on the note card.