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Statement by Congresswoman Leonor K. Sullivan

Tuesday, November 28, 1967

Congresswoman Leonor K. Sullivan issues a statement on the passing of the Consumer Credit Protection Act of 1967.

Negroes Are Not Moving Too Fast

In this article, Dr. King attempts to refute allegations that Negroes are moving too fast and expect special favors. He states, "the Negro is not going nearly fast enough."

Telegram from Marion Barry and Edward Biking to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1960

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee extends gratitude to Dr. King for his deep commitment to the concept of nonviolence and a free society while he is incarcerated in the Dekalb County Jail.

Telegram from Richard C. Gilman to Dora McDonald

Saturday, November 12, 1966

Richard C. Gilman sends this telegram to Dora McDonald confirming Dr. King's speaking engagement at Occidental College.

Telegram from Morris Abram to MLK

Morris B. Abram expresses his support for Dr. King's efforts in the Civil Rights Movement and shares his outrage towards the police brutality exhibited during a protest in Selma, Alabama.

Letter from MLK to Hazel Gregory

Wednesday, July 24, 1963

Dr. King responds to Hazel Gregory's previous correspondence about transportation to the March on Washington. He informs Mrs. Gregory that he is attending a meeting regarding the logistics of the march the next day and will communicate further about a bus from Montgomery to attend the event.

Letter from Eleanor Allen to MLK

Wednesday, November 20, 1963

Eleanor Allen, Director of Christian Education of the Edgewood Congregational Church, writes Dr. King in an effort to connect with a Pastor of a Negro church that is in need of rebuilding "after the recent bombings."

Letter from Rev. Pavel Titera to MLK

Saturday, December 11, 1965

Pavel Titera responds to a letter from Dr. King, in which he expressed his hope for a coming to visit. Titera sends well wishes for Dr. King and his family, and encloses a photograph of his family "as a token of the brotherly love."


This note card discusses cognition in relation to the context of events.

Confidential Memorandum

This handwritten document outlines plans for the SCLC's Direct Action program. The program will target Birmingham, Alabama, Montgomery, Alabama and Danville, Virginia.

Letter from Ann Pooney to MLK

Ann Pooney expresses her sentiments regarding Dr. King's teachings and the state of African Americans. Pooney feels that most blacks have not proven to be good Christians or citizens of the US.

Letter from Steve Adams to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Steve Adams devotes his support to Dr. King and the nonviolent movement. He mistakenly expresses condolences to Dr. King on the death of his father. However, Dr. King's father "Daddy King" would not pass away until November of 1984.

Telegram from MLK and Mrs. King to Dr. Benjamin E. Mays

Dr. and Mrs. King commend Dr. Benjamin E. Mays for all he has accomplished during his twenty-seven years as President of Morehouse College.

MLK Addresses the District 65 AFL-CIO

Saturday, September 8, 1962

This is an address given by Dr. King to District 65 of the National AFL-CIO Convention in Miami, Beach. Dr. King recognizes their contribution to the Southern Christen Leadership Conference.

Campaign for a World Constitution Leaflet

This pamphlet announces a World Constitutional Convention to be held in Switzerland. Dr. King, who was among the signers of a "Call for a Constitutional Convention," is quoted in the leaflet stating that a world government would lessen tensions.

Telegram from Rev. Ralph Abernathy to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1961

Rev. Ralph Abernathy sends best wishes to Dr. King and everyone affiliated with the Civil Rights Movement. Rev. Abernathy is disheartened because he is not present to assist with the movement, but assures Dr. King that he wants to be an active participant.

Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March

Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and Floyd McKissick sign the Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March, which represents a "public indictment and protest of the failure of American society." In solidarity, they demand courses of actions to deal with voting fraud, strengthened civil rights legislation, and impartial application of the law.

Letter from Gitta Gossman to Dora McDonald

Friday, February 26, 1965

Gitta Gossman forwards Ms. McDonald two copies of the contract for the Dutch-language edition of "Why We Can't Wait" for Dr. King's signature.

Letter From S. I. Hayakawa to MLK

Friday, July 26, 1963

S.I. Hayakawa inquires about a previous contribution to the SCLC and asks if it is tax deductible.

Letter from Women's Society of Tremont Baptist Church to MLK

Wednesday, May 26, 1965

The Women's Society of Tremont Baptist Church informs Dr. King that the money raised during their Women's Day will be forwarded to assist with his work in the South.

Letter from Rowland Koefod to MLK Regarding "Stride Towards Freedom"

Tuesday, February 21, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Koefod requests permission to reproduce a one page of manuscript from Dr. King's "Stride Towards Freedom," for a special issue of Boston University's alumni magazine.

Memorandum from MLK and the World's Fair

Tuesday, April 21, 1964

This is a draft for Dr. King's correspondence regarding the endorsement of the "Stall In" at The World's Fair. The mass demonstration is lead by the Unity Council, of which Dr. King is associated with. Though he does not agree with the demonstration, he assures that his solidarity with the Council members remains.

Letter from Wallace Terry to MLK

Monday, April 8, 1963

The Washington Post anticipates Dr. King's presence as their speaker for the Public Lecture Series "One Hundred Years of Freedom." However, the coordinator of the event, Wallace Terry, understands that Dr. King's imprisonment in the Birmingham jail might prevent Dr. King from appearing. Terry suggests that the Reverends Fred Shuttlesworth, Ralph Abernathy or Wyatt Walker could serve as a substitute. Lastly, Terry pledges to collect an offering for the SCLC.

Letter from Mrs. Frank Summers to SCLC

Monday, April 9, 1962

Mrs. Frank Summers sends contribution to SCLC and wishes to pass on the March SCLC Newsletter.


Dr. King quotes St. Augustine’s “Confessions.”

Letter from Anna Cohen to MLK

Anna Cohen inquires to Dr. King about the involvement of the Jewish community in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Tom Cochran to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1966

Tom Cochran, President of the Young Democrats at the University of Georgia School of Law writes to invite Dr. King to speak as a lecturer. According to Mr. Cochran, the political climate in the state of Georgia has increased the urgency for Dr. King to speak at the institution.

Letter of Appreciation from MLK to Edna R. McKinnon

Wednesday, December 20, 1967

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Edna McKinnon expressing deep appreciation for her generous contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He continues to say that the work of the organization is strengthened by such support.

Letter from MLK to John Frink

Friday, January 5, 1968

In this letter, dated January 5, 1968, Dr. King writes to John A. Frink expressing his gratitude for his contribution to the S.C.L.C.

Help For Nigeria

Saturday, March 25, 1967

Nigeria requests help from Negro civil rights leaders such as Dr. King, Randolph, and Roy Wilkins. Nigerians feel that the hate between the government and its people will result in war.