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Religion

Dr. King quotes Ferre's view on religion.

Western Union Telegram from Albert Shanker to MLK

Mr. Shanker, President United Federation of Teachers AFL-CIO, thanks Dr. King for his support during a teachers' strike.

Telegram from Mr. Robert Lieberman to MLK about Denver Teachers Union

In this telegram, Mr. Lieberman writes to Dr. King requesting his support for an upcoming unionization vote by Denver public school teachers.

Selma to Montgomery Commemorative Rally Suggestion

This outline features a tentative agenda, statement of purpose, and key logistical information pertaining to the commemorative rally celebrating the completion of the 1965 Selma to Montgomery March.

A Thank You for Their Hospitality

Monday, August 13, 1962

Lawyer William Kunstler writes this thank you to Dr. and Mrs. King and discusses a few legal matters.

The American Dream

The is a draft outline of Dr. King's "The American Dream" speech delivered at many colleges, universities and churches throughout the country. Dr. King urges Americans to abandon practices of discrimination in order to protect the American dream and the proliferation of the nation.

Wedding Ceremony Invitation

Sunday, August 16, 1959

This document is an invitation to the wedding ceremony of Bertha Sue Alford and Mr. Charles A. Pinkston.

Get Well Letter from William H. Allen, M.D.

Tuesday, September 30, 1958

William H. Allen, M.D. sent this letter to Dr. King expressing sympathy to Dr. King, for his nearly fatal stabbing. Dr. Allen, further into the letter, encouraged Dr. King to continue to pray in order to eliminate evil in the world and hoped he will remain protected to continue his mission for freedom.

Letter from Ms. Dorothy Clark to Rev. Abernathy

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

In this letter accompanying a contribution, Ms. Clark expresses her condolences after Dr. King's assassination and pledges her personal support in continuing his mission.

Unitarian Universalist Statement of Consensus on Racial Injustice

Friday, May 20, 1966

The Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association listed several laws adopted by the association. Some of the laws incorporate civil rights, demonstrations, voting rights, equality, civil disobedience, and discrimination in employment and housing.

Letter to MLK from Philip L. Estrada about Operation Breadbasket Milwaukee

Phillip Estrada, the editor of the Milwaukee Star News, request Dr. King's presence in support of the Breadbasket Operation. Estrada describes this growing organization as one that has made an impression on Milwaukee. He hopes that Dr. King will deliver words of encouragement to keep the morale up and to show his support.

Letter from Marie Turner to MLK

Thursday, May 2, 1963

In this letter Marie Turner of the American Friends Service Committee requests copies of Dr. King's "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" to be reproduced and distributed.

Lenin

The role of State in Society is described as Dr. King documents a quote from the book "The State and Revolution" written by Vladimir Lenin.

Telegram from MLK to Eartha Kitt

Thursday, May 16, 1963

Dr. King thanks singer-actress Eartha Kitt for her generous support and deep concern for the people of Birmingham, Alabama, and elsewhere in the South. He extends his appreciation to those in the Harlem Apollo Theatre who have contributed in response to her example.

Notes on Movies

Monday, October 9, 1967

The writer states that the movie industry needs more stories without the 'Playboy' touch. He argues that this should come from the "masses" and not "society."

SCLC Board Meeting

Tuesday, September 29, 1964

This is the agenda for a board meeting of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in Savannah, Georgia.

Contribution Letter from Dr. and Mrs. Bacon to Dr. King

Friday, February 23, 1968

Dr. and Mrs. Bacon are writing to express their support and concern for the "last chance" SCLC project. Enclosed in the letter is $200 contribution to help further support the initiative.

Transformed Nonconformists Sermon Outline

In this brief outline for a sermon based on Romans 12:2, Dr. King asserts that Christians are citizens of two worlds, those of time and eternity. They are in the world, but not of it. In a generation of the mass mind, they are called to live differently – to make history not be made by history. But nonconformity in itself is not good; there must be a mental transformation. The world is on the brink of moral and physical destruction and the need of the hour is for nonconformists to materialism, nationalism and militarism.

Memo from Edwin Berry and Melville Hosch to Freedom Government Conference Members

Wednesday, March 8, 1967

The United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare details the purpose of the Freedom-Government Conference and outlines the objectives for the scheduled meetings in the spring.

Draft of Address at the Fourth Constitutional Convention of the AFL-CIO

In this address to the AFL-CIO, Dr. King compares the labor and civil rights movements. He argues that those who are anti-labor are also likely anti-civil rights. Thus, the Negro understands the labor movement and shares the same enemies. Dr. King also predicts that the coming years will be trying ones for laborers due to the automation of work processes, stating that "automation will grind jobs into dust." Dr. King urges the labor movement to strengthen itself by embracing the Negro people.

Letter from Asher Feren to MLK

Wednesday, February 2, 1966

Asher Feren writes to Dr. King to express his concerns for the Hyde Park High School Unity Plan.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. Benjamin E. Mays

Tuesday, October 19, 1965

Dora McDonald informs Dr. Benjamin E. Mays that Dr. King will attend the Morehouse Board of Trustees luncheon.

Telegram from R.C. Bell to Ivan Allen

Monday, March 25, 1963

In this telegram to Mayor Allen of Atlanta, Dr. Bell protests the Dental Society. The Dental Society is scheduled to meet at the Municipal Auditorium on a segregated basis. Dr. Bell reminds Mayor Allen that the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled such segregation illegal.

Press Statement Regarding Crusade for Citizenship

Saturday, October 5, 1957

Dr. King delivers a statement surrounding the civil rights struggle of the Negro community and the appeals for justice to public officials. He asserts that in regards to the Prayer Pilgrimage, there cannot be a citizen whom does not have the right to vote. With the initiation of the Crusade for Citizenship, the citizenship of the Negro has the opportunity to be a reality.

Letter from Chip Hawkins to MLK

Monday, January 2, 1967

In this letter, Chip Hawkins questions Dr. King's affiliation with communist organizations and individuals. In addition, he requests that Dr. King publicly address the Communist accusations brought against him.

Invitation from the Government of Barbados to MLK

The Government of Barbados invite Dr. King and Coretta Scott King to the Celebrations to Mark the Independence of Barbados. This event held high historical importance due Barbados' inquiry for independence for many years.

Invitation to 101st Founders' Day of Morehouse College

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

In this letter, Joseph Draper, a former classmate, invites Dr. King to the 101st Founders' Day Inauguration activities at Morehouse College. Draper hopes for Dr. King's attendance, as he feels this will give support to newly instated President Gloster.

CORE - Progress Report #1

Friday, August 20, 1965

Benjamin Brown details the structure of the latest publication from the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE). The CORE Guide to Negro History will be a composite of contributing essays, pictures, prized Negro literature and evaluations of social progress by current civil rights leaders. Beacon Press is listed as the potential publisher for the groundbreaking book.

Coronet Magazine: After Desegregation-What

Sunday, January 1, 1961

In this draft of an article for Coronet Magazine, Dr. King outlines the challenges that Negro college students will face after desegregation and the impact of the student movement as a whole. He argues that desegregation is not the same as integration, but that the former must happen in order for the latter to exist. Dr. King also explains that Negro students are gaining a much richer education by participating in sit-ins and other civil rights demonstrations, which will prepare them for society once desegregation is a reality.

Invitation from Manitoba New Democratic Party

Thursday, August 19, 1965

B. Swailes, Provincial Secretary of the Manitoba New Democratic Party, extends a speaking invitation to Dr. King to discuss human rights.