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Telegram Text from MLK to USAG Robert Kennedy

Sunday, October 6, 1963

Dr. King requests that Attorney General Robert Kennedy intervene in New Orleans to prevent further intimidation of civil rights supporters by police.

Letter from Annie L. Cook to MLK

Thursday, December 17, 1964

Annie Cook asks Dr. King to make a speech at a program sponsored by the Greenbrier County branch of the NAACP. She predicts that the program will be informative and improve communication between Negros and whites.

Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence Newsletter

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

This newsletter, Volume I Number 4, is published by Henry and Sue Bass of Atlanta. They write about the Atlanta Peace Parade, an anti-Vietnam protest to take place on August 6, 1967. The Atlanta Peace Parade would become the south's first major peace parade, about which the Basses write President Johnson was worried, calling for counter-demonstrations.

Official Religious Representatives Attending MLK Funeral

This document contains a list of official religious representatives who will attend Dr. King's funeral.

Letter from Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker to the Honorable Harold E. Stassen

Thursday, May 7, 1964

Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker requests that the Honorable Harold E. Stassen, of the American Baptist Convention, contribute a commentary on Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait."

Telegram from Randolph Blackwell to Mr. M. H. Thomas

Friday, August 6, 1965

Randolph T. Blackwell sends a telegram to M. H. Thomas to permit the SCLC to honor requests for telephone installations made by Carole Hoover.

Invitation to President Kennedy's Inaugural Concert

This invitation was sent to Dr. and Mrs. King, inviting them to attend a concert celebrating the inauguration of President John F. Kennedy and Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson. The concert features Mischa Elman, a Russian emigre and famed musician.

Letter from Lucille Banta to MLK

Thursday, October 27, 1966

In addition to a financial contribution, Lucille Banta sends Dr. King a proposal for the civil rights and peace movements to oppose the Vietnam War. She suggests that they work together to "plan and organize a nationwide United Peace and Freedom Parade to Washington."

Telegram from the New York Chapter of Americans for Democratic Action to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958

The New York Chapter of Americans for Democratic Action wishes Dr. King well in his recovery.

Telegram from Sen. Edward Kennedy to MLK

Saturday, October 17, 1964

Senator and Mrs. Edward M. Kennedy congratulate Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Dora McDonald to A. Dale Fiers

Friday, September 23, 1966

Miss Dora McDonald writes Dr. Fiers regarding Dr. King's visit to Dallas, Texas.

Letter from MLK to Murray Thomson

Thursday, February 18, 1965

Dr. King writes Murray Thomson expressing his inability to accept an invitation to be a consultant for Thomson's organization's conference in Portland, Ontario. He explains that due to his commitment to the civil rights struggle he can only accept a limited amount of engagements.

Adverse Letter to MLK

The author of this letter negatively expresses his opinion for Dr. King and the civil rights movement.

Love of God

Dr. King cites a scripture from the biblical book of Isaiah referencing God's goal to redeem all mankind.

SCLC Newsletter: November-December 1963

Friday, November 1, 1963

Dr. King writes about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy and how it affected the citizens of the United States. King asserts that Kennedy handled international and national issues "with a depth of concern, a breadth of intelligence, and a keen sense of history." Dr. King says that while the question of who killed Kennedy is important, one should ask "what killed him" instead.


Dr. King cites Karen Horney's "The Neurotic Personality of Our Time.


Dr. King outlines historical information regarding the Anabaptists and the religious philosophy of the group.

Letter from Margo Belden to MLK

Thursday, March 21, 1968

Margo Belden inquires about materials from Dr. King for Choice '68, the national collegiate presidential primary.

Letter from Mary E. Bull to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

Mary Bull asks Dr. King to reply to an earlier letter, of which she encloses a copy. Mrs. Bull asserts that the Civil Rights Movement made excellent progress up to 1966, but afterwards seemed divided. She wants to know the reasons for this division and asks Dr. King to bring back the supporters who have strayed.

Telegram from Phil Stovin to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967

Mr. Stovin praises Dr. King for his nonviolent approach towards achieving peace.

Letter from Dorris M. Roberts to MLK

Dorris Roberts, Chairman of the New Breed Committee, writes to Dr. King concerning inaccurate statements regarding her organization's participation in a recent march. Mrs. Roberts encloses a newspaper article regarding the march and also requests that Dr. King release a statement declaring that the New Breed Committee were supporters of the march and not protestors.


Dr. King references the Book of Amos regarding the ethics of God. According to the scriptures God is just and fair and demands "justice and sacrifice."

Anti-Poverty Expenditures that Cheat Federal Taxpayers and the Poor

Harry G. and Elizabeth R. Brown express their concerns about housing in America. They claim that while open housing will help Negroes who can afford it, those who cannot will continue to live in slums. They pose the idea of reforming the tax policy as a solution to this problem.

Choice 68 Request for Information

The students of the Catholic University of America are participating in the Choice 68' elections and request that Dr. King provide information of himself so that they may further promote his Presidential candidacy.

Letter from Elisabeth Leonard to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967

Elisabeth Leonard expresses her support and gratitude for Dr. King's work, which includes his speeches about the Vietnam War as well as an upcoming speech on the Spring Mobilization.


Dr. King reveals the definition of a dictator according to Plato.

Letter from John Brooks to MLK

John Brooks affirms the importance of Dr. King's work and informs Dr. King of an enclosed contribution to the SCLC.

A Look to the Future

Monday, September 2, 1957

Dr. King addresses the Highlander Folk School during the organization's twenty-fifth anniversary. He discusses the many accomplishments and hurdles of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to Rev. E. Wayne Roberts

Sunday, January 3, 1965

Dr. King writes Rev. E. Wayne Roberts in support of his fellow friend and SCLC Co-Founder Rev. C. K. Steele, Jr. He notes Rev. Steele as "a thorough and competent pastor" that exemplifies the teachings of Jesus Christ.

MLK Address Regarding the Negro Family

Thursday, January 27, 1966

In this address, Dr. King discusses the struggles of the Negro family. He states that the Negro family's life determines the individuals' capacity to love. Dr. King also discusses how American slavery has impacted the Negro family.