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Letter to J. Avery from MLK

Friday, May 13, 1966

Dr. King expresses embarrassment because of his late response to a telegram requesting his presence and explains that the mistake is due to an overworked, understaffed office. The tone of the letter conveys the personal concern King feels for each of the numerous individuals who seek his participation in events around the country.

Draft Letter from MLK to Gregory Coffin

Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Mr. Coffin for sending newspaper clippings and a proposal regarding schools in Darien, Connecticut. He also states that he is hopeful that Mr. Coffin's program will act as a contributing factor in the effort to end segregation.

Oppositional Letter to MLK

A critic of Dr. King advises him to help his supporters purchase birth control instead of focusing on civil rights.

Telegram from King Family to Mrs. Lucille Anderson

The King family sends its condolences to Mrs. Anderson.

Letter from C. M. Williams to Ralph David Abernathy

Wednesday, April 24, 1968

In this letter, addressed to Reverend Ralph Abernathy, supporter C.M. Williams references Dr. King's funeral and requests a copy of his last speech. Many sympathizers and mourners wrote letters like this to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference after Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965

In this letter, dated March 9, 1965, Dr. Benjamin E. Mays requests Dr. King's attendance at the annual Morehouse College Board of Trustees meeting.

Letter from John Lewis to MLK Regarding the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party

Thursday, July 15, 1965

In this letter, John Lewis encourages Dr. King to start a letter writing campaign to prevent the illegal election of Representatives from Mississippi. Lewis offers Dr. King assistance from the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Introduction of MLK

These notes are from an introduction written about Dr. King and presumably delivered before he gave an address. Dr. King, who remains unnamed, is presented as a man whose record precedes him given that his life and work has had so profound an impact upon his time.

Letter from Norma Perez to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Norma Perez sends her condolences to Mrs. King after Dr. King's assassination.

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church

Sunday, January 22, 1956

This is a church program for Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in early 1956. As Pastor, Dr. King gave a sermon on "Redirecting Our Missionary Zeal."

God

Dr. King writes about God, according to Jeremiah 3:12.

Letter from Mr. John W. Hall to MLK

Friday, September 30, 1966

Mr. Hall of Pomona, California shows his support for Dr. King and the SCLC through an ongoing monetary contribution.

Letter from MLK to Michelle Feinberg

Wednesday, February 13, 1963

Dr. King responds to Michelle Feinberg, a special education student from Gary, Indiana. In the letter, Dr. King tells Michelle her letter meant a lot to him and she is fortunate to have a special teacher.

Civil Rights Act of 1957

Monday, September 9, 1957

The Civil Rights Act was signed into law on September 9, 1957 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Commonly referred to as the Civil Rights Act of 1957, this was the first such federal law since Reconstruction. The law was aimed at ending voter discrimination tactics such as poll taxes and literacy tests, but it also created the Civil Rights Commission to ensure proper administration of the law.

SCLC Press Release About a Mississippi Political Rally

Thursday, February 8, 1962

This press release describes a political rally of Negro voters in Clarksdale, Mississippi at which Dr. King spoke. It declares the need for voter registration and the possibility for Mississippi to have as many as five African-American congressmen in Washington.

Press Statement Regarding Crusade for Citizenship

Saturday, October 5, 1957

Dr. King delivers a statement surrounding the civil rights struggle of the Negro community and the appeals for justice to public officials. He asserts that in regards to the Prayer Pilgrimage, there cannot be a citizen whom does not have the right to vote. With the initiation of the Crusade for Citizenship, the citizenship of the Negro has the opportunity to be a reality.

Memorandum from Pacem In Terris II to All Participants

This memorandum from the Pacem In Terris II Secretariat issues detailed arrival and departure instructions to all participants of the Pacem In Terris Convocation. General conference information is also included. Translated as "Peace on Earth," the event was held in Geneva, Switzerland and accommodated participants from around the world. Dr. King attended the conference and delivered an address.

Letter from Charles R. Bell Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, November 23, 1966

Mr. Bell inquires about a prisoner who was beaten to death in his home state of Alabama.

Letter from Al Fann to MLK About Hunter College Program

Wednesday, March 6, 1968

In this letter A1 Fann, director of A1 Fann & Co., gives an overview of the company and it's founding while offering up the services of the company under the direction of Dr. King.

Transformed Noncomformist

Friday, November 1, 1957

Dr. King delivered this sermon in November 1957 while serving as the pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. In the sermon, Dr. King discusses the Christian dilemma of being "a citizen of two worlds: the world of time and the world of eternity." He situates the experience of black people in America within this dichotomy, and asserts that Christians must not conform to the world of mass opinion when it lacks Christian virtue, but must assume nonconformity.

Letter from Abram Eisenman to MLK

Abram Eisenman, a 1968 candidate for President of the United States, requested Dr. King's assistance in his campaign for the New Hampshire ballot.

Volunteers Serving Program

This report highlights the voluntary efforts of programs serving for social justice along with numerous SCLC contributions.

Homogeneous Thoughts & Heterogeneous Thoughts

Dr. King describes Alfred North Whitehead's distinction between homogeneous and heterogeneous thought in "The Concept of Nature."

Letter from Executive Director of Catholic Interracial Council to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967

The following document is a cover letter of enclosed letters John A. McDermott sent seventeen Negro state legislators "congratulating them on their fight for fair housing".

Letter from MLK to James K. Shipman

Friday, November 17, 1967

Dr. King thanks James Shipman, Chairman of the Organization Committee of the Ohio Association of Community-Junior Colleges, for an invitation to speak at Cuyahog Community College. Dr. King regretfully declines the invitation due to schedule demands related to planning for the first four months of 1968.

Letter from Stephen Holden to MLK

Monday, May 22, 1967

Stephen Holden, staff editor for the American Peoples Encyclopedia, wrote this letter to Dr. King to request an article for inclusion in the publication's 1968 edition.

Letter from MLK to Brigitte Kirch of Germany

Wednesday, November 13, 1963

Dr. King thanks Brigitte Kirch for her encouraging letter.

Letter from Moss Kendrix to MLK

Wednesday, February 27, 1963

Mr. Kendrix wishes to meet with Dr. King to discuss a certain rumor concerning him and the Coca-Cola Company.

Women's Response to the Rising Tide of Violence

Monday, February 21, 1966

Women's Response to the Rising Tide of Violence was a two day day conference in Philadelphia. The women who gathered agreed that violence was not a spontaneous action, but something that grows out of the environment. The way to combat such violence it enforce positive action with long-term solutions through social, economic, and political programs.

Letter from Al Shabazz to MLK

Friday, August 25, 1967

Al Shabazz requests Dr. King review his proposal for Black Independence.