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"BRAZIL"

Letter from Rev. Thurman Goodman to MLK

In this letter, Mr. Goodman writes Dr. King inquiring about a position in a new organization in Oakland, CA that works to uplift the black race.

Letter from Abdul Razak Ahmad to MLK

Friday, August 26, 1966

Abdul Razak Ahmad requests a message of support from Dr. King for an upcoming event. Ahmad is the president of the University of Singapore's Socialist Club. This letter praises Dr. King for his leadership and also discusses racial problems in Singapore.

Stokely Carmichael Requests MLK Photo

Thursday, October 20, 1966

Julia Polk of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, asks for an autographed photo of Dr. King for Stokely Carmichael's collection.

A Christmas Sermon

Sunday, December 24, 1967

Dr. King discusses the topics of peace, the state of mankind, and his vision for the future during the delivery of this sermon to the congregation of Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

Lette from Alta Yount to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

Alta Yount expresses her approval of a speech that Dr. King delivered. She also requests some copies of it.

Letter from Ruth E. Foster to MLK

Monday, March 11, 1968

Mrs. Foster writes Dr. King expressing doubt in his nonviolent methods. She feels his nonviolent marches are an ineffective way to gain equality for Negroes.

Letter from George Y. Sodowick to MLK

Saturday, February 10, 1968

George Sodowick expresses to Dr. King disapproval of the planned Poor Peoples Campaign of 1968. Sodowick suggests that, instead of occupying Washington, the demonstrators should settle in and enhance "riot torn cities."

Letter from MLK to Miss Read

In this handwritten draft letter, Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Miss Read's "interest in and support of our work and the American Negroes [sic] struggle for freedom and dignity."

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King cites Vergilius Ferm’s “First Chapters in Religious Philosophy.”

Letter from Robert L. Green to Mr. James Harrison

Tuesday, November 28, 1967

The Chicago Adult Education Department provides the Behavior Research Laboratories with the needed funds to amend the budget for their contract. Robert L. Green provides Mr. James Harrison with the distribution location for this contribution.

"One Solitary Life"

The document, shown here, contains a narrative describing Jesus, entitled "One Solitary Life." Dr. King would use this narrative, in one of his last and most famous sermons "The Drum Major Instinct." The sermon was delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church, February 4, 1968, exactly two months before his untimely assassination.

"The Drum Major Instinct" Ebenezer Baptist Church

Sunday, February 4, 1968

The Drum Major Instinct, a sermon delivered by Dr. King at the Atlanta Ebenezer Baptist Church, frames the “instinct” as being responsible for the social ills of the world. Dr. King proclaims that racial inequality in America and the war in Vietnam are the result of nations engaging in a “bitter colossal contest for supremacy.” He suggests that the only way to end this “suicidal thrust” is to abide by an altered definition of the instinct – the definition of Jesus Christ.

Letter from Alfred K. Barr to MLK

Tuesday, February 22, 1966

Alfred Barr, of the Cosmopolitan Club of the University of Georgia Athens, invites Dr. King to speak at their campus, citing the fact that Dr. King was the only Nobel Prize winner from Georgia.

SCLC Press Release About a Mississippi Political Rally

Thursday, February 8, 1962

This press release describes a political rally of Negro voters in Clarksdale, Mississippi at which Dr. King spoke. It declares the need for voter registration and the possibility for Mississippi to have as many as five African-American congressmen in Washington.

Is Dr. King Used as Soviet Decoy?

This article discusses Dr. King's forthcoming visit to Russia to speak with representatives from the US and North and South Vietnam. Dr. King seeks to assist in ending the war in Vietnam; however, onlookers do not think his actions will lead to positive results.

Letter from Ms. McDonald to Ms. Elinor G. Galusha

Thursday, October 27, 1966

In this letter dated October 28, 1966, Ms. McDonald tells Ms. Galusha that she may use an excerpt from Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech.

Letter from Ted Bleecker to MLK

Thursday, December 29, 1966

Ted Bleecker, Director of Publications for the United Federation of Teachers, extends gratitude to Dr. King for his statement in the Federation's 50th anniversary issue. Enclosed is a copy of the issue in which Dr. King congratulates the Federation, draws comparisons between the attitudes of the Federation and the Civil Rights Movement, and thanks them for receipt of the John Dewey Award.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, May 26, 1965

Joan Daves asks Dora McDonald about obtaining a copy of the speech Dr. King made to the New York City Bar Association.

Letter from Cranor F. Graves to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967

Cranor F. Graves expresses his gratitude to Dr. King for greeting him on the plane. He encloses a copy of Pope Paul 's Easter encyclical. He also extends his best wishes to Mrs. King.

Statement on Selma-Montgomery March of March 21-26

Monday, April 26, 1965

Sister Mary Leoline reflects upon her participation in the Selma-Montgomery March as a positive experience.

Letter from MLK to Kenneth Keating

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

In this dictation by Dr. King, he expresses gratitude to the Honorable Kenneth B. Keating for his leadership in securing the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Speaking Out

Dr. King discusses the roles of Civil Rights leaders. He states that leaders do not control crime but have the responsibility of maintaining discipline. Dr. King reminds his audience that the Negro was the creator of nonviolence.

Letter from Annis Pratt to MLK

Saturday, January 13, 1968

Professor Annis Pratt of Spelman College writes about her support for the proposed Poor People's Campaign. She suggests that the problems traditionally associated with race may be more economic in nature, and encloses a check from her husband and herself for the march.

Letter from John H. Scott to MLK

John H. Scott writes Dr. King regarding his planned trip to the Holy Land. Scott expresses his admiration for Dr. King and seeks to join the tour.

Letter from John A. McDermott Copied to Al Raby and MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967

John A. McDermott, Executive Director of the Catholic Interracial Council, writes to Al Raby and Dr. King. Mr. McDermott describes the Council's involvement with the Chicago Freedom Movement. Mr. McDermott also expresses his appreciation for Mr. Raby and Dr. King's support in the fight for fair housing legislation in Chicago. McDermott goes on to describe the Movement struggle with the controversial Atomic Energy Commission project in Weston, Illinois.

Letter from John H. Telfer to MLK

Saturday, March 13, 1965

Mr. Telfer, a 6th grade teacher, offers his sincerest gratitude for Dr. King and his efforts to eradicate injustice. He includes an additional thanks to Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth, a fellow civil rights leader.

Letter from Abram Eisenman to MLK

Abram Eisenman, a 1968 candidate for President of the United States, requested Dr. King's assistance in his campaign for the New Hampshire ballot.

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Robert Kennedy writes to Dr. King to express his support for the Civil Rights Movement and the strive to preserve the basic values of freedom and dignity throughout the world. Lastly, Robert Kennedy sends Dr. King a series of speeches he made in January and wish to hear Dr. King's reactions to them.

National Sharecroppers Fund Annual Report

Frank P. Graham, chairman of the National Sharecropper's Fund, mails out two separate articles from The New York Times and The New York Post that referencing the organization which supports migrant farm workers. Graham provides factual information pertaining to the proposed legislation to improve living standards for farm workers, and communicates the need for such a proposal.

Folder

The folder, shown here, contained a sermon of Dr. King entitled "Paul's Letter to American Christians." This address was one of Dr. King's well-known sermons.