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The Voter Registration Project of Winston-Salem Presents MLK

Monday, April 13, 1964
North Carolina (NC), Atlanta, GA

This program details the schedule and many sponsors of a Voter Registration Project event in North Carolina, in which Dr. King was the keynote speaker.

God

Dr. King cites a scripture from the biblical book of Isaiah regarding God's grace and mercy.

Letter from H. C. Whitley to MLK

Friday, September 3, 1965
UNITED KINGDOM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

H. C. Huntley invites Dr. King to come speak at St. Giles Cathedral in Scotland during Holy Week.

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "Statements of Wisdom"

This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in cardboard filing boxes in reference to a statement of Wisdom by Charles G. Finney.

Letter from Congressman Adam Clatyon Powell to MLK

Friday, April 16, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Harlem Representative Adam Clayton Powell informs Dr. King that all of the "War on Poverty" hearings will be cancelled until furtherl notice.

God

Dr. King explores the topic of God and quotes the classical scholar Gilbert Murray.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Royalties

Tuesday, October 25, 1966
New York, NY

In this letter, J. Campe encloses royalties for Dr. King's "Why We Can?t Wait," and "Strength to Love."

Oxford Movement

UNITED KINGDOM

Dr. King explains the Oxford Movement, a nineteenth century movement within the Anglican Church.

Letter from MLK to Wesley A. Hotchkiss

Tuesday, March 1, 1966
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks Dr. Wesley A. Hotchkiss from the United Church of Christ for his generous contribution of $11,000 to the SCLC. King includes a list of how they money will be spent to assist with voter registration.

Letter from UN Ambassador Adlai Stevenson to MLK

Friday, November 29, 1963
New York, NY

Adlai Stevenson, the United States Representative to the United Nations, invites Dr. King to attend an upcoming meeting "to discuss current developments" in policy decisions on Africa.

Letter from Student Suzi Breece to MLK

Missouri (MO)

Cuba, Missouri High School freshman Suzi Breece asks Dr. King to send a letter about why civil rights are important to everyone. She hopes to use his statement as part of a class project.

Letter From Christine Heath to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
Texas (TX)

Ms. Christine Heath, a high school student, asks for information on how "Civil Disobedience," by Henry David Thoreau, has affected Dr. King.

Letter from Esther G. Stone to MLK

Sunday, January 21, 1968
Columbus, OH, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

Esther G. Stone writes to Dr. King to express her opinions on Negro leadership, American politics, and the Vietnam War. Stone writes that President Lyndon Johnson has done so much for Negroes and that Mrs. Johnson did not deserve the hurtful remarks of Eartha Kitt.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. J. M. Douglas

Thursday, March 28, 1963
Virginia (VA)

Miss McDonald informs Dr. J. M. Douglas that she has discussed his invitation with Dr. King and that it will be placed in a special folder for further correspondence when there is availability in Dr. King's schedule.

Letter from Thomas Bradley to MLK

Thursday, November 7, 1963
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Los Angeles, CA

Thomas Bradley, Los Angeles' Tenth District Councilman, requests Dr. King's support with a fundraising campaign.

Religion (Ritschl)

Dr. King quotes Albrecht Ritschl's "The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation."

Handwritten notecard regarding Religion

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on religion. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Nobel Lecture Itinerary

Oslo, Norway

This is an itinerary for the King family for the Nobel Peace Prize luncheon and lecture.

Jesus

Dr. King makes reference to Jesus' recognition among those not of the Christian faith.

Who Are We?

Saturday, February 5, 1966
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Florida (FL), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, VIETNAM

In this sermon Dr. King contemplates "who are we?" and "what is man?". He differentiates between the pessimistic attitudes of the materialistic understandings of man and the optimistic attitudes of humanistic definitions of man. King also states that man is neither all good nor all bad, but a combination. Man is both an everlasting miracle and mystery.

Schleiermacher (The Social Implication of Religion)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter from Mary T. Clark to MLK

Wednesday, November 11, 1964
New York (NY)

This letter from the Social Action Secretariat, National Federation of Catholic College Students references an enclosed letter which was issued to all member colleges. The enclosed letter supports student activity in the 1964 Freedom Fast.

Letter to Hubert M. Humphrey from MLK

Friday, January 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Hubert M. Humphrey to praise his "matchless, exhaustive and courageous leadership" in guiding the Civil Rights Act of 1964. For his effort, Dr. King tells Congressman Humphrey that he has earned the "sincere gratitude" of the international community.

Letter from E.B. Putnam to MLK

Washington, D.C.

Mrs. E.B. Putnam writes Dr. King regarding her concerns with the Communist Party's presence in America. She believes they are using race issues to gain power. The author also tells Dr. King that he should focus on leading people to Christ and not on race relations.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Martin Peretz

Wednesday, October 11, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

In this letter, Ms. McDonald informs Dr. Peretz that Dr. King will be able to have lunch with him and that he will be accompanied by Reverend Andrew Young, Reverend Bernard Lee and herself.

A Letter Enclosing an Address by George B. Nesbitt

Thursday, August 3, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

In an address at the CME Church Conference, George B. Nesbitt analyzes the role of the church during the Civil Rights Movement. During slavery, the church was a place of refuge and hope, but now individuals are beginning to lose their faith in the church.

Latitudinarianism

Dr. King defines latitudinarianism, a term "applied to a liberal opinion which allows the diversity of opinion."

Letter from A. Susi to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967
New York, NY

The Local 89 Chefs, Cooks, Pastry Cooks and Assistants Union of New York provided Dr. King with $100 to aid in his work for equality.

Integrating Elementary Schools in Berkeley

Thursday, April 20, 1967
Berkeley, CA, California (CA), New Jersey (NJ)

This article details the integration of several Berkeley area elementary schools. The Presidents of each school give feedback regarding the public's response and their plans on how they will proceed.

James H. Halsey Writes MLK About Alumni Solicitation

Friday, March 15, 1963
Connecticut (CT)

James H. Halsey writes Dr. King about financial support for the University of Bridgeport and its program.