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Letter from Mrs. Carrie Fillmore to MLK

Mrs. Fillmore requests help from Dr. King as she informs him that she has six children and cannot afford to get them into schools. She also lets Dr. King know that she has gone to the NAACP without results.

Handwritten Notecard Regarding Sin

On this note card, Dr. King discusses the repercussions of sin according to Albrecht Ritschl.

Address to Members of the Hungry Club

Wednesday, December 15, 1965

Dr. King discusses the Negro's dilemma in an address to the members of the Hungry Club in Atlanta, Georgia. He argues that some of the challenges facing the Negro are: taking advantage of all the new federal programs, encouraging youth to go into higher education, and developing massive action programs to rid unjust systems. Dr. King also states three myths the Negro should explore: the myth of time, the myth of "exaggerated progress," and the myth of "total reliance on the boothstrap philosophy."

Letter from J. R. Coan to Alumni of Turner Theological Seminary

Friday, January 12, 1968

Mr. Coan, acting director of Turner Theological Seminary at the Interdenominational Theological Center, issued this correspondence to all of Turner Theological Seminary's Alumni. The letter announces the details and record of minutes for the Seminary's Third Annual Founders' Day Convocation.

Telegram from Rev. Loe Champion to MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968

Dr. King was the recipient of this Western Union telegram from Rev. Loe Champion of the Milwaukee Operation Breadbasket, an economic project of the SCLC. Rev. Champion sent this telegram to show support for Dr. King's struggles in the South. The correspondence was sent two days after a march Dr. King led in Memphis, Tennessee in support of striking sanitation workers.

Letter from Donald G. Brownlow to MLK

Thursday, December 9, 1965

After hearing Dr. King's speech at Billanova University, Mr. Brownlow requests that the Reverend speak at the Haverford School located in Pennsylvania. Secondarily, Brownlow requests that Dr. King send a few words of congratulations to a student attending the college.

MLK Requests Federal Protection from US Attorney General

Friday, February 19, 1965

Dr. King sends this urgent request for protection to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach. Negro citizens were brutalized while protesting the arrest of James Orange. Alabama State Troopers prevented protestors from seeking medical attention by refusing to allow them to leave Zion Methodist Church.

Letter from James M. Force to Dora McDonald

Friday, April 28, 1967

James M. Force, Public Information Coordinator for the University of Wisconsin, requests that Dr. King consider allowing his speech scheduled for May 12, 1967 be broadcast over the radio. WSAU Radio expresses interest in carrying Dr. King's speech live. WHA Radio, operated by the University of Wisconsin, requests permission to tape the speech for later broadcast.

Letter from John G. Kirk to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967

John G. Kirk of Metromedia asks Dr. King to write an editorial for a future publication called "America Now." Dr. King's article is to be based on the assumption that it is the responsibility of the government to enhance the dignity of individual citizens.

Telegram from MLK to the Fairmont Hotel

Saturday, September 16, 1967

Dr. King writes to the Fairmont Hotel in San Francisco California, requesting a reservation of two single rooms.

Letter from David Mays to Dora McDonald

Monday, October 28, 1963

David Mays, Chairman of the Department of Speech and Theatre at Austin Peay State College in Clarksville, Tennessee, participates in a continued correspondence with Dora McDonald. Mays inquires if the speech he requested will be under separate cover, as it was not enclosed in the recent letter. He also requests Dr. King's permission to make copies of the speech in order to pass out to students in his Principles of Rhetoric class.

Debit Memo from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Friday, April 7, 1967

This debit memo from Joan Daves informs Dr. King of the expenses for "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

An Invitation to the Honoring of Rabbi Israel Dresner and Reverend Richard Wilson

This document serves as an invitation to a event honoring Rabbi Dresner and Rev. Wilson for their outstanding spiritual leadership.

People In Action: March on Washington

Saturday, August 24, 1968

Dr. King wrote this article for the New York Amsterdam news in anticipation of the March On Washington. He hoped it would be a nonviolent "orderly massing of people." He discusses past meetings and rallies that suffered from low participation due to fear of association with the protest movement. Dr. King encourages supporters to be courageous enough to attend this march.

Telegram from James Endicott to MLK

Tuesday, December 12, 1967

James Endicott writes to Dr. King inviting him to address the mass rally in Toronto with the theme being Vietnam, civil rights and world peace.

Condolences to the Wife of Theodore Trammell

Tuesday, March 20, 1962

Dr. King and Rev. Wyatt Walker send condolences to Mrs. Theodore Trammell. They make a promise to rededicate themselves to the fight for human rights, just as her husband had done.

Righteousness

Dr. King records a quote on righteousness from Karl Barth's "The Epistle to the Romans."

Hegel

Dr. King outlines principles of Hegel's philosophy regarding rationality and reality.

King Plans Capital Shantytown 'In a Tumbledown Shack'

This article describes Dr. King's plans, as observed by a detractor, for the 1968 March of Poor People to Washington.  The Associated Press reports that shacks and poor people from all over the nation will descend on the nation's capital to make the nation aware of their presence. President Lyndon B. Johnson, when reached for comment, said he hoped to work with the groups.

MLK Sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church

Sunday, January 16, 1966

As pastor of Ebenezer, Dr. King delivered this particular sermon to his congregation in January of 196. He begins by referencing representative-elect Julian Bond's statement against war and against America's involvement in Vietnam, and he commends Mr. Bond for being courageous enough to speak his mind. He uses quotes from historical figures and biblical passages to support his claim that humans should be men of conviction and not of conformity. Dr.

Telegram from MLK and Mrs. King to Dr. Benjamin E. Mays

Dr. and Mrs. King commend Dr. Benjamin E. Mays for all he has accomplished during his twenty-seven years as President of Morehouse College.

Letter from Jodi Moses to MLK about TAC Rally

Thursday, May 26, 1966

The Community Relations Committee of the Tenant's Action Council (TAC) writes this letter to Dr. King asking him to speak at a rally being held at the Olivet Community Presbyterian Church in Chicago, Illinois.

Telegram from Anne Farnsworth and Marty Peretz to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

Anne Farnsworth and Marty Peretz offer their encouragement to Dr. King.

Letter from Edwin Berry to Jane Lee J. Eddy

Friday, November 18, 1966

Edwin Berry, Executive Director of the Chicago Urban League, writes Jane Lee Eddy, Secretary of the Taconic Foundation, to request funding for a "get-out-the-vote campaign" in Chicago.

Wisdom

Dr. King quotes and comments on Proverbs 2:6, saying that wisdom is a supreme virtue for the author of Proverbs and involves moral character and knowledge.

Letter of invitation from Rabbi Albert A. Goldman to MLK

Thursday, May 20, 1965

Goldman invites Dr. King to be the guest speaker for the Community Thanksgiving Service at The Isaac M. Wise temple in Ohio.

Operation Breadbasket Program Hosts MLK

Thursday, May 26, 1966

This program acts as proof of direct action as Dr. King, Reverend Newberry, Reverend Jesse Jackson, and Reverend Johnson present Operation Breadbasket to New Friendship Church.

Immortality (Aquinas)

Dr. King references Saint Thomas Aquinas regarding the topic of immortality.

MLK Announcement of Rally to be held in San Francisco

Dr. King announces the details for a rally in San Francisco, California to garner support for the pending Civil Rights Bill in Congress. He makes a call to action for various diverse groups to join in this initiative.