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Letter from Ellen Tamaki to MLK

Friday, November 24, 1967

Ellen M. Tamaki, from Berkeley, California, has a list of questions for Dr. King that center on accusations of "merg[ing] the peace movement with the civil rights struggle." The writer references Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War and asks about the motivation for his opinions.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Moisa Bulboaca

Monday, May 16, 1966

Dora McDonald responds to a request from Louisiana native Moisa Bulboaca invites Dr. King to visit Romania. Ms. McDonald states Dr. King is involved in the freedom struggle and at the present time will be unable to accept the invitation.

SCLC Mail Log: March 4, 1968

Monday, March 4, 1968

This mail log lists the names of people and organizations sending correspondences to several SCLC staff members.

Letter from MLK to John L. Tilley

Tuesday, January 6, 1959

Dr. King is requesting the use of Morehouse College for a three-day conference of southern leaders. The conference will be sponsored by the SCLC and the Fellowship of Reconciliation. Target issues include nonviolence and social action.

Montesquieu

Dr. King references French social commentator Montesquieu regarding his ideas on history. King quotes, "He attempts to show how civilization has been modified by the action of the external world."

Hegel

Dr. King references German philosopher, George Hegal, in this handwritten notecard.

Letter from Nelson A. Rockefeller to MLK

Tuesday, July 18, 1967

Governor Nelson Rockefeller writes Dr. King thanking him for sending a copy of his book "Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?".

People to People: The Law is Majestic

Saturday, July 31, 1965

Dr. King pays homage to the numerous lawyers of the Civil Rights Movement and asserts that the one unifying belief among lawyers is the idea that "law is majestic and the judicial process is supreme." Dr. King supports this claim with a story about his Negro lawyers successfully winning a case in Birmingham with an all-white jury.

The Committee of Clergy and Laymen Speak on Vietnam

As a public service, the Committee of Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam have reprinted several statements and addresses of its members. The selected addresses of Dr. King were chosen because of their poignant exposition of the then current issues surrounding the Vietnam War. In the compilation's forward, Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr takes the opportunity to address two of the misconceptions that surrounded the included works of Dr. King.

Annual Address Delivered at the First Annual Institute on Nonviolence and Social Change

Monday, December 3, 1956

Dr. King's speech at the First Annual Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change addresses many issues regarding the African American. The most recurring issues are of obtaining and maintaining freedom, equality and personal dignity.

Test of Address by Vice President Richard M. Nixon

Friday, October 19, 1956

Vice President Nixon discusses the legacy of Alfred E. Smith and how it correlates with the American dream.

Letter from Archbishop Hallinan to MLK

In this letter, Archbishop Hallinan offers his words of gratitude to Dr. King, for his work, and requests a copy of "Where Do We Go From Here."

Letter from Congressman Charles Diggs to MLK

Monday, July 22, 1963

Michigan Congressman Charles Diggs returns the proposed plans for the August 28th, 1963 "March on Washington" to Dr. King.

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, August 3, 1967

Senator Robert Kennedy declines Dr. King's invitation to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's 10th Anniversary Convention in Atlanta, Georgia.

Reason

Dr. King cites several scriptures from the Bible regarding reason.

Letter from Delight S. Gordon to MLK

Monday, January 9, 1967

Ms. Gordon urges Dr. King to use his influence as a great leader to persuade Negros not to condone the actions of Adam Clayton Powell.

Statement on Nonviolence in the South

Thursday, January 10, 1957

This document is a statement addressing the need to combat the growing violence between southern Caucasian Americans and African Americans.

Letter from Eric Malling to MLK

Tuesday, December 21, 1965

Statement from MLK Returning from Receiving Nobel Prize

Friday, December 18, 1964

Upon returning from receiving the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King issued this statement on segregation, calling it "nothing but a new form of slavery."

Annual Record and Report of Life and Work

This document is a blank "Annual
Record and Report of Life and Work" for the American Baptist Convention. Had it been filled out, it would have contained information about the activities of Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Telegram from MLK to Judy Silver & Gordon Geller

Dr. King salutes the Cincinnati Committee of Concern for Soviet Jewry for their efforts to end discrimination against the Jewish people of the U.S.S.R.

Program for Annual Meeting of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference

This document is a brief agenda for the September 1962 Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Rev. Samuel B. McKinney

Dr. and Mrs. King express their condolences for the passing of Reverend Samuel B. McKinney's mother.

Letter from Ralph David Abernathy to the Executive Board of S.C.L.C

Tuesday, September 29, 1964

In this letter, Ralph Abernathy provides the financial statement for the S.C.L.C.'s September 1, 1963 - August 31, 1964 fiscal year.

Letter From William N. Goldsmith to MLK

Sunday, May 26, 1963

William N. Goldsmith informs Dr. King of funds that were collected at Brandeis University for the SCLC. Mr. Goldsmith also apologizes for Dr. King having to bear so much of the load in Birmingham.

Letter from MLK to Aileen B. Armstrong

Wednesday, October 16, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Armstrong for her letter and contribution. He explains the difference her donation will make in the SCLC's efforts to integrate "the Negro into all aspects of American life."

Letter from Juanita Epps to MLK

Tuesday, March 23, 1965

Juanita Epps sends Dr. King a check on behalf of the People's Community Church of Queens, New York. Epps acknowledges that their church doesn't have a huge congregation but they wanted to make their contribution towards justice and equality.

North and South

The SCLC newsletter informs its readers of the recent events that its members have taken part in. Hosea Williams went to Chicago to conduct a voter registration and voter motivation drive. Also, the SCLC's Operation Breadbasket, led by Jesse Jackson, made an agreement with a big food chain company. The company agreed to transfer some accounts from white banks to struggling Negro banks and to offer its Negro customers products manufactured by small Negro firms.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. Benjamin E. Mays

Tuesday, October 19, 1965

Dora McDonald informs Dr. Benjamin E. Mays that Dr. King will attend the Morehouse Board of Trustees luncheon.

Letter from Wilma Fondel to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967

Wilma Fondel expresses interest in attending Dr. King's pilgrimage to Israel.