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"Birmingham, AL"

Letter from Rene Remond to MLK

Tuesday, November 15, 1966

The "Centre Catholique des Intellectuels Francais" is an organization focused on raising the consciousness levels of its members through public conferences, debates, and discussions. Rene Remond informs Dr. King that they have enclosed additional information to prepare him on the discussion involving Christians and violence.

Albany Justice Draft for Amsterdam News

Dr. King expounds upon the city of Albany and the adversities it faced that brought about the focus of international scrutiny. Dr. King notes two prominent international occasions that occurred in Albany, the peace walk to Cuba and the Guantanamo Peace March. He cites quotations from Chief Laurie Prichett and Bradford Lyttle. Dr. King further elaborates on the injustices of Albany, segregation, discriminatory practices and more.

Letter from Donald G. Brownlow to MLK

Thursday, December 9, 1965

After hearing Dr. King's speech at Billanova University, Mr. Brownlow requests that the Reverend speak at the Haverford School located in Pennsylvania. Secondarily, Brownlow requests that Dr. King send a few words of congratulations to a student attending the college.

Letter from MLK to Dr. William H. Allen regarding kind letter

Tuesday, October 15, 1968

Dr. King sent this thank you letter to Dr. William Allen for the prayers and well wishes expressed to Dr. King, as he recovered from a nearly fatal stabbing in Harlem in 1958. He also conveyed to Dr. Allen that he had been making great progress in his health and anticipated rejoining those working hard in the fight for equality.

Statement on Nobel and Catholic Interracial Council Awards

Saturday, October 17, 1964

John A. McDermott, Executive Director of the Catholic Interracial Council, lauds Dr. King's receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize and announces that the Council is awarding King its John F. Kennedy Award.

The Hard or the Easy Way?

Thursday, October 5, 1961

The Southern Regional Council discusses the topics of school segregation and integration in specific southern states and counties, especially Yancey County, North Carolina.

God

Dr. King writes about God, according to Jeremiah 3:12.

Letter from Juanita McKinly to MLK

Thursday, February 24, 1966

Juanita McKinly requests Dr. King visit her home to evaluate the less than standard living conditions of the building. As a key figure for addressing social ills, many people sought the help of Dr. King in relation to individual concerns.

Letter from Iva Sturm to MLK

Thursday, August 10, 1967

The author requests Dr. King to answer questions to solidify the political practices in America before he is to vote democratically.The questions involve concerns surround military, political, and economic issues within the United States. The authors' primary contention is the Vietnam War.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Jacob Broertjes

Tuesday, August 4, 1964

Dora McDonald sends Jacob Broertjes a tentative schedule for Dr. King's upcoming speaking engagement in Amsterdam with the Baptist Federation.

Telegram from Dick Rettig to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1960

Dick Rettig, President of the United States National Student Association, writes Dr. King to express the organization's solidarity with the sit-in movment.

Letter from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

Wednesday, July 19, 1967

A. Phillip Randolph, president of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, writes to Dr. King enclosing a letter to President Lyndon B. Johnson. Mr. Randolph addresses concerns of nationwide rioting in retaliation to social and economic oppression.

The Poor People's Campaign Informational Flyer

Tuesday, March 5, 1968

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference circulates an informational flyer for The Poor Peoples Campaign held in Washington, D.C. This demonstration is to highlight the grave problems of the poor and is a call to the government to address the needs of the poor.

Letter from SNCC Chairman John Lewis to William Shawn

Thursday, April 22, 1965

John Lewis, Chairman of SNCC, responds to a recent article in "The New Yorker." He provides a number of corrections to the article and also explains who should be considered official spokespersons for SNCC.

Cloudy Summit

Sunday, January 15, 1967

In this article, Mr. Randolph organizes a conference of Negro leaders to take action in the suspension case of Rep. Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from Mrs. A. P. Boynton to MLK

Saturday, November 30, 1963

Mrs. A.P, Boynton, chairman of the Dallas County Voters League, informs Dr. King of unjust treatment towards colored women employed at Dunn's Rest Home. Due to physical abuse from the rest home's owner Charles E. Dunn, many of the women left. The Dallas County Voters League also requests a sewing machine from Dr. King to assist the women with "gainful employment."

Letter from MLK to Marion Jordan

Friday, May 4, 1956

Dr. King apologizes to Mrs. Marion Jordon and the Pittsburgh branch of the NAACP for the lack of acknowledgment for their contribution to the Montgomery Improvement Association. He expresses appreciation for their support and provides a report of their total contributions.

Letter from MLK to Office of Inspector of Foreign Dividends

Saturday, January 18, 1964

In this letter, Dr. King states that he is the beneficial owner of the Copyright Royalties paid by Laurence Pollinger, Ltd. and that he is still receiving income from them.

Letter from Marion Dockhorn to Dr. and Mrs. King

Monday, April 16, 1962

Marion Dockhorn invites Dr. and Mrs. King to attend the 5th Annual Bucks County World Peace Fair. Dockhorn believes that Dr. King's attendance will boost support for the civil rights movement by providing a place to "spread [the] message."

MLK Note

Dr. King writes a story about a father and son waiting for a train at New York's Grand Central Station. The son is headed to college in New England and the father gives the young man some simple, yet profound advice. "Bill, never forget who you are."

Letter from Ben J. Mack to Reverend Andrew Young

Ben Mack forwards to Reverend Young an invitation for Dr. King to speak at the annual banquet of the South Carolina Congress of Parents and Teachers.

Letter from the United Nations to SCLC

Friday, January 26, 1968

The United Nations Special Committee on the Policies of Apartheid of the Government of the Republic of South Africa, requests information regarding activities planned and undertaken by the SCLC against apartheid.

Bibliography Compiled by MLK

This handwritten bibliography documents texts that discuss theology.

Letter from Bryan Fulks to MLK

Tuesday, March 20, 1962

Bryan Fulks writes Dr. King expressing appreciation for his diligent work during the fight for social justice and human dignity. Fulks also mentions how elated he was when the editor of the "London Humanist" chose to enrich his article including a pictorial illustration of Dr. King riding through the southern region of the United States.

Letter from Mary T. Clark to MLK

Wednesday, November 11, 1964

This letter from the Social Action Secretariat, National Federation of Catholic College Students references an enclosed letter which was issued to all member colleges. The enclosed letter supports student activity in the 1964 Freedom Fast.

Speech to SCLC Convention about Vietnam

Thursday, August 12, 1965

Dr. King makes one of his first public statements opposing the war in Vietnam during the SCLC Convention held in Birmingham. According to King, "Neither the American people nor the people of North Vietnam is the enemy. The true enemy is war itself, and people on both sides are trapped in its inexorable destruction."

Notecard Containing MLK's Handwriting Regarding Democracy

On this handwritten notecard, Dr. King outlines Ralph Barton Perry's views on Democracy. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from Mrs. Ted Gustafson to MLK

Sunday, December 10, 1967

Mrs. Ted Gustafson writes Dr. King to express her dismay with pastors and the pulpit, providing her belief that a Saint is long overdue.

A Realistic Look at Race Relations

Thursday, May 17, 1956

Dr. King gives the three views one can take regarding the state of race relations: optimism, pessimism, and realistic. Dr. King argues for a realistic stance because America has accomplished much in race relations, but still has a long way to go. He further explains that he thinks segregation is in its last days.

Ezekiel and the Philosophy of History

Dr. King records his interpretation of Ezekiel and the Oracles against Foreign Nations. He asserts that the Biblical series affirms monotheism and a "providential philosophy of history."