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SNCC Newsletter - The Student Voice

Friday, March 5, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Arkansas (AR), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Selma, AL, Maryland (MD)

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) began publishing "The Student Voice" in June 1960. The news magazine contained reports on SNCC activities, marches, sit-ins and other events related to the civil rights movement. The copy shown here is addressed to Andy Young.

Letter from the Interpreters' House to MLK

Thursday, February 8, 1968
North Carolina (NC)

Carlyle Marney and J. C. Herrin invite Dr. King to attend a conference to discuss the future mission and tasks for American Baptists in the South.

Letter from Joan Daves to Pierre Servais

Friday, November 20, 1964
Oslo, Norway, BELGIUM

Joan Daves writes to Pierre Servais in Belgium, thanking him for requesting the presence of Dr. King at the launching of a new edition of Strength to Love. She informs Mr. Servais that Dr. King's itinerary has not yet been set and that he will receive more information at a later date.

MLK Notes - Voting Issues and Strategies

North Carolina (NC)

These handwritten notes of Dr. King's, found on the back of a memorandum, focus largely on voter registration issues and strategies. Of interest is an item adjacent to the body of the notes remarking, "Daddy King has yet to understand non-violence."

Photo of MLK and Mr. David

Jackson, MS

Mr. David sends Dr. King a picture displaying the two outside a Jackson, Mississippi Holiday Inn.

Monarchianism

Dr. King defines the doctrine monarchianism as "a doctrine stressing the unity of the Godhead as against the ultimately prevailing tendency to affirm personal distinctions within the Godhead."

Schleiermacher (Religion as a Social Experience)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

And There Was Love

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Jerry Peace writes a poem entitled "And There Was Love" regarding the state of blacks in America during the Civil Rights Movement. Peace asserts, "The street became filled with hate. Whips sang, horses prances, gas floated" as he depicts the violent truth many Negroes faced daily.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Raphael Demos

Friday, July 19, 1963
Cambridge, MA

Dr. King writes Harvard University professor Dr. Demos confirming his enrollment in the professor's Philosophy of Plato course. He also thanks Dr. Demos for his "kind words" regarding an article he wrote for "Christianity and Crisis." In addition, Dr. King further extends his regards to Mrs. Demos, whom Mrs. King studied with at the New England Conservatory of Music.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Shapiro

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Mr. Shapiro's song, "The Most Important People." Dr. King states that the song is an "admirable contribution to the furtherance of the Freedom Movement."

Telegram from Richard J. Daley to MLK

Friday, July 16, 1965
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Detroit, MI

Mayor Richard J. Daley discusses the issue of human rights in Chicago and the initiation of new programs. The mayor suggests a visit with Dr. King to acquire his intellect on this progressive plan. In addition, Mayor Daley informs Dr. King that he will be attending the National League of Cities Conference.

News from the AFL-CIO: Labor News Conference

Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, New York (NY), New York, NY

AFL-CIO's public affairs program, the Labor News Conference. Donald Slaiman, Director of the AFL-CIO's Department of Civil Rights was questioned by Alan Adams of Business Week Magazine and Stanley Leward of Scripps-Howard Newspapers. The three have a discussion about apprenticeship opportunities for minority youths, particularly of Negro and Puerto Rican heritage.

Address by MLK at Golden Anniversary Conference of National Urban League

Tuesday, September 6, 1960
New York, NY, NIGERIA, SOUTH AFRICA, LIBERIA, ETHIOPIA, INDIA, Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King gives an address at the National Urban Leagues's Golden Anniversary Conference in New York City. He speaks on the subject, "The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness" and discusses the Negroes new sense of "somebodiness." The factors that contribute to this new sense of dignity include a population shift from rural to urban life, rapid educational advance, gradual improvement of economic status, Supreme Court decisions outlawing segregation in the public schools, and awareness that freedom is a part of a world-wide struggle.

Editor of The Nation Offers Unsolicited Advice

Friday, December 23, 1966
New York, NY

The editor of The Nation solicits Dr. King's annual article for the next publication. This year, McWilliams suggests that Dr. King expand beyond the usual update on the civil rights agenda. He then offers advice that King consider moving to New York, where the political environment is right for promoting ambitious programs and his leadership ability would be able to shine.

Letter from John Shirley to MLK

Thursday, January 18, 1968
Atlanta, GA, London, England, Cleveland, OH, Washington, D.C.

John Shirley, of the Oxford University Cherwell Newspaper, poses a list of questions to Dr. King concerning Civil Rights, the Vietnam War, and the emergence of Black Power groups. Shirley assures the Reverend of his gratitude for any feedback he may provide, and informs him of the circulation of the literature at being well over 10,000 within the University.

Letter to Congressman Elect Adam C. Powell

New York (NY)

This letter from constituent Robert Greene urges Adam C. Powell to reopen his case so that he may be cleared of any wrong doing. Greene states how important Powell is to the Black community and the State of New York. Greene provides information that may assist Powell with his case.

Postcard to MLK on Dallas Police

Monday, March 18, 1968
Dallas, TX, Atlanta, GA

This newspaper clipping makes reference to an article about the Dallas Police Department's effort to recruit Negro police officers.

Letter from John A. McDermott to MLK

Wednesday, August 4, 1965
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Mr. McDermott, Executive Director of the Catholic Interracial Council, thanks Dr. King for speaking at a recent special membership meeting even though Dr. King was not feeling well at the time.

Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

Montgomery, AL

This sermon is one draft of Dr. King's "Three Dimensions of a Complete Life." It was first delivered by Dr. King to the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama.
Another version is entitled, "The Dimensions of a Complete Life." The first dimension is concerned with the well-being of the self. The second dimension is concerned with the well-being of others. The last dimension is concerned with reaching towards God.
As Dr. King implies, if all of these dimensions are equal, then a complete life will be obtained.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. White

Dr. King informs Mrs. White that she should seek financial assistance from her local welfare office because the SCLC will not be able to provide that service.

Social Ethics

Dr. King refers to Micah 3:9-12, saying the prophet condemns the love of money of civil and religious leaders. King wonders whether religious leaders today should be paid for their work and concludes that money should never be a priority over service.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Herman Strase

Thursday, October 28, 1965
GERMANY, SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. King expresses appreciation for Mr. Strase position on justice for all. More specifically, he praises Strase for his written sentiments concerning apartheid policies of the Union of South Africa government.

Letter from Rembert Stokes to MLK

Monday, December 16, 1963
Ohio (OH), Cincinnati, OH

The President of Wilberforce University anticipates Dr. King's speech before a delegation of the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Rembert Stokes also notes that Dr. King would receive a donation following his address, to help support the civil rights movement. Stokes wishes that Dr. King's message would center around the AME church leadership's involvement in the freedom struggle.

Judaism

Dr. King highlights a quote regarding the distinction between Reform, Orthodox and Conservative Judaism.

Letter from Dora McDonald and MLK to the United Federation of Teachers

Thursday, November 10, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King congrats the United Federation of Teachers AFL- CIO on their Fifteenth Anniversary of serving school children.

Contribution Letter from Dr. and Mrs. Bacon to Dr. King

Friday, February 23, 1968
North Carolina (NC)

Dr. and Mrs. Bacon are writing to express their support and concern for the "last chance" SCLC project. Enclosed in the letter is $200 contribution to help further support the initiative.

Telegram to MLK from the Dogwood Tree

Tuesday, May 2, 1967
Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King receives a telegram of support from "The Dogwood Tree." The telegram conveys that "the orthodox Jewish religion is working for you. Keep your faith...."

SCLC Press Release

Monday, May 16, 1966
Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA, Massachusetts (MA), Georgia (GA)

This press release announces Dr. King's election as a Fellow of The American Academy of Arts and Sciences. The statement provides a brief history of the research center, including its affiliation with prestigious figures such as President John Adams and American writer Ralph Waldo Emerson. The release concludes with a brief biography of Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Richard C. Ernst

Wednesday, August 23, 1961
New York, NY, Birmingham, AL, McComb, MS

Dr. King writes Richard Ernst and thanks him for his generous contribution which "has tangibly resolved a part of the difficulty we face in the legal defense of Rev. Abernathy." Dr. King highlights some the programs the SCLC has been able to implement due to contributions, such as the Citizenship School Training Center and voter registration drives.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1962

Saturday, September 1, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), CONGO / ZAIRE, Atlanta, GA, North Carolina (NC), Mississippi (MS), South Carolina (SC), New York, NY, New York (NY), Tallahassee, FL, Florida (FL), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), West Virginia (WV), Birmingham, AL, New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King discusses the terrible cost of securing voting rights for blacks, especially in Leesburg, Georgia, where the Shady Grove Baptist Church was bombed and burned following the SNCC's use of the space to register voters.