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Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK

Thursday, August 16, 1962
New York, NY

Cass Canfield, of Harper and Row, requests for Dr. King to give commentary on Louis Lomax's book "The Negro Revolt."

Letter from United States Congress to MLK

Friday, September 22, 1967
Washington, D.C., Detroit, MI, Los Angeles, CA

Joseph McDade writes Dr. King to solicit his views regarding the affects of organized crime on the plight of the urban poor. test_1_4_2:58pm

Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. Charles Evans

Tuesday, March 26, 1968
Pennsylvania (PA)

In this letter Dr. King offers his gratitude to Mr. and Mrs. Evans for their monetary contribution of $200. Dr. King references the work of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and explains how the Evans' contribution supports the efforts of the organization.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Thursday, April 9, 1964
Washington (WA)

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General, writes Dr. King acknowledging his previous telegram about racism in St. Augustine, Florida. In addition, Marshall refers a copy of the telegram to the attention of George B. Hartzog, Jr.

Suggested SCLC Organizational Structure

Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

This document outlines the preliminary organizational structure of SCLC with brief descriptions of roles and responsibilities.

MLK Memorandum: Plans for Selma, Alabama

Tuesday, January 19, 1965
Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King outlines his plan for civil rights goals in Selma, Alabama.

Letter from C. L. Evans to MLK

Thursday, September 7, 1967
Richmond, VA

C. L. Evans is giving a $100 contribution on behalf of the Baptist Allied Headquarters, to Dr. King for his work and organization.

Great Neck Declaration of Rededication

New York (NY)

The citizens of Great Neck, New York rededicate themselves to the "struggle for equality and justice."

Letter from Effie Wilderson to MLK

New Mexico (NM)

Mrs. Wilderson writes to Dr. King informing him that the white Christian Church is in support of non-violence and equality for the Negro people.

Church, Negro

Dr. King provides insight on the interaction between the church and the Negro youth.

Letter from MLK to A.S. Grant

Dr. King thanks Elder Grant for the kind remarks from his previous letter and lets him know that due to the business of his schedule as the President of the SCLC, he is unable to devote attention to Grant's proposal.

Letter from the Hadley Executive Committee to Dora McDonald

Saturday, April 8, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

Ernest Shaefer communicates with Dora McDonald to solidify the details surrounding Dr. King's lecture in Pennsylvania. Mr. Shaefer informs Miss McDonald of the written confirmation and formal contract that must be signed in advance.

Letter from the Algemeen Handelsblad to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964
NETHERLANDS, Oslo, Norway, Birmingham, AL, NORWAY, Alabama (AL)

C. A. Steketee, chief editor of Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad, asks Dr. King to write an article about the American Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Fra Morton Sims to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967
Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King is encouraged to read a US News & World Report article entitled, "One Negro Woman's Advice to Her People." The article approaches the issues of the African American community from an understanding perspective.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK Regarding Paul Chapman

Wednesday, May 6, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, writes Dr. King in reference to a previous telgram correspondence concerning an assault on Reverend Paul Chapman. Burke writes that his department can take no action due to a lack of evidence indicating a crime.

SCLC News Release

Saturday, February 26, 1966
Atlanta, GA

This 1966 SCLC news release relays news of the successful "Crawfordville Enterprises" business venture, one which has brought hope to the rural Negroes of Taliaferro County as a combined initiative of the SCLC and cooperating sister organizations.

Letter from MLK to Sara B. Jackson

Friday, April 13, 1956
New York, NY

Dr. King extends gratitude to Mrs. Jackson for her moral and financial support.

Letter from W. Russell Smith to MLK

Tuesday, September 26, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

On behalf of the Interfraternity Council of Lehigh University, W. Russell Smith invites Dr. King to present his views on civil rights.

Letter from MLK to Corine Jenkins About Prayer

Tuesday, February 27, 1968
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

In this letter, Dr. King replies to Corine Jenkins regarding her missing daughter. He informs her that she and her daughter are in his prayers.

Letter from MLK to Jim Harney of Saint Gregory's Rectory

Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM, Maryland (MD)

Dr. King thanks Jim Harney for his letter of support. He touches on his own views of Vietnam, pointing out that the war is a symptom of a deeper problem, and those who seek peace through nonviolence must always strive to make their voices be heard.

Social Ethics

Dr. King's references a chapter and verse from the biblical Book of Zephaniah. He notes that the passages concerning social phenomena such as infidelity, pride, selfishness and oppression are still "entirely up to date."

Thank You Letter from Dr. King to Eartha Kitt

Tuesday, December 18, 1962
California (CA)

In this letter, Dr. King is expressing his deep apprecitation to Eartha Kitt for her contribution to the Southern Chrisitan Leadership Conference.

Letter from William H. Chester to MLK

Friday, September 6, 1963
San Francisco, CA, SOUTH AFRICA, California (CA)

William H. Chester writes Dr. King enclosing a donation to the SCLC from Mary Louise Hooper, chairman of the Northern California Committee on African Affairs, on behalf of the San Francisco Church-Labor Conference. The organization conducted a Human Rights Day parade that was broadcast in Africa. Mr. Chester further informs Dr. King that Mrs. Hooper encourages the SCLC to "keep moving forward until victory is achieved."

SCLC Affiliates

Tuesday, October 17, 1967
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS)

Tom O. writes Mrs. King attaching an example of a brochure which entails a description SCLC's affiliate program. Tom O. also insures Mrs. King that the color in which the brochure is printed is not final.

Letter from MLK to Leslie Cohen

Friday, August 9, 1963
New York (NY)

Dr. King offers his appreciation to Leslie Cohen for communicating to him an "honor bestowed... ...by each of Miss Egnal's eighth grade class."

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK

Thursday, July 26, 1962
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

In reply to Dr. King's telegram concerning the actions of a Mitchell County peace officer towards Mrs. Slater King, the wife of a civil rights activist and successful real estate broker, Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall writes that an investigation of this matter has been ordered.

Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

GREECE, Virginia (VA), Georgia (GA), INDIA

Dr. King delivers a sermon that urges his listeners to search for their purpose in life. He requests that his younger listeners attend school and strive for higher education. He stresses to not let the color of their skin keep them from achieving their dreams.

Looking Forward: The Montgomery Improvement Association, Inc.

Montgomery, AL

This pamphlet outlines the ten points the Montgomery Improvement Association uses to promote healthy race relations.

Letter from MLK to Herman Strase

GERMANY, SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. King writes to Mr. Herman Strase expressing his appreciation for an earlier letter that including sentiments to extend justice to all people regardless of race. The Reverend states that he agrees with Strase regarding the demand of Christianity in the expression of compassion and love for all people, no matter their race.

Letter from Clarence G. Petersen to MLK

Thursday, August 25, 1966
Illinois (IL)

Clarence G. Petersen tells Dr. King that he should avoid marching in the city of Cicero. Petersen describes Cicero as a slum with old houses and an oppressive, industrial atmosphere. While Petersen supports Dr. King's campaign, he believes it'd be best if the city were avoided for Dr. King's safety.