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Letter from Robert Wacker to MLK

Tuesday, March 16, 1965

Robert Wacker is highly distressed about housing discrimination in his neighborhood. In this letter to Dr. King, Wacker displays his determination towards eradicating segregated communities and encourages Dr. King to rally around this issue.

MLK's Letter Addressing Poverty

Dr. King addresses poverty, unemployment and other issues relevant to Americans and the mission of the SCLC before requesting funds to counter these issues.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Gates

Dr. King composes a draft for a letter to Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Gates. He expresses his appreciation for their contribution and encouraging words. He discusses the SCLC's support of other organizations that are consistent with Judeo-Christian values and conveys their dedication to equality.

Letter from John D. Reinheimer to MLK

Monday, December 4, 1967

Mr. Reinheimer, Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Wayne County Interfaith Commission on Human Rights, inquires about Dr. King's response toward debasing remarks made about him by Ohio Congressman John M. Ashbrook. The author states that the Commission does not agree with Mr. Ashbrook's comments and would like to assist in refuting them.

Telegram from Nathaniel Tillman Jr. to MLK

Thursday, February 28, 1963

The Washington, D.C. chapter of Morehouse College Alumni invites Dr. King to speak at its first annual Public Affairs Forum. The organization suggests a topic of "The Negro 100 Years After Emancipation."

Statement Issued from Harlem Hospital by MLK

Tuesday, September 30, 1958

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the staff at Harlem Hospital and those who supported him during his stay at this location. He asserts that the telegrams, letters, calls and other means of contact have been accepted as a token of respect.

Notes about Books

Dr. King opposes the existence of books that degrade the Negro image and falsely contribute to a "national brainwashing." He cites quotations from novelist John Steinbeck, which discourse on the "sacred" nature of a book.

Operation Breadbasket

Thursday, August 25, 1966

Operation Breadbasket outlines the results of negotiations between them and the Coca-Cola Bottling Company located in Chicago, Illinois. The negotiations brought about the opening of thirty-nine positions in the company that will be filled by Negro employees.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Queen Mother Moore

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Dora McDonald communicates with Queen Mother Moore to discuss Dr. King's inability to meet with her prior to the Washington Campaign for Jobs or Income. Queen Mother Moore was an important figure during the Civil Right Movement and a founder of the Republic of New Afrika.

Adverse Postcard to MLK

American Opinion illustrates a propaganda postcard of Dr. King that accuses him of being a communist. The photo on the postcard was taken at the Highlander School in 1957 which trained leaders in nonviolent passive resistance.

Letter from MLK to Berl Bernhard

Monday, August 20, 1962

Dr. King writes Berl Bernhard, Staff Director of the Commission on Civil Rights, to introduce him to Mrs. Walter Lee Mengledorff. Mrs. Mengledorff is a resident of Savannah, Georgia, and "has concrete evidence on voting irregularities in Chatham County, Georgia. She is interested in bringing the whole matter to the attention of the Commission on Civil Rights.

Letter from Leon Lowry to the King's

Saturday, December 8, 1962

A. Leon Lowry invites the Kings to speak at Beulah Baptist Institutional Church in Florida for their Men's and Women's services.

Jesus: Humanity and Ethical Character

Dr. King lists verses from the New Testament on Jesus as an ethical character and man as sinner.

Letter from John Moorman to MLK

Friday, June 9, 1967

John Moorman, President of the Student Christian Association at Guilford College, invites Dr. King to be the speaker for their Religious Emphasis Week in April of 1968. Moorman discusses details of the arrangement, including Dr. King's honorarium and travel expenses.

The Atlanta United Negro College Fund Inter Alumni Council Flyer

This flyer, from the Atlanta United Negro College Fund Inter Alumni Council, announces its Annual UNCF Statewide Recognition Banquet.

Letter from Dorothy I. Height to MLK

Wednesday, October 4, 1967

Dorothy Height invites Dr. King to the 32nd National Convention of the National Council of Negro Women. Height serves as the national president of the NCNW.

Brief for the Petitioners

Saturday, October 1, 1966

This brochure illustrates questions as well as events pertaining to petitioners during the Civil Rights Movement. Important petitioners, such as Dr. King and Ralph David Abernathy, were convicted and charged with Contempt of Court in violation of the First and Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution.

Statement by MLK & Dr. W. G. Anderson

Wednesday, July 25, 1962

Dr. King and Dr. Anderson release a statement declaring a "Day of Penance" for those in the Negro community who have not yet adopted the nonviolent strategy.

Letter from Odell to Dora McDonald

Odell writes to Ms. McDonald, requesting a signature of an enclosed letter from Dr. King.

Letter from Julian Bond to MLK

Friday, September 15, 1967

Julian Bond, a member of the Georgia House of Representatives, encloses a memorandum that proposes that the Atlanta Student Movement performs the following actions: "educate and involve the community, convince the Atlanta Board of Education that 'everyone cares,' and force action from the Board."

MLK Draft from Strength to Love: The Answer to a Perplexing Question

Here is a draft chapter from Dr. King's book "Strength to Love" in which Dr. King discusses that the casting out of evil in human lives requires "both man and God."

Transcendence and Immanence of God

Dr. King quotes Jeremiah 23:23, and he provides his interpretation of the biblical passage.

Letter from Rosamond C. Kay, Jr. to MLK

Monday, December 4, 1967

Reverend Rosamond Kay, Jr. invites Dr. King to speak at Morning Star Baptist Church in Pennsylvania. He also informs Dr. King he is a 1939 graduate of Morehouse College, and their fathers are life-long friends.

Fort Valley State College Vesper Program

Sunday, October 23, 1955

This program outlines the events of a service held at Fort Valley State College in Georgia and notes Dr. King as the keynote speaker.

Declaration of the World Council of Peace on Vietnam

Monday, February 12, 1968

The World Council of Peace issued this press release declaring their position against the Vietnam War. They state that they are pro-peace and against American oppression and that President Johnson is ignoring their peace proposals.

Letter from Carol Thomas to MLK

Saturday, February 24, 1968

Carol Thomas writes Dr. King to inform him that she is making a donation to help with the war on poverty. Enclosed with the letter is a $125.00 check. She also explains that she received one of King's books in the mail. Ms. Thomas further inquires of the purchasing and mailing information of books made to the public.

Letter from Joseph M. Hendricks to MLK

Monday, September 10, 1962

Joseph M. Hendricks writes Dr. King requesting a copy of the speech Dr. King gave at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.

Waste in Foreign Aid

Sunday, February 19, 1967

Irene M. Kashmer suggests Dr. King address the issue of wasted foreign aid in his march on Washington. She encloses a New York Times article from February 15, 1967 to emphasize her point.

Address at a Conference of Religious Leaders Under the Sponsorship of the President's Committee on Government Contracts

Monday, May 11, 1959

Dr. King addresses a delegation of religious leaders at a conference hosted by the President's Committee on Government Contracts. In this pivotal speech, Dr. King outlines the responsibilites of clergymen and government officials in combating poverty and economic discrimination. He stresses the need for lay leaders and representatives of government to bodly speak out against the vestiges of discrimination that continuously hinder the economic and social progress of Negroes in America.

Telegram from Sylvester Nichols to Mrs. King

Friday, May 3, 1968

Mrs. King received many telegrams, following the assassination of Dr. King. This telegram, in particular, came from Sylvester Nichols and the members of the Brooklyn branch of the National Association of Negro Musicians. The association wanted to extend sympathy to the King family and to inform Mrs. King that they would continue to live out Dr. King's principles.