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"CONGO / ZAIRE"

Unity

Dr. King documents insight regarding unity, reason, and God.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to Francis Robinson

Wednesday, May 25, 1966

Mrs. King expresses her appreciation for the opera tickets that Mr. Robinson gave to her and Dr. King.

Letter from Anne Jewett to MLK

In this letter dated May 5, 1967, Jewett informs King of her song. Let There Be Peace. Jewett believes that this simple song is what churches and peace marchers need, so that they can be heard. She has given the song to King in hopes that the people everywhere will be able to sing out.

War by Executive Decree

Citizens for Governmental Restraint favors the impeachment of President Lyndon Johnson for declaring the war in Vietnam by Executive Order.

Letter from John M. Thornton to MLK

Wednesday, October 16, 1963

John M. Thorton invites Dr. King to speak at the Citizenship Award Banquet hosted by the National Capital Voters Association, in order to encourage the 425,000 Negro citizens of Washington, DC to vote in the upcoming presidential election.

Postage Stamp, April 4, 1968

This postage stamp to Washington D.C is dated April 4, 1968.

Detroit Council for Human Rights: Walk To Freedom

Sunday, June 23, 1963

The Detroit Council of Human Rights adopted a declaration for Detroit, Michigan on May 17, 1963. In the declaration, the Council decided to stand in solidarity against the injustices that plague the city's African American population. This program is from the yearly demonstration that the Council holds to commemorate their pledge to combat the "inequality of this country."

Letter from Herschel Auerbach to MLK

Friday, October 13, 1967

Mr. Auerbach objects to "anti-Semitic and anti-Israel" resolutions adopted at the National Conference of New Politics, at which King was a keynote speaker.

Letter from Stiv Jakobsson to MLK

Stiv Jakobsson expresses his wishes for Dr. King's well being due to the recent attacks against him. Various organizations in Sweden are engaging into an annual conference and are confirming Dr. King's acceptance to speak at the event.

Official Program of the Spring Mobilization

The following document is an official program listing the schedule of the Spring Mobilization on April 15, 1967.

Minutes of National Action Council Meeting

Sunday, July 1, 1962

The National Action Council, a sector of the Congress of Racial Equality, hosts a regional meeting in Miami, Florida where they will vote on council member positions, as well as regional and national NAC meeting logistics.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967

Theodore Brown writes Dr. King requesting his signature on a telegram to President Johnson from the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa expressing disapproval of South Africa's rule over South West Africa and requesting U.S. support for turning over administration to the United Nations.

Letter from the British and Foreign Bible Society to MLK

Saturday, September 10, 1966

The British and Foreign Bible Society invites Dr. King to their Bible Week at Aberystwyth during the summer of 1967. The society is commemorating the 400th anniversary of Welsh New Testament. Rev. T. J. Davies informs Dr. King of possible publication opportunities for his book that can take place during his stay in Aberystwyth.

Letter from G. Merrill Lenox to MLK

Friday, April 19, 1963

G. Merrill Lenox, Executive Director for the Metropolitan Detroit Council of Churches, informs Dr. King he is being remembered and in the daily prayers of thousands during his incarceration in the Birmingham Jail.

Letter from Homer Littlefield McCall to MLK

Thursday, September 21, 1967

In this letter, Mr. McCall requests that Dr. King send the certificate of his ordination from Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Rabbi Heschel on the War on Vietnam

Rabbi Abraham Heschel, civil rights advocate and associate of Dr. King, writes on the ethical corruption created by the Vietnam War. Calling the war an example of "extreme absurdity" that has been "nurtured on stereotypes," Rabbi Heschel encourages American citizens to recognize the demoralization of the war and take action against it.

The Catholic Review: Letter From Birmingham Jail

Friday, July 19, 1963

Dr. King's "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" is printed in this publication along with articles and columns illustrating the Church's civil rights activities. Efforts included priests taking part in direct action to integrate an amusement park and an archbishop backing the civil rights bill.

Telegram from Charles Morris to MLK

Mr. Morris, president of The Negro Business and Industrial Association, extends an invitation to Dr. King to participate in an initiative designed to combat the rioting in Negro communities.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. D.A. McGregor

Monday, September 25, 1961

Dr. King expresses delight in Mrs. D.A. McGregor's request for a copy of his sermon "Paul's Letter to American Christians." However, since he doesn't have a complete manuscript of the sermon at the time he receives the letter, Dr. King mentions that it will be published in his upcoming book of sermons. The book of sermons would eventually be named "Strength to Love."

Statement Upon Return to Montgomery

Dr. King reflects on his near death experience after Izola Ware Curry stabbed him with a letter opener at a book signing in New York City on September 20, 1958. Although Dr. King refers to Curry as a "deranged woman," he has "no bitterness towards her" and sees her actions only as a "reflection on the moral climate." Dr. King further states what he will remember most is the "vast outpouring of sympathy" that was received from all races and creeds.

Commission on Human Relations of the City of Pittsburgh

Thursday, March 21, 1968

This is a preliminary report requesting an investigation on the cancellation of insurance coverage on business establishments and churches in Homewood-Brushton.

Letter from Maurice A. Dawkins to MLK

Saturday, June 5, 1965

In this letter, Mr. Dawkins informs Dr. King that the Summer Community Organization and Political Education, S.C.O.P.E., stands to benefit from the involvement of the VISTA organization.

Telegram from Thich Nhat Hanh to MLK

Saturday, February 24, 1968

Thich Nhat Hanh informs Dr. King that he will be in Atlanta from February 24th to February 29th.

Letter from Tetsuo Kohmoto to MLK

Thursday, June 3, 1965

Tetsuo Kohmoto, president of the Shinkyo Shuppansha Protestant Publishing Company, inquired to Joan Daves about publishing Dr. King's book, "Strength to Love," in Japanese. Mr. Kohmoto happily informs Dr. King that the Japanese edition of his book has now been "published to the reading public in Japan."

Letter from Reverend Durstan R. McDonald to MLK Regarding an Invitation

Friday, March 15, 1968

The Hobart and William Smith Colleges have brought influential leaders to their campus from the civil rights and black power movements. Many students desire a further understanding of the Gospel and have requested to invite Dr. King to speak. The dates provided for this engagement are unfortunately subsequent to the assignation of Dr. King.

MLK Index Card

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines John Dewey's views on Metaphysics. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses. Topics covered include theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches, sermons, and writings.

Remarks at the Lincoln Memorial

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Mathew Ahmann, Executive Director of the National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice, asserts that the citizens of the US have permitted evil and racial discrimination for too long. He joins forces with those against inequality with hopes for a better lifestyle for all Americans regardless of the color of their skin.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

This note, signed "A white citizen who likes good Negroes," warns that President Johnson is no friend to the Civil Rights Movement, only supporting African American voting rights to earn more votes for his reelection. It is unclear if both sides of this note were written by the same author. Both discuss how they are conscientious objectors, although they object to an integrated society, writing that "[No] high-class, intelligent persons (politicians excepted) will accept the Negro when he has an axe to grind."

Letter from MLK to Office of Inspector of Foreign Dividends

Saturday, January 18, 1964

In this letter, Dr. King states that he is the beneficial owner of the Copyright Royalties paid by Laurence Pollinger, Ltd. and that he is still receiving income from them.

Letter from Sue M. Stiles to MLK

Sunday, May 24, 1964

Sue Stiles writes Dr. King to assert her viewpoints and beliefs according to her childhood and upbringing. In expressing these truths, Stiles affirms her support in Dr. King's practices in human rights and encloses a financial contribution.