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"Birmingham, AL"

Christianity

Dr. King references Emil Brunner's argument on Christianity.

103:24 General Correspondence 1967 (S)

Monday, May 1, 1967
Minnesota (MN), Atlanta, GA

Addressed to Sigrid L. Sharp, this receipt is forwarded to Minneapolis, MN for a donation of $3.00 to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa to MLK

Tuesday, May 26, 1959
Johannesburg, South Africa, South Africa, New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This fundraising letter and accompanying bulletin describes the plight of South African non-whites brought on by apartheid and economic disparities. The Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa requests donations and support for the work of the Diocese of Johannesburg.

"A Knock At Midnight"

Sunday, August 9, 1964
New York (NY), New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C., New York, NY, Mississippi (MS), FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, Montgomery, AL

This is a draft of the sermon Dr. King wrote comparing a story from the Bible in St. Luke to the struggle to obtain equality and civil rights.

Letter from Richard Boone to Barbara Hicks

Friday, July 2, 1965
Montgomery, AL

Rev. Boone encloses some adverse literature to be distributed to Dr. King and others.

Letter from James R. McDowell to Mrs. King

Monday, February 25, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Rev. James McDowell, Headmaster of The Lovett School in Atlanta, informs Mrs. King that the application for Martin Luther King III has been rejected. Mrs. King's application represented the first formal Negro application in the history of The Lovett School, thus the Headmaster had consulted the Board of Trustees. Upon receiving the rejection from the Trustees, McDowell returns Mrs. King's check and apologizes for any inconvenience. Attached to this set of documents is Coretta's statement regarding why she wanted her son to attend The Lovett School.

Statement by Floyd McKissick

VIETNAM

This is information sheet is about the National Director of CORE, Floyd McKissick's statement on the Vietnam's War. In addition to other topics, he is scheduled to discuss the immorality of the conflict by drawing "parallels between self determination for the people of Vietnam and the quest for equality for Black Americans."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967
New York, NY

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that Constance Webb would to ask him questions regarding the biography she is writing on Richard Wright.

Letter to Mr. Otwell from Dr. King Regarding the Request for an Article for the Chicago Sun-Times

Monday, March 30, 1964
Chicago, IL

Dr. King informs Mr. Otwell that, due to prior obligations, he will not be able to write the article for the Sunday edition as requested. However, he assures Mr. Otwell that he will look into the possibility of editing a section of "Why We Can't Wait" to be published instead.

Invitation from Edwin H. Tuller to MLK

Wednesday, January 29, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA)

Edwin Tuller requests Dr. King show special attention to the invitation from the European Baptist Federation. Mr. Tuller is certain that Dr. King's presence in Europe at this time would be "extremely beneficial" with the progression of "racial brotherhood."

Philosophy Reading List

This document serves as the reading list of various philosophers. Plato, Aristotle, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, and more are apart of Dr. King's philosophical reading from October through January.

Letter from Sam Massell Jr. to MLK

Thursday, November 19, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Sam Massell Jr., President of the City of Atlanta Board of Aldermen, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Gaylord Nelson to MLK

Thursday, July 2, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Wisconsin Democratic Senator Gaylord Nelson writes Dr. King expressing his gratitude for his kind letter regarding the passage of the Civil Rights Act. Senator Nelson reports that many of his constituents were solidly in favor of the bill.

Letter from R. H. Edwin Espy to MLK

Monday, June 28, 1965
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Mr. Espy acknowledges the contribution of Dr. King's congregation, Ebenezer Baptist Church, to the National Council of the Churches of Christ and seeks a renewal of that commitment to its work.

Letter from Richard W. Boone

Saturday, October 29, 1966
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), New York, NY, Memphis, TN, Chicago, IL, Cambridge, MA, New Orleans, LA, Texas (TX), Jackson, MS

The Child Development Group of Mississippi is being terminated by the Office of Economic Opportunity. This is not because the program isn't valid but because it would disturb the balance of politics in Mississippi. Klein and Saks, Inc. has helped keep the program alive. The goal of the program was to provide education, medical assistance, and nourishment for preschool children and their families.

Letter from Maj Palmberg to MLK

Thursday, February 3, 1966
FINLAND, Stockholm, Sweden, London, England, FRANCE, UNITED KINGDOM, SWEDEN

Maj Palmberg, Cultural Secretary for Abo Akademi University in Finland, inquires about Dr. King's availability to speak to students regarding the Civil Rights Movement. Palmberg suggests raising funds in an effort to further Dr. King's nonviolent endeavors in America. Palmberg wrote Dr. King invitations to speak on numerous occasions.

Letter from John L. Gregory to MLK

Tuesday, November 19, 1963
Vermont (VT), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

John L. Gregory informs Dr. King about the check dedicated to the SCLC. The Vermont Church Council is concerned with the Civil Rights Movement and contributes to Dr. King's organization to be an asset to the improvement of the American society.

Letter from Judy Richardson to Mrs. King

Thursday, September 30, 1965

In this letter, Judy Richardson of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee asks Mrs. King to help them revise a second edition of the "Negro History Primer."

Telegram from Terrence Hallinan to MLK

Tuesday, November 7, 1967
VIETNAM, San Francisco, CA, California (CA)

Mr. Hallinan requests Dr. King's assistance in aiding a service member undergoing a "court martial for refusal to go to Vietnam."

Dorothy Cotton telegraphs congratulations

Sunday, January 31, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), New York, NY

Dorothy Cotton, long-time colleague of Dr. King at Southern Christian Leadership Conference, congratulates Dr. King for being nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize. Cotton was one of the only non-family members to subsequently accompany Dr. King to Oslo, Norway, for the prize ceremony.

The SCLC and Leadership of MLK

INDIA, Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C.

The various protest mechanisms and action organizations serves as a long lasting contribution to the Negro community initiated by the movement in the South. The church has served as a location for organization which progresses community participation. During slavery, the slaves were allowed to congregate only at weddings and funerals. Many of these events were fabricated in order to create a means of collective communication between the slaves. The author asserts that it was in this tradition that the SCLC was formed.

Letter from Honi Coles, Jackie Robinson and Arthur Logan to MLK

Monday, August 9, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King is informed of an event honoring Frank C. Schiffman, Director of the Apollo Theater, for his support of Negro entertainers and for providing jobs in the Harlem community. The gentlemen also present the SCLC a check for $5,500, which they hope will be used to purchase vehicles for the SCLC Freedom Fleet.

Letter from Gitta Badeker to Dora McDonald

Thursday, June 8, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

In this letter, Gitta Badeker, from the office of Joan Daves, informs Dr. King that enclosed are copies of the contract for a Norwegian-language edition of "Where Do We Go from Here. The contract requested for Dr. King to sign and initial.

Letter from Harriet C. Kelley to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1962
Indiana (IN)

Ms. Kelley explains to Dr. King why she cannot send a contribution to him. She is on a limited income and already donates both to the NAACP and the United Negro College Fund.

SCLC Memo- The Ministers Leadership Training Program

Thursday, February 15, 1968

This memo reminds the Steering Committee and Executive Staff, of the SCLC, that "funds for the Ministers Leadership Training Program are not being used to finance currect SCLC direct-action programs."

Letter from MLK to Hazel Gregory

Wednesday, July 24, 1963
Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL)

Dr. King responds to Hazel Gregory's previous correspondence about transportation to the March on Washington. He informs Mrs. Gregory that he is attending a meeting regarding the logistics of the march the next day and will communicate further about a bus from Montgomery to attend the event.

Letter from Patricia Kleps to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967
San Francisco, CA

Dr. King informs Mrs. Patricia Kleps that he will be unable to fulfill her request to speak at the First Unitarian Church in San Francisco. However, Dr. King pledges to contact her around January of 1968 to possibly schedule a date for him to address her congregation.

Points for Progress, Birmingham, Alabama

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

This is a list or outline of points for progress in the Birmingham Campaign. They may have been used in a face-to-face presentation with local community leaders or with media officials. These words carefully enumerate the demands or wishes of the civil rights leaders and the Negro community.

Letter from MLK to Henry Luce

Thursday, February 28, 1963
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King conveys his appreciation to Henry Luce for the invitation to attend the 40th Anniversary Dinner of Time Magazine. However, due to another engagement on the other side of the U.S., Dr. King regretfully cannot commit to come to the dinner.

Address for the Formation of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights

Thursday, May 17, 1962

This address was delivered by Dr. King at the Formation of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights event on May 17, 1962. Dr. King opens by discussing various anniversaries that coincide with the event and represent similar struggles for justice including the Supreme Court school desegregation ruling, the Emancipation Proclamation, and Henry David Thoreau's death.