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"BRAZIL"

Letter from MLK to Robert McDougal, Jr.

Tuesday, December 14, 1965

Dr. King thanks Robert McDougal, Jr. for his contribution and support to SCLC and the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.

The People Speak

Tuesday, December 20, 1966

The neighborhood residents initiate a self-reliant program entitled, "Self-Help Policy-67 Model", due to the inadequacies within the federal government's Anti-poverty Program and the War on Poverty Program. These individuals are considered "The New Breed" and are working to cease their economic disparities. They correlate the biblical story of Nicodemus to associate the promised land of economic freedom.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to John H. Calhoun

Dr. and Mrs. King deliver their condolences for the recent passing of Mason, brother of John H. Calhoun. The Kings informs Mr. Calhoun that he is not alone in his hour of mourning and that the community is also suffering this great loss.

Letter from Elsa Wischkaemper McIntyre to MLK

Sunday, November 3, 1963

Elsa McIntyre writes to Dr. King to seek information on how to contribute to his organization. Mrs. McIntyre was moved by Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech and inquires about obtaining a copy.

Letter to Rev. Malcolm Calhoun to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968

Dr. King appreciates Rev. Calhoun's concern for the SCLC and the mission the organization has for the creating equality. Dr. King then explains how other programs offer contributions to the SCLC so that they may continue to engage in education, voter registration, economic development, and training of ministers for urban ministries.

Ritschl, Albrecht

Dr. King provides a biographical sketch of German theologian Albrecht Ritschl.

Letter from Arthur L. Baney to the SCLC

Thursday, June 24, 1965

Arthur Baney writes the SCLC on behalf of Eastman Dillon, Union Securities & Company regarding five shares of General Electric Company stock that was gifted to the SCLC by Mary Cushing H. Niles.

Anonymous Adverse Letter

Thursday, April 6, 1967

An anonymous writer sends Dr. King this adverse letter equating Dr. King to a gorilla he saw at the zoo.

Letter from MLK to Franklin D. Roosevelt III about Contribution

Wednesday, March 1, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Mr. Roosevelt regarding a contribution he made to the SCLC.

Letter from Pastor William A. Lawson to MLK

Sunday, September 25, 1966

Pastor Bill Lawson writes Dr. King seeking his help with spreading the Civil Rights Movement in Houston. He asks King to establish a permanent SCLC office in Houston and engage in nonviolent demonstrations.

Vietnam and Beyond

This program for the Ecumenical and Community Conference held at the Thornfield Conference Center in Cazenovia, New York, highlights leaders from across the globe invited to attend the conference. These leaders were invited to support the efforts in Vietnam and assess policies regarding the country.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Monday, June 20, 1966

Ernest Shaefer, Executive Secretary of the Hadley Executive Committee corresponds with Dora McDonald to arrange a date for Dr. King to address the committee. Shaefer provides a list of available dates from which Dr. King can select.

Fund Raiser Event for the SCLC

Mrs. Richard Gile expresses her admiration to Dr. King for his work with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. The La Fleurs Garden Club wishes to sponsor a Benefit Freedom Tea event to raise money for the SCLC.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Jaggart to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967

Mr and Mrs. C. Jaggart express how much they enjoyed one of Dr. King's messages.

Albany Movement Position Paper

Tuesday, July 17, 1962

The Albany Movement expresses the damages of segregation and outlines their requests for peaceful integration.

Letter from William H. Gray to Eugene Rhoads

Friday, April 19, 1963

William H. Gray encloses an article regarding advice given to Dr. King by Billy Graham. Graham admits that he "is not a thoroughgoing integrationist. "

Statement by MLK on Perjury Charges

Wednesday, February 17, 1960

Dr. King addresses his indictment for perjury supposedly related to improperly filed Alabama state tax returns. He points out that the tax auditor who assured him that his returns were accurate is the person bringing the charges. He proposes a group of distinguished citizens to review his books and report their findings and concludes by stating that his conscience is clear.

Letter from Clifford Alexander to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968

Clifford Alexander, Chair of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, sends Dr. King a report involving discrimination against Jews in the workplace. According to the report, numerous members of the Jewish community face prejudice from receiving management level jobs in the white collar sector.

Letter from MLK to Brown Brothers Harriman and Company about a Contribution

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

In this letter Dr. King offers his gratitude to the Brown Brothers Harriman and Company for an anonymous contribution of company stock they forwarded. Dr. King also comments on why such contributions are needed.

Letter from MLK To W. H. Jackson

Tuesday, April 24, 1962

Dr. King responds to a letter from W. H. Jackson, regarding the Chicago Sunday Evening club. Mr. Jackson receives information on the possible effects his previous letter may have on Dr. King's white friends.

Letter from MLK to O. J. Tyler

Monday, April 9, 1962

Dr. King thanks Mr. Tyler for his words of encouragement and encloses an autographed photograph. Dr. King also sends his best wishes to the people he encountered in Virginia.

Get Well Letter from Olive Andrews to Mrs. King

Tuesday, September 23, 1958

Dr. King received this kind get well letter from Mrs. Olive Andrews, noting that she and her family prayed for his healing. She, furthermore, expressed that something good might come out of his unfortunate situation.

A Journey of Conscience

In this draft of his 1967 speech, "A Journey of Conscience," Dr. King provides the many reasons he so strongly opposes the war in Vietnam. He writes of how he first felt it was important to remain silent, but gradually felt compelled to speak out, as the US made no initiatives toward peace. He points at that the war abroad takes away our focus on our problems at home, and we must "combine the fervor of the civil rights movement with the peace movement."

Calvin Kytle to Head Information Center for Urban America

This press release revelas that Calvin Kytle will head a new national information center for Urban American, Inc.

Letter from Erma Burton to the Steering Committee of SCLC

Monday, October 3, 1966

Erma Burton stresses the importance of preserving important SCLC documents for the purpose of not only securing information for future research, but so that there will be no misinformation about their own history. She gives guidelines for how the documents should be protected and stored.

Memo from Tom Offenburger to SCLC Field Staff

Wednesday, March 6, 1968

Tom Offenburger released this memo to members of SCLC's field staff concerning the advertisement of the 1968 Poor People's Campaign.

Congratulations To Rev. Martin Luther King And Mrs. King

Thursday, February 24, 1966

An anonymous supporter sends encouraging words to Dr. and Mrs. King.

Letter from Mr. Levison Regarding U.S. Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.

Monday, September 19, 1966

Mr. Levison expresses his support for Representative Powell during the controversial House of Representatives committee chairmanship and ethical dilemma. Levison goes on to defend the suggestion of race being the determining factor of his criticism by volunteering his support of any review of congressional systems.

Letter from Reverend Virgil W. Glanton to SCLC

Saturday, June 18, 1966

In this letter, Reverend Virgil Glanton gives a contribution to SCLC and offers support for the Meredith March.

Monroe, Mich. News, "From the Book Bag"

Monday, June 26, 1967

A review of Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?", was published by the Monroe, Michigan newspaper. The review outlined the positions Dr. King took on the Vietnam War and the Black Power movement. The author of this review considered Dr. King to be "an advocate-articulate, persistent and exhortative." Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" was published and released in 1967.