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Letter from Negro Non-Commissioned Officers to Civil Rights Leaders

Saturday, January 7, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Louisiana (LA), VIETNAM

The non-commissioned officers of Fort Polk write major civil rights organizations and publications to share their story of segregation and discrimination in the town of Leesville. The authors hope that their letter will be published - exposing the injustices.

Letter from Edwin Berry to Jane Lee J. Eddy

Friday, November 18, 1966
New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C.

Edwin Berry, Executive Director of the Chicago Urban League, writes Jane Lee Eddy, Secretary of the Taconic Foundation, to request funding for a "get-out-the-vote campaign" in Chicago.

Objects and the Nature of Thought

Dr. King notates the various explanations of "objects" and "the nature of thought."

Telegram to MLK from John Jacobs

Alabama (AL), Oklahoma (OK)

John Jacobs accuses Dr. King of being associated with Communists. He proclaims that Negroes learned raping, robbing and relief with Dr. King's training.

Dedication Page (Edited Draft) for "Why We Can't Wait"

Dr. King drafted this dedication page for his children, in his book, "Why We Can't Wait." Similar to the famous quote in his "I Have A Dream" speech, the dedication hoped that his children "would not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character."

Letter from Adam C. Powell to MLK

Tuesday, November 16, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Minister Powell commends Dr. King on his recent message at the 157th Anniversary of Abyssinian Baptist Church. He also encloses a donation to the SCLC.

Letter from Representative Charles Longstreet Weltner to MLK

Monday, January 4, 1965
Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

Representative Weltner disagrees with Dr. King's assessment that Weltner's decision to seat the regular Mississippi delegation "was a vote for organized violence, murder, and oppression." Weltner also reminds Dr. King that he voted for the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

The Martin Luther King Column: Life's Three Dimensions

INDIA

In this self titled column, Dr. King writes about his theory of the three dimensions of the life: length, breadth and height. He refers to the "length of life" as an individual's desire to achieve personal goals. Next, he speaks of the "breadth of life," which is characterized by reaching out and helping others. Last but not least, Dr. King describes the "height of life" or a person's spiritual pursuit and connection with God. Dr. King asserts that in order to live a complete life, all three dimensions must be cultivated.

MLK: A Profile In Leadership

VIETNAM, New York, NY, New York (NY)

Outraged by recent allegations, civil rights leaders rally to unify their support of Dr. King and his position on the War in Vietnam. This document encourages his supporters to unite for a common purpose.

Memo from Joan Daves to MLK

Thursday, May 28, 1964
New York, NY

In this memo, Joan Daves informs Dr. King, along with others, that the Detroit News will run installments for "Why We Cant Wait." They are also told that the copyright will be in Dr. King's name and that credit will be given to Harper and NAL.

Letter from Anonymous Sender to MLK

Thursday, February 18, 1960
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Dr. King's business partner writes to him from the Midtown Office in New York regarding a column in which they are working on. His partner assures Dr. King that the column will be successful and discusses future plans and events to help fund raise and raise awareness about the it.

Resource Teachers

This document lists the eight duties of Resource Teachers, and includes targeted instruction for how this group should interact with base teachers and students.

Letter to Ruth D. Beyer from Dorothy Gaines

Thursday, July 8, 1965
Maryland (MD), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dorothy Gaines provides Ruth D. Beyer with the address of the Montgomery Improvement Association due to the possibility of a check lost in the mail.

Letter from Ernest Gruening to MLK

Friday, May 19, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, CHINA

Democratic Alaskan Senator Earnest Gruening informs Dr. King that he has inserted one of Dr. King's speeches into the Congressional Record, in order to combat misconceptions about Dr. King's beliefs. The speech in question was delivered to the Riverside Church in New York, and it conveyed Dr. King's views on Vietnam. Senator Gruening includes this section of the record with his letter.

Transcripts of Speeches And Statements Along The Meridith March

Thursday, June 16, 1966
Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King discusses the recent violent challenge faced by the Negro and the SCLC in which they have experienced a "threat of murder." This issue has motivated Dr. King to continuously press for social change and maintain the responsibilities in Mississippi.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, November 20, 1964
New York, NY, Oslo, Norway

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, suggests a discussion concerning future writing plans. She mentions the possibility of publishing a collection that would include several of Dr. King's speeches and writings, among them the March on Washington address and the Oslo speech.

Letter from MLK to Sr. Joao Carlos Meirelles

Thursday, February 25, 1965
BRAZIL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King informs Sr. Meirelles that prior commitments regarding the Right-to-Vote Campaign in Alabama preclude his ability to attend the conference in Brazil.

Faith

Dr. King quotes English author and priest William Ralph Inge's "Lay Thoughts of a Dean," as well as English soldier and essayist Donald Hankey.

Letter From Bessie Burrett to MLK

Memphis, TN

Bessie Burrett, a NAACP member, writes Dr. King asking for help and explaining the multiple incidences of racial injustice she and her husband have personally witnessed. Burrett describes her husband's injuries, which he obtained as a result of police brutality, and their struggles with unfair treatment in the court system. As a result, her husband is unable to work and they have mounting hospital and court fees to pay, creating a financial hardship for their family.

Letter from Robert T. Stafford to MLK

Monday, August 30, 1965
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Vermont (VT), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Congressman Robert T. Stafford, U. S. Representative from Vermont, informs Dr. King he has signed the discharge petition regarding the District of Columbia Home Rule Bill.

Letter from Mrs. W. Brown to MLK

Mrs. W. Brown proclaims that Dr. King should preach a colorblind love that is absent of hate and resentment toward white people. She further asserts that the contributions Dr. King received could have been used to improve substandard housing. Mrs. Brown continues to discuss her perception of the inadequacies within the black community in comparison to white people.

Letter from George T. Raymond to MLK

Monday, February 4, 1963
Chester, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

George Raymond, Rebecca Taylor and Rosa Ballard follow up with Dr. King about his availability to speak to the NAACP in Chester, Pennsylvania.

MLK Outline on Preaching Ministry

Dr. King outlines the development of the preaching ministry. As an aspiring minister, Dr. King expresses how he wishes to develop his own ministry and provides ideas of the message he desires to share.

Letter from John R. Loch to MLK

Monday, November 7, 1966
Pittsburgh, PA, Atlanta, GA

John R. Loch, Director of the Student Union at the University of Pittsburgh, thanks Dr. King on behalf of the Public Affairs Committee for his visit to the University. He also encloses a copy of the "Pitt News" that reported his visit.

Letter from Joan Daves to Ms. Dora McDonald

Thursday, July 16, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves tells Dora McDonald that she had tentatively spoken to Dr. King about accepting the invitation to speak at The University Settlement award ceremony. She asks Ms. McDonald if she would keep the date for the engagement should he be able to attend. Daves also requests a copy of Dr. King's itinerary.

Bernard of Clairvaux

Dr. King writes about Bernard of Clairvaux and his idea of the character of the ideal Christian.

Sin

Dr. King outlines some insights regarding moral duty and sin.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Saturday, June 30, 1962
Atlanta, GA

Benjamin E. Mays, President of Morehouse College, expresses his gratitude for the copy of the letter Dr. King sent to the editor of The Christian Century. Mays also inquires about the response of the editor.

Letter from Michell Blue to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
Berkeley, CA

A sixth grader from Berkeley, California writes Dr. King to share his supportive view. In closing the young man remarks, "I don't have much to say but thank you."

SCLC Press Release: 1967 Election Results

Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

This SCLC release hails the election of America's first two black mayors, Carl Stokes in Cleveland, Ohio and Richard Hatcher in Gary, Indiana. The release stresses that such men "cannot do the job alone" and condemns efforts in Congress to cut the War on Poverty even as billions are spent on the Vietnam War.