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Letter to the Federal Housing Commissioner from MLK

Tuesday, November 7, 1967

This document is a Federal Housing Administration application from Dr. King concerning one of his many housing programs.

Letter from MLK to Howard O. Eaton

Wednesday, December 29, 1965

Dr. King writes Howard Eaton to explain that he will have his assistants read and brief him on the document due to his limited amount of time. He expresses that the document is a worthy contribution to the movement and he and his staff are appreciative.

Address by Jackie Robinson at SCLC Freedom Dinner

Tuesday, September 25, 1962

Guest speaker Jackie Robinson discusses his personal struggles with adopting the philosophy of nonviolence, race relations and the far-reaching efforts of the SCLC.

Letter from William A. Lawson to MLK

Friday, May 1, 1964

William A. Lawson extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak to an assembly at Texas Southern University.

Letter to Rev. Malcolm Calhoun to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968

Dr. King appreciates Rev. Calhoun's concern for the SCLC and the mission the organization has for the creating equality. Dr. King then explains how other programs offer contributions to the SCLC so that they may continue to engage in education, voter registration, economic development, and training of ministers for urban ministries.

Letter from James O'Malley to MLK

Father James O'Malley of St. Nicholas of Tolentine Church in Chicago asks Dr. King to withdraw from the Chicago Lawn area. He is concerned about the potential response to integration of the Lithuanians and Poles who live in the neighborhood.

Augustine's Theory of Knowledge

Dr. King discusses St. Augustine's Theory of Knowledge. According to Augustine, "sense knowledge is the lowest level of knowledge."

Letter to MLK from Dore Schary

Wednesday, January 6, 1965

In this letter, Dore Schary invites Dr. and Mrs. King to attend the 52nd annual dinner of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith at which President Lyndon B. Johnson will receive the America's Democratic Legacy Award.

Telegram from I.W. and Helen Grizzard to MLK

Tuesday, October 31, 1967

I.W. and Helen Grizzard encourage Dr. King to "endure to the end in God's loving light" while King is in jail in Bessemer, Alabama.

MLK Statement from the Harlem Hospital

Tuesday, September 30, 1958

Dr. King writes from the Harlem Hospital in New York as a result of being stabbed by Izola Currey. King asserts that he does not have any ill feelings towards Currey, and hopes that she receives the help she needs to become a functional member of society. King also thanks his supporters for all the cards, telegrams, and phone calls which fortified him throughout his tribulation. Dr. King ends by saying he is "impatiently waiting to rejoin [his] friends and colleagues to continue the work that we know must be done regardless of the cost."

SCLC Executive Staff Meeting

Thursday, June 22, 1967

Dr. King provides Civil Rights Activist, Septima Clark, with information regarding the Executive Staff meeting for the SCLC. Dr. King requests that Ms. Clark have her report ready to present prior to the meeting.

American Committee On Africa Invitation to Protest Apartheid

Tuesday, March 7, 1967

This form letter informs and invites the recipients to attend functions sponsored by the American Committee on Africa in protest against Chase Manhattan Bank's financial relationship with the apartheid regime in South Africa.

Letter from Ben Carper to MLK

Tuesday, December 12, 1967

Ben Carper expresses his opinion in regards to Dr. King's position on Communism. Mr. Carper states that Dr. King is, "playing hand in glove with Godless Communists."

Telegram from Teamsters Vice President Harold Gibbons to MLK

International Brotherhood of Teamsters Vice President Harold Gibbons conveys his support to Dr. King for a statewide Mississippi boycott. Gibbons congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Frank R. Romano to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967

Frank R. Romano expresses his support for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr by explaining his run as a peace candidate in the 1966 primary.

Letter from the Dutch Vietnam Committee to MLK

Sunday, May 7, 1967

An unknown author writes Dr. King on behalf of the Dutch Vietnam Committee to seek assistance in stopping the bombing in Vietnam. The committee requests Dr. King record a few powerful remarks which will hopefully influence ending the war.

Bayard Rustin Statement on Schwerner, Goodman and Chaney

Tuesday, August 4, 1964

Baynard Rustin notes the recent violence against three Negro male volunteers in the voter registration drive. Mr. Rustin describes the death of these men as acts that violate the "constitutional rights" of the Negro people. In the hopes of Mr. Rustin, this occurence will initiate a new force of the nonviolent movement.

Letter from MLK to Reverend W.E. Gardner

Wednesday, February 28, 1962

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for a gift given to the SCLC on behalf of the First Baptist Church in Long Island, New York.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Florence Wright

Wednesday, August 1, 1962

Dora McDonald informs Florence Wright that Dr. King is currently in jail in Albany, Georgia. Dora McDonald reassures Miss Wright that her encouraging words will mean a great deal to Dr. King.

Letter from Alma Weil to MLK

Thursday, August 11, 1966

Alma Weil expresses deep intolerance for prejudice and further discloses a desire to support Dr. King's efforts.

Professor Andrew Blane Offers Assistance to MLK

Saturday, November 4, 1967

Andrew Blane, Assistant Professor of History at Hunter College, offers to brief Dr. King on the role of religion in Russian culture, particularly the Russian Baptists. He attaches along with his letter, a description of his "scholarly interests and training" for Dr. King to consider.

Letter from W. A. F. Braem to MLK

Monday, December 4, 1967

Mr. Braem writes Dr. King emphasizing the importance of self-reliance. Braem list some issues that Civil Rights leaders should pay attention to such as education.

Letter from MLK to C. B. King

Tuesday, October 10, 1967

Dr. King thanks C. B. King for a recent contribution and tells him that the widespread, articulate opposition to the war in Vietnam is unprecedented in American history.

Letter from Martha Kennedy to MLK Regarding March on Washington

Thursday, February 29, 1968

This document is a letter from Martha D. Kennedy to Dr. King in response to a previous letter from Dr. King in regards to a pilgrimage to Washington, D.C..

Western Union Telegram from Barrington Dunbar to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

In this telegram, Barrington Dunbar of the peace and social committee from New York, informs Dr. King of the support from his religious society.

Letter from Ms. Bernice Gutman to The Public Review Advisory Commission

Thursday, March 30, 1967

This document is a letter to the Public Review Advisory Commission from a union concerning a scholarship and additional information for applicants.

Letter from Moses Walker to MLK

Saturday, January 30, 1965

Dr. King moves his family to Chicago to assist with the Chicago Freedom Movement. Walker writes to Dr. King on behalf of the Republican party of the twenty fourth ward. He thanks Dr. King for choosing the twenty fourth ward as the starting point for his campaign to end slum housing. Mayor Daley eventually negotiated with Dr. King to build better housing and to make mortgages available regardless of race.

Introduction of Senator Edward M. Kennedy

Monday, August 8, 1966

Dr. King introduces Senator Edward M. Kennedy at a SCLC banquet and highlights his accomplishments.

SCLC Annual Conference Registration

Monday, September 11, 1961

Wyatt Tee Walker, Executive Director of the SCLC, sent this letter to associates of the SCLC prior to the 1961 Annual Convention held in Nashville, Tennessee. The letter included registration cards for the event with a request to RSVP immediately.

Letter to Dora McDonald from F. Fishman

Friday, October 27, 1967

This document is a correspondence between Mr. Frank Fishman and Miss. Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary. Mr. Fishman had enclosed a copy of a letter dated July 25 and his letter September 25, enquiring that he did not receive a reply about his script that was sent back July 25, 1967.