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God

Dr. King expounds on points made about the idea of "God," by Immanuel Kant, William James, and W.E. Hocking.

Letter from Jerome S. Ozer to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967
New York, NY

Mr. Ozer informs Dr. King that his organization will be publishing "Eyewitness: The Negro in American History" by William Loren Katz, which covers the Negro in every aspect of American life. He then requests that Dr. King write an introduction for the book.

The Negro

Atlanta, GA

This poem describes the strength and perseverance of the Negro during difficult times.

MLK Speech at the Americana Hotel

Tuesday, October 23, 1962
New York (NY), Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA)

Dr. King compares the Maritimer Union's struggle for improved working conditions to the continuous fight for civil rights in the African American community.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi Julius Rosenthal

Friday, December 10, 1965
New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King writes to his supporter Rabbi Julius Rosenthal responding to concerns raised about Dr. King's connections with Congressman Adam Clayton Powell (a prominent pastor and politician). Congressman Powell was a controversial figure during that time and while Dr. King did not share all of his views, he gave him credit for advocating Civil Rights for African Americans.

Letter to MLK from Vice President Hubert Humphrey

Thursday, June 15, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this letter, U.S. Vice President Hubert Humphrey thanks Dr. King for his support and applauds him for all his hard work, while commenting on fair and decent housing.

Redirecting Emotion

Dr. King writes on the redirection of emotion as a method of emotion management. He states that in order for one's emotion to be successfully redirected, one must project their emotion onto a different, unifying object, namely an ideal.

WBTV Editorial: "King's Bedfellows"

Monday, February 19, 1968
North Carolina (NC), PUERTO RICO, Cambridge, MA, Washington, D.C.

The content of this document suggested that Dr. King break ties with leaders Stokley Carmichael and H. Rap Brown, due to their stance on violence as a weapon. At the bottom of this document, is an invitation for Dr. King, H. Rap Brown and Stokley Carmichael to respond.

Letter from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Thursday, March 2, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Roy Wilkins, Chairman of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, invites Dr. King to serve as a member of the conference's executive committee.

City Council Kills Hopes for Low Rental Apartment Complex

Sunday, September 3, 1967
California (CA)

This article, located in The Independent, covers a housing conflict in San Diego, California. The housing project would provide clean, modern apartments for the Negro population, using the extra land of Mt. Hope Cemetery. The goal of the project is to alleviate an area with over 4,000 substandard housing units. Approved by federal agencies, the project would also offer supplemented rent to those unable to afford the full amount. Despite approval, city council members rejected the idea due to opposition from white property owners and residents.

Letter from MLK to the Bulstrode School Children

Friday, July 9, 1965
UNITED KINGDOM

Dr. King thanks the school children of Bulstrode in England for their SCLC contribution by means of their daffodil sales. Outlining the current work of the SCLC, he educates the young supporters on the measures being taken to secure voting rights via "Operation Breadbasket" and "Operation Dialogue."

Letter from Clarence E. Duffy to MLK

Tuesday, May 16, 1967
New Mexico (NM), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Rev. Duffy expresses his religious and political concerns with Dr. King as he considers a potential presidential campaign in 1968.

Letter From Christine Heath to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
Texas (TX)

Ms. Christine Heath, a high school student, asks for information on how "Civil Disobedience," by Henry David Thoreau, has affected Dr. King.

Letter to J. Avery from MLK

Friday, May 13, 1966
New York (NY)

Dr. King expresses embarrassment because of his late response to a telegram requesting his presence and explains that the mistake is due to an overworked, understaffed office. The tone of the letter conveys the personal concern King feels for each of the numerous individuals who seek his participation in events around the country.

Statement to SCLC Board About Alabama Boycotts

Friday, April 2, 1965
Baltimore, MD

In this statement, Dr. King explains the need for a boycott of the state of Alabama because of extreme violence and police overreaction, which he calls "totalitarian."

Draft Letter from MLK to Mrs. Pickett

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King responds to Mrs. Pickett's poem and some questions that she sent. He offers condolences for the loss of her husband and promises that the "redemptive suffering of few brings new life to many."

The Tri-City Chapter of C.O.R.E. Invites MLK to Appear.

Sunday, December 13, 1964
Washington (WA)

Wallace Webster, Vice President of the Tri-City Chapter of C.O.R.E., writes Dr. King inviting him to appear in the Tri-City community.

Letter from Dudley Babcock to MLK

Saturday, October 14, 1967
Virginia (VA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CAMBODIA, THAILAND, BURMA / MYANMAR, GERMANY, VIETNAM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

Dudley P. Babcock writes to Dr. King to assure him he supports his civil rights leadership but questions his involvement in the Vietnam War protests. Babcock reminds Dr. King that there are always pacifists who might need to accept war in order to prevent more war, citing the example of Neville Chamberlain and the escalation of violence in World War II.

Introduction of Senator Edward M. Kennedy

Monday, August 8, 1966
Massachusetts (MA), Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS

Dr. King introduces Senator Edward M. Kennedy at a SCLC banquet and highlights his accomplishments.

Letter from A. S. Young to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967
VIETNAM, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), New York, NY, MEXICO

Mr. Young criticizes Dr. King and the black community for their support of heavyweight champion Cassius Clay's refusal to be drafted into the military. He also expresses worry about the quality of black leadership and urges a move from a selfish focus on Negroes only to concern for all people.

Letter from Willis M. Tate to MLK

Wednesday, September 15, 1965
Dallas, TX

Willis M. Tate, President of Southern Methodist University, expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's acceptance to come to the university. He assures Dr. King that his trip is welcomed and presents two alternative dates to address the student body. This address is part of the 50th Anniversary Celebration that Dr. King has already been invited.

Letter from Roger Dunloff, Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, September 5, 1962
Michigan (MI), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Due to his inability to contribute financially, Roger G. Dunloff offers his prayers and moral support to Dr. King and the SCLC.

Letter from Clara Sturges Johnson to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1963
California (CA)

Ms. Johnson informs Dr. King of her efforts promoting the passing of the "Kennedy Civil Rights Memorial Act." The United States Congress would go on to pass this act in 1964.

Rev. P.A. Berry Invites MLK to England

Friday, June 9, 1967
New York, NY

Rev. Quinland R. Gordon informs Dr. King of a recent letter sent to him by Rev. P. A. Berry. Father Berry is interested in securing Dr. King as a guest speaker at his Cathedral in England on Sunday November 12, 1967.

Letter from the Assistant Secretary of State to Fay Ramsey Regarding Vietnam

Thursday, August 17, 1967
New York (NY)

In this letter from Dixon Donnelley (the Assistant Secretary of State), Fay Ramsey receives thanks for a letter she sent President Johnson and an explaination of the state's logic regarding the Vietnam situation.

Statement from MLK Returning from Receiving Nobel Prize

Friday, December 18, 1964
New York, NY

Upon returning from receiving the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King issued this statement on segregation, calling it "nothing but a new form of slavery."

William E. Channing

Baltimore, MD

Dr. King references theologian William E. Channing regarding his views on "Unitarian Christianity."

New South: The Current Crisis In Race Relations

Saturday, March 1, 1958
Montgomery, AL, New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), New York (NY), Georgia (GA), NIGERIA

Dr. King, as President of the Montgomery Improvement Association, examines the race relations crisis. He discusses how segregation makes the Negro feel inferior and unaccepted. Dr. King also affirms that he will not accept a system of violence and the "evils of segregation."

Letter from MLK to Jesse Hill, Jr. Regarding His Speech on Vietnam

Thursday, May 11, 1967
Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Dr. King sends two of his recent speeches on Vietnam, so that Jesse Hill, Jr. may know firsthand his position rather than distorted statements from other sources.

Letter from MLK to The Honorable John Sherman Cooper

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Kentucky Senator John Sherman Cooper to commend his role in facilitating the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.