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"Birmingham, AL"

Church, Negro

Dr. King provides insight on the interaction between the church and the Negro youth.

Letter from Mary E. Peabody to MLK

Thursday, June 29, 1967
St. Augustine, FL, Florida (FL), Boston, MA, Cambridge, MA

Mary E. Peabody writes a letter requesting that Dr. King send her a copy of one of his books along with a signature. She also informs him of her opinion on education and the racial issues the city of Boston faces.

Cooperative/Noble Competition


Dr. King writes a sermon on the topic "Cooperative Competition." King utilizes the biblical text deriving from Luke chapter 22 verse 24, which expresses how Jesus views competition. According to the text, Jesus thinks that competition is good as long as an individual competes with humility and serving others.

Robert Greene's Resolutions

Thursday, February 1, 1968

Robert Greene, of Puerto Rican and African American ancestry, resolves to censure the State of New York. He lists a plethora of racist activities and "Orwellian deceptions" as causes.

The Southern Struggle - What Can You Do?

North Carolina (NC), Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL

Corretta Scott King discusses the privilege of being able to experience a great social revolution based on love and nonviolence, as inspired by the teachings of Jesus and Gandhi. She identifies Rosa Park's personal protest on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama as the beginning of the southern struggle and consequent revolution. She goes on to describe how this simple act aroused a great movement across the south, ultimately leading to the creation of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in January of 1957.

Guide for Churchmen in Interracial Conflict Situations

Wednesday, March 29, 1967
New Orleans, LA

In this document, the Southern Field Service encourages church leaders to aid in African American social justice mobilization.

Letter from J.Campe to MLK regarding Book Royalties

Friday, May 19, 1967
New York, NY

This financial document references earnings from the Japanese editions of Dr. King's books, "Stride Towards Freedom" and "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Clarita Wordlaw to MLK

Tuesday, January 31, 1967
North Carolina (NC), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Mrs. Wordlaw requests that Dr. King instructs the New Bern, North Carolina SCLC Chairman to refrain from demonstrations against Negroes. She also informs Dr. King of actions that should be taken to benefit the Negroes of New Bern.

Unsigned Letter of Support

Monday, December 25, 1967

The following document is a letter of support and encouragement written to Dr. King, the President of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Malcolm X Trio Still Marking Time Waiting for Trial

Wednesday, August 11, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY)

This article documents the legal aftermath of the assassination of Malcolm X on February 21, 1965. It also discusses the three men accused of the killing and reports comments made by the lawyers involved in the case.

Statement Condemning Judge Elliot's Restraining Order

Sunday, July 22, 1962
Albany, GA

Dr. King and Dr. William G. Anderson, President of the Albany Movement, denounce US District Judge J. Robert Elliott's temporary restraining order that prevents them from staging protests. They add that, out of respect for the federal judiciary, they will abide by the order and appeal to a higher level. They assume the order applies only to the named defendants and colleagues and not to the entire community and will not discourage others from taking action. Judge Elliott’s injunction was later overturned by the Fifth Circuit US Court of Appeals.

MLK Report: Annual Address, MIA

Thursday, December 3, 1959
Los Angeles, CA, Montgomery, AL, ITALY, FRANCE, GERMANY, Virginia (VA), Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Georgia (GA)

In his final address to the Montgomery Improvement Association, Dr. King gives a status report on the various initiatives of the organization. He also gives a final farewell in hopes that the MIA is challenged to continue to fight in the struggle for equality.


Dr. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's "Adventures of Ideas."

Letter from MLK to Peter A. Mullin

Tuesday, February 27, 1968
Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King writes Mr. Mullin to express his deep appreciation for being selected to receive the Gold Key Award at Boston College.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. R. Elliot

Wednesday, February 21, 1968
New York (NY)

This letter is in response to an inquiry made by Mr. R. Elliot, on February 8th, 1968, in regards to housing development plans for the Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Edwin B. Allaire's Letter to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
Michigan (MI)

Mr. Allaire informs Dr. King that there are many individuals who would vigorously support him in becoming a presidential candidate.

Letter from T. K. Mahadevan to MLK

Friday, January 20, 1967
New Delhi, India, Atlanta, GA

T. K. Mahadevan, of the Gandhi Peace Foundation in New Delhi, India, refers to potential meetings with Dr. King and his colleagues.

MLK Address on Racial Injustice, Poverty, and War

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Dr. King addresses the French community during his "Racial Injustice, Poverty, and War" speech. He discusses topics such as poverty, politics, war, and the government.

Letter from Butler Henderson to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967

Butler Henderson invites Dr. and Mrs. King to the Dinner for the President of Morehouse College, Dr. Benjamin E. Mays.

Letter from Gerald Feffer to MLK

Thursday, October 17, 1963
Philadelphia, PA

Gerald Feffer of Lehigh University invites Dr. king to speak at the university in the near future.

Elmer Evans Advocates for Black Power

Sunday, July 16, 1967
New Jersey (NJ), Los Angeles, CA, London, England, SPAIN

"A white caucasian" advocates for black power, claiming that it is synonymous with sovereign power. Responding to a televised discussion on the subject of black power, Elmer Evans aims to challenge what he felt was inaccurately presented on the show.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Martin Fischer at the Theological Seminary of Berlin

Monday, September 28, 1964
Berlin, Germany

Dr. King thanks Dr. Fischer and the faculty at the Theological Seminary of Berlin for awarding him with an honorary degree. He expresses that the honor gives him courage to strive on and wishes them multiple blessings from God.

Notecard on the Definition of Time

On this notecard, Dr. King explores the meaning of "Time" according to modern physics and philosophy. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books, and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.


Dr. King cites Karen Horney's "The Neurotic Personality of Our Time.

Letter from Alfred T. Davies to Coretta Scott King

Wednesday, May 26, 1965
Ohio (OH)

Alfred T. Davies writes Mrs. King thanking her for her performance before the General Assembly. Davies also sends well wishes and support to Dr. and Mrs. King in their endeavors.

Letter from Archbishop Hallinan to MLK

In this letter, Archbishop Hallinan offers his words of gratitude to Dr. King, for his work, and requests a copy of "Where Do We Go From Here."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Henry R. Luce

Friday, February 15, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dora McDonald writes to Henry Luce, of Time & Life, in response to his prior correspondence to Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Irene Shunfenthal

New York (NY), VIETNAM

Dr. King thanks Irene Shunfenthal for her support. He says that those who seek peace through nonviolence must use every creative means of protest available to achieve U.S. disengagement from Vietnam, and must also urge that nonviolence be adopted internationally to settle disputes among nations.

Letter from William H. Gray to Eugene Rhoads

Friday, April 19, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

William H. Gray encloses an article regarding advice given to Dr. King by Billy Graham. Graham admits that he "is not a thoroughgoing integrationist. "

Letter from Constance Beitzell to MLK

Sunday, April 14, 1963
California (CA), Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Los Angeles, CA

In the aftermath of Dr. King's arrest in Birmingham, Constance Beitzell expresses her dissatisfaction with federal officials not putting an end to the intimidation against Negroes in Birmingham. Beitzell is perplexed at the fact that the United States promotes freedom but does not allow freedom for many of its citizens who happen to be Negro. According to Beitzell, "What man in a Christian nation can trample on the rights of a citizen because of his race?"