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What is the OIC Institute?

This brochure for the Opportunities Industrialization Center describes what it provides for students with the characteristics and training needed to develop an accelerated professional caliber for employment.

National Clergymen's Conference on Operation Breadbasket

This schedule for the National Clergymen's Conference on Operation Breadbasket provides a description of the topics to be covered during the convention.

Letter from Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa to MLK

Tuesday, May 26, 1959

This fundraising letter and accompanying bulletin describes the plight of South African non-whites brought on by apartheid and economic disparities. The Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa requests donations and support for the work of the Diocese of Johannesburg.

Letter of Condolence from Anny Elston

Saturday, April 6, 1968

73 year old widow Amy Elston, who makes contributions sparingly to the SCLC, is deeply impacted in her philanthropy in the wake of Dr. King's death and decides to send this letter, along with a contribution, to the SCLC to show her support in the advancement of the actualization of Dr. King's dreams.

Request Letter from Joan Kasabach to Dr. King

Sunday, March 6, 1966

In this letter. Joan Kasabach is writing Dr.King to notify him of a speech program she is launching at Bloom Township High School and Community College. Kasabach request that Dr. King offer any comments or suggestions to add as she is developing the program.

God

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "The Christian Faith."

Freedom

Dr. King quotes from Hegel's "The Philosophy of History."

Letter from MLK to Bert Onne

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

Dr. King takes an opportunity to thank Bert Onne of Stockholm for his assistance in supporting the SCLC's Freedom Movement in Chicago.

Letter from V. W. Shepard to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967

V. W. Shepard admonishes Dr. King for joining the anti-Vietnam War Movement. He explains that prior to Dr. King's joining the movement he considered the Reverend to be "one of the greatest living Americans."

Letter from Eleanor Lawrence to MLK

Sunday, May 7, 1967

Eleanor Lawrence thanks Dr. King for his bold opposition to the Vietnam War. She understands that Dr. King's views transcend all across the globe and believes that Dr. King would make a perfect peace candidate for President in the 1968 elections.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Richard T. Andrews, Jr.

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dr. King express thanks for the Mt. Zion Congregational Church's contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King details and outlines how their financial assistance will further foster the improvement of the racial issues in the South. The SCLC would be "caught in a dungeon of despair" if they did not have any moral support from various individuals and organizations.

Speech to the Synagogue Council of America

Sunday, December 5, 1965

Dr. King receives the Judaism and World Peace Award from the Synagogue Council of America and uses the occasion to speak about the Civil Rights Movement and international peace. He laments the vehement criticism of dissent and discussion of the Vietnam War and enumerates reasons why the Hebrew prophets are so needed today.

Letter from John R. Yungblut to CSK

Monday, August 2, 1965

Mr. Yungblut of Quaker House, writes Mrs. King to inquire whether the King Children may be interested in participating in a youth dramatics program.

Letter from MLK to Robert L. Shirley

Tuesday, December 13, 1966

Dr. King writes to Robert Shirley to inform him that, if necessary, he will send a member of the SCLC to serve in the interm for Golden Frinks who has been reassigned to another location.

Letter from Ivery Simmons to MLK

Tuesday, August 8, 1967

Ivery Simmons, President of Simmons Construction Company, informs Dr. King that his organization will assist with renovating the slum areas through out the nation, if financially supported by the government.

Letter from P. A. Riley to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

A critic writes Dr. King a carefully constructed letter to share her view on his Vietnam War stance. As a widow of a late Korean War veteran, she claims that Dr. King's position undermines "everything that our fighting men, down thru the long, long, years, have fought and died for." The widow questions Dr. King's combination of civil rights and peace movement issues, and asserts "patriotism is one of the factors free men live and prosper under!"

People to People: A Choice and a Promise

Saturday, November 21, 1964

Dr. King addresses the idea that American people of all races have a choice to make this nation a great society.

Letter to MLK Regarding the Draft Law

Sunday, July 30, 1967

Dr. King receives an anonymous letter regarding the revision of Draft Law. The author states that the July 1, 1967 revision of the law allows regulations that further burden the military service to lower income groups, specifically Negroes, instead of requiring that Military service be spread more equally. The author encloses the State Memorandum No. 6-21, which was issued by the Illinois State Director of Selective Service on July 19, 1967.

Letter from Rosalie Montag to MLK

Monday, October 22, 1962

Rosalie Montag writes the office of Dr. King requesting biographical information about the Reverend for her feature article in the school's newspaper.

Letter from Jimmie Barnett to MLK

Wednesday, March 9, 1966

A Negro owner of "so-called slum property" takes offense at Dr. King's stance on the subject. He argues that the owners of the properties are primarily Negroes who are not at fault. Dr. King undertook an extensive "End to Slums" campaign in Chicago in 1966 under the sponsorship of the SCLC and various community organizations.

Letter from MLK to George Bass

Friday, June 17, 1966

Dr. King responds to Mrs. George Bass' recent letter inviting him to speak at the annual convention of the Planned Parenthood Association. Dr. King regretfully declines the invitation because his schedule is booked for the entire month of January.

Letter from Jack Egle to MLK

Tuesday, April 12, 1966

Jack Engle, European Director of the Council on Student Travel, thanks Dr. King for intervening during the "Nuit des Droits Civiques" in Paris. He also informs Dr. King that the ad hoc committee formed for the event will be disbanded at an upcoming meeting.

Telegram from Civil Rights Leaders to President Kennedy

Monday, September 16, 1963

Members of the SCLC and prominent civil rights leaders request an immediate conference with President John F. Kennedy regarding the 1963 Birmingham church bombing.

SCLC Policy-Making Board to Meet in Washington, D.C. February 6-7

Thursday, February 1, 1968

The SCLC Executive Board of Directors will hold its semi-annual meeting in Washington, D.C. They intend to discuss future projects as well as continuing projects.

Letter from Julius Avery to MLK Regarding Vietnam

Monday, May 15, 1967

In this letter Julius H. Avery writes MLK to urge him to reconsider his position on the Vietnam war. Avery expresses his support for world peace but stresses that Dr. King's remarks are volatile and do not warrant "opening the flood gates to Communism."

I Sat Where They Sat Sermon Outline

This sermon draft of Dr. King's was never delivered, but focuses on the Christian themes of empathy and understanding. Dr. King claims that "if the white man was closer to the Negro he would... ...understand them" better.

Letter from Dan C. Lortie to MLK

Monday, May 23, 1966

Professor Dan Lortie of the University of Chicago invites Dr. King to speak at the Colver-Rosenberger Lecture Series.

Letter from MLK to Jesse W. Furlow

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

Dr. King disagrees with Mr. Furlow's theory that "we are the victims of a Catholic conspiracy."

Memo on Food Crisis in India

Monday, March 20, 1967

Rodney H. Clurman, Executive Secretary of the World Food and Population Crisis Committee, writes this memorandum to committee members. Clurman sends this status report on the state of food affairs in India. He references a letter received from John Taylor who lives in Bihar, India and works for the Ford Foundation.

Press Release Issued by MLK

Monday, June 5, 1961

The following document is a press release issued by Dr. King. In the first section, he comments on the success of various civil rights demonstrations across the nation. In the second section, of the press release, Dr. King makes a clear distinction between race riots and nonviolent movements in Alabama.