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Birthday Card from Margarite Foley

This birthday, wishing the recipient "increasing joy," was sent by Margarite Foley.

Letter from John Isaacson to MLK

Wednesday, June 7, 1967

John Isaacson, on behalf of the Student Steering Committee for the Senior Symposia at Dartmouth College, invites Dr. King to come speak on the topic "The Critic and Government Policy."

Letter from Laurence V. Kirkpatrick to MLK

Friday, May 28, 1965

Laurence Kirkpatrick writes Dr. King on behalf of the World Convention of Churches and Christ expressing their appreciation for Dr. King's acceptance of their invitation and discusses the travel logistics.

Letter by William Castleman on Northern Marches

Thursday, August 11, 1966

William Castleman, Executive Director for the American Federation of Senior Citizens, commends Dr. King on the effectiveness of the marches in the North and says they should not be abandoned. At the time this letter was written, Dr. King had led numerous marches in Chicago and other urban cities focusing on equal housing. The correspondence references the Founding Fathers and the Constitutional rights that allow peaceful solution of the nation's problems.

Letter from MLK to Gene Exman

Tuesday, March 19, 1963

Dr. King responds to Eugene Exman's invitation to participate in the weekend seminar. Dr. King regrettably informs Exman that he will be unable to attend because he and his wife will be in Europe during that time.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Irvine I. Turner

Tuesday, April 24, 1962

Dora McDonald explains to Irvine Turner that Dr. King is unable to endorse political candidates due to the "non-partisan nature" of the SCLC.

Race Role Urged For Girl Scouts

Saturday, February 3, 1962

De. Harold Taylor, former president of Sarah Lawrence College, challenges the Girl Scouts of America to play a greater role in fighting racism in the South. He also suggest that the Girl Scouts work with the Peace Corps to help spread their teachings internationally.

Letter from Roland de Corneille to MLK

Friday, September 10, 1965

Rev. Roland de Corneille informs Dr. King that he has been invited by the International Teach-In Committee at the University of Toronto to participate in a program featuring representatives from Vietnam.

U.S. News & World Report: New Negro Threat

Monday, August 28, 1967

U.S. News & World Report reports that Dr. King plans on using "civil disobedience on a massive scale," including marches, sit-ins and boycotts in "riot-torn" Northern cities.

Postcard from Dekker Family

The Dekker family of Holland sends its support to Dr. King.

Coretta Scott King - Soprano

Friday, July 10, 1959

This 1959 program features Mrs. King in concert. One section of the performance is entitled "Portrait of the Non-Violent Integration Movement in Montgomery."

Birmingham Manifesto

The Birmingham Manifesto was formulated as a testament to explain the reasons why efforts were being made to desegregate Birmingham. According to the Manifesto, broken promises were made by city and state officials, which led to plans of direct action.

Letter from Rene Remond to MLK

Tuesday, November 15, 1966

The "Centre Catholique des Intellectuels Francais" is an organization focused on raising the consciousness levels of its members through public conferences, debates, and discussions. Rene Remond informs Dr. King that they have enclosed additional information to prepare him on the discussion involving Christians and violence.

Letter from Joseph S. Clark to MLK

Friday, July 17, 1964

Senator Joseph S. Clark informs Dr. King of the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's support.

MLK Speech Outline

This document contains a preliminary speech outline by Dr. King. The topic of the talk is "The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness," and in it Dr. King maintains that, "We must continue to courageously challenge the system of segregation."

Letter from Terry J. Fox to MLK

Wednesday, August 2, 1967

This letter, was written to Dr. King from Terry J. Fox. Terry J. Fox is the President of Iroquois Industries Inc. In this letter he attaches to Dr. King a copy of his company brochure.

Detroit Council for Human Rights: Walk To Freedom

Sunday, June 23, 1963

The Detroit Council of Human Rights adopted a declaration for Detroit, Michigan on May 17, 1963. In the declaration, the Council decided to stand in solidarity against the injustices that plague the city's African American population. This program is from the yearly demonstration that the Council holds to commemorate their pledge to combat the "inequality of this country."

Letter from Mrs. Raphael Demos to Mrs. Coretta Scott King

Monday, February 10, 1958

Mrs. Demos thanks Mrs. King for her Christmas card and expresses congratulations on the birth of Martin Luther III. Mrs. Demos goes on to provide Coretta with various updates occurring in her own life.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King quotes Karl Barth's "Dogmatics in Outline" on Jesus and his relationship to God.

Letter from E. M. Blaz to MLK

Thursday, July 27, 1967

Mr. Blaz writes Dr. King to inform him about the formation of the Negro organization Chicago Central Service Bureau. This organization is an enterprise that includes a variety of programs that offer education towards consumer loans, mortgage loans, travel agencies, insurance, etc.

Letter from Benjamin Spock to MLK

Monday, February 21, 1966

Dr. Spock, pediatrician and Vietnam anti-war activist, writes Dr. King to enlist his support for an anti-war effort by joining in a "statement of common concern" with other "key spokesman for major American interests and institutions." He proposes that the group hold a press conference to release the statement with the intention of encouraging collective action against the Vietnam War. Dr. Spock indicates that he would like to hold the press conference on March 7, 1966. Dr. Spock hopes the group can get an audience with President Johnson to discuss their concerns.

Receipt from the SCLC to Mr. John Henry Kelly IV

Monday, July 10, 1967

This document is a receipt to John Henry Kelly IV for his $1.00 contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from Eileen Coyne to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Second grader Eileen Coyne sends condolences to the King family. She and her classmates were instructed to write letters to Mrs. King to express their feelings following Dr. King's assassination. This document is a part of a collection of sixteen letters from this Bronx, New York classroom.

Telegram from Sylvester Nichols to Mrs. King

Friday, May 3, 1968

Mrs. King received many telegrams, following the assassination of Dr. King. This telegram, in particular, came from Sylvester Nichols and the members of the Brooklyn branch of the National Association of Negro Musicians. The association wanted to extend sympathy to the King family and to inform Mrs. King that they would continue to live out Dr. King's principles.

Letter from Emily A. Fortson to MLK

Monday, July 17, 1967

Ms. Fortson requests Dr. King contact her immediately regarding a press release to announce his upcoming pilgrimage. She informs Dr. King that both Jews and Arabs have shown "intense interest" in the trip.

Inter-Office Telephone Extensions

Documented are the telephone extensions for the SCLC office staff.

Royalty Statement for "Strength To Love"

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

This royalty statement reference royalties from Dr. King's french-language edition book, "Strength To Love", published by Castermann s.a.

Letter from H. L. Wynter to Dora McDonald

Monday, May 17, 1965

H. L. Wynter writes to Ms. McDonald stating new developments regarding Dr. King's visit to Jamaica in hopes that Dr. King and Mrs. King can adjust.

Comments on John F. Kennedy by MLK at the Berlin Festival

Sunday, September 13, 1964

Dr. King gave this speech at the Berlin Freedom Festival in Berlin, West Germany, in memorial to the recently assassinated President John F. Kennedy. Dr. King reflects on the personality, achievements and enormous influence Kennedy had on the world. He highlights Kennedy's commitment to international human rights, which included recognition of Negro rights, and his leadership in concluding the atmospheric nuclear test ban treaty.

Letter from Howard Moore Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

Mr. Moore, of the Atlanta law firm Hollowell, Ward, Moore & Alexander, congratulates Dr. King on receiving of the Nobel Peace Prize. He goes on to encourage Dr. King and the SCLC to "establish a full fledge non-sectarian four year college and graduate school."