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Sermon on Conformity Thought "Nonconformist - J. Bond"

Sunday, January 16, 1966

Dr. King in this sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church speaks to his congregation on the topic of disent. He expresses in detail about how we essentially must not conform to standards set by society.


Dr. King quotes Samuel Arthur Devan's "Ascent to Zion."

Stokely Carmichael Requests MLK Photo

Thursday, October 20, 1966
Atlanta, GA

Julia Polk of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, asks for an autographed photo of Dr. King for Stokely Carmichael's collection.

Darien Integration

Friday, April 17, 1964
Connecticut (CT)

This article is a summary of the integration of the Negro population into high-income residential suburbs. The Superintendent of schools and the Darien Board of Education has created a program to exchange schoolteachers and encourage students to attend schools with integrated classes.

Letter from Gitta Badeker to Dora McDonald

Thursday, June 8, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

In this letter, Gitta Badeker, from the office of Joan Daves, informs Dr. King that enclosed are copies of the contract for a Norwegian-language edition of "Where Do We Go from Here. The contract requested for Dr. King to sign and initial.

Copyright Agreement for MLK’s Nobel Lecture

Oslo, Norway, NORWAY, Stockholm, Sweden

This is the Copyright Assignment Agreement established between Dr. King and the Nobel Foundation.


Dr. King writes notes on Saint Augustine, Bishop of Hippo, and his "vast theological system" called Augustinianism. Dr. King describes the system as a comprehensive church philosophy that was very pessimistic about the nature of man.

Letter from Lewis Conrad to MLK

Monday, January 14, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA)

The Penn Unitarian Fellowship of the University of Pennsylvania extends an invitation to Dr. King to meet with the student body for an informal discussion. The university desires Dr. King to converse with several race relation classes for a more realistic perspective from an active leader in the movement. Due to the growing population of the African American community in Philadelphia, it is the university's hope that Dr. King will address social issues specifically in Philadelphia.

Letter from T. W. Cole Sr. to MLK

Monday, August 12, 1963
Texas (TX)

The General President of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity sends Dr. King a contribution to aid the SCLC in the quest for "human dignity." Dr. King was inducted into Alpha Phi Alpha at Boston University in 1952.

Letter from UN Ambassador Adlai Stevenson to MLK

Friday, November 29, 1963
New York, NY

Adlai Stevenson, the United States Representative to the United Nations, invites Dr. King to attend an upcoming meeting "to discuss current developments" in policy decisions on Africa.

Letter from Hosea Williams to Project Leaders and Field Staff

Tuesday, March 5, 1968
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Louisville, KY, Kentucky (KY), Tennessee (TN), New York (NY), Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), North Carolina (NC), Virginia (VA), Baltimore, MD, Maryland (MD), New Jersey (NJ), Pittsburgh, PA, Cincinnati, OH, Ohio (OH), Milwaukee, WI, Wisconsin (WI), Chicago, IL, South Carolina (SC), Detroit, MI, Cleveland, OH, Washington, D.C.

Hosea Williams, Director of National Mobilization for the Washington Poor People's Campaign, informs each project leader of their immediate supervisors of mobilization.

Acknowledgement of Condolences

A standard form of an acknowledgment response, in reference to the receipt of condolences, is highlighted in this document.

Letter from MLK to Herman Strase


Dr. King writes to Mr. Herman Strase expressing his appreciation for an earlier letter that including sentiments to extend justice to all people regardless of race. The Reverend states that he agrees with Strase regarding the demand of Christianity in the expression of compassion and love for all people, no matter their race.

Letter of Support to MLK While In Jail

Tuesday, October 31, 1967
Connecticut (CT), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Silas Townsend wrote this letter to Dr. King upon his jailing in Birmingham in 1967. Townsend writes how appropriate it is that Dr. King is jailed on All Saints Day.

Letter from Julian Bond to Voters

Atlanta, GA

Georgia State Representative Julian Bond requests support for his Georgia House of Representatives re-election bid. Mr. Bond elaborates on planks in his campaign platform concerning education, housing, and employment. Bond was also a long time civil rights activist who helped found the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Paix, Bonheur, Sante et Amour pour l'an 1960

Friday, January 1, 1960

Dr. King received this card from the editor of the French tabloid Paris-Jour (Paris Day). The headline reads, "Peace, Happiness, Health and Love for the Year 1960."


Dr. King defines the doctrine monarchianism as "a doctrine stressing the unity of the Godhead as against the ultimately prevailing tendency to affirm personal distinctions within the Godhead."

Letter from F. N. Campbell to Ralph David Abernathy

Washington, D.C.

In this letter F. N. Campbell commends Abernathy for his dignified and effective handling of the first phase of the People's March in Washington, DC. It is his hope to utilize the climate of response following Dr. King's assassination. To this end, he proposes the establishment of a foundation in memory of Dr. King.

Pinn Memorial Baptist Church

Sunday, September 11, 1960
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

This program outlines the Sunday morning worship service for Pinn Memorial Baptist Church. Dr. King is featured as a guest speaker to deliver a sermon on September 11, 1960.

American Negro Concert Pianist Undertakes 100 Cites Tour in Support of Haiti's Pan American Festival of the New World

HAITI, Washington, D.C., SENEGAL

Ambassador Bonhomme announces the Pan American Festival of the New World, proposed and implemented by Negro-American Concert Pianist Robert Pritchard. The festival's inauguration was held in Haiti in the summer of 1969. The event attracted students in the "Pan American hemisphere." The festival's main features focused on the establishment of three summer schools.

SCLC Newsletter: March-April 1966

Alabama (AL), SWEDEN, Hawaii (HI), New York (NY)

This is an example of one of many SCLC Newsletters printed for public distribution. In this third volume, topics include: Bloody Sunday, Dr. King Thanks Sweden, Man with a Plan, Abernathy Tells Hawaii of Brotherhood, and several others.

Letter from Norman R. Snook to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967
Ohio (OH)

Mr. Norman Snook of the United Christian Center invites Dr. King to come preach at the Ohio State University United Chapel.

Bold Design for a New South

Saturday, March 30, 1963
Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Mississippi (MS), North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King notes that civil rights has been replaced as the "Number One" domestic issue, dwarfed by the Cuban missile crisis, trade legislation and tax reform. He attributes this to public acceptance of tokenism as well as an overly cautious administration. While acknowledging that the administration has made greater efforts on civil rights than previous ones, Dr. King says the progress is constricted and confined.

Telegram from Duncan Wood to MLK

Thursday, September 28, 1967

Dr. King receives a telegram from Duncan Wood in Geneva, Switzerland concerning upcoming international trips.

Letter from Henry S. Huntington Expressing Concerned About Vietnam

Saturday, February 17, 1968
New York, NY

Huntington expresses deep concern regarding the Vietnam War. Huntington believes that humor and ridicule is a weapon against the war that is being used too little. He urges Dr. King and his supporters to each send a message to the president, and also write a letter to the local paper asking peace-lovers to state a message ridiculing President Johnson. In conclusion, Huntington hopes to gain other peace organizations to join in the Ridicule For Johnson Movement.

The Museum of Negro History and Art 1967 Calendar

Sunday, January 1, 1967
Chicago, IL, Pennsylvania (PA), CANADA, Ohio (OH), Tennessee (TN), Missouri (MO), Virginia (VA), New Orleans, LA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), Texas (TX), Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C., Baltimore, MD

Distributed by the Museum of Negro History and Art, this calendar was used by Coretta Scott King and contains biographies of famous African American musicians. Mrs. King studied at the New England Conservatory to be an opera singer. On this calendar, she also marked April 27th as "my birthday."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, November 25, 1964
New York, NY, Berlin, Germany, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Joan Daves sends Dr. King an issue of Cuadernos, which printed a Spanish version of his Berlin address about President Kennedy. A copy of "Why We Can't Wait" is sold to Figaro Litteraire.

Inauguration Response by J. Lynwood Gresham

Friday, November 10, 1967

This document is the inauguration response delivered by Dr. J. Lynwood Gresham of Barber-Scotia College.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Charles B. McConnell

Thursday, October 31, 1963
New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King thanks Rev. McConnell for his words of encouragement and financial contribution following the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King explains that Americans of all races and ethnicities must join together in this common cause to achieve American community.

The Servant of Jehovah

Dr. King writes that Isaiah 41:1-6 seems to describe the servant of the Lord as the personification of Israel, whose task is to bring peace and prosperity to Israel and knowledge of Him to the entire world.