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United Nations Seminar Brochure

Washington, D.C., New York (NY), CHINA

This pamphlet offers information on the registration, time, place, and cost of the United Nations Seminar being held in Washington D.C from October 17-21, 1966. Enclosed is a registration form for the Seminar.

Letter from MLK to Harry Belafonte

Tuesday, July 23, 1963
Washington, D.C., CANADA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, California (CA), New York (NY)

Dr. King writes Harry Belafonte to discuss the date, time, and occasion for the March on Washington. Dr. King also expresses his desire for Belafonte to be present.

Letter from Berry Gordy to Reverend Wyatt Tee Walker

Thursday, July 18, 1963
Detroit, MI, Atlanta, GA

Mr. Gordy writes to Mr. Walker to negotiate album production and royalty rates for Dr. King's speeches.

The Dilemma of Negro Americans

Chicago, IL, ITALY, Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), EGYPT, Georgia (GA), Philadelphia, PA, Mississippi (MS), VIETNAM

In this draft of a chapter for his book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?, Dr. King offers an in-depth description of the plight of African Americans over the past few hundred years and how it will never be fully understood by their white counterparts. He recounts the issues associated with American slavery – the dehumanization of slaves and the destruction of the family unit. He ties what happened in the past to what is occurring in the present, explaining that because of these layers of oppression African Americans have to play catch up to be seen as equals in America.

Correspondence - Aftermath of Dr. King's Assassination, 4/5/68

Friday, April 5, 1968
Chattanooga, TN, Memphis, TN, Connecticut (CT), California (CA), Nashville, TN

This letter, originating from Chattanooga, TN on the day immediately following Dr. King's assassination, is a personal note of condolence and lament. In it the writer identifies Dr. King as "truly America's outstanding citizen of our time". The writer and addressee are unidentified.

Eulogy for Sixteenth Street Baptist Church Victims

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

This is Dr. King?s eulogy for three of the four young girls killed in the 1963 bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. God gives man the right to exercise good and evil, King says, but God wills that everything will happen for the good ? that out of tragedy comes redemption. Martyred in the struggle for freedom, the girls have become symbols of the crusade and of the faith that sustains it. King speaks of forgiving those who murdered the girls and the need to transform the system, the way of life, and the philosophy that led to the bombing.

Letter from Murray Thomson to MLK

Thursday, February 3, 1966
Atlanta, GA, CANADA

Thomson, a representative of the Canadian Friends' Service Committee, invites Dr. King to participate in a week-long conference held in Toronto, Ontario. The event will consist of diplomats from all over the world.

United States Department of State Reprint of Vice President Nixon Speech

Thursday, December 6, 1956
New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

This document contains the text of an address made by Vice President Nixon before the Automobile Manufacturers Association in New York.

SNCC Newsletter - The Student Voice

Friday, March 5, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Arkansas (AR), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Selma, AL, Maryland (MD)

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) began publishing "The Student Voice" in June 1960. The news magazine contained reports on SNCC activities, marches, sit-ins and other events related to the civil rights movement. The copy shown here is addressed to Andy Young.

Letter from President Johnson to MLK on Assuming Presidency

Monday, December 2, 1963
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

President Johnson writes Dr. King thanking him for his sympathetic telegram as he assumes the Presidency and assures him that he will continue the fight for civil rights initiated by President Kennedy.

A Knock At Midnight

Sunday, August 9, 1964
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

In a tape-recorded address to the Riverside Church in New York City, Dr. King compares the civil rights struggle to a parable from St. Luke. His sermon specifically tackles contemporary social issues such as segregation, discrimination, and the philosophy of nonviolence. In addition, Dr. King explores the role of the church in dealing with such problems.

Copyright Agreement for MLK’s Nobel Lecture

Oslo, Norway, NORWAY, Stockholm, Sweden

This is the Copyright Assignment Agreement established between Dr. King and the Nobel Foundation.

Telegram from the New York Chapter of Americans for Democratic Action to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958
New York, NY, New York (NY)

The New York Chapter of Americans for Democratic Action wishes Dr. King well in his recovery.

Letter from Ellen Tamaki to MLK

Friday, November 24, 1967
California (CA), VIETNAM

Ellen M. Tamaki, from Berkeley, California, has a list of questions for Dr. King that center on accusations of "merg[ing] the peace movement with the civil rights struggle." The writer references Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War and asks about the motivation for his opinions.

History: Voltaire

Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King references a quote from the philosopher and historian Voltaire.

Letter from Matthew Schoenwald to MLK

Monday, May 18, 1964
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Matthew Schoenwald , manager of the Undergarment and Negligee Workers Union, encloses a check in the amount of $100 as a contribution to the SCLC.


Dr. King discusses the "ontological structure of self" and its relation to symbols.

A Resolution for Dr. King from the Church Women United in Atlanta

Atlanta, GA

This is a resolution honoring Dr. King's life and work upon his untimely death.

Letter from Ethelyn Hall to MLK

Saturday, November 30, 1963
Texas (TX)

Ethelyn L. Hall, a student at the University of Houston, writes Dr. King in reference to SCLC's distribution of literature. Hall is preparing a term paper for a sociology class and requests any available literature relating to civil rights, interracial relations, and racism. She is also interested in learning the purposes and functions of the SCLC.

Reader's Digest: Martin Luther King's March on Washington

Monday, April 1, 1968
Washington, D.C.

This April 1968 article by William Schulz warns that the Poor People's March on Washington and the planned disruption of the nation's capital pose an enormous challenge to security forces and may humiliate the country internationally.

Existentialism Defined

Dr. King provides a descriptive definition of the word Existentialism, based in part on the works of Russian religious and philosophical leader Nikolai Berdyaev.

Letter from John D. Reinheimer to MLK

Monday, December 4, 1967
Ohio (OH)

Mr. Reinheimer, Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Wayne County Interfaith Commission on Human Rights, inquires about Dr. King's response toward debasing remarks made about him by Ohio Congressman John M. Ashbrook. The author states that the Commission does not agree with Mr. Ashbrook's comments and would like to assist in refuting them.

Burn Baby Burn: Problems of the Urban Ghetto

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

This letter from the Georgia Chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union announces a cocktail reception for Aryeh Neier at the Wit's End.

Letter from MLK to Ellis Pinkston

Friday, January 19, 1968
Chicago, IL

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Mrs. Ellis Pinkston for her support. He also extends gratitude on behalf of Mrs. King.

Letter from John Moody

Thursday, February 22, 1968
New Orleans, LA, Washington, D.C., California (CA), Maryland (MD)

Mr. Moody discusses his hopes of creating an event that will demonstrate the phenomenon of Harumbe, with hopes of it becoming a National holiday. The proposed name of this day is "Harumbe", a Swahili term meaning Let's Get Together. Moody suggests May 19, the birthday of Malcolm X, as the date for this event to occur. Additionally, Moody provides an outline for the festivities, and requests that Dr. King contribute his suggestions after reviewing the proposal.

Letter from Kenneth Barney to MLK

Monday, August 22, 1966
New York (NY)

Dr. Kenneth R. Barney sends this letter of support to Dr. King. Barney expresses his appreciation for King's interpretation of "black power" and admires his wisdom on the country's current state of affairs. He urges Dr. King to keep a "broad perspective" on the problems of American society and civilization. Barney believes that domestic and foreign policies can no longer be considered separately.


Dr. King provides a definition of the term supralapsarianism.

Letter from A. Dale Fiers to MLK

Saturday, January 15, 1966
Indiana (IN), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Texas (TX), Dallas, TX

A. Dale Fiers, Executive Secretary for the International Convention of Christian Churches, informs Dr. King of the order of events to take place at the Dallas Assembly of the International Convention on September 25, 1966.

Letter from MLK to A. Phillip Randolph

Monday, April 13, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. King writes A. Philip Randolph to acknowledge the need for future strategic planning in the civil rights movement.

Letter from David Goodwin to MLK

New York (NY), Washington, D.C.

David Goodwin, a child 16 years of age, is outraged by the racial issues in the United States and hopes to be of assistance during the March on Washington despite his young age.