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"Berlin, Germany"

Draft: The Time for Freedom Has Come

Tuesday, May 1, 1962

In this draft of Dr. King's article, "The Time for Freedom Has Come," he discusses the role of African American students in the Civil Rights Movement. He praises the commitment and determination of students and credits them with the desegregation of lunch counters. He also identifies with the students' frustration with the slowness of forward progress in the struggle for equality. The article was published in New York Times Magazine on September 10, 1961.

Letter to Mrs. H.G. Smith from MLK

Wednesday, October 13, 1965

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Smith for her financial contribution to the SCLC. He briefly explains the current efforts of the SCLC and the importance of contributions.

Black Power

This flyer gives a description of what black power entails.

Royalty Statement for MLK's "Why We Can't Wait"

Tuesday, January 17, 1967

This statement from Joan Daves details royalty earnings for the German edition of Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait", published by Econ Verlag, for the period 1/1/65 to 12/31/65.

Letter from Ben A. Todd to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

Ben A. Todd commends Dr. King for his recent stand against the United States' position in Vietnam, particularly because making such a statement may hurt the Civil Rights Movement.

"Leaders of 'Socialist Scholars' Talk Guerrilla War in Cities Next Year"

Saturday, December 30, 1967

Alice Widener argues that the Black Power movement will result in domestic guerilla warfare. The writer's stance originates from a Black Power workshop she attended. Widener argues that the U.S. government must "round up and imprison" the "Red-Black power criminals."

Letter from MLK to Henry Luce

Thursday, February 28, 1963

Dr. King conveys his appreciation to Henry Luce for the invitation to attend the 40th Anniversary Dinner of Time Magazine. However, due to another engagement on the other side of the U.S., Dr. King regretfully cannot commit to come to the dinner.

Dr. King's response to a letter from Mr. Joseph Beaver

Friday, October 24, 1958

Dr. King, in this letter, thanked Mr. Joseph Beaver for his kindness and for the enclosed booklet entitled "I Want You to Know Wendell Phillips Dabney" sent to him, during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. Dr. King took a moment to apologize for he and Mrs. King not being able to communicate with Mr. Beaver, while they vacationed in Mexico. He concluded the letter by acknowledging his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process was complete.

Letter from Bryn Mawr College to MLK

Monday, May 30, 1966

Bryn Mawr College commends Dr. King for his recent "forceful" presentation that impressed those in attendance at the institution.

Letter from William H. Gray, Jr. to Congressman James A. Byrne

Monday, June 5, 1967

Prominent offical and businessman William H. Gray, Jr. writes United States Congressman James Byrne in regards to discrimination issues related to Negro students and the Selective Service System. Gray communicates with Congressman Byrne to intervene in a discriminatory matter involving a young Philadelphia native. Dr. King is forwarded a copy of this correspondence.

Letter from Peggy Duff to MLK

Friday, April 28, 1967

Peggy Duff writes Dr. King inviting him to join the World Conference on Vietnam in Stockholm. The conference will include delegates from multiple peace organizations around the world to help protest the war in Vietnam.

Harry Belafonte Concert Promotion

Monday, May 28, 1962

The Belafonte Concert Committee reaches out to Atlanta music lovers for a show featuring Harry Belafonte and Miriam Makeba.


Citing two sources concerning war, Dr. King notes the opinions of Dr. Charles W. Mayo and John M. Fletcher. Dr. Mayo believes that it is impossible to abolish war, as "war is part of our human inheritance," while Fletcher takes the opposite view in his book "Human Nature and World Peace."

Letter from MLK to Joyce Armstrong

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Dr. King responds to Joyce Armstrong, a student at Central High School, regarding her concerns on equality. Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation and states, "it is gratifying to us to know that so many young people are dedicated to the cause of Freedom."

Letter from Alma Szatmary to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

Alma Szatmary writes Dr. King concerning his stance on the Vietnam war. Szatmary writes that it should be prohibited for Puerto Ricans and African Americans to serve as oppressors in Vietnam when they are the ones being oppressed here at home.

Telegram from Rev. Enoch Jones to MLK

Saturday, November 28, 1964

Reverend Enoch Jones informs Dr. King that the Baptist Minsters Conference of Nashville, Tennessee have selected Dr. King for their Emancipation Proclamation speaker. Reverend Jones provides information about the event in hopes that Dr. King will accept.

Letter from James Thomas to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967

Mr. Thomas, Chairman of the Committee for the Improvement of Public Schools, requests Dr. King to "contact citizens protest." The protest is for blacks who are highly qualified for positions and have been turned down.

Minutes for the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights

Wednesday, April 19, 1967

The minutes for this meeting include the Civil Rights act of 1967, the "Freedom Budget," and discrimination in military off-post housing.

Handwritten Draft Letter from MLK

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for the generous contribution made by Mr. Hunter and addresses questions that were asked in a previous letter.

Letter from Ralph David Abernathy to the Executive Board of S.C.L.C

Tuesday, September 29, 1964

In this letter, Ralph Abernathy provides the financial statement for the S.C.L.C.'s September 1, 1963 - August 31, 1964 fiscal year.

Letter from MLK to Jessie Treichler

Friday, September 7, 1962

Dr. King writes Jessie Tresichler to inform her that he and his wife will be unable to accept her invitation to Antioch College. He explains that his calendar will not allow him to accept any more speaking engagements and that Coretta is an expecting mother.

King Plans Capital Shantytown 'In a Tumbledown Shack'

This article describes Dr. King's plans, as observed by a detractor, for the 1968 March of Poor People to Washington.  The Associated Press reports that shacks and poor people from all over the nation will descend on the nation's capital to make the nation aware of their presence. President Lyndon B. Johnson, when reached for comment, said he hoped to work with the groups.

The False God of Science

Sunday, July 5, 1953

In this manuscript the author addresses their belief on the validity of modern man making a god of science.

Letter from Judy Richardson to Mrs. King

Thursday, September 30, 1965

In this letter, Judy Richardson of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee asks Mrs. King to help them revise a second edition of the "Negro History Primer."


Dr. King references the book of Psalms regarding the subject of immortality.

Index card written by MLK regarding Faith

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines another thinker's insights on the subject of faith. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for quick reference to quotations, ideas, and bible verses, among other things. Material covered on these index cards includes topics such as theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches and sermons.

"Life" by Eudora V. Savage

In this poem, Ms. Savage expresses her views on "Life."

Telegram from Rev. Andrew J. Young to Mrs. Rosa M. Mcghee

Monday, August 9, 1965

Rev. Andrew Young sends this telegram to Mrs. Rosa Mcghee apologizing on behalf of the SCLC for neglecting to invite the officials and members of the American Federation of Teachers.

Letter from MLK to Office of Inspector of Foreign Dividends

Saturday, January 18, 1964

In this letter, Dr. King states that he is the beneficial owner of the Copyright Royalties paid by Laurence Pollinger, Ltd. and that he is still receiving income from them.