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Letter from Congressman Charles Longstreet Weltner to MLK

Thursday, August 25, 1966
Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

Democratic Congressman Charles Longstreet Weltner asks Dr. King to help with a project that will commemorate the 200th anniversary of US independence. Weltner requests that Dr. King write a letter in which he discusses the problems that democracy will face in the coming decade. Weltner also encloses a related document entitled, "A Proposal for the Formation of a Committee of Correspondence."

Letter from Dora McDonald to H. L. Wynter

Tuesday, August 24, 1965
JAMAICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dora McDonald sends H. L. Wynter, Registrar for the University of the West Indies, an estimate on travel expenses Dr. King and Reverend Lee will require for their trip to Jamaica.

Letter from Neil Sullivan to MLK

Thursday, May 25, 1967
California (CA), Berkeley, CA

In this letter, Superintendent of Schools Neil Sullivan writes about the complete integration of the Berkeley County Public Schools.

Letter from Shelley Winters Franciosa to MLK

Thursday, March 19, 1959
New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ)

Actress Shelley Winters sends Dr. King her personal copy of "The Diary of Anne Frank" after he and Mrs. King attend a screening for the film adaptation in New York. Winters would go on to receive an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for the film.

Letter from Alfred Gallen to MLK

Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

A Chicago native writes to Dr. King concerning his current social and political affairs. He suggests that Dr. King should redirect his efforts to empower the black community rather than utilizing government assistance. He asserts that his presence and activities have ignited negative race relations.

Letter from James Dombrowski to MLK

Saturday, November 13, 1965
Louisville, KY, New Orleans, LA

A letter to Dr. and Mrs. King, from Mr. James Dombrowski, thanks them for their support and contribution to SCEF.

Current Magazine

Thursday, August 1, 1963
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY, NORTH KOREA, SOUTH KOREA, GERMANY, Berlin, Germany, VIETNAM, Iowa (IA), Des Moines, IA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, CUBA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Ohio (OH), Connecticut (CT), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA, HUNGARY, Montgomery, AL, South Carolina (SC), JAPAN, Tokyo, Japan, California (CA), Cleveland, OH, UNITED KINGDOM, ISRAEL, DENMARK, FINLAND, NORWAY, SWEDEN, West Virginia (WV), MEXICO, Arizona (AZ), CHINA, London, England, UZBEKISTAN, Florida (FL), SWITZERLAND, AUSTRIA, BRAZIL, ARGENTINA, CHILE, VENEZUELA, POLAND, CZECH REPUBLIC, UKRAINE

This Current Magazine issue on racism in the U.S. features an article "Is Direct Action Necessary" by Dr. King, as well as pieces by James Meredith, James Reston, and others.

Notes for Darien Interfaith Human Rights Council Youth Program

Sunday, January 31, 1965
Connecticut (CT)

Leaders of the Darien Interfaith Human Rights Council outline a brief youth program to be held one afternoon in the Royle School, in which a video tape of one of Dr. King's speeches will be played for the students in attendance.

Letter from A. Bohdan to MLK

Wednesday, April 14, 1965
AUSTRALIA, New York, NY, New York (NY)

A. Bohdan, catering manager of Sydney, Australia's Chevron Hotel, writes Dr. King in request of his favorite meal to include on a special menu featuring dishes of other "famous personalities in Politics, Industry, and Art."

Letter from Reverend William D.F. Morris to MLK

Sunday, December 20, 1964
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

Rev. William D. F. Morris, of Centennial United Church in Toronto, invites Dr. King to visit his church during Lent.

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "Statements of Wisdom"

This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in cardboard filing boxes in reference to a statement of Wisdom by Charles G. Finney.

Letter from the Mayor of Jerusalem to MLK

Friday, February 3, 1967
ISRAEL

Teddy Kollek, the Mayor of Jerusalem, Israel, expresses appreciation and support for Dr. King's planned pilgrimage to the Holy Land. At the time of this letter, West Jerusalem was Israeli territory and East Jerusalem part of Jordan. During the 1967 Six-Day War, Israeli occupied and annexed East Jerusalem, but that annexation is not recognized by the international community.

Letter from George Russell to MLK

Monday, February 5, 1968
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

George Russel offers his support for any endeavor Dr. King would assign him.

Letter from Anne Braden to A.D. King

Tuesday, February 13, 1968
Louisville, KY

Joe Mulloy will be highlighted in a set of galley proofs for a story in the February issue of The Southern Patriot. Anne Braden informs Reverend A.D. King of the induction refusal by Mr. Mulloy and how it correlates to many SCLC staff members. Mrs. Braden is sending the letter to Dr. King as well and hopes that Rev. A.D. King will participate in this action.

Letter from MLK to Rev. W.W. Finlator about Preaching Invitation

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King offers deep regrets to Rev. Finlator for his inability to accept an invitation to preach at The Pullen Memorial Baptist Church.

Mrs.Herr of the Yakima Chapter to MLK

Friday, April 2, 1965
Washington (WA)

Mrs. Herr, on behalf of the Yakima Chapter of United Nations Association invites Dr. King to speak October 24, in honor of United Nations Week. The organization offers to pay his fee for speaking to their organization.

Letter from Debby Hopper to MLK

Sunday, May 26, 1963
Massachusetts (MA), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Boston, MA

Debby Hopper, a 17-year-old from the Boston area, writes Dr. King to discuss prejudice in America and relates what she believes to be the hypocrisy of whites in her community. She also offers Dr. King words of encouragement in his fight for civil rights.

Letter from Edward P. Gottlieb to Editor, New York Times

Thursday, November 23, 1967
New York (NY)

Edward P. Gottlieb writes to the Editor of the New York Times expressing his concern on racial pride. He begins by stating that racial pride is to be deplored and discouraged. Gettlieb concludes with the notion that an African American will feel free only after he is able to explore his own history and culture so he may take from it what he wants for his personal enhancement.

Urban Insurance Coverage

Washington, D.C.

Congressman William S. Moorhead introduces legislation to the House of Representatives, seeking to improve urban insurance coverage and provide governmental riot reinsurance.

People In Action Column: "Can We Ever Repay Them"

Saturday, June 9, 1962
Louisiana (LA), Shreveport, LA, New Orleans, LA

This column by Dr. King in the New York Amsterdam News highlights Dr. C.O. Simpkins, leader of the United Christian Movement. Following cross burnings on his front lawn, death threats, and other harassment, both his home and summer house were bombed. The arsonists returned again the next day to ensure the complete destruction of both buildings.

Letter from Mrs. Sammie Adams to MLK

Monday, April 4, 1966
Georgia (GA)

Mrs. Sammie Adams, a 67-year-old widow, writes an emotional appeal to Dr. and Mrs. King in an effort to collect money for Easter clothes for her children. She acknowledges that she previously donated to Dr. King and the cause for civil rights and would benefit from some assistance.

Report of A Participant

VIETNAM, Washington, D.C.

This report illustrates the authors concern and outlook on the Vietnam war.

MLK's Remarks at the World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964
EGYPT, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS)

This is a draft of remarks made by Dr. King to the World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon of the NAACP's Legal Education Defense Fund. The event took place at the Americana Hotel in Arlington, Virginia. Dr. King states that human rights involve two elements: recognition and opportunity. Dr. King proposes that the United States launch a Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged.

Darien Integration

Friday, April 17, 1964
Connecticut (CT)

This article is a summary of the integration of the Negro population into high-income residential suburbs. The Superintendent of schools and the Darien Board of Education has created a program to exchange schoolteachers and encourage students to attend schools with integrated classes.

Funeral Service: Grand Master John Wesley Dobbs

Saturday, September 2, 1961
Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

This program outlines the funeral service of Grand Master John Wesley Dobbs. Mr. Dobbs established a number of civil rights organizations in the Atlanta area and was considered to be a close friend and confidant of Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Seymour Siegel in Appreciation for Being Awarded an Honorary Degree

Wednesday, July 3, 1968
New York, NY

This letter from Dr. King to Dr. Seymour Siegel extends appreciation for being awarded an honorary degree from the Jewish Theological Seminary of America.

Letter from Sharon Judith Bresler to SCLC

California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Sharon Bresler encloses a check to the SCLC and requests that they write Rabbi Sanford Shopero from the Congregation of Temple Emmanuel to inform him that the gift was made in his honor.

Telegram from Carl and Anne Braden to MLK

Monday, October 24, 1960
Louisville, KY, Kentucky (KY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Carl and Anne Braden offer their support to Dr. King while he remains in the Fulton County Jail.

Newsmakers Interview with MLK

Saturday, July 10, 1965
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, VIETNAM, Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Virginia (VA), Selma, AL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA)

Los Angeles' Channel 2 interviews Dr. King for its Newsmakers program. Topics include King's call for a negotiated settlement in Vietnam and the resulting criticism by other civil rights leaders, plans for mass demonstrations in Los Angeles on the poverty bill, King's position on the armed group called the Deacons and his commitment to nonviolence, and how he responds to the personal threats on his life.

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

Dr. King uses a statement by Mahalia Jackson and the philanthropy of Sir Alfred Nobel to encapsulate the purpose of the Civil Rights Movement. Jackson refers to the racial problems in America as "family business," but Dr. King believes that in order for man to become a brotherhood, society has to search for truth like Alfred Nobel.