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Letter from Norma Lineberger to MLK

Tuesday, December 17, 1963

Mrs. Lineberger encloses a financial contribution for Dr. King to use for his personal well-being. She states that the gift is in memory of the late President Kennedy with hopes that his death will result in a unified stride "toward the good life."

Telegram from Community Leaders to Dr. King

Sunday, October 22, 1967

This telegram is requesting that Dr. King contact certain prominent politicians to urge their support for funding "rent supplements" and "model citizens" programs.

The New York Times: Books of The Times Storm Warnings

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

Eliot Fremont-Smith examines Dr. King's stance on the term of Black Power, his views on political power for Negroes and his focus on nonviolence.

Letter to MLK from Philip L. Estrada about Operation Breadbasket Milwaukee

Phillip Estrada, the editor of the Milwaukee Star News, request Dr. King's presence in support of the Breadbasket Operation. Estrada describes this growing organization as one that has made an impression on Milwaukee. He hopes that Dr. King will deliver words of encouragement to keep the morale up and to show his support.

Hegel

Dr. King documents a quote from philosopher Thomas Hegel regarding God and knowledge before commenting with his own thoughts.

Knowledge

Dr. King notes several New Testament passages that pertain to knowledge.

Note from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, September 4, 1963

A representative of Joan Daves is enclosing a check for $120 for the Spanish edition of the book "Stride Toward Freedom."

Manichaeism

Dr. King describes Manichaeism, a religion and philosophical doctrine that originated in Persia.

Letter from Leslie Orear to MLK

Wednesday, March 22, 1967

Leslie Orear requests Dr. King's assistance with judging the eight candidates for the Russell Bull Scholarship.

Letter from J. Carter Fahy to Mr. Roy Wilkins about NAACP Name Change

Friday, July 28, 1967

In this letter to the president of the NAACP, Fahy suggests changing the name of the NAACP to NAABA, replacing "colored people" with "Black Americans."

Letter from Helen Ramirez to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967

Helen Ramirez of The Brunswick Foundation informs Dr. King that they cannot donate to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from MLK to Alan Bible

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Alan Bible, a United States Senator from Nevada, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Harper & Row to Joan Daves regarding "Why We Can't Wait"

Monday, May 11, 1964

Harper & Row informs Joan Daves about the receipt of the quote on Dr. King from Harry Golden, Editor of the Carolina Israelite.

Letter from Helen White to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967

Ms. White seeks the opinion of Dr. King for her research on American Aristocracy.

Letter from MLK to Leslie Dunbar

Monday, August 22, 1966

Dr. King writes to Dr. Leslie Dunbar to assure her that the SCLC was indeed ready and able to administer CEP Grant Funds for that school year.

Letter from Charles Wallace to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1967

Charles Wallace, a retired white high school teacher from California, offers his support to Dr. King for the implementation of the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. Wallace emphasizes that he has been a faithful supporter and participant in the civil rights movement. Wallace proposes to assist in the mobilization efforts to structure the campaign.

Letter from John Conyers to MLK

Monday, December 28, 1964

John Conyers, Congressman-Elect for the first district of Michigan, writes Dr. King seeking advice and endorsement for his campaign.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to the Mapp and Welch Families

Thursday, February 2, 1967

Dr. and Mrs. Coretta Scott King express their condolences to the Mapp and Welch Families, and the West Hunter Street Baptist Church.

Letter From MLK Concerning the Sustainability of SCLC

Addressing the recipients of this letter as "Friends", Dr. King shares the triumphs and struggles of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference while on its continuous quest for civil rights. He concludes the message by encouraging readers to contribute support to this "urgent moral crusade".

How to Believe in a Good God in the Midst of Glaring Evil

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "How to Believe in a Good God in the Midst of Glaring Evil." In this sermon, King asserts that in many instances the facts of life contradicts a believer's faith, and poses reasons why one should hold firm to their faith.

Abstract of "The Role of the Behavioral Scientist in the Civil Rights Movement"

This document is an abstract entitled "The Role of the Behavioral Scientist in the Civil Rights Movement," with references to Dr. King's viewpoint.

Letter from Mary Meeks to MLK

Saturday, August 14, 1965

Mrs. Meeks praises Dr. King for his nonviolent approach. She describes Dr. King as a "man of God" and believes that he is also a servant of God.

Letter from James P. Twomey to P. N. Brownstein

Monday, September 23, 1968

James Twomey writes P. N. Brownstein to express his pleasure in receiving Mr. Brownstein's letter informing him of the $4,000,000 the FHA-HUD has allocated for the housing rehabilitation program that Dr. King proposed.

Old Bull, The Great Violinist

Dr. King relates the mishap of a great violinist, during a concert, to the general act of overcoming obstacles in life.

The United States and Eastern Asia: The Report of a Conference of Asian Scholars

Thursday, December 28, 1967

Harry D. Gideonse, President of Freedom House, sends Dr. King two reports concerning international relations between the United States and Asia. The first of the two is a report on the international policies that have been implemented between Western nations and the countries of Asia. The second is a report that tracks the progress of freedom throughout those regions.

Jeremiah

In this series of ten notecards, Dr. King breaks down the Book of Jeremiah into mutiple sections, including chapters and versus regarding Good, knowledge, sin, and forgiveness.

Letter from SNCC Communication Director Horace Julian Bond to MLK

Sunday, May 31, 1964

Horace Bond, writing on behalf of the Council of Federated Organizations, asks Dr. King to join other civil rights organizations in writing a letter to President Johnson to support the organization's bid for a meeting with the President.

Letter from Grace Graham to MLK

Tuesday, June 18, 1963

Grace Graham, Chairman in the School of Education extends an invitation for Dr. King to give a series of lectures at several colleges in the Northwest. In addition to the University Oregon, other colleges include Montana State and Portland State.

Letter from David Morgan to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

David Morgan writes this letter of condolence to Coretta Scott King following Dr. King's assassination.

Bloody Sunday

Dr. King recollects events that occurred on "Bloody Sunday" in Selma, Alabama as 525 blacks marching were tear-gassed, clubbed, and beaten by police officers and discusses how television helped the Civil Rights Movement. King asserts that the television helps us all be participants in vital matters and it adds trust and validity to the movement.