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MLK Memorial Service Program in Seattle, Washington

Sunday, April 7, 1968
Washington (WA)

Three days after the death of Dr. King this memorial service, conducted by Reverend Theodore Kennedy, took place at the First Unitarian Universalist Church of Seattle.

Letter of Appreciation from Alabama State Teachers Association to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967
Alabama (AL)

The Executive Secretary of the Alabama State Teachers Association expresses his gratitude for services rendered by Dr. King at an Annual Convention via a $500.00 check.

Letter from MLK to Maurine B. Neuberger

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Oregon Senator Maurine B. Neuberger to express gratitude for her support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Brief for the Petitioners

Saturday, October 1, 1966
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Wisconsin (WI), Kentucky (KY), California (CA), Connecticut (CT), Texas (TX), Louisiana (LA), New Hampshire (NH), South Carolina (SC), Rhode Island (RI), Maryland (MD), Virginia (VA), New York, NY, Florida (FL), Minnesota (MN), Georgia (GA)

This brochure illustrates questions as well as events pertaining to petitioners during the Civil Rights Movement. Important petitioners, such as Dr. King and Ralph David Abernathy, were convicted and charged with Contempt of Court in violation of the First and Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution.

Letter from Maynard Gertler to MLK

Monday, November 18, 1963
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

Maynard Gertler, of Harvest House Limited Publishers, informs Dr. King that he was able to obtain a copy of one of his speeches and his correct mailing address.

Letter to Twelve Southern Governors

Dr. King addresses twelve southern governors regarding the urgency of a unification between the Negro community and government leaders. Dr. King requests a meeting between the governors and himself to address and resolve their issues concerning race relations.

Letter from Congressman John McCormack to MLK

Saturday, July 10, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Congressional House Speaker John McCormack writes that he is very glad the McCulloch Substitute Bill was rejected by the House of Representatives.

Letter from Marshall C. Dandy to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
Virginia (VA)

Marshall C. Dendy, the Executive Secretary of the Board of Christian Education, invites Dr. King to be a speaker for the organization's conference in Montreat. Dendy also suggests that Dr. King reconsider his stance on America's involvement in Vietnam, even though he also detests war.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Gates to MLK

Sunday, June 30, 1963
Missouri (MO), Chicago, IL

Bob and Betty Gates write Dr. King enclosing a contribution toward his work for freedom and better opportunities for African Americans. The Gates also ask Dr. King's opinion regarding the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund.

Science and Religion

Dr. King wrote this essay while enrolled at Crozer Theological Seminary, circa 1948-1951. The thrust of Dr. King's stance is that "there never was a conflict between religion and science as such."

Howe Fears Draft Of Too Many Students

This article discusses how Education Commissioner Harold Howe complained to a House Special Education Sub-Committee that more than a third of graduate students could expect to be drafted in the following year due to the changes in the Selective Service law.

Note to Dr. King from JOAN DAVES, New York, NY, dated September 23, 1973

Sunday, September 22, 1963
New York, NY, GERMANY

This note is to request Dr. King's signature on a contract with Oncken for german language edition of Stride Toward Freedom.

Evil (Problem of)

Dr. King discusses the concept of evil.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom News Release

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

The National Urban League expresses it's gratitude for being apart of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Whitney Young expresses the importance of Americans continuing their fight for equality through the proper necessary legislation.

Letter of Resignation Rachel Davis DuBois to MLK

Wednesday, November 2, 1966
New York (NY)

Rachel Davis DuBois resigns from the staff of SCLC to help the organization during a time of financial difficulties. Dr. DuBois offers her services in the future whenever needed without compensation.

Letter from Rabbi Roland B. Gittelsohn to S.C.L.C.

Wednesday, June 21, 1967
Boston, MA

In this letter, Rabbi Roland B. Gittelsohn enclosed a contribution of twenty-five dollars for S.C.L.C.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. D.A. McGregor

Monday, September 25, 1961
New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King expresses delight in Mrs. D.A. McGregor's request for a copy of his sermon "Paul's Letter to American Christians." However, since he doesn't have a complete manuscript of the sermon at the time he receives the letter, Dr. King mentions that it will be published in his upcoming book of sermons. The book of sermons would eventually be named "Strength to Love."

Battle of Economic Opportunity

Friday, November 17, 1967
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY

In this New York Post article, the author provides a perspective of the events leading to the Economic Opportunity Act as it pertains to both opposing sides; Democratic and Republican.

Religion

Dr. King paraphrases H. G. Wells.

Man

Dr. King records a quote from Jeremiah 17:9, which discusses the evilness of man.

Black Marches and White Hysteria

Monday, August 15, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This editorial by WBBM-TV in Chicago, a CBS station, highlights recent civil rights marches and the corresponding white hysteria. Carter Davidson, editorial director, discusses the marches and the middle-class citizens who displayed Nazi swastikas in response.

Letter from MLK to Peter S. Kliewer

Thursday, July 13, 1967
California (CA), VIETNAM

In response to a "letter to the editor" from the "Times-Advocate" sent in by a reader, Dr. King addresses America's role in Vietnam.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Thursday, May 7, 1964
Atlanta, GA

Morehouse College President Benjamin E. Mays writes Dr. King to ask him to consider donating his papers to the Atlanta University Center Library as an alternative to Boston University.

Letter from Derrick Cameron to MLK

Thursday, January 20, 1966
Chicago, IL

Derrick Cameron, a seventh grade student, writes Dr. King expressing thanks for his fight in Civil Rights. In addition, Cameron offers to make copies on his ditto machine; a low-volume printing method used mainly by schools and churches.

Letter from the Seventh Grade Class of Woodward School to MLK

Saturday, February 3, 1968
FRANCE, CANADA

Anita Davis, Gail Williams, and Joan Rockwell request an interview with Dr. King for their class project.

Letters Between MLK and Max Dean

Thursday, June 1, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Chicago, IL, Kentucky (KY), Louisville, KY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, Illinois (IL)

Dr. King sends a letter out to supporters, updating them on the progress made through the Civil Rights Movement. Dr. King also informs supporters that the work is far from done and asks for support. Writing on the back of Dr. King's letter, Max Dean informs Dr. King that his most important priority is an immediate and unconditional withdrawal from Vietnam. This is despite that Dean has "great respect" for Dr. King and the SCLC.

Letter from Alan Campbell to MLK

Friday, July 26, 1963
Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA

Alan B. Campbell writes Dr. King to express his appreciation for the address "Paul's letter to American Christians," which he hopes to republish in national journals such as Readers' Digest.

Immortality

Dr. King writes that the belief in immortality by scholars in different disciplines suggests that while immortality cannot be proved nor has it been disproved.

A Historian Looks at Our Political Morality

Saturday, July 10, 1965
VIETNAM, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, CHINA, CUBA, Florida (FL), Hawaii (HI), HUNGARY, GUATEMALA, IRAN, BRAZIL

Liberal historian Henry Steele Commager writes on the political morality of the United States. He asserts that the United States is not above the historical tendency to become corrupt, and the issue will become more important as the United States grows more powerful. He argues that the United States must reconcile the "principles of law and of morality."