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Letter from J. M. Koelbe to Dr. King

Friday, August 12, 1966
Minnesota (MN)

Mr. Koelbe writes Dr. King about his financial distress. He also tells Dr. King that he admires him for his courage and gives him encouragement for the future.

Letter from Carey McWilliams to MLK

Monday, November 22, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY

Carey McWilliams, Editor of "The Nation," reminds Dr. King that it is nearly time to publish his annual article. McWilliams also requests that the timing of the article correspond with the beginning of the new session of Congress.

What is Man?

Sunday, January 12, 1958
Montgomery, AL

Citing views from historical and contemporary figures, Dr. King asserts that the definition of "man" lies somewhere between God and an animal. Dr. King contends that, although man is limited by time and space, humans are not animals, because they have the capacity for rational thought. However, the central theme that Dr. King argues is that humanity is inherently evil and must constantly strive for high moral standards.

Outline Written in MLK's Handwriting Entitled: Be Ye Perfect

The document, shown here, is a combination of a handwritten outline and notes for the preparation of a sermon. Under the title, "Be Ye Perfect", Dr. King described Jesus, in relation to rational and moral perfection.

Letter from a Supporter of MLK

An anonymous person pleads with Dr. King to not accept a rumored government job that was offered to him, in exchange of his plans to alleviate poverty.

Letter from the Interseminary Movement's John Robert Nelson to MLK

Friday, August 31, 1962
Ohio (OH), Nashville, TN, Tennessee (TN), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

J. Robert Nelson, National Chairman of the Interseminary Committee, invites Dr. King to be a part of their national conference with theological professors and students for the following year. He hopes that Dr. King will be the speaker on the subject of the Strategy of Churches and Ministers for Social Change.

Letter from SNCC Communication Director Horace Julian Bond to MLK

Sunday, May 31, 1964
Atlanta, GA

Horace Bond, writing on behalf of the Council of Federated Organizations, asks Dr. King to join other civil rights organizations in writing a letter to President Johnson to support the organization's bid for a meeting with the President.

Letter from MLK to John Conyers

Friday, February 19, 1965
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Selma, AL

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for Congressman John Conyers' visit to Selma, Alabama. Dr. King requests Congressman Conyers' support for passing federal legislation that will eliminate the barriers to a free voting process for African American citizens.

Board of National Missions Writes the Editors of the Washington Post

Monday, October 24, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

George E. Todd, G. H. Jack Woodard, and Joseph W. Merchant send a letter to the Editors of the Washington Post regarding the Mississippi Action for Progress. They claim the organization is a tool for the destruction of the Child Development Group of Mississippi. Additional allegations are made that MAP was an instrument of the governor and legislature of Mississippi to stall school integration.

Letter from C. Kenzie Steele to MLK

Tuesday, March 6, 1962
Tallahassee, FL, Atlanta, GA

C. Kenzie Steele writes Dr. King to thank him for his "expression of encouragement" for the celebration of his Tenth Anniversary as pastor of Bethel Baptist Church.

Telegram from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

A. Philip Randolph congratulates Dr. King on the statement he made on "Face the Nation."

Letter from Richard P. Heath to MLK

Monday, November 29, 1965
Atlanta, GA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, Washington, D.C.

Richard P. Heath expresses his distaste for Dr. King's method of attaining equal rights and freedoms. He posits, "In order to have rights and freedoms, we must be responsible for our actions."

Letter from Clifford P. Case to MLK

Monday, July 20, 1964
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., New Jersey (NJ), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL)

Senator Clifford P. Case, U. S. Senator from New Jersey, writes Dr. King regarding the Civil Rights Act being passed. Case encloses a copy of the bill as it passed, with an explanation of "the major changes from the House version."

Letter from Carl E. Farris to William Rutherford

Wednesday, December 27, 1967

Mr. Farris strongly rejects Mr. Rutherford's offered position to answer Dr. King's mail and to act as Deputy Director of CEP at board meetings.

Paul Tillich

Dr. King references the theologian, Paul Tillich, by asserting, "If philosophy of religion does not consider the revelation claim of religion, it misses its object and doesn't deal with real religion."

Telegram from Joseph Lowery to Wyatt Walker

Friday, November 3, 1967
Birmingham, AL

Reverend Joseph E. Lowery writes to Reverend Wyatt Walker acknowledging his support of Walker's "sacrifice in behalf of freedom and justice for all."

The West Indies Laymen Nation Christian League on Communism

JAMAICA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, CHINA

The article addresses the issue of Communism within the Caribbean and the need to stop its spread throughout the islands. The article stresses the importance of spreading the message of Christianity so that Communist thought can be laid to rest.

Letter from MLK to C. Anderson Davis

Monday, October 21, 1963
West Virginia (WV)

Dr. King replies to Reverend Davis' invitation to speak at the West Virginia Emancipation Proclamation Committee event in Bluefield, West Virginia. Dr. King declines the invitation citing his he has already accepted the maximum number of speaking engagements for the next ten to twelve months. Dr. King does extend his appreciation for the Committee's moral and financial support of the work done by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

The Wells Newsletter: January 1964

Tuesday, October 15, 1963
New Jersey (NJ), Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, POLAND, FORMER YUGOSLOVIA, CZECH REPUBLIC, HUNGARY, CANADA, FRANCE, CUBA, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, COLOMBIA, VENEZUELA, South Carolina (SC)

This publication, to which Dr. King subscribed, discusses global issues such as Russian Communism, Marxism, the status of the United States economy, and Negroes in college.

Letter from Fred Warren to MLK

Tuesday, January 30, 1968
Berkeley, CA, Los Angeles, CA, San Francisco, CA

Fred Warren, Professor of Music at the University of California at Berkeley writes to Dr. King saddened that he will not be able to come to the University. Professor Warren encloses a brochure describing the department's program on Africa, music, and its related arts.

Telegram from John Dempsey to President John F. Kennedy

Monday, July 30, 1962
Washington, D.C., Albany, GA, Connecticut (CT)

John Dempsey, Governor of Connecticut, telegrams President John F. Kennedy urging "the full force of the federal government be used to assure the personal safety of Dr. King and his associates who are asserting their rights as citizens."

Letter from W. P. Buckwalter, Jr. to MLK

Friday, July 30, 1965
New Jersey (NJ), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

W. P. Buckwalter, Jr. writes the SCLC enclosing a check from various church groups to be used toward Selma expenses.

Letter from R. Edward Dodge, Jr. to MLK

Saturday, June 19, 1965
Ohio (OH), Baltimore, MD

This letter dated June 19, 1965, was written to Dr. King from R. Edward Dodge, Jr. In this letter Mr. Dodge, a Caucasian man asks Dr.King if he can help him find integrated housing in Baltimore, Maryland. He will be moving there in a year to study at the John Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. He wants to bring his family with him and he wants his children to interact and become friends with other black children. He asks for Dr. King's help without any fanfare.

Letter from Barry Gray to Jackie Robinson

Monday, August 22, 1966
New York, NY, New York (NY), Florida (FL)

Barry Gray, an influential American radio personality, writes Jackie Robinson expressing his disappointment with how he dealt with countering issues. According to Gray, Robinson sent a letter to "distinguished Americans, including his friends" and presumably blackmailed him. Gray discusses his input in the Civil Rights Movement through exposing unequal systems through television and radio.

New York Mayor Wagner Remarks at Reception

Thursday, December 17, 1964
New York, NY, New York (NY), Oslo, Norway, NORWAY

New York Mayor Robert F. Wagner honors Dr. King at a reception following a ceremony where he was presented the Medallion of Honor of the City of New York after receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. The Mayor especially commends Dr. King for his courageous leadership in nonviolence and the spirit of love, goodwill, and peacemaking that he brings to the struggle for racial justice.

Telegram from Al Duckett to MLK

Saturday, July 9, 1966
New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

In this telegram to Dr. King, Mr. Al Duckett professes his willingness to protest in Chicago.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, April 13, 1964
JAPAN, New York, NY

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about Protestant Publishing Co. Ltd, lacking the ability to offer better figures, for the Japanese rights to "Strength to Love."

People to People: A Choice and a Promise

Saturday, November 21, 1964
Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), Virginia (VA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King addresses the idea that American people of all races have a choice to make this nation a great society.

The Bible

Dr. King records notes regarding Protestant Orthodoxy and its great error in dealing with the Bible.

Letter from Hersel Lillard to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968
Louisville, KY, Kentucky (KY)

Lillard writes to Dr. King from the United States Public Health Service Hospital in Lexington Kentucky in hopes that Dr. King will help him because he feels the Court was prejudice against him. He hopes to prevent his injustice from happening to others in his situation. He also mentions two other men, Mulloy and Pratt, about to stand trial and in need of assistance.