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Jeremiah

In this series of ten notecards, Dr. King breaks down the Book of Jeremiah into mutiple sections, including chapters and versus regarding Good, knowledge, sin, and forgiveness.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to Francis Robinson

Wednesday, May 25, 1966
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Mrs. King expresses her appreciation for the opera tickets that Mr. Robinson gave to her and Dr. King.

Letter from Loretta Abbott to MLK

Wednesday, October 1, 1958
New York (NY), MEXICO

Facing the Challenge of a New Life

EGYPT, GREECE, CHINA, FRANCE, INDIA, PAKISTAN, Montgomery, AL

Dr. King uses Greek Philosophy, the Christian conception of agape love, and the need for nonviolent resistance as a guideline of "Facing the Challenge of a New Life" in America. Throughout the sermon, he encourages African Americans to remain committed to the nonviolent principles of the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the precepts of Christian living to facilitate the birth of a new way of life in an America dealing with violent conflicts over social conditions.

Letter from Joseph L. Kapica to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967
Connecticut (CT), Atlanta, GA, Minnesota (MN), Boston, MA, CANADA, Chicago, IL

Joseph Kapica, a freelance writer from Connecticut, requests special commentary from Dr. King regarding the issue of interracial adoption. Kapica writes about interracial adoption based on findings from the Child Welfare League of America.

Schleiermacher (The Religious Man)

Dr. King quotes Schleiermacher's views on man's identification with Religion.

L. A. Dotson Attempts to Speak with MLK

Saturday, August 19, 1967
Atlanta, GA

L. A. Dotson has made several attempts to speak with Dr. King on a personal matter. Unfortunately, Dr. King has not responded. L. A. Dotson forwards contact information to Dr. King and has taken residence at the Regency Hyatt room 226.

MLK Manuscript: Why We Can't Wait

This document reflects one page of the original manuscript of "Why We Can't Wait." "Why We Can't Wait" is a book by Martin Luther King, Jr. about the civil rights struggle against racial segregation in the United States, and specifically in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Wilma Wolsink to MLK

Sunday, October 30, 1966
NETHERLANDS

Wilma Wolsink, an eleven-year-old girl from Holland, writes to Dr. King to express her support. She also requests an autographed photograph.

Letter from Robert Bondy to MLK

Wednesday, April 12, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), GERMANY, VIETNAM, BRAZIL, Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, Washington, D.C.

Though a long time supporter of Dr. King, Robert Bondy, criticizes for Dr. King for mixing the issues of civil rights and Vietnam. He argues that speaking out against Vietnam has only further inflamed opponents of the Civil Rights Movement, and Dr. King has thrown back the movment "for a long time to come."

Letter from Robert Lee Hill to MLK

Robert Lee Hill writes to inform Dr. King of the discrimination taking place in the United States Post Office. He then requests the help of the Reverend to put an end to it.

MLK Drafted as a Presidential Candidate Announcement

New York (NY), California (CA), Washington (WA)

The Peoples Committee of America drafts Dr. King as their candidate for the 1968 Presidential Election.

Letter from MLK to Gilbert J. Clark

Saturday, May 21, 1966
CANADA

Dr. King informs Gilbert J. Clark, Chairman at the Law School Forum, that he is unable to speak in Edmonton under the auspices of the Alberta Law School Forum during his trip to Canada.

Letter from Rev. Hedley W. Plunkett to MLK

Friday, March 3, 1967
IRELAND, Washington, D.C.

Reverend Hedley W. Plunkett of Belfast, Northern Ireland, invites Dr. King to include the city on his schedule the next time he comes to Europe. Plunkett describes his interest in King's work and Ireland's own "Color Bar."

Letter from Dora McDonald to William S. Thompson

Wednesday, March 27, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Dora McDonald responds to William Thompson's letter inviting Dr. King to address the National Bar Association. She explains that Dr. King's calendar shows that he will not be able to attend the event due to his travels.

Letter from MLK to Abby Seldes

Friday, January 31, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King dictates a response letter to Miss Abby Seldes expressing his heartwarming appreciation to the young lady. He also expresses gratitude towards Abby's parents for attending the March On Washington demonstration.

All Local 1 Members Invited

New Jersey (NJ)

All Local 1 members are invited to hear Dr. King discussing the intricacies of "The Summer Project."

Letter from MLK to Elsa Wischkaemper McIntyre

Tuesday, November 12, 1963
California (CA), Birmingham, AL, New York, NY

Dr. King writes Elsa McIntyre thanking her for her financial contribution to the SCLC. He also informs her of how her contribution will aid in the organization's work to fight discrimination.

Newspaper Article on MLK

Sunday, August 9, 1964
Florida (FL)

In this article from the Miami Florida Herald, the writer summarizes a portion of the book "Why We Can't Wait", written by Dr. King.

Letter from Beryl Bugatch to MLK

Sunday, July 25, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Baltimore, MD

Beryl Bugatch of the University of Pennsylvania asks Dr. King to speak on "the governments role in enforcing racial morality."

Letter from George Richard to MLK

North Carolina (NC)

George Richard asks Dr. King for books on demonstrations, and he also asks Dr. King to visit his town.

Letter from MLK to Walter Everett

Wednesday, August 23, 1961
New York (NY), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Birmingham, AL, New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King writes Walter Everett regarding the libel cases of Rev. Abernathy, Rev. Shuttlesworth, Rev. Lowery and Rev. Seay. He thanks Mr. Everett for his support and informs him that they are "winning the victory" with his help.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Ms. Dora McDonald

Monday, April 12, 1965
Georgia (GA), New York, NY, Mississippi (MS)

In this letter to Miss McDonald, Ms. Daves discusses a request for Dr. King to write a short introduction to William Bradford Huie's work "Three Lives for Mississippi". Ms. Daves stresses the importance of this opportunity as it addresses a topic "very much on Dr. King's mind," namely the starting of a "dialogue...between the two opposing forces."

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Harry Crosby to MLK

Sunday, March 8, 1964
Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA

The Crosby family of Massachusetts encloses a check to Dr. King to aid in the fight for equality. Mrs. Crosby notes that her husband was the first individual to employ a Negro teacher at Boston University, where Dr. King received his PhD in systematic theology.

Letter from Paul H. Douglas to MLK

Thursday, July 2, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Paul H. Douglass extends his gratitude to Dr. King, Roy Wilkins and their followers for the "passage of the Civil Rights Bill."

Religion

Dr. King writes on the topic of religion, stating that the people living in the 18th century regarded religion as "the source of both political tyranny and social conflict."

"Where Do We Go From Here"-Invoice

Monday, May 22, 1967
New York (NY), London, England, Pennsylvania (PA)

This document contains a Harper & Row, Publishers invoice for the sale of four copies of Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Letter from Walter Ducey of the Illinois Fair Employment Practices Commission to MLK

Friday, June 26, 1964
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

In an effort to reduce the number of school dropouts, Walter Ducey of the Illinois Fair Employment Practices Commission requests to include Dr. King in their upcoming brochure. Ducey asks to include Dr. King's photograph and a quotation from a speech he delivered at Chicago's Soldier Field which highlighted academic achievement as a necessity.

Aquinas, Thomas

Dr. King notes biographical information about Thomas Aquinas.

Philadelphia Inquirer: Balance of Payments 'Cure' Was Devised in Near-Panic

Thursday, January 11, 1968
Wisconsin (WI), JAPAN, Washington, D.C.

This article by Rowland Evans and Robert Novak criticizes a proposed 2% border tax on imported goods. They argue that President Johnson's support of such a measure is reckless and will cause economic repercussions around the world.