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Worship (Definition)

Dr. King defines worship as contemplation on the whole of existence.

Cover Letter Draft for MLK's 1967 Pilgrimage to the Holy Land

JORDAN, ISRAEL, FRANCE, GREECE, ITALY

Sandy F. Ray drafts a cover letter to be enclosed with the packets for Dr. King's 1967 Pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

Letter from Morehouse College to MLK

Monday, November 6, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Tobe Johnson asks Dr. King and other members of the Morehouse College Board of Trustees to fill out a questionnaire in preparation for re-accreditation by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.

Letter from John C. Hall to MLK about a March

Thursday, February 8, 1968
Washington, D.C.

In this letter John C. Hall informs Dr. King of his desire to participate in the upcoming march to Washington D.C. and requests any information regarding such.

King and SCLC Meet in Montgomery

Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS)

This press release announces a mass meeting held in Montgomery, Alabama by the Executive Board of SCLC. The meeting was held in response to a major libel suit against four prominent SCLC officials. Dr. King gives an address to boost morale during the course of this suit. In Dr. King's view, "The South has lost its solidity. Whites fight against whites over desegregation. Be it known, evil cannot permanently organize itself." The libel suit came to be known as the New York Times Company vs. Sullivan (1960).

CORE - Progress Report #1

Friday, August 20, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Benjamin Brown details the structure of the latest publication from the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE). The CORE Guide to Negro History will be a composite of contributing essays, pictures, prized Negro literature and evaluations of social progress by current civil rights leaders. Beacon Press is listed as the potential publisher for the groundbreaking book.

Letter from MLK to Nelson A. Rockefeller

Monday, November 1, 1965
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King thanks Governor Nelson Rockefeller for taking the pulpit at Ebenezer Baptist Church for their Men?s Day Observance. He appreciates the Governor?s contribution of $25,000 to their tax exempt Society to match his own donation from the Nobel Peace Award.

Letter from Francis Stern to MLK

Friday, February 19, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY)

Francis H. Stern, Chairman of the Humanitarian Award Committee, writes Dr. King informing him that he has been selected unanimously to receive the 1964 Brith Sholom Humanitarian Award. Stern points out that past recipients include Eleanor Roosevelt, Thurgood Marshall, Rabbi Stephen Wise, UN secretary general Trygvie Lie, and former Prime Minister of Australia Herbert Evatt.

Aid Victims of South Africa's Racism

Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), New York, NY, New York (NY)

Members of the American Committee on Africa solicit funding for the support and advancement of victims of Apartheid in South Africa. This brochure highlights the unjust treatment of black South Africans through individual testimonies.

Letter from Charles A. Halleck to MLK

Thursday, December 31, 1964
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Charles A. Halleck expresses gratitude for Dr. King's letter outlining his reasons for opposing the seating of the five congressmen for the state of Mississippi.

Letter from J. Stanley Purnell to Rev. MLK, Sr.

Monday, February 26, 1968
Pennsylvania (PA)

The Chairman of the United Health Foundations, J. Stanley Purnell, sends out an gratitude of thanks to Daddy King.

Letter from the Georgia Voter's League

Sunday, March 17, 1968
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Hosea Williams and P. B. McCoy, co-chairmen of the Georgia Voter's League, inform members of the organization that Dr. King will be addressing their 1968 annual convention.

I Have A Dream

South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Alabama (AL)

In the most famous of his speeches, given from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial at the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Dr. King drew on themes from previous sermons and speeches, including an address he called The American Dream. Citing Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation, the US Constitution, and the Declaration of Independence, King calls upon the nation to fulfill its promise of freedom and justice for all of its citizens. Although he began by reading from a manuscript, he later abandoned it and spoke directly to the crowd of more than 200,000.

MLK Norway Radio Interview

Monday, November 9, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, London, England, PAKISTAN, INDIA, CONGO / ZAIRE

Dr. King addresses the importance of the Chicago Adult Education Project and the impact it would have on the Lawndale community. Issues of discrimination, segregation, racism, and oppression have lead to constant riots and violence in this densely populated area. Dr. King submits the idea that, to cure the issue of the "ghetto", Americans and the government must work to eradicate the causes by offering better education, better housing, and fair wages instead of "anti-riot" legislation.

Memorandum from Ralph D. Abernathy to MLK

Monday, June 20, 1966
Atlanta, GA

This memorandum regarding SCLC liabilities, income and bank balances, was sent from Ralph Abernathy to Dr. King.

Memo from Clarence Jones to MLK

Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN), North Carolina (NC)

Clarence Jones sends Dr. King an article regarding the increasing number of blacks being elected into local governments in the Deep South. Also included is in article informing readers that Jones has been named partner in a member firm of the New York Stock Exchange.

Telegram from Leroy B. Allen to MLK

Wednesday, September 20, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

The president of Cheyney State College invites Dr. King to deliver the Founder's Day Address any day in November of 1967.

Higher Education Opportunities for Southern Negroes

Sunday, January 1, 1967
Washington, D.C., New York, NY, Boston, MA, Virginia (VA), Texas (TX), Alabama (AL), Arkansas (AR), Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Kentucky (KY), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN)

The Southern Education Foundation provides a detailed list of references concerning various opportunities, organizations and procedures related to higher education. This pamphlet was strategically designed to assist organizations and community leaders seeking to improve educational opportunities for students of color.

Letter from Mr. Matthias Mirschel to MLK

Saturday, June 10, 1967
Berlin, Germany

In this letter Mr. Matthias Mirschel of Kirchliche Hochschule Berlin expresses commitment to Dr. King's stance against American intervention in Vietnam as well as integration for colored citizens. "We ask you not to cease with your endeavors...many people in the USA and all over the world hear your voice and support your campaign," writes Mr. Mirschel.

Oxford Movement

UNITED KINGDOM

Dr. King explains the Oxford Movement, a nineteenth century movement within the Anglican Church.

Dorothy Cotton's Notes

Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), DENMARK

Dorothy Cotton's compilation of notes includes topics such as the advantages of urbanization, diversity, automation, the "purpose of human effort," Denmark, community mobilization, the democratic method, the behavior of a responsible citizen and the "greatest prize" for mankind. Dorothy Cotton was the SCLC's Education Director and one of the organization's highest ranking female members at the time.

Letter from Marcellus Biot to Coretta Scott King offering Condolences

Monday, April 8, 1968
Los Angeles, CA

Mr. Biot of Los Angeles, CA offers sympathies to Mrs. King behalf of himself and Mother Green.

Hell (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Nikolai Berdyaev on the concept of hell.

Note from Will Dale to MLK

MEXICO, KENYA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Will Dale writes Dr. King commending him for encouraging Black athletes to boycott the Olympic games.

The Burning Truth in the South

New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Wisconsin (WI), Montgomery, AL

This article reprinted from "The Progressive," details the discriminatory conditions experienced by blacks in the South and urges support in the nonviolent struggle for freedom and equality.

Conception of Man

Dr. King documents a passage from Reinhold Niebuhr's work "The Nature and Destiny of Man." He would later cite this work in his essay "The Theology of Reinhold Niebuhr," written during his career at Boston University.

Letter from Cornelius E. Gallagher to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965
Washington, D.C., New Jersey (NJ)

Cornelius E. Gallagher writes Dr. King concerning the signing of the discharge petition concerning home rule for the District of Columbia.

Letter from MLK to William Ericson

Wednesday, March 6, 1968
New York (NY)

In this letter, Dr. King states his appreciation for the contribution made by Mr. Ericson to the SCLC Foundation. Dr. King goes on to express how grateful he is to have such support in the promotion of social change through non-violence.

Letter from John A. McDermott Copied to Al Raby and MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

John A. McDermott, Executive Director of the Catholic Interracial Council, writes to Al Raby and Dr. King. Mr. McDermott describes the Council's involvement with the Chicago Freedom Movement. Mr. McDermott also expresses his appreciation for Mr. Raby and Dr. King's support in the fight for fair housing legislation in Chicago. McDermott goes on to describe the Movement struggle with the controversial Atomic Energy Commission project in Weston, Illinois.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to John H. Calhoun

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. and Mrs. King deliver their condolences for the recent passing of Mason, brother of John H. Calhoun. The Kings informs Mr. Calhoun that he is not alone in his hour of mourning and that the community is also suffering this great loss.