Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Brooklyn, NY"

People to People: The Negro Looks at Africa

Saturday, December 8, 1962

In his column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King reports on the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa that brought together a cross-section of the Negro community to discuss foreign policy toward Africa. He writes that colonialism and segregation are siblings and that the future of the emerging nations of Africa and the American Negro are interrelated. He speaks of the contradictions in policy toward Africa, the need for more Negroes in the diplomatic corps, and the importance of action by the Administration against racism at home and racism in US foreign policy.

Letter from Theodore R. Britton Jr. to MLK

Saturday, February 24, 1968

Theodore R. Britton promotes the candidacy of Dr. King for the pastorship of Riverside Church throughout this letter. Britton also asserts that New York is in need of Dr. King's leadership and sermons.

Letter from Robert M. Steornson to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967

Robert Steornson commends Dr. King for taking a stand against the Vietnam war and his efforts to promote peace.

Letter from Karen Ladin to God

In her letter to God, Karen Ladin expresses concern for the plight of the Negro.

Telegram from Dr. Richard Moore to MLK

Saturday, March 13, 1965

Dr. Richard Moore, on behalf of Bethune Cookman College, expresses support for Dr. King during the SCLC Voting Rights Campaign in Selma, Alabama.

Letter from Rabbi Roland B. Gittelsohn to S.C.L.C.

Wednesday, June 21, 1967

In this letter, Rabbi Roland B. Gittelsohn enclosed a contribution of twenty-five dollars for S.C.L.C.

Letter from MLK to Earl Hall

Friday, July 14, 1967

Dr. King offers his gratitude to Mr. Earl Hall, who sent a letter to the "National Observer" in defense of Dr. King.

Institute for Human Relations LBJ Leaflet

The Office of Economic Opportunity republished this spotlight on President Johnson's War on Poverty from Look Magazine in June 1967. The editors discuss the "poverty of opportunity" plaguing nearly 1 in every 6 Americans, saying that Johnson's War on Poverty makes an attempt to combat the economic conditions of America's most vulnerable, including Negro Americans. The articles also shed light on the numerous shortcomings the Johnson Administration-supported legislation has encountered amongst legislators and the American public.

Letter from E. Thomas Williams Jr. to MLK

Friday, April 23, 1965

On behalf of the Peace Corps Staff in Washington D. C., E. Thomas Williams, Jr. sends Dr. King a contribution to aid in the work of the SCLC. Williams also explains that many of the donors have made more than financial contributions to the civil rights movement.

Peace and Freedom Party

Sunday, January 1, 1967

The Peace and Freedom Party was originally established in the Northern region of California in 1967. This pamphlet features the party's political platform in addition to voter registration procedures.

Letter from Jeremiah Rome to MLK

Wednesday, August 2, 1967

Mr. Rome writes to Dr. King to state that African-Americans need good white people, to create job opportunities for the black race.

Man

Dr. King records one atheist’s perspective on man.

Death

Dr. King quotes Nels Frederick Solomon Ferré on the subject of death from his book Evil and the Christian Faith.

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

Thursday, July 5, 1962

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."

Statement Before the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee

Saturday, August 11, 1956

Dr. King addresses the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee. He calls for strong federal action in the South to prevent violence and to uphold the decisions of the Supreme Court pertaining to the end of segregation.

Dr. Luther King Cause of U.S. Violence

Thursday, November 11, 1965

The articles mentions Dr. King and his supposed involvement with the Communist Party. The author is not convinced that Dr. King is the "good Samaritan" everyone believes him to be, and he is ensuring more violence with his cause.

SCLC's People to People Tour

The SCLC held their Alabama "People to People Tour" from December 5-8, 1962. This itinerary lists the SCLC staff that participated in addition to the locations of their meetings.

CBS's Face the Nation Interview

Sunday, April 16, 1967

This is an official transcript of an interview on CBS's Face the Nation that focused on the Vietnam War. Dr. King explains his vision for the Civil Rights Movement and Antiwar Movements. The Great Society, Dr. King believes, is being shot down over Vietnam, as the funding for the programs are diverted to the war.

President Kennedy's Stand on Negotiation in Albany

In this statement made from the Albany, Georgia city jail where he was imprisoned, Dr. King expresses appreciation for President Kennedy's support of negotiation between Albany's City Commission and civil rights leaders.

Letter from Helga Gulbrandsen to MLK

Monday, December 7, 1964

Helga Gulbrandsen responds to a previous letter from Dr. King and congratulates him on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. Gulbrandsen expresses regret concerning the Reverend's unavailability for a lecture in the Oslo Group.

Telegram from F. M. Horton to MLK

F. M. Horton relays Norwegian ambassador True Davis' congratulations to Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Eulogy for the Four Girls Who Were Murdered in the Church in Birmingham

Sunday, September 15, 1963

Dr. King eulogizes the girls killed in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church as "martyred heroines." He asserts that their deaths will serve a greater purpose: they will shed new light on Birmingham and the civil rights struggle.

Invitation to the 20th Anniversary World Conference Against Atom and Hydrogen Bombs

Saturday, June 26, 1965

Ichiro Mortaki, of the Japan Congress Against Atom & Hyrdrogen Bombs, invites Dr. King to their conference taking place 20 years after two atomic bombs were dropping on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, in World War II. This leading Japanese disarmament organization was founded the same year they extended this invitation to Dr. King.

Transcripts of Speeches And Statements Along The Meridith March

Thursday, June 16, 1966

Dr. King discusses the recent violent challenge faced by the Negro and the SCLC in which they have experienced a "threat of murder." This issue has motivated Dr. King to continuously press for social change and maintain the responsibilities in Mississippi.

Presentation of the Marcus Garvey Prize for Human Rights

Dr. King was a recipient of the first Marcus Garvey Prize for Human Rights. This award was issued by the Jamaican Government and was presented to Coretta Scott King due to the tragic death of Dr. King earlier in the year. This program outlines that event.

MLK Note

Dr. King writes a story about a father and son waiting for a train at New York's Grand Central Station. The son is headed to college in New England and the father gives the young man some simple, yet profound advice. "Bill, never forget who you are."

Invitation for MLK to Speak at Bryn Mawr College

Tuesday, January 4, 1966

The class of 1966 from Bryn Mawr College invite Dr. King to be the baccalaureate speaker for their service on Sunday May 29th. They remind Dr. King that he was scheduled to speak previously but other engagements prevented him from doing so.

Letter from A. Philip Randolph Institue to MLK Regarding "Right to Work"

Monday, May 22, 1967

In this letter, Bayard Rustin, the Executive Director of A. Philip Randolph Institute, expresses gratitude for Dr. King signing the introduction - "Right to Work" Laws --A Trap for America's Minorities".

Draft: The Time for Freedom Has Come

Tuesday, May 1, 1962

In this draft of Dr. King's article, "The Time for Freedom Has Come," he discusses the role of African American students in the Civil Rights Movement. He praises the commitment and determination of students and credits them with the desegregation of lunch counters. He also identifies with the students' frustration with the slowness of forward progress in the struggle for equality. The article was published in New York Times Magazine on September 10, 1961.

Letter from Jacob Javits to MLK

Wednesday, May 13, 1964

Senator Jacob Javits expresses his gratitude for an inscribed book that Dr. King sent him.