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Royalties Summary to MLK from J. Campe

Wednesday, October 5, 1966

Here J. Campe itemizes the income from Dr. King's various publications including "Why We Can't Wait," "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Strength to Love", for a total of $2202.26.

Ontology

Dr. King poses the ontological question "What is being itself?" and quotes Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology."

Brunner & Niebuhr

Dr. King relates Swiss theologian Emil Brunner to American theologian Reinhold Niebuhr, in that they both argue that reason is for adjusting to the material world, and faith is for dealing with God.

The Annual Men's Fellowship

This pamphlet lists the order of procedures for the Friendship Baptist Church Annual Men's fellowship.

Letter from William T. Murphy to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Mr. Murphy, a representative of the United States Congress, writes to Dr. King to convey his intentions to support the House of Judiciary Committee Voting Rights bill.

Letter from Nina Brown of Penn State to Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 7, 1965

Nina Brown writes Dora McDonald in preparation for Dr. King's visit to speak at Pennsylvania State University. She further inquires about logistics pertaining to Dr. King's speech, publicity and members of his party.

Support Letter to MLK

Thursday, February 1, 1962

A Jewish man sends Dr. King a letter expressing his support for "Stride Toward Freedom" and informing Dr. King about his connection to the black community.

Leibnitz's Doctrine of Evil

Dr. King cites Albert C. Knudson's "Doctrine of Redemption."

Letter from Nina Brown to MLK

Friday, January 22, 1965

Nina C. Brown writes Dr. King expressing appreciation on behalf of Pennsylvania State University for his visit to the institution. Additionally, she wishes Dr. King much success in his continued efforts to achieve civil rights.

Letter from Emily Fortson to Andrew Young

Saturday, February 25, 1967

Emily Fortson of Concreta Tours Incorporated sends Reverend Andrew Young an itinerary for an upcoming conference. Fortson also requests several materials to be included in a letter being formed to invite Dr. King to the conference.

Letter of Commitment to Reverend Jesse Jackson from John Wooten

Friday, February 10, 1967

John Wooton expresses the commitment of the Negro Industrial Economic Union towards the efforts of Reverend Jesse Jackson and SCLC's Operation Breadbasket.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Jack Delano

Tuesday, July 6, 1965

Dr. King accepts Mr. Delano's invitation to appear for an hour on WIPR-TV during his visit to Puerto Rico.

Letter from Joan Daves to Ms. Dora McDonald

Thursday, July 16, 1964

Joan Daves tells Dora McDonald that she had tentatively spoken to Dr. King about accepting the invitation to speak at The University Settlement award ceremony. She asks Ms. McDonald if she would keep the date for the engagement should he be able to attend. Daves also requests a copy of Dr. King's itinerary.

Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March

Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and Floyd McKissick sign the Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March, which represents a "public indictment and protest of the failure of American society." In solidarity, they demand courses of actions to deal with voting fraud, strengthened civil rights legislation, and impartial application of the law.

The Nation: Fumbling on the New Frontier by MLK

Saturday, March 3, 1962

Dr. King elaborates on a report regarding civil rights and the collective efforts with the Kennedy Administration to eradicate racial discrimination. The Executive Orders from President Kennedy are unprecedented as he is attempting to eliminate employment discrimination and has appointed Negroes to key government positions. In an effort not to move "too fast," the President's legislative programs have now commenced a pace that is parallel with the consensus. Dr.

1965 Human Rights Day Flyer

This flyer advertises a rally to benefit South African victims of apartheid.

Letter from MLK to Thomas J. Dodd

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Senator Thomas J. Dodd's support in the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Black Power: The Politics of Liberation in America

Stokely Carmichael and Dr. Charles Hamilton are in partnership with SNCC to promote the Black Power Movement. SNCC creates "freedom gifts" to provide the community with the expression of the "humanistic spirit" and goal of the movement. These freedom gifts range from posters, poetry, calendars, and more.

Answers in the American Way

Monday, March 25, 1968

This text derives from a television show outlining the facts of the Black Panther Party. In attendance were civil rights activist like Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, H. Rapp Brown and their affiliates within the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter to MLK Requesting Information to Rebut Allegations of Communist Affiliation

Wednesday, February 16, 1966

Ernest O. Norquist, Director of the Commission on Religion and Race of the Illinois Synod of the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A., commends Dr. King for his recent speech at Illinois Wesleyan University. He alerts Dr. King of the Birch Society’s attempts to spread allegations of his communist’s affiliations, and recommends a booklet refuting the charges and offers to help prepare and print it. Norquist requests a meeting with Dr. King in Chicago for himself, and other executive members of the Illinois Council of Churches to discuss how they can support Dr. King’s work.

Letter from O. O. Rabb to MLK

Monday, March 27, 1967

This note and newspaper clipping from O.O. Robb was addressed to "The Right Reverend Martin Luther King, Pastor & Civil Rights Agitator." Robb assures Dr. King that he would, in fact, find supporters, "for there are many soft-headed wild-eyed people who have a soft heart and no brains who will follow." Robb contines that President Johnson's Great Society and War on Poverty must go on and ends that Dr. King and his supporters will get their reward - a prison cell.

Telegram from MLK to Richard Maguire of the DNC

Dr. King informs Richard Maguire of the Democratic National Committee that he is unable to accept an invitation to the pre-inaugural dinner.

Letter to Ralph David Abernathy from Allen L. Johnson

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

Southern Christian Leadership Conference board member Allen L. Johnson wrote this letter to Rev. Abernathy shortly after Dr. King's death. Johnson expressed his support of Rev. Abernathy's leadership of the organization.

Brotherhood

Dr. King quotes Richard Henry Tawney's "Religion and the Rise of Capitalism."

Letter from MLK to Yves Montand

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Dr. King thanks Mr. Montand of France, for his financial contribution as well as his personal support for the success of the movement in the United States.

Letter from R. Elliot of B.M. Heede, Inc. to MLK

Thursday, February 8, 1968

This letter is an inquiry and request for feedback on the redevelopment plans of Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Letter from Blanche Shropshire to MLK

Saturday, November 11, 1967

Mrs. Shropshire expresses her gratitutde to Dr. King for his inspiring words at an address delivered in Buffalo, New York.

Address by MLK at 47th NAACP Annual Convention

Wednesday, June 27, 1956

Dr. King addresses the audience at the 47th NAACP annual convention in San Francisco, California. King begins with background information of slavery and its physical and mental effects on Africans, then tells the "Montgomery Story." This story begins with a mental transformation among blacks, which led to the Montgomery boycott. As a result of the boycott, blacks were empowered and began fighting injustice and seeking changes in unfair legislation.

Letter from Gitta Badeker to Dora McDonald

Friday, June 2, 1967

Ms. Badeker informs Dora McDonald that three copies of a contract with Econ Verlag are enclosed. She instructs that Dr. King is to sign and return the copies in order to further the German-language rights to "Where Do We Go from Here?"

Letter from Joan Daves to Clarence Jones

Friday, October 30, 1964

Joan Daves writes to Dr. King's attorney to discuss her receipt of the Martin Luther King Treasury published by the Educational Heritage. Impressed with the volume, Daves proceeds to give details on its organization and content. Raising the issue of whether certain material is in the public domain, Daves offers to expedite the copyright assignment process.