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Letter from Dora McDonald to Carey Preston

Friday, June 12, 1964

Ms. McDonald informs Mrs. Preston that two of Dr. King's friends have encouraged him to reconsider accepting an invitation to speak at her sorority's convention. Hopefully, rearrangement of Dr. King's schedule will permit his acceptance.

Letter from Joan Daves to Carlota Frahm

Monday, October 26, 1964

Joan Daves denies permission to Norwegian Publishers to reprint Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech in connection with "Why We Can't Wait." Daves asserts that the speech will be part of Dr. King's forthcoming publication.

Letter from Thomas M. Ward to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1962

Thomas M. Ward, Assistant to the Minister of Calvin Presbyterian Church, requests that Dr. King provide documentation to defend against allegations of being a Communist or Communist sympathizer.

Memo From Hosea Williams to SCLC Staff

Friday, March 8, 1968

Hosea Williams, the National Director of Mobilization of the SCLC, sends this memorandum urging members to have their assigned region organized before Dr. King arrives on his People-To-People tour.

Ave Maria National Catholic Weekly: A Voice for Harlem

Monday, July 31, 1967

Dan Griffin forwards this letter to Dr. King with an enclosure of a magazine from Ave Marie, entitled "A Voice for Harlem." The magazine includes several topics such as hunger in the United States, the War in Vietnam, and worship in the Soviet Union.

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson about VISTA Director

Thursday, September 15, 1966

Dr. King writes President Johnson recommending that Dr. Maurice Dawkins become the new director of VISTA.

Letter from MLK to Rev. John A. Clark

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

Dr. King expresses his agreement with Reverend Clark regarding the church's lax position on "racial justice and brotherhood among men." Although he cannot participate in Reverend Clark's suggested campaign, Dr. King encourages the minister to move forward with his plans of establishing a revival campaign to preach "the message of Our Lord at every opportunity."

Letter from Al Capp to MLK

Wednesday, May 27, 1964

Al Capp refuses to donate to the SCLC because he feels that organizations like Dr. King's promote violence against White Americans.

Letter from John Frankel to MLK

Monday, May 8, 1967

John Frankel expresses gratitude to Dr. King on behalf of Sargent Shriver for supporting the efforts of the Queens Clinical Society in South Jamaica.

Letter from Myles Horton to Friends of Highlander

Friday, December 8, 1967

Myles Horton, the co-founder of the Highlander Research and Education Center, explains that he has been working on a program for the Appalachian area. He also mentions that the Center sponsors voter registration, political education programs and a series of workshops to help Negro candidates run for local and state offices.

MKL At Zoin Hill - "The Ballot"

Tuesday, July 17, 1962

This transcript of a passionate, poetic, and inspiring speech touches on many of King's motifs. It starts with an appeal for voting rights, addresses the despair the audience feels from time to time, and ends with a refrain of "we shall overcome."

Articles Regarding Strides Made in the Civil Rights Movement

This SCLC news bulletin published around 1964, discloses information regarding Dr. King and others staying in the Birmingham jail. Also included are updates on the progress of the Civil Rights Movement in various cities, additions and changes within the SCLC and relationships with familiar and notable personalities.

Letter from Heather Davidson to MLK

Thursday, May 7, 1964

Miss Heather Davidson invites Dr. King to speak during the University of Western Ontario's Religion-in-Life-Week.

Letter from Thomas Elliott Huntley to MLK

Tuesday, May 21, 1963

Influential clergyman, activist and fellow Morehouse alum Rev. Thomas Elliott Huntley thanks Dr. King for the warm hospitality he received upon his visit to Atlanta. He further discusses Dr. King's next visit to St. Louis and offers his home if other accommodations were not made.

Letter from H. L. Wynter to Dora McDonald

Monday, May 17, 1965

H. L. Wynter writes to Ms. McDonald stating new developments regarding Dr. King's visit to Jamaica in hopes that Dr. King and Mrs. King can adjust.

Formative Elements

From Alfred North Whitehead's "Religion in the Making," Dr. King records the formative elements of the temporal world.

Letter from Donald Godbey to MLK Regarding Cooperation

Thursday, June 15, 1967

In this letter, Donald Godbey offers Dr. King various suggestions on how men and women of all backgrounds can join together in unity.

MLK Appears on “Tonight” Show with Harry Belafonte

Friday, February 2, 1968

This press release informs individuals about Dr. King's upcoming appearance on the NBC-TV "Tonight" show with Harry Belafonte.

Interview with MLK for Radio Norway

Dr. King shares the way that Americans celebrate Christmas.

Outline of Our God is Able

Dr. King outlines his sermon, "Our God is Able." He plans to explain the good and evil in humanity and ensures his audience that through all, "Our God is Able."

Letter from Harper & Row Publishers to Joan Daves

Friday, March 10, 1967

Harper & Row, Publishers representative Cass Canfield provides feedback about Dr. King's manuscript for "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" to Joan Daves, Dr. King's agent. Canfield suggests replacing the last chapter of of the draft with a briefer and less expansive final section.

Letter from MLK and Others to H. Brownell

Wednesday, January 11, 1956

Dr. King and other prominent clergymen "urgently request" a conference with U.S. Attorney General Brownell to discuss discrimination against bus passengers.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Wednesday, May 1, 1963

This version of Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail," published by the American Friends Service Committee, also includes the original statement made by the clergyman that prompted Dr. King's response. The eight clergymen described Dr. King's actions as "unwise and untimely." In his response, Dr. King references biblical and historical figures to illustrate why the Civil Rights Movement can no longer wait. He also expresses his frustration with many within organized religion and the moderate white American.

A Resolution for Dr. King from the Church Women United in Atlanta

This is a resolution honoring Dr. King's life and work upon his untimely death.

Invitation to President Kennedy's Inauguration Reception

The Distinguished Hospitality Committee of the Inaugural Committee invite Dr. and Mrs. King to attend a reception preceding the inauguration of President-elect John F. Kennedy and Vice President-elect Lyndon B. Johnson.

Letter from Chester Sims to MLK

Monday, December 5, 1966

Chester Sims of the Chess Record Company, recommends Charles Souder to Dr. King. He attests that Mr. Soulder is a dedicated man who showed loyalty during his service with SCLC.

Marx

Dr. King references German philosopher Karl Marx regarding his teachings. King states, "Marx teaching resolves into three principal elements: a philosophy of history, and economic theory, and a practical program for the realization of a new social order."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Robert Kennedy

Monday, November 28, 1966

Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary, informs Senator Robert F. Kennedy that Dr. King has accepted the invitation to appear before the subcommittee on Executive Reorganization.

Letter from Jack Tatum to Dora McDonald

Friday, October 13, 1967

In this letter, Jack Tatum lets Ms. Dora McDonald know that he will be in Atlanta from November 16th-20th, 1967. He states that he would appreciate a meeting with Dr. King and the SCLC executive staff.

Senate Subcommittee on Urban Reorganization Statement

Thursday, December 15, 1966

In a hearing on the plight of inner cities, Dr. King focuses on injustices in the urban ghettoes, stating that the problem is not primarily a race issue but an economic one. He calls for a rebalancing of national priorities and links the plight of America's poor to the squandering of resources on war.