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Anonymous Postcard to MLK

This postcard refers to 5 men arrested for exhibiting "black power."

MLK Address at Mass Meeting in Eutaw, Alabama

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Dr. King challenges the Negro residents of Eutaw, Alabama to participate in the upcoming SCLC Poor People's Campaign. In this address, he urges the citizens of Eutaw to occupy Washington, D.C. in an effort to press Congress for a redistribution of wealth in America. He urges, "All ye who are tired of segregation and discrimination, come unto us. All ye who are overworked and underpaid, come unto us."

People in Action: A Look To 1964

Saturday, January 4, 1964

Dr. King writes this article looking forward to the new year of 1964. He notes that all the activity and accomplishments in 1963 set the tone for what is to come in the following year. Though "the Negro as a community has increased his skills tremendously in quantity and quality," there is still much work to be done. King references the civil rights legislation that currently stands before Congress. Among other topics, he also states that there are efforts to broaden the power of the Negro consumer market.

Letter to MLK Regarding Opposing Views

Friday, August 18, 1967

The author of this letter expresses opposition towards Dr. King's civil disobedience methodologies, believing that civil disobedience is "contrary to God."

Intervention Anyone? A New Look at Social Action

Dr. Hans B. C. Spiegel wrote this piece to describe the different components of social action. Dr. Spiegel, the Director of the Center for Community Tensions at Springfield College, uses the Montgomery and Albany Movements as examples of various levels of social intervention. He also references the SCLC, the Fair Employment Practices Commission, and the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity.

Jesus Christ (Two Natures)

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's notion of the "two natures of Christ." Reinhold Niebuhr was a scholastic mentor of Dr. King and was therefore cited in several of his theological works.

Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

Dr. King delivers a sermon that urges his listeners to search for their purpose in life. He requests that his younger listeners attend school and strive for higher education. He stresses to not let the color of their skin keep them from achieving their dreams.

Statement by MLK in San Francisco

Tuesday, May 26, 1964

Dr. King gives an address in San Francisco regarding race relations, equality, and segregation. Dr. King charges people from all communities to unite so that hope can be created for others.

Letter from Pamela Schnida to MLK

Thursday, October 10, 1067

Pamela Schnida writes to Dr. King requesting information on the riots that occurred in 1967.

Four Top Rights Leaders Considering Africa Trip

Monday, December 18, 1967

Roy Wilkins, Dr. King, Whitney Young, and A. Philip Randolph, four of America's top civil rights leaders, are considering making a trip to Africa to stop the war in Nigeria. These leaders also serve as members on the call committee of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa.

Letter from Bruce Macdonald to MLK

Monday, October 2, 1967

Brice Macdonald, a writer for Canada's national newspaper "The Globe and Mail," informs Dr. King that he will be travelling to the South to see how it is developing. Macdonald inquires if he can converse with Dr. King or any of his employees who are well informed on the situation in Southern regions.

Letter from Judy Palmer to MLK

Saturday, January 6, 1968

Judy Palmer agrees with Dr. King concerning the traffic jam in Washington D.C, and asks if Dr. King can befriend the White House.

The Servant of Jehovah

Dr. King writes that Isaiah 41:1-6 seems to describe the servant of the Lord as the personification of Israel, whose task is to bring peace and prosperity to Israel and knowledge of Him to the entire world.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi S. Burr Yampol

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Rabbi Yampol, Chairman of the National Committee to Combat Nazism, for sending a copy of his organization's resolution.

Letter from Swedish Student Katarina Andersson to MLK

Wednesday, February 17, 1965

Katarina Andersson, a young Swedish girl, thanks Dr. King for the inspiration his book "Why We Can't Wait" has provided her. She expresses her keen interest in the American civil rights movement and her hope to study in the United States in the future.

Letter from Gregory Williams to MLK

Thursday, February 29, 1968

Eleven-year-old Gregory Williams expresses his admiration and support for Dr. King's leadership in the Civil Rights Movement.

Man

Dr. King quotes Jonathan Swift’s scathing assessment of man.

Letter to MLK from F.D. Patterson regarding Differences of Opinion

Monday, April 17, 1967

The president of Phelps-Stokes Fund writes to encourage Dr. King to meet annually with other Negro leaders for a discussion on their differences of opinion.

Evil (Psalm)

Dr. King notes that Psalm 73 raises the question of why the wicked prosper and suggests that the only solution for the mystery of evil is faith.

Letter from the President and Vice President of United Oil Co., Inc. 1968

In this letter, executives of the United Oil Company enclose gross profits from one day of operation for two of their Los Angeles gas stations. The executives also express their support for Dr. King and his dream.

Letter from Vivian C. Kelley to MLK and President Kennedy

Vivian C. Kelley offers her support to Dr. King in his continued efforts in the Civil Rights Movement. Mrs. Kelley shares with Dr. King a letter in which she asks President John F. Kennedy to address issues of discrimination in the United States. In response to Mrs. Kelly, Lee C. White, Assistant Special Counsel to the President, expresses thanks on the behalf of President John F. Kennedy and assures Mrs. Kelley the President and the Administration are dedicated to ending discrimination and securing the Constitutional Rights of all Americans.

The Wells Newsletter: January 1964

Tuesday, October 15, 1963

This publication, to which Dr. King subscribed, discusses global issues such as Russian Communism, Marxism, the status of the United States economy, and Negroes in college.

Letter from George Field to Ms. McDonald

Tuesday, November 12, 1963

Mr. Fields requests advance text of remarks Dr. King is to give at the Twenty-second Freedom House Anniversary Dinner. The Freedom House Dinner receives major attention from the media and boasts a guest list of influential opinion makers.

Letter from Irene Bryson to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

Mrs. Bryson introduces herself as a former neighbor of the King family on Auburn Avenue and recalls fond memories during those years. She compliments Dr. King "as a God sent preacher," and cites biblical scriptures for him to incorporate in his public speaking. Bryson states, teaching God's word "is what it is going to take to help this sin sick world we are living in."

Letter from Johann R. Goelz to MLK

Tuesday, May 7, 1963

Johann R. Goelz highlights the spiritual irony that Dr. King's has the same name of the historical Martin Luther. Mr. Goelz served as a former Lutheran pastor in Germany and expounds on the religious realities of Jesus Christ.

John F. Kennedy Award Dinner for MLK

Thursday, October 1, 1964

The Catholic Interracial Council sponsors the John F. Kennedy Dinner for Dr. King. The Master of Ceremonies will be Sister Mary William and will take place at the Pick-Congress Hotel.

Letter from Manley Brudvig to MLK about an Autograph

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

In this letter Manley Brudvig asks Dr. King for his autograph on the enclosed Newsweek cover.

Chicago Freedom Movement on Open City Reform

The Chicago Freedom Movement requests that the city's mayor equally enforces the Chicago Fair Housing Ordinace.

Crusade for Citizenship

Friday, October 21, 1966

This check was issued to Chauncey Williams for his assistance with the Crusade For Citizenship's voter registration campaign.

Telegram from Thich Nhat Hanh to MLK

Thich Nhat Hanh expresses his support for Dr. King and conveys his desire to meet with Dr. King during his upcoming visit to Atlanta.