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"Birmingham, AL"

Correspondence to MLK from D. Leon Everett II

Saturday, July 3, 1965

D. Leon Everett is notifying Dr. King that he will be sending two checks from his church for the SCLC and SNCC. He offers his continuous support for the movement. He makes mention of information in regards to holding a recital for Mrs. King and a souvenir book

Letter from M.W. Espy to MLK

Tuesday, November 28, 1967

This letter is requesting that Dr. King sign the First Day Cover of the twenty cent postage stamp honoring Gen. George C. Marshall. It is also noted that two other Nobel Peace Prize winners have signed the Cover as well.

Handwritten notecard regarding Religion

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on religion. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Where Do We Go From Here (Chapter V Draft)

This draft of Where Are We Going?, Chapter 5 of Dr. King's book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? was significantly edited before publication but the central ideas are here. The government's failure to develop economic justice programs cannot be blamed on the Civil Rights Movement's lack of ideas, as often claimed. Building the political will for change is more important for the movement. The rights of Negroes to economic well-being are well aligned with goals and tactics of the labor movement. Negro leadership needs to be developed from within the community.

Martin Luther King's Fund

Tuesday, March 29, 1966

The Facts and Activity Program of the Swedish Organization developed "The Martin Luther King Fund" to raise money in support of Dr. King. The group has raised funds through the sale of tickets and recordings at the Stockholm Opera.

Telegram from George Houser to MLK

Thursday, November 11, 1965

George Houser of the American Committee on Africa urges Dr. King to telegram the President about Rhodesia's unilateral declaration of independence. The Rhodesian government, under Prime Minister Ian Smith, took this illegal action to break from the United Kingdom after days of negotiation with British Prime Minister Harold Wilson. The British sought to give blacks a fair share of power.

Aristotle's Psy

Dr. King writes about Aristotle's views on the soul.

Letter from Lonnie MacDonald to MLK

Tuesday, May 28, 1963

Lonnie MacDonald, a friend of the King family, encloses a song that she has written for Dr. King. She writes that the song was inspired by his commitment to freedom as reflected by his recent actions in Birmingham, Alabama.

Evil

Dr. King quotes James Ward's "The Realm of Dr. King quotes James Ward's "The Realm of Ends" on the subject of evil.

Telegram from Phil Stovin to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967

Mr. Stovin praises Dr. King for his nonviolent approach towards achieving peace.

Letter from MLK to Benjamin E. Mays

Tuesday, February 11, 1964

Dr. King sends Dr. Mays a check for $200 and informs him that he will not be able to attend the Founders' Day celebration.

Tillich's Philosophy of Religion

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's "The Protestant Era."

Letter from Rev. T.Y. Rogers to SCLC Affiliates

Tuesday, October 24, 1967

Rev. Rogers writes to SCLC affiliates in Alabama, Georgia and Mississippi informing them that Dr. King, Rev. Ralph Abernathy, and others will begin serving a 5-day jail sentence in Jefferson County Jail for violating an injunction forbidding them to march on Good Friday or Easter Sunday. He requests that all affiliates meet in Birmingham, Alabama to show support.

Letter from MLK to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King describes Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy's efforts as "courageous" and "effective" in guiding Congress to establish the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Helen G. Frumin to Coretta Scott King

Monday, December 5, 1966

Mrs. Frumin writes Mrs. King to request sponsorship for the Committee of Responsibility. She includes a list of others who have agreed to sponsor the organization among which is Dr. Benjamin Spock, affluent pediatrician and anti-war activist, and other prestigious figures.

Man

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich’s “Systematic Theology” on man as the telos (purpose) of creation.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Sunday, November 29, 1964

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, includes a summary of several foreign contracts drawn on Dr. King's behalf for three of his books.

Letter from Irv Kupcinet to MLK

Monday, January 28, 1963

Irv Kupcinet, columnist for the Chicago Sun-Times, offers Dr. King recognition for his appearance his TV show. He thanks Dr. King for his significant contribution to the overall success of the program.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 1, 1964

In this letter Joan Daves informs Ms. Dora McDonald that all matters pertaining to the published works of Dr. King must pass through her office, as she is the literary agent for Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Jacob Nolde

Dr. King discusses with Jacob Nolde the importance of nonviolent peace movements and the malady of the Vietnam War. He stresses that these nonviolent actions should be exercised internationally and America should cease its desire to maintain wide-spread military control.

Correspondence to Dr. King from Chuck Wallis, 11/15/1962

Thursday, November 15, 1962

Chuck Wallis, of Keuka College in New York, wrote to Dr. King at the request of Melvin Arnold an executive at Harper and Rowe Publishing Company. In the letter Wallis informs Dr. King of his editing responsibilities for a forthcoming book project highlighting Dr. King's sermons and requests a face to face meeting to discuss revisions.

MLK Remarks at the NAACP's Civil Rights Rally

Sunday, July 10, 1960

Dr. King addresses the NAACP in regards to the equality of the school systems for Negro students. He urges the crowd to "employ only the highest weapons of dignity and discipline" while continuing to fight against segregation.

Letter from Peter S. Shults to NAACP

Wednesday, August 25, 1965

Peter Shults writes the NAACP requesting a comment on a postcard he received that depicts Dr. King as a communist. He asks multiple questions regarding the validity of the picture on the postcard.

Co-Op Movements for Black Economic Development

This memorandum sent to Dr. King by Professor St. Clair Drake, is a full proposal for the development/revival of the co-operative movements among negroes in large urban centers.

Letter from MLK to Herbert Lamont

Wednesday, August 23, 1967

This document contains a small series of responses between Dr. King and Herbert Lamont. Dr. King expresses gratitude for Mr. Lamont's moral support, while Lamont affirms Dr. King's sentiments on peace and justice.

MLK Announcement of Rally to be held in San Francisco

Dr. King announces the details for a rally in San Francisco, California to garner support for the pending Civil Rights Bill in Congress. He makes a call to action for various diverse groups to join in this initiative.

Godm (Micah)

Dr. King refers to the biblical book of Micah to write about Micah and Hosea's similar reference to the strength of the love of God.

Letter from Werner Kelber to MLK

Wednesday, August 22, 1962

German native and theological student Werner Kelber writes Dr. King expressing his discontent with the race relations in the Deep South. He compares the attitudes in the Deep South to those under Nazi Germany. Werner also explains that he would like to write his master's thesis on the movement and would value Dr. King's feedback.

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

Thursday, July 5, 1962

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Agenda

Friday, August 16, 1963

This document is a strategic outline for the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.