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"Birmingham, AL"

Letter from Mrs. R. K. Matthews to Mrs. King

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

This letter is from a middle class housewife who expressed her despair and frustration to Mrs. King in learning of Dr. King's assassination.

Organize Voter Registration in North

Dr. King discusses the gap in black and white voters across the US,specifically in the North. King organizes speeches and a tour across Northern cities to get blacks registered to vote.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. W.J. Givan to MLK

Monday, November 27, 1967

Mr. and Mrs. Givan urge Dr. King to become a televised preacher, citing a lack thereof and the need for someone to combine the "social gospel" with the Christian fundamentals.

Letter from Rabbi Dudley Weinberg to MLK

Monday, September 14, 1964

Rabbi Dudley Weinberg writes Dr. King requesting him to give a sermon in Wisconsin because he believes that his presence there would provide "enormous impetus for the work which many of [us] are attempting to get done on behalf of our Negro fellow citizens."

God

Dr. King cites Sigmund Freud's view in "New Introductory Lectures on Psycho-Analysis" that the need for religion stems from the Oedipus complex.

The Cartoonist's View: Make Gains In St. Augustine

This column features news on "gains in St. Augustine," and quotations from various sources on civil rights issues.

Letter from Irene Bryson to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

Mrs. Bryson introduces herself as a former neighbor of the King family on Auburn Avenue and recalls fond memories during those years. She compliments Dr. King "as a God sent preacher," and cites biblical scriptures for him to incorporate in his public speaking. Bryson states, teaching God's word "is what it is going to take to help this sin sick world we are living in."

At Your Service!

The Washington Office of the Council for Christian Social Action chronicles the events of the organization including various seminars and cooperation with other organizations.

Royalty Statements from Harper & Row, Publishers

Sunday, June 30, 1963

Harper & Row, Publishers sends Dr. King this royalty statements for sales of "Strength to Love" and "Stride Toward Freedom" for the first 6 months of 1963.

Letter from Senator Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Senator Robert Kennedy thanks Dr. King for a previous correspondence and expresses his aligned views regarding nonviolent reconciliation. Senator Kennedy believes in the preservation of dignity and freedom internationally without imposing "incessant military conflict" upon those with unaligned views. He references Dr. King's statement regarding the precedence of progress in America to that of other countries. He also wishes to hear Dr. King's reaction to a series of his speeches on "A Program for the Urban Crisis" that he has attached.

Injunction Requested by the City of Birmingham against Protests

The City of Birmingham submitted this "bill of injunction" to the Circuit Court of Alabama to try to stop the sit ins, boycott pickets, and marches led by Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights, SCLC, and others in April of 1963. After the injunction was granted and served April 10th, they continued their civil disobedience and many more were arrested. From solitary confinement, Dr. King then wrote "Letter from a Birmingham Jail."

Telegram from Committee of Concerned Mothers to MLK

Monday, February 22, 1965

The Committee of Concerned Mothers for Mrs. Malcolm X and Family writes to Dr. King requesting the SCLC to help assist Mrs. Malcolm X and her four children in the wake of her husband's assassination.

People in Action: Our New President

Saturday, February 1, 1964

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes optimistically about the prospects for civil rights in the transition from President Kennedy to President Johnson. He believes that Johnson's Southern-ness may disarm the likes of George Wallace and that the President's proven commitment to civil rights and skills as Majority Leader in the Senate will aid in passing legislation.

Letter from Leroy Johnson to MLK

State Senator Leroy R. Johnson forwards a Senate Pass to Dr. King, and informs him of an open invitation to visit the Senate at his leisure.

Letter from Frazer Earle to MLK

Monday, November 16, 1964

Frazer Earle, a member of the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews Inc., extends Dr. King a second invitation to their Annual Banquet. Mr. Earle informs Dr. King that his acceptance to this invitation will allow him to meet with the students, the press, the religious community, and businessmen.

Telegram from American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa to President Johnson

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Members of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa express their disapproval of South Africa's rule over South West Africa and ask for U.S. intervention.

Moment (Its Meaning)

Dr. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's "The Concept of Nature."

Letter from Dennis Crawford to MLK

Monday, May 25, 1964

Dennis Crawford, Executive Secretary of the YMCA-YWCA, invites Dr. King to the first Northwest Collegiate Civil Rights Conference. In addition, Crawford makes mention of their contributions to the movement in the form of students, money, books and community leadership.

The Emergency Civil Liberties Committee Defends the Constitutional Rights

Friday, February 16, 1968

ECLC writes to ask for assistance with their efforts to criminalize governmental draft tactics. As staunch supporters of the Bill of Rights and the Constitution, ECLC argues that the Draft is a violation of citizen's constitutional rights. Furthermore, they have dedicated their services to protecting the rights of youth, arguing that the draft is economically discriminatory in "student deferments". The organization challenges other civil liberties organizations to join them in this fight.

Letter from MLK Regarding Atlanta University Center

Dr. King writes to a woman concerning what he calls "the best Negro colleges in the South." He discusses the Atlanta University Center, which consists of Spelman College, Morehouse College, Clark University and Morris Brown College.

Letter from Marshall Bean to MLK

Saturday, July 3, 1965

Marshall Bean, a public school teacher suffering from cancer, writes Dr. King requesting an autographed picture and a "few words of joy."

Letter from Alfred Hearin to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Alfred Hearin expresses to Dr. King that he admires him and that he has faith in his ability to help mankind. He then asks Dr. King to send him a handwritten letter and a photograph of himself for his collection.

Proposed Resolution on East-West Relations

The Council for Christian Social Action of the United Church of Christ, citing President Johnson's State of the Union statement that he hopes to end the Cold War, indicates its support of government efforts to create a dialogue with the Soviet Union and other Eastern European countries. The Council asks that the Senate ratify the outer space treaty and the U.S.-Soviet consular convention and that Congress approve an East-West trade bill and lifting restrictions on the Food for Peace program.

MLK Remarks on Negro Press Week

Monday, February 10, 1958

In this transcribed radio address, Dr. King describes how future generations will remember the 20th century as a time where righteous people fought for social, economic, and political freedom. Dr. King also states that the African-American fight for true citizenship is not only a part of American heritage, but also the story of people everywhere who struggle for dignity and freedom. Dr. King made this radio address for Negro Press week a the request of Louisville Defender Editor and National Newspaper Publishers Association board member Frank Stanley.

Remember Who You Are!

Thursday, December 6, 1956

Dr. King addresses the student body and officials of Howard University with a poignant sermon entitled, "Remember Who You Are." The content of the sermon makes various references between Jesus, Shakespeare and Greek philosophers who sought to identify the mechanisms that made man important to society.

Letter from George Lucas to MLK

Wednesday, September 30, 1964

George Lucas writes Dr. King to follow-up on a telephone conversation confirming Dr. King's appearance in Dayton, Ohio. Lucas informs Dr. King that the event will take place at the Field House of the University of Dayton.

Telegram from C. C. Shell to MLK

C. C. Shells writes Dr. King suggesting that segregationist Lester Maddox run for President of the United State with Dr. King as Vice President.

Letter from Michael Williams to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

The Chairman of the Society of African and Afro-American Students, at the University of Pennsylvania, extends an invitation to Dr. King to come speak with students during "Black Week."

Letter from Irving Davis to MLK

Tuesday, August 15, 1967

Irvin Davis of Celebrities Art Exhibits invites Dr. King to tour with the organization depending on his artistic abilities.

Telegram from Eddie S. Carter to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Mr. Carter expresses his appreciation to Dr. King and the SCLC. He also informs Dr. King that he has recently made a contribution the organization and shall continuously do so.