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James H. Halsey Writes MLK About Alumni Solicitation

Friday, March 15, 1963

James H. Halsey writes Dr. King about financial support for the University of Bridgeport and its program.

Letter from Mary Hart to MLK

In one of three letters Mary Hart sends Dr. King, she thanks him for his efforts in assisting poor people in America. Hart says that she is representing all poor people and sends apologies that she will not be present for the March of Poor People to Washington.

Dr. King in his Office at SCLC

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Open Letter from MLK to Negro Youth

Tuesday, September 6, 1966

In the wake of the urban uprisings of 1966, Dr. King writes an open letter to Negro youth empathizing with their desire to return to school and to find jobs. He mentions that he's written the President urging funding so all poor children can attend school and advocating implementation of a public works program to provide jobs for youth. He encourages young people to abstain from violence as ineffective in achieving their goals.

Letter from Chuck Barris to MLK

Tuesday, May 4, 1965

Chuck Barris has received national monetary support for the truck rentals used for the Selma to Montgomery March.

MLK Urges the Vice President to Visit the South

Thursday, June 13, 1957

Dr. King informs the press that he is articulating plans with the SCLC to launch a campaign to prepare the Negro community for the 1958 election. Dr. King appeals to Vice President Richard Nixon to perform three duties to aid the practice of justice and freedom in the United States. The first of the three involves personal appearances of Nixon to speak to the people of the South about civil rights. The second duty asserts Nixon's initiation of the United States Constitution to support the Negro's voting rights.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rabbi Joel Goor

Monday, August 17, 1964

Dora McDonald informs Rabbi Joel Goor of Dr. King's absence from the city due to an engagement to speak before the European Baptist Federation. She promises to have Dr. King signed a copy of his book for Goor to keep and appreciates Goor's support to the civil rights movement.

Telegram from the James A. Bailey Family to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958

The James A. Bailey family offers its prayers for Dr. King's recovery.

Letter from John T. Walker to MLK

Wednesday, February 21, 1968

On behalf of the Washington Cathedral. John Walker extends an invitation for Dr. King to preach at the Cathedral and articulate the true premise of the Poor People's Campaign to their congregation. Walker believes that Dr. King's physical presence will help eliminate doubts that this civil disobedience campaign will turn to violence. Dr. King is would eventually preach the final sermon of his life on March 31 at the Washington Cathedral under the subject "Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution."

Discrimination Is a World Wide Issue

Dr. King delivers this address speaking to humanity's failure to offset discrimination. He believes the United States, with all its technological and democratic advances, could stand to learn from the social morality of India, which is considered a "less developed nation." Dr.

Declaration of the World Council of Peace on Vietnam

Monday, February 12, 1968

The World Council of Peace issued this press release declaring their position against the Vietnam War. They state that they are pro-peace and against American oppression and that President Johnson is ignoring their peace proposals.

Holiday Card to Mrs. King

This holiday card was sent to Mrs. King from the Miller Family.

American Journal: Let Justice Roll Down

Monday, June 6, 1966

Carey McWilliams writes to Dr. King to inform him his article, "Let Justice Roll Down," was included in the American Journal, a publication by the US Information Service aimed at representing opinions and current subjects of interest in the United States. This edition, published in 1965, was he 5th year in a row Dr. King had contributed an article describing the tempo of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.

Letter from MLK to Peter Mansfield

Wednesday, November 3, 1965

Dr. King accepts the invitation extended by Peter Mansfield, Acting President of the National Union of South African Students, to give the opening address for the organization's 41st Annual Congress at the University of Natal in South Africa.

Questions Which Easter Answers

Dr. King writes a sermon entitled, "Questions Which Easter Answers." King asserts that while many people attend church on Easter because of its value as it relates to Christ, the true significance in Easter is in the fact that is makes one think of immortality; as symbolized in Jesus Christ.

God

Dr. King cites a scripture from the Book of Job, elaborating on the goodness of God and it's correlation with human suffering.

Letter from Andre Katz to MLK

Wednesday, January 3, 1968

Andrea Katz, editor of Quadrangle Books, informs Dr. King about a book titled, "Where to, Black Man?" It is a diary of an African American man, Ed Smith, who traveled to Africa to reaffirm his American identity.

Memorial Service Flyer - Robert F. Kennedy

Robert F. Kennedy, Attorney General of the United States offered extemporaneous remarks on the death of Dr. King. He wrote, "What we need in the United States...is love and wisdom and compassion toward one another, and a feeling of justice toward those who still suffer within our own country, whether they be white or they be black."

Letter from John Dempsey to S. Ernest Vandiver

Monday, July 30, 1962

Connecticut governor John Dempsey writes to Georgia governor S. Earnest Vandiver expressing his concern for the safety of Dr. King and his associates.

Address at a Conference of Religious Leaders Under the Sponsorship of the President's Committee on Government Contracts

Monday, May 11, 1959

Dr. King addresses a delegation of religious leaders at a conference hosted by the President's Committee on Government Contracts. In this pivotal speech, Dr. King outlines the responsibilites of clergymen and government officials in combating poverty and economic discrimination. He stresses the need for lay leaders and representatives of government to bodly speak out against the vestiges of discrimination that continuously hinder the economic and social progress of Negroes in America.

Freedom Festival Speech on Chicago Campaign

At the Freedom Festival a speech was made in regards to the Chicago Campaign. The campaign focuses on the urban renewal of the area. Specifically, it discusses the unemployment rate and housing conditions of African-Americans.

Transcripts of Speeches And Statements Along The Meridith March

Thursday, June 16, 1966

Dr. King discusses the recent violent challenge faced by the Negro and the SCLC in which they have experienced a "threat of murder." This issue has motivated Dr. King to continuously press for social change and maintain the responsibilities in Mississippi.

Letter from MLK to Michael Joesph Mansfield

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King thanks Senator Mansfield for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Telegram from American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa to President Johnson

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Members of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa express their disapproval of South Africa's rule over South West Africa and ask for U.S. intervention.

Letter from John Mack to MLK Requesting Advice

Tuesday, August 22, 1967

In this letter, John Mack asks Dr. King for advice on selecting the proper employment position that would satisfy his desire to contribute to "the perpetuation of social change and Negro progress," while still providing economic security for him and his family.

Telegram from Senator Phil Hart to MLK

Friday, June 21, 1963

Senator Phil Hart of Michigan sends this telegram to Dr. King expressing his optimism about the eradication of segregation in America.

Let's Be Human

Wednesday, March 1, 1967

Long time civil rights agitator Harry Fleischman wrote this syndicated column for the American Jewish Committee's National Labor Service. Articles within the column took a humorous and often irreverent view of social and civil rights issues around the globe. Fleischman was also the national secretary of the Socialist Party USA from 1942-50.

Letter from MLK to Senator Phillip A. Hart

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Senator Phillip A. Hart expressing gratitude for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Eugene Cook to Wyatt Tee Walker

Thursday, August 15, 1963

Eugene Cook, Attorney General of Georgia, writes to Mr. Walker regarding Dr. King's refusal to reveal the name of the persons recommending and interviewing Jack O'Dell.

Letter from Iva Sturm to MLK

Thursday, August 10, 1967

The author requests Dr. King to answer questions to solidify the political practices in America before he is to vote democratically.The questions involve concerns surround military, political, and economic issues within the United States. The authors' primary contention is the Vietnam War.