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Letter from Richard B. Specht to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968
Pennsylvania (PA), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Richard B. Specht requests Dr. King's opinion regarding the importance of Latin for modern day students.

Letter from Manley Brudvig to MLK about an Autograph

Wednesday, July 6, 1966
Wisconsin (WI)

In this letter Manley Brudvig asks Dr. King for his autograph on the enclosed Newsweek cover.

Agnosticism

Dr. King quotes Ernst Haeckel's "The Riddle of the Universe."

Letter from Gitta Badeker to Dora McDonald Regarding "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Tuesday, July 11, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter Badeker writes to McDonald about the advancement from Gummessons Bokforlag for "Where Do We Go From Here."

Note Cards on God

Dr. King's writes on the possibility of finding God from the First Book of Chronicles.

Letter from A. Dudley Ward to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Oregon (OR)

A. Dudley Ward, General Secretary for the General Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church, forwards an enclosed resolution to Dr. King.

Letter from Leon Forer to Dr.King

Wednesday, March 6, 1968
New York (NY)

Leon Forer expresses that Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here" is a "sobering testament to our times." In this letter he also makes a suggestion to change the appendix.

Statement to the Press by MLK

Friday, January 22, 1965
Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL

This document is Dr. King's statement to the press as a result of a Teachers March for voting rights, in Selma, Alabama.

Letter from John Maguire to MLK

Tuesday, October 12, 1965
Connecticut (CT)

Mr. John D. Maguire, on behalf of Wesleyan University's Department of Religion, writes to Dr. King inviting him to preach in their chapel.

Letter from the Interseminary Movement's John Robert Nelson to MLK

Friday, August 31, 1962
Ohio (OH), Nashville, TN, Tennessee (TN), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

J. Robert Nelson, National Chairman of the Interseminary Committee, invites Dr. King to be a part of their national conference with theological professors and students for the following year. He hopes that Dr. King will be the speaker on the subject of the Strategy of Churches and Ministers for Social Change.

Letter from Ehru E. Hart to SCLC

Wednesday, April 6, 1966
California (CA)

Hart sends commendations to Dr. King after hearing him speak, and requests copies of the speech.

Letter from Annie Mae Williams to MLK

Sunday, May 2, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Annie Mae Williams and her family make a contribution of $25 to Dr. King.

Letter from Larry T. Wimmer to MLK

Friday, December 2, 1966
Utah (UT), Atlanta, GA, Tennessee (TN)

Larry T. Wimmer, Assistant Professor at Brigham Young University, writes Dr. King seeking information regarding his views on communism and the Civil Rights Movement. He also asks if it is possible to obtain any films regarding the Civil Rights Movement and Dr. King's leadership.

Letter From Jane Hall to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968
New York, NY

Jane Hall writes Dr. King suggesting that there be a focus on equitable representation of the negro in television advertising in order to attain "maximum quality and quantity" of integration.

Paul's Letter to American Christians

FRANCE, New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King writes an imaginary letter to modern day Christians from the perspective of the apostle Paul. In the letter, Paul praises his listeners for their technological advancements, yet reprimands them for their spiritual degradation. He encourages them to uphold Christian values despite outside factors.

Postcard Sent to MLK

Memphis, TN, Atlanta, GA

This unsigned postcard sent from Memphis, Tennessee depicts Dr. King and Lyndon B. Johnson pulling down a judge who symbolizes justice.

Five Denominations of Protestants Said To Ignore Negroes

Washington, D.C.

This article discusses a claim brought against "five influential Protestant denominations" by members of the Rockefeller Fund for Theological Education. Specifically referenced is Rev. Dr. C. Shelby Rooks, Executive secretary of the fund, who is reported as saying that the American Baptist Convention, the Episcopal, the Methodist, the United Presbyterian Churches, and the United Church of Christ discriminated against African Americans "from the centers of denominational power and decision making." Dr.

Letter from Omar Burleson to MLK

Tuesday, September 14, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS)

In response to a previous telegram, Omar Burleson, Chairman of the Eighty-Ninth Congress, writes Dr. King to assure him that proper consideration is being given in the Mississippi Congress Delegation.

Letter from Erskine Caldwell to MLK

Wednesday, November 11, 1964
California (CA)

Noted author Erskine Caldwell congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. Caldwell's works, including the highly acclaimed book Tobacco Road, addressed poverty, racism and social problems in his native South.

Letter from Nancy Childs to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
Detroit, MI

Nancy Childs, a junior in high school, writes Dr. King to convey support in the fight for equality and civil rights in America. Childs is a student at an integrated high school in Detroit, Michigan and expresses her delight that Dr. King has the ability to stand up for his beliefs. This letter was drafted following the bloody assault against demonstrators during the first attempt to march from Selma to Montgomery on March 7, 1965.

The Danger of A Little Progress

Saturday, February 15, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL

In Dr. King's article, The Danger of a Little Progress, he discusses the work of the SCLC and SNCC in correlation to statistics regarding integrated housing and schools, as well as discrimination in employment. Dr. King concludes that there has been little progress among blacks in Atlanta statistically.

Letter from Mrs. Catherine Hartman to MLK about a New Publication

Tuesday, August 1, 1967
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

In this letter Mrs. Catherine Hartman of Atheneum Publishers sends Dr. King a new publication, asking that Dr. King read it and offer any comments.

Letter from Helen Hickey to Mrs. King

Monday, April 8, 1968

In this letter Helen Hickey sends her sympathy to Mrs. King pertaining to the loss of her husband. She also comments on the personal characteristics that she admired most about Dr. King.

Freedom

Dr. King quotes Tillich in sketching his views on man's freedom in relation to destiny.

Suffering

Dr. King records J. S. Mill’s view of suffering.

Richard Millard Congratulates MLK

Wednesday, October 28, 1964
Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA

Richard Millard, the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts at Boston University, congratulates Dr. King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Telegram from Bishop James K. Mathews to MLK

Friday, June 14, 1963
Boston, MA, Birmingham, AL

Telegram from Bishop James K. Mathews to Dr. King congratulatiing him on his "Letter from a Birmingham Jail."

Address by MLK to Southern Association of Political Scientist

Friday, November 13, 1964

Dr. King addresses the issues of poverty, unemployment, education, health, and housing disparities within the nation. Granted, many strides have been made but there is still more work to be done. Equality has still not come full circle in regards to these social issues. Dr. King urges the people to continue the fight of social justice in all aspects of inequality.

Letter from Ethel Love to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, May 9, 1961
Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA

Ms. Love, program chairman of Warren Business and Professional Women's Club, responds to Ms. McDonald's previous letter regarding Dr. King's availability to speak in Warren, Ohio. Ms. Love ask Ms. McDonald to respond with "an approximate estimate of the likely fee."

Letter from Mrs. Julia D. Fields to MLK

Thursday, February 22, 1968
Florida (FL)

Julia Fields is the only Negro stockbroker in Florida and discusses the adversities she has experienced with Dr. King. Mrs. Fields describes this time period as the "worst year of her life" because the whites resent any Negro attempting to move in their neighborhood. Dr. King is addressed to possibly give advice to better her situation and uplift her "let down" spirit.