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"CHINA"

Letter from Dora McDonald to Marshall E. Bean

Thursday, July 8, 1965

Dora McDonald communicates to Marshall E. Bean that Dr. King is remembering him in his prayers and sends a photograph as a visual reminder. Miss McDonald also includes a scripture from the Book of Psalms.

Letter from Margo George to MLK

Friday, April 23, 1965

Margo George, a student at the Kent School, wrote to Dr. King requesting any suggestions on how she could help with the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Parker

Dr. King sympathizes with the unfortunate plight of Mrs. Parker's financial situation and encourages her to remain steadfast.

Letter from Mrs. Mildred Yacks to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

Mildred Yacks writes Dr. King, complimenting him on his character but shares her belief that King's efforts are useless unless he redirects the youth.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The sender of this letter lists six main goals that should be accomplished in 1968. The sender pleads for Dr. King to take leadership in accomplishing these goals.

Brief for the Petitioners

Saturday, October 1, 1966

This brochure illustrates questions as well as events pertaining to petitioners during the Civil Rights Movement. Important petitioners, such as Dr. King and Ralph David Abernathy, were convicted and charged with Contempt of Court in violation of the First and Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution.

Instructions for Honorary Degree Recipients

This document reflects instructions for Dr. King as the recipient of an honorary degree from Yale University. The program also includes some random handwritten notes by Dr. King and information regarding his seating arrangement.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, August 14, 1964

This letter references the enclosure of a check as an advance for the German edition of "Strength to Love".

King Says Voice of White Moderate Needed

Monday, March 25, 1963

This press release entitled, "King Says Voice of White Moderate Needed," highlights Dr. King's challenge to moderate white southerners to become more vocal against racial injustices.

Letter from Agnes Rudell to MLK

Sunday, July 30, 1967

Ms. Rudell suggests that Dr. King should relocate to another country due to his dissatisfaction with the United States of America.

Letter from Helen Ramirez to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967

Helen Ramirez of The Brunswick Foundation informs Dr. King that they cannot donate to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Look Magazine: Can Johnson Win His Other War?

Tuesday, June 13, 1967

The Office of Economic Opportunity republished this spotlight on President Johnson's War on Poverty from Look Magazine in June 1967. The editors discuss the "poverty of opportunity" plaguing nearly 1 in every 6 Americans, saying that Johnson's War on Poverty makes an attempt to combat the economic conditions of America's most vulnerable, including Negro Americans. The articles also shed light on the numerous shortcomings the Johnson Administration-supported legislation has encountered amongst legislators and the American public.

Letter from MLK to Charles A. Melton

Monday, April 25, 1966

Dr. King declines an invitation to visit Westchester, Pennsylvania due to the time he must devote to the Chicago campaign and helping political candidates in Alabama.

The Lonesome Road

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

Stanley D. Levison sends Dr. King an article from The Washington Post titled "The Lonesome Road," which is a review of Dr. Kings book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Martin Duberman, the author of the article, explains Dr. King's reasons for writing the book, and Duberman also provides a favorable review of the publication.

Letter from President Johnson to Robert W. Gilmore

Wednesday, August 9, 1967

President Johnson writes Robert Gilmore regarding the "Democratic Action in South Vietnam" statement of the Center for War/Peace Studies. Johnson assures him that the U.S. government shares his concern for the development of democracy in Vietnam.

Outline Regarding Jacques Maritain

Dr. King outlines in great detail Catholic philosopher Jacques Maritain's views on: communism, democracy, politics, and the relation between church and state.

Letter from H. Rogosin to MLK

Tuesday, August 8, 1967

H. Rogosin writes to Dr. King encouraging him to read the enclosed material on "The Role of Psychologists in Helping Solve Problems of Intergroup and Racial Tensions."

God

Dr. King writes about God, according to Isaiah 31:3.

I've Been To The Mountaintop

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

"I've Been to the Mountaintop" is the last speech Dr. King delivered. A day after making this address at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, Tennessee, he was assassinated on the balcony of his hotel room. Dr. King spoke of faith, nonviolent protest and his support of the Memphis Sanitation Workers Strike. He urged both a march and a boycott against Memphis area businesses. Dr. King ended his speech by musing about his previous brush with death and other threats against him.

Strength to Love

In this article, Dr. King's accomplishments are highly spoken upon. There is also information on his book "Strength to Love," and a form to order additional copies of his books.

Gandhi Society for Human Rights

Thursday, May 31, 1962

The Gandhi Society for Human Rights lists the names of individuals whom they would like to serve on the organization's Board of Directors in which Dr. King serves as the Honorary President.

Letter from Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall to MLK

Monday, June 17, 1963

Assisrtant US Attorney General Burk Marshall informs Dr. King that the allegations of police misconduct in Danville, Virginia are being investigated by the Department of Justice and assures him that the appropriate actions will take place "with respect to any violations of federal law."

Operation Breadbasket Advises Tastee Bread Company on Negro Economic Relations

The Cincinnati and Midwestern Division of SCLC's Operation Breadbasket provides Tastee Bread Company with several recommendations concerning employment practices and involvement in the Negro community.

MLK - Form Letter Draft

Dr. King writes a form letter to acknowledge the "sacrifices, fasting, and prayer" from people throughout the world.

Law Suit Against Wrens Nest

Wednesday, October 11, 1967

This letter from Mrs. A. L. Wilkinson to a lawyer, is urging this person to help a man to win his case against tha Association responsible for keeping Negroes from entering the Wren's Nest in Atlanta.

Telegram from Icabod Flewellen to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

Icabod Flewellen welcomes Dr. King to Cleveland, Ohio.

Gray Power

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

This sketch was originally sent to Dr. King from John McClellan along with a letter that titled the sketch, "Gray Power."

Civil Rights Act of 1957

Monday, September 9, 1957

The Civil Rights Act was signed into law on September 9, 1957 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Commonly referred to as the Civil Rights Act of 1957, this was the first such federal law since Reconstruction. The law was aimed at ending voter discrimination tactics such as poll taxes and literacy tests, but it also created the Civil Rights Commission to ensure proper administration of the law.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. William Lawson

Wednesday, May 6, 1964

Dora McDonald writes in response to a request from Reverend William Lawson of Texas Southern University. McDonald encloses a biographical sketch and photograph of Dr. King, then relays a message from the Reverend to exclude a reception for him on May 17.

Letter from Hano Bailey to MLK

Friday, December 22, 1967

Hano Bailey praises Dr. King for asking black athletes "to sit out of the Olympics." He informs Dr. King that there are 15 teachers at his University writing letters to their relatives in support of Dr. King's campaign.