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Telegram from Robert J. Brown to MLK

Robert J. Brown writes Dr. King with prayerful wishes, encouraging strength in his fight for civil rights.

Letter from William T. McKnight to Time Magazine

Tuesday, December 31, 1963
New York, NY, New York (NY)

William McKnight communicates with officials at "Time" magazine, thanking them for honoring Dr. King as their "Man of the Year." He feels that their decision to honor Dr. King also gives attention to the plight of the Negro in 1963.

House Resolution 12962

Monday, September 18, 1967

This is a copy of House Resolution 12962, passed by the Ninetieth United States Congress in 1967. This resolution called for the establishment of a Commission on Negro History and Culture.

Letter from M.W. Espy to MLK

Tuesday, November 28, 1967
Alabama (AL)

This letter is requesting that Dr. King sign the First Day Cover of the twenty cent postage stamp honoring Gen. George C. Marshall. It is also noted that two other Nobel Peace Prize winners have signed the Cover as well.

Message from the President

Dr. King expounds on the importance of nonviolence and voter registration to the mission of the SCLC.

Letter from Tetsuo Kohmoto to MLK

Friday, January 22, 1965
JAPAN, Tokyo, Japan

Tetsuo Kohmoto, president of the Shinkyo Shuppansha Protestant Publishing Company, writes Dr. King regarding the Japanese edition of "Strength to Love." Kuhmoto requests a preface or message for the book and thanks Dr. King in advance for his kindness.

103:15 General Correspondence 1967 (R)

Tuesday, April 4, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Reich suggests that Dr. King join the "other side" since he feels that the government is on the wrong side.

Religion and Intelligence

Dr. King posits a theory on a battle between "semi-intelligent religion" and "irreligious intelligence."

Letter from Sigmund Diamond of Political Science Quarterly to MLK

Tuesday, January 30, 1968
New York (NY)

Sigmund Diamond asks Dr. King if Political Science Quarterly can re-print his review of Ronald Segal's "The Race War: The World-Wide Clash of White and Non-White."

Letter from Walter E. Sanford to MLK

Wednesday, February 19, 1964
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Walter Sanford, Labor Adviser for the United States Department of Labor, writes Dora McDonald regarding Mr. John Dube's visit to Atlanta. In Dr. King's absence, Dube will meet with his Executive Assistant, Wyatt T. Walker, to discuss the structure of the SCLC and techniques employed to "promote improved civil rights for the Negroes in the US."

Committee to Adopt a Freedom Rider

Saturday, August 5, 1961
New York (NY)

This is a brochure to an event entitled the Card Party. This event is catered to raising funds to adopt a freedom rider.

The Christian Way of Life in Human Relations

Wednesday, December 4, 1957
Little Rock, AR, Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL, Arkansas (AR), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Missouri (MO)

Dr. King makes a speech to the National Council of Churches regarding the issue of American race relations. After school integration ... has noticed a radical change in the attitudes of African-Americans, ultimately giving birth to this mental and figurative notion of the "new Negro". He solicits the assistance and leadership of the nation's churches to take a firm stand against the rampant inequalities afflicting blacks are facing in America.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Payments from England

Wednesday, December 2, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Literary agent Joan Daves provides Dr. King with detailed figures of royalties from an anthology containing his work and the British edition of "Stride Toward Freedom."

Letter from E. F. S. Davies to MLK

Friday, July 16, 1965
Richmond, VA, Virginia (VA), New York (NY)

E. F. S. Davies, Head of the Department of Philosophy at Virginia State College, writes Dr. King regarding A. J. Muste's civil rights efforts in the 1930's and 1940's.

Findings and Recommendation Committee

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Florida (FL), Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Massachusetts (MA), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Arkansas (AR), Tennessee (TN), Texas (TX), Louisiana (LA), Virginia (VA)

This is a recommendation to establish a temporary coordinating committee in Atlanta, GA to deal particularly in the areas of finance and communication.

Letter from Ira Sandperl to MLK with Concerns of Supporting SCLC

Saturday, December 10, 1966
California (CA), Chicago, IL, South Carolina (SC)

Sandperl pleas with Dr. King to review and respond to his four point proposal, proclaiming that only then will he and Joan Baez continue to support SCLC. Sandperl criticizes SCLC for not being honest with it's coworkers, being unorganized, and self defeating. Sandperl wants Dr. King to convince him otherwise, but does not view the SCLC as being able to achieve social change from what he experienced at the retreat in South Carolina. Sandperl promises support if his proposal is adopted by the SCLC.

Letter from Charles E. Rogers to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967
Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

Charles Rogers writes Dr. King expressing his grief because of King's recent "allegiance to the communist cause in Southeast Asia." Rogers states that because of Dr. King's speech, his fame will face a decline and people will ask, "who is Martin Luther King?"

Letter from Susan Neisuler to MLK

Sunday, August 14, 1966
New York, NY

Susan Neisuler encourages Dr. King to speak out against anti-semitism, for there are many Jews who believe that "black power" means anti-semitism.

Thank You Letter from Dr. King to Chas. E. Elmore

Tuesday, July 30, 1963
Norfolk, VA

This letter dated July 31, 1963 was written by Dr. King to Mrs. Chas Elmore. In it he thanks her for the kind letter she wrote to him about his letter from the Birmingham Jail.

Thank You Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Wednesday, February 26, 1964

In this letter, Benjamin E. Mays former president of Morehouse College thanks Dr. King for his Founders' Day contribution.

Statement on The Negro's Political and Economic Power

Friday, October 14, 1966
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dr. King discusses the inferior political and economic power of the American Negro against the backdrop of emerging Black Power organizations. He reveals several new non-violent programs the SCLC targeted at economic and social justice: youth training and political reformation in the South. It is in accordance with the philosophy of non-violence that Dr. King believes the vast majority of Negroes will birth a "community in which neither power nor dignity will be black or white."

Letter from MLK to Reverend Charles R. Bell Jr. about Beating of a Prisoner

Tuesday, December 13, 1966
California (CA)

In this correspondence, Dr. King offers thanks to Rev. Bell for his letter about the "horrible beating" of a Negro prisoner in Wetumpka, Alabama.

Letter from Peggy Duff to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967
DENMARK, Stockholm, Sweden, VIETNAM

Peggy Duff invites Dr. King to speak in Copenhagen on behalf of the Danish Peace Movement.

Letter from Charles Wallace to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Texas (TX), California (CA)

Charles Wallace, a retired white high school teacher from California, offers his support to Dr. King for the implementation of the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. Wallace emphasizes that he has been a faithful supporter and participant in the civil rights movement. Wallace proposes to assist in the mobilization efforts to structure the campaign.

MLK Notes for Speech to the Chicago Headline Club

Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

This is a draft of a speech Dr. King delivered to the Chicago Headline Club. The speech encompasses information regarding the difficulty the media may have covering the SCLC and the Civil Rights Movement.

War by Executive Decree

NORTH KOREA, SOUTH KOREA, VIETNAM, Minnesota (MN)

Citizens for Governmental Restraint favors the impeachment of President Lyndon Johnson for declaring the war in Vietnam by Executive Order.

Sin

Dr. King paraphrases a scripture from the book of Leviticus that pertains to sin.

Latitudinarianism

Dr. King defines latitudinarianism, a term "applied to a liberal opinion which allows the diversity of opinion."

Suggestions for Survival During Period of Prolonged Civil Disorder

Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

This document contains a list of tips and suggested supplies for survival during a period of civil disorder, including specific food items and tools. The document recommends stockpiling enough supplies to survive for at least one month without needing to leave your home.

MLK Press Conference in NYC

Thursday, December 14, 1967
New York, NY, MEXICO

Dr. King speaks at a Press Conference to expresses his support for the boycotts occurring around the nation. He also stands in affirmation with the Olympic athletes who chose not to participate in the games due to the civil injustice taking place in America.