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"Birmingham, AL"

Telegram to Dr. James Nabrit from MLK

Monday, July 16, 1962

In this telegram, Dr. King invites Dr. James M. Nabrit to share the privilege of being a special guest with him at the National Press Club.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

In this letter from Joan Daves, Dr. King is informed that a check for $24.96 is enclosed. The check represents the permission fee for the use of an extract from "Stride Toward Freedom" by Macmillan Company.

Letter from Mike Epstein to MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1967

Mr. Epstein thanks Dr. King for his leadership in the Civil Rights Movement and his stance on the war in Vietnam. Epstein considers Dr. King's status as "a man of judgment" an asset.

"Lost Sheep" or "The God of the Lost"

Sunday, September 18, 1966

Dr. King delivers a sermon about the parable of the lost sheep from the book of Luke. In this sermon, Dr. King poses the question that has pondered mankind for ages, "What is God Like?" He declares, "God is like a good shepherd" caring for his sheep. Dr. King commends the good done in America, but compares the nation to "a lost sheep" for failing to maintain equality for all men. He summarizes by describing good as a process, that everyone is significant and God is seeking to find the lost.

Telegram to MLK from Treasurer W. E. Shortridge

Thursday, August 9, 1962

Members of the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights send Dr. King encouraging words during his sentence at Albany City Jail.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967

This New York writer castigates Dr. King and refers to him as "the worst phoney [sic] in the country."

Letter from Rev. Pavel Titera to MLK

Saturday, December 11, 1965

Pavel Titera responds to a letter from Dr. King, in which he expressed his hope for a coming to visit. Titera sends well wishes for Dr. King and his family, and encloses a photograph of his family "as a token of the brotherly love."

Letter from Wendell P. Whalum to Fellow Morehouse Alumnus

Thursday, January 11, 1968

Wendell P. Whalum informs the alumni of Morehouse College about the events that will place during inaugural week.

Man

Dr. King records a quote from Jeremiah 17:9, which discusses the evilness of man.

Letter from G. Mansfield Collins to MLK

Monday, January 4, 1965

G. Mansfied Collins outlines Dr. King's travel arrangements to a Christian Conference held in Southern California, in which Dr. King is urged to discuss unemployment.

Letter from Ross Bass to MLK

Thursday, April 29, 1965

Ross Bass, United States Senator, writes Dr. King expressing thanks for a previous letter regarding support for the proposed elimination of the poll tax.

Telegram from Trinity Cathedral to MLK

Friday, May 24, 1963

Members of Trinity Cathedral in Newark, New Jersey offer their support to Dr. King and others "who are endangering your lives for the sake of others." Dr. King received this telegram in the midst of the desegregation campaign in Birmingham, 1963.

Letter From Mitchell Sviridoff to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

Mitchell Sviridoff responds to a telegram from Dr. King, in which Dr. King states his support of the Queens Clinical Society's proposal for a neighborhood health service center.

God (Definition)

Dr. King references Schleiermacher as he attempts to define God.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Samuel Evans

Wednesday, September 23, 1964

Dora McDonald writes to Samuel L. Evans, of Greater Philadelphia Citizens Committee, on behalf of Rev. Andrew Young regarding Dr. King's appearance in Philadelphia.

Letter from Daniel A. Jezer to MLK

Thursday, March 7, 1968

Rabbi Daniel Jezer, of Temple Beth Shalom in Satellite Beach, Florida, responds to Dr. King's request for contributions to the SCLC. Rabbi Jezer, a past contributor to the SCLC, now feels in a quandary because of ?an anti-Israel, anti-Zionist platform? approved at the Conference of New Politics, which included delegates from the SCLC.

The Catholic Review: Letter From Birmingham Jail

Friday, July 19, 1963

Dr. King's "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" is printed in this publication along with articles and columns illustrating the Church's civil rights activities. Efforts included priests taking part in direct action to integrate an amusement park and an archbishop backing the civil rights bill.

Letter to MLK Regarding the Direction of the Movement

The author expresses her opinion about Dr. King and how he should use his "impressive" vocabulary in the right direction. She further elaborates on her perceptions of the police protection, mobs, labor needs, and more.

Letter from Paul R. Trumpler to MLK

Friday, May 25, 1962

Paul Trumpler writes Dr. King expressing how he and his wife are pleased to have the chance to support Dr. King's work. They believe in Dr. King's ideas regarding racial issues and solutions. Trumpler encloses a check written out to Dr. King so he can use the money as he designate.

Letter from Daniel L. Eckert to MLK

Monday, January 9, 1967

This letter was written to Dr.King to express disapproval for Dr.King's support of Adam Clayton Powell. Mr. Eckert states that Mr.Powell should be treated as white leaders are treated.

Dr. King's response to a letter from Mr. Joseph Beaver

Friday, October 24, 1958

Dr. King, in this letter, thanked Mr. Joseph Beaver for his kindness and for the enclosed booklet entitled "I Want You to Know Wendell Phillips Dabney" sent to him, during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. Dr. King took a moment to apologize for he and Mrs. King not being able to communicate with Mr. Beaver, while they vacationed in Mexico. He concluded the letter by acknowledging his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process was complete.

How Modern Christians Should Think of Man

In the early 1950's, Dr. King writes a paper elaborating on how modern Christians should think about man. He discusses the difficulty of transition by idealizing the perception of man in a mild neo-orthodox or liberal view. Dr. King battles with having an optimistic view of man and the reality of his experiences in the south. He asserts that man is neither good nor bad by nature by has the potential for either. The objectivity of man as a finite child of nature is further expounded upon. He explains that man is rational, free, and a responsible being.

Letter from H. Rogosin to MLK

Tuesday, August 8, 1967

H. Rogosin writes to Dr. King encouraging him to read the enclosed material on "The Role of Psychologists in Helping Solve Problems of Intergroup and Racial Tensions."

A Statement to the South and Nation

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement. The document states that a world-wide campaign for social and political freedom shows an international plight for human dignity. As America is one of the two most powerful nations in the world, "the unresolved problem of civil rights becomes the most crucial issue." There is contradiction between the freedom America proclaims and the actual practice of civil liberties and democracy. Dr.

Prophet

Dr. King references John C. Archer's "Faiths Men Live By."

MLK at his 36th Birthday Celebration

This series of photographs depicts Dr. King celebrating his birthday with family and friends.

Letter from Donald G. Brownlow to MLK

Friday, November 1, 1963

Donald G. Brownlow from Department of History invites Dr. King to speak with students on the current issues of today, especially race relations in the United States. Dr. King's handwritten note in the margin indicates, "Can't go this academic year...Southern struggle."

Letter from Wendell Morgan to SCLC

Monday, July 31, 1967

Wendell Morgan encloses a check to SCLC on behalf of the Howard University Campus Chest.

Letter from Rachelle Horowitz to Dora McDonald

Thursday, September 7, 1967

Administrative Secretary for the A. Phillip Randolph Institute, Rachelle Horowitz apologizes to Dora McDonald for an apparent misunderstanding regarding pamphlet pricing.

Letter from Louise Andrews Sims to MLK

Thursday, October 18, 1962

Louise Andrews Sims asks Dr. King to consider providing assistance to the American Friend's Service Committee by setting aside one week for aspeaking engagement in October or November of 1963. Alternate dates could be in January through April of 1964.