Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Birmingham, AL"

Telegram from Tina McDonald to MLK

Hartford, CT

Tina McDonald wishes Dr. King a happy birthday and is pleased to send God's blessings of courage and strength.

Telegram from L. M. McCoy to MLK

Friday, May 12, 1967
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, BRAZIL, New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

L. M. McCoy telegrams Dr. King expressing the urgency that the Methodist Church of Brazil receive a reply to their invitation for him to speak at their Centennial celebration in Brazil.

103:15 General Correspondence 1967 (R)

Tuesday, April 4, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Reich suggests that Dr. King join the "other side" since he feels that the government is on the wrong side.

Letter from Otto Fuerbringer of Time Magazine to MLK

Tuesday, February 18, 1964
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Time Magazine's Otto Fuerbringer informs Dora McDonald that Dr. King's picture is apart of a traveling Time cover exhibit. He pledges to forward copies of Dr. King's family portrait.

Letter from Robert T. Stafford to MLK

Monday, August 30, 1965
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Vermont (VT), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Congressman Robert T. Stafford, U. S. Representative from Vermont, informs Dr. King he has signed the discharge petition regarding the District of Columbia Home Rule Bill.

Letter from MLK to Clarence E. Pickett

Monday, October 14, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King regretfully informs Mr. Pickett of American Friends Service Committee, he has accepted the maximum number of speaking engagements allowable for the next year or longer.

Letter from Mrs. Samuel Turkenkopf to Coretta Scott King

Thursday, October 15, 1964
New Jersey (NJ), Oslo, Norway

Overwhelmed by the news of MLK winning the Noble Peace Prize, Mrs. Turkenkopf expresses her congratulations to Mrs. King.

Letter from Helen G. Frumin to Coretta Scott King

Monday, December 5, 1966
New York (NY)

Mrs. Frumin writes Mrs. King to request sponsorship for the Committee of Responsibility. She includes a list of others who have agreed to sponsor the organization among which is Dr. Benjamin Spock, affluent pediatrician and anti-war activist, and other prestigious figures.

Remarks of MLK: En Granslos Kval Pa Operan

Thursday, March 31, 1966
SWEDEN, EGYPT, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

In this address, Dr. King expresses his Dream for America and his sincere appreciation for Sweden's support for "the cause of racial justice in America."

Letter From Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, August 4, 1964
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Berlin, Germany

Joan Daves writes Dr. King to inform him of her meeting, in Germany, with publishers before the Frankfurt Bookfair.

Letter from Don DuMont to MLK

Sunday, October 24, 1965
Chicago, IL

Mr. DuMont expresses his disapproval of Dr. King's leadership of the negro race and the association of the movement with Christianity, because he seeks proof that Dr. King's movement is not "Communist-inspired." Dumont was an evangelist who ran unsuccessfully for a variety of political offices.

Letter from MLK to Clara Graves

Monday, October 21, 1963
Illinois (IL)

Dr. King responds to Clara Bell Graves thanking her for the encouraging letter. Dr. King states, "please be assured that we welcome with grateful heart such letters as the one you directed to me."

Black Power: Two Views

Saturday, October 1, 1966
Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), GHANA, HAITI, Chicago, IL, Lowndes County, AL, GERMANY, SPAIN, SOUTH AFRICA, Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

James Peck, a white civil rights activist, writes an article concerning the path of the Civil Rights Movement. He is beginning to notice that black power and black racism are taking over organizations that had been focused on nonviolence and racial equality.

Report of the Committee on Budget and Finance

Monday, December 18, 1967
New York, NY

These minutes of the Committee on Budget and Finance detail the events of the meeeting and the committee's discussion of the organization's budget and spending. An itemized statement of expenses is enclosed.

Dr. King Plans '67 Pilgrimage to Holy Land

PALESTINIAN TERRITORY, OCCUPIED, JORDAN, ISRAEL

This newspaper clipping outlines plans for Dr. King's Pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, July 21, 1964
New York, NY

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King of updates regarding the advertisement of "Why We Can't Wait". Joan Daves also discusses a conversation they previously had on the phone and gives an explanation of her actions.

Memorandum

Wednesday, September 7, 1960
Atlanta, GA, Tennessee (TN), Little Rock, AR, Montgomery, AL, SOUTH AFRICA, Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), New Orleans, LA, Texas (TX), South Carolina (SC), Virginia (VA)

This memorandum, sent to Dr. King, expresses the need for a convocation between Negro and white Southern leaders. Recent developments, such as peaceful integration of lunch counters and schools, show that whites are respecting equal rights of Negro citizens more.

SCLC SCOPE Pamphlet

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL)

This pamphlet is a product of the Summer Community Organization and Political Education project (SCOPE), a project initiated by the SCLC dedicated to increasing voter participation and political education in Alabama and throughout the South. The pamphlet highlights several common economic and political issues that face Negro communities.

Prayer

Dr. King records a prayer.

Letter from John A. McDermott to Chicago Daily News

Friday, June 30, 1967
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

John McDermott anticipates discrimination in housing and job opportunities as a result of a proposed federal project for a nuclear power plant in Illinois. Ideally, The Weston Project should create equal opportunities for both black and white Americans. McDermott expresses concern considering the current conditions of racial injustice that exists in Illinois.

Letter from Angilcan Students' Federation to MLK

Tuesday, August 17, 1965
SOUTH AFRICA, New York, NY

Stephen Hayes, of the National Union of South African Students, invites Dr. King to speak at their open national congress. The subject of discussion is "The Role of the Christian Student in the Struggle for Social Justice." Hayes does fear that the South African government might refuse to grant Dr. King a visa if he accepts the invitation.

The Urban Coalition

Friday, March 1, 1968
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), Texas (TX), New York, NY

The Urban Coalition's weekly report from the National Coordinator details the newly introduced bill which provides $150 million for summer jobs and anti-poverty programs. The report further discusses the monetary inadequacies for programs involving employment, education, and recreation. A proposal is established by the Office of Economic Opportunity to adhere to the summer programs.

God

Dr. King quotes a passage from "The Historic Faith and a Changing World," by Norman Pittenger.

Telegram from Ted Aretha to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967
Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), Alabama (AL), New York, NY

Ted Aretha sends words of encouragement to Dr. King during his time in the Birmingham City Jail.

Telegram from Harry Van Arsdale to MLK While in Jaill

Monday, October 24, 1960
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Harry Van Asrdale, President of the New York City Central Labor Council, informs Dr. King that the organization has voted to demand the release of Dr. King and others from Fulton County Jail. He states that the arrest violates "basic constitutional rights" and that the Council fully supports the fight to end discrimination and segregation in the United States.

The Modern Negro Activist

Montgomery, AL, GHANA, NIGERIA, KENYA, CONGO / ZAIRE, Alabama (AL), California (CA), Cambridge, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King profiles the emergent young Negro civil rights activist who is college-educated, creative, brave and committed to the discipline of non-violence. He attributes the activist's diligence to a keen awareness that they inhabit a world on the cusp of positive social change and that they will have the privilege to direct that change. They are no longer to be an imitator of his white counterpart, but rather an initiator and leader in this new age.

Letter from Joseph Matasovsky to MLK

Thursday, April 23, 1964
Pittsburgh, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

A member of the Slovak Catholic Sokol expresses their respect for Dr. King's action against the Vietnam War. The author deems Dr. King a "patriot" and appreciates his spiritual profundity, as well as his intellect surrounding national politics.

Friends Journal: A Quaker Weekly

Saturday, July 26, 1958
New Jersey (NJ), Philadelphia, PA, CANADA, MEXICO, London, England, Berlin, Germany, Indiana (IN), JAPAN, LEBANON, NORWAY, Geneva, Switzerland, TURKEY, Pittsburgh, PA, Richmond, VA, California (CA), Montgomery, AL, INDIA

Dr. King's article, "Nonviolence and Racial Justice" is included in this edition of the Friends Journal. Dr. King's entry discusses the various implications of race relations in America and the beneficial elements of nonviolence.

Letter from Herschel Auerbach to MLK

Friday, October 13, 1967
Illinois (IL)

Mr. Auerbach objects to "anti-Semitic and anti-Israel" resolutions adopted at the National Conference of New Politics, at which King was a keynote speaker.

Letter from Ruth A. Salinger to MLK

Thursday, November 14, 1963
Massachusetts (MA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA), Maryland (MD)

Salinger requests that Dr. King provide contact information for civil rights leaders along the route of a scheduled trip to study race relations to be taken by high school students from the church communities of Concord, Massachusetts.