Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Brooklyn, NY"

MLK Addresses Riots and War

Sunday, October 1, 1967

Dr. King encourages friends to support nonviolence in order to avoid physical or moral destruction. He explains that the, "SCLC cannot support riots for moral and pragmatic reasons."

Letter from Jerome S. Ozer to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967

Mr. Ozer informs Dr. King that his organization will be publishing "Eyewitness: The Negro in American History" by William Loren Katz, which covers the Negro in every aspect of American life. He then requests that Dr. King write an introduction for the book.

Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam

Saturday, April 22, 1967

This letter informs fellow members of the Spring Mobilization to End the War in Vietnam of the successes of their organization and serves as a call to action on the upcoming steps.

Letter from Bette Zugerman to Rev. Abernathy, SCLC

Saturday, April 27, 1968

Ms. Zugerman writes Reverend Abernathy to introduce an enclosed document which she suggests is the "one and only non-violent answer to alleviate the suffering of all people."

Letter from Rhonda Hutchins to MLK

Rhonda Hutchins, a seventh grade student from George A. Towns Elementary, encloses a copy of a recent interview with Dr. King. Hutchins states, "feel free to make any necessary corrections and/or additions" before it is published.

Spirit

Dr. King writes that there is no way of defining the essential nature of spirit because it is manifested only in the activities of intellect, sensibility and will.

Letter of Condolence from Jerry K. Bolton

Thursday, April 4, 1968

Mr. Bolton expresses his heartfelt sympathy for the "unjust loss" of Dr. King.

Follow Me

Dr. King outlines a sermon. "Follow Me" and "The Call of Christ" are considered as possible titles.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Robert Jacoby

Thursday, July 25, 1963

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Reverend Robert Jacoby for his kind letter concerning his use of the Letter From the Birmingham Jail.

Letter from Tom Perry to MLK

Tuesday, December 26, 1967

Tom Perry thanks Dr. King for inspiring him to continue his work in the peace movement in Canada.

Essay on Violence and Nonviolence

The impractical and immoral effect of violence and testimony to the moral power and efficiency of nonviolence are discussed in this essay. Violence is recognized as achieving social justice with great results, but not without damage to society. Although a much tougher way of seeking social justice, nonviolence is a more satisfying lasting solution.

Letter from Richard L. Zanglin to MLK

Wednesday, August 9, 1967

Richard L. Zanglin invites Dr. King to speak to the student body at Xavier University in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Our Struggle

Dr. King discusses blacks' struggle for racial equality in America. King explores racist whites' views of "the inferior social, economic, and political position" of the Negro. However, when Negroes begin to reevaluate their position in society and tension in race relations arise, he argues that the Negro begins to "organize and act" against the status quo as evident in the boycotts and sit-in demonstrations occurring throughout the South.

Letter from Paul Rosing to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Dr. King is notified by Paul Rosing of the Borromeo Seminary College that he has been placed on the mock ballot for their "Choice 68" campaign. He asks that Dr. King submit any type of potential campaign literature, speeches and etc.

Letter from Midsouth Management's Ardin Hartman to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967

Ardin Hardin writes to Dr. King thanking him for the invitation to the SCLC's convention, but informs him that he will not attend because he does not agree with Dr. King's views on the Vietnam War.

Letter from the Hadley Executive Committee to Dora McDonald

Saturday, April 8, 1967

Ernest Shaefer communicates with Dora McDonald to solidify the details surrounding Dr. King's lecture in Pennsylvania. Mr. Shaefer informs Miss McDonald of the written confirmation and formal contract that must be signed in advance.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK

Monday, February 27, 1967

In this letter, is enclosed a check from Alfred A. Knopf Inc. for the use of "What Next? Five Negro Leaders Reply" in the book "Minorities In A Changing World by Milton L. Baron.

Letter from the American Committee on Africa Regarding South Africa's Participation in the Olympics

Thursday, January 11, 1968

George M. Houser, Executive Director of the American Committee on Africa, informs readers of the International Olympic Committee's upcoming meeting that will discuss the 1968 Olympics. Mr. Houser encloses a paper regarding the history of South Africa and the Olympics to help urge the committee to reconsider granting South Africa permission to participate in the Olympics.

Telegram from Elizabeth J. Miller to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967

Elizabeth Miller, the Executive Director of the Christian Social Concern division of the American Baptist Convention, extends support to Dr. King while he is in the Jefferson County Jail in 1967. She expresses gratitude for Dr. King's leadership and commends him for his non-violent action.

Letter from E. Paul Weaver to MLK

Tuesday, January 9, 1962

E. Paul Weaver writes to Dr. King enclosing a small contribution for the work of the SCLC. Weaver also requests that the Dr. King visit Camp Mack as a guest speaker. The Executive Secretary of Church of the Brethren, one of three historic peace churches in the U. S., informs Dr. King of the Brethren's strong stand against slavery long before the Civil War.

Letter from Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall to MLK

Wednesday, May 6, 1964

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General, responds to Dr. King's telegram regarding the assault of Rev. Paul Chapman. Marshall informs him that evidence has failed to disclose any "violation of a federal criminal statute," so the Department of Justice is unable to take action.

Receipt for Sigrid L. Sharp

Thursday, August 20, 1964

Acknowledging receipt of a letter and a $100 contribution to the SCLC, Dr. King sends his appreciation to Mary Sarvis. Dr. King makes reference to an enclosed receipt of the contribution.

Letter from Robert Gabor to MLK

Thursday, June 27, 1963

Robert Gabor writes Dr. King inviting him to Oslo, Norway to speak at the 7th International Congress of the International Union of Socialist Youth. Gabor expresses to Dr. King that their organization supports "the present struggle of the American Negro."

The Purpose of the State

Dr. King records some thoughts on the functions of the state.

Letter from Gloria Caruthers to MLK

Saturday, October 17, 1964

Miss Caruthers congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. She states that no other individual is more deserving of the award.

Letter from Sarah Harvey to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1962

Sarah Harvey states that the receipt of Dr. King's letter and book made her feel "very unworthy." Mrs. Harvey also makes financial a contribution.

Letters from Irvine I. Turner to MLK

Tuesday, April 17, 1962

Irvine I. Turner requests, in three different letters, Dr. King provide an endorsement for reelection to the Newark Municipal Council.

SCLC 10th Anniversary Advertisement Order Form

This letter serves as an order form for advertisement in a booklet commemorating the SCLC's ten-year anniversary.

Notecard regarding science

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on science.This is an example of one of many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books, and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from P. G. Harkins to MLK

Mrs. Harkins, program chairman of the Voice of Women, requests that Dr. King speak for the organization when his schedule permits.