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Handwritten Note from Harry Wachtel to Dora McDonald

Harry Wachtel, confidant and legal counsel to Dr. King, writes a note to Dora McDonald referencing an enclosure intended for Dr. King.

Letter to MLK from Dore Schary

Wednesday, January 6, 1965

In this letter, Dore Schary invites Dr. and Mrs. King to attend the 52nd annual dinner of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith at which President Lyndon B. Johnson will receive the America's Democratic Legacy Award.

Letter from M. A. Cross to Marie Goldner

Tuesday, October 1, 1963

M. A. Cross, Director of Public and Industrial Relations at Dan River Mills, Inc., informs Mrs. Goldner that Dan River Mills, Inc. does not discriminate against Negroes.

Letter from Judith D. Greenberg to MLK

Saturday, March 23, 1968

Judith Greenberg of the Stern College for Women asks Dr. King about material for a report concerning Choice '68.

King Family Christmas Card

Thursday, December 1, 1966

The King family sends out holiday greetings with their family Christmas card. The card displays a portrait of the King family along with a holiday message.

People In Action: Nothing Changing Unless

Sunday, January 28, 1962

In his regular column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes in support of a 435 million dollar job training bill that would "salvage a segment of the unemployed and potentially employable."

MLK on Brown versus Board of Education

Dr. King writes notations regarding the Supreme Court's decision in 1954 of Brown versus Board of Education, listing the various positive and negative aspects of that decision. The Reverend closes by stating, "Let us go and unite and be inspired once more..."

Telegram from MLK to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach

Dr. King writes US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach to inform him of the reports of "known election irregularities" he is receiving concerning the next day's Georgia Democratic primary election.

Letter from Fred Becker to MLK in Regard to Speaking Engagements

Monday, January 14, 1963

Mr. Fred C. Becker writes to Dr. King about his speaking engagement, lectures, and attendance at special meetings. He requested that Dr. King would send a list of speaking engagements in as advance as possible. The publishers wanted the opportunity to allow the public to be aware of his speaking schedule, so they may be able to purchase his books.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK Regarding Morehouse Anniversary

Friday, January 13, 1967

In this letter, President Mays invites Dr. King to Morehouse's 100th Anniversary celebration.

The Atlanta Constitution: Dr. King Warns Against the Riots

Tuesday, June 27, 1967

Eugene Patterson describes Dr. King's position against violent race riots and the consequences of these movements on the Black and White community.

Religious Education

Dr. King cites Henry Nelson Wieman's "Normative Psychology of Religion."

Letter from Joan Daves to Clarence Jones

Friday, October 30, 1964

Joan Daves writes to Dr. King's attorney to discuss her receipt of the Martin Luther King Treasury published by the Educational Heritage. Impressed with the volume, Daves proceeds to give details on its organization and content. Raising the issue of whether certain material is in the public domain, Daves offers to expedite the copyright assignment process.

Letter from MLK to the Fourth Grade Class of Germantown Friends School

Friday, November 29, 1963

Dr. King thanks Kendall Bryant and the fourth grade class of the Germantown Friends School in Philadelphia for their letter and contribution following the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing. Dr. King also mentions the need for all races and ethnicities to work together to achieve the "Brotherhood of Man."

MLK Address at Park Sheraton Hotel

Wednesday, September 12, 1962

Dr. King gives an address commemorating the one hundredth anniversary of the passage of the Emancipation Proclamation. In the celebratory speech, he calls all Americans to take action in applying the principles of the Emancipation Proclamation to society. Dr. King states that the commands of the Proclamation have fallen short in practice and that it will take a cumulative effort from every citizen to undo this process.

Telegram from Mrs. Mary L. Ayler to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

This telegram is an expression of support and encouragement from Mrs. Ayler of Murphysboro, IL, to Dr. King while he was incarcerated in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Ozro T. Jones to the SCLC's C. T. Vivian

Friday, May 28, 1965

Ozro Jones, President of the International Youth Congress, writes C. T. Vivian stating that he sincerely appreciates Dr. King for accepting the invitation to speak at the International Youth Congress in Chicago.

Letter from Irv Kupcinet to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967

Irv Kupcinet, a writer for the Chicago Sun-Times, encloses a copy of his special column including Dr. King's power quote on NBC's Meet the Press. The interview was in direct correlation to the riots that occured in many urban cities.

Draft of Showdown for Nonviolence

Monday, April 1, 1968

This is a draft, with Dr. King's revisions, of the article "Showdown for Nonviolence" for Look Magazine. The article was published posthumously on April 16, 1968.

Letter from Clarence Jones to MLK

Friday, May 15, 1964

Clarence Jones writes Dr. King requesting commentary concerning "The World March Towards Human Rights: Luncheon on May 28, 1964."

Relation Between Eternal Objects and Actual Occasions

Philosophically rooted, the set of notes on this series of cards explores metaphysical claims for the understanding that each "eternal object" is necessarily connected to an "actual occasion." Dr. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's "Science and the Modern World" and speaks to the actualization of an event as result of possibilities.

Lecture Tour Request from David Bilk to MLK

Wednesday, October 5, 1966

David Bilk, representing the British National Union of Students, requests that Dr. King present a lecture series for the larger British Universities explaining the past, present, future of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.

Letter from Walter Gibson to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967

Mr. Gibson writes to Dr. King concerning his political position on the Vietnam War. He believes that the war is a just war because the end is to help the South Vietnamese halt the spread of communism.

Letter from Silas K. Brown to MLK

Tuesday, December 26, 1967

Mr. Brown requests the help of Dr. King and the SCLC on behalf of Reverend U.S. Gilliam. Reverend Gilliam, the first Negro to run for public office in Grenada, Mississippi, is under attack by whites in his community.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Friday, May 7, 1965

Dr. Mays informs Dr. King of his recommendation to confer an honorary degree from Morehouse College on Dr. J. Curtis Dixon. Mays includes a biographical sketch of Dr. Dixon and asks Dr. King to respond to the letter with his approval or disapproval.

For Healing of The Nations

Sunday, February 14, 1954

The National Council of Churches of Christ in the USA publishes this brochure on peace and race relations, calling Christians into action with the responsibility of making brotherhood a reality. Guidelines are presented for individual Christians and Churches to follow in order to create a world full of love and free of racial turmoil.

Letter from WSB-TV's Don Elliot Heald to MLK

Friday, December 29, 1967

Don Elliot, of WSB Television in Atlanta, encloses an editorial for Dr. King to review. In the editorial, American Baptist Convention President J. H. Jackson criticizes Dr. King for not taking a more constructive approach towards influencing Congress to pass more civil rights legislation.

MLK Notes

Dr. King expresses concern about common attitudes towards the Church. In his words, "So often people will do a good thing, and then spoil it by some ugly twist of the spirit."

Letter from MLK to Premier Lyndon Pindling

Friday, January 19, 1968

Dr. King encourages Premier Pindling of the Bahamas to accept an invitation to address the Atlanta Press Club. Dr. King assures Premier Pindling that the invitation is a great opportunity to speak with leading journalists from all over the United States.

Letter from Cleonia and Frank to MLK

Tuesday, February 23, 1960

Cleonia and Frank, of Montgomery, Alabama, convey their support to Dr. King and the civil rights movement.