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MLK Note Card - Schleiermacher, Theology and God-consciousness

The person to whom Dr. King is referring is the German philosopher Friedrich Schleiermacher.

Letter From Kivie Kaplan to MLK

Sunday, February 5, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Kaplan thanks "Coretta and Martin" for their cards and acknowledges the preparation of Dr. King's fourth book.

Memorandum Regarding Civil Rights Complaints

Robert Greene, John Griffin and Ralph Scott make a claim against the state of New York, asserting that they were denied their civil rights and treated unjustly.

Democracy

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Children of Light and the Children of Darkness" on the subject of democracy.

Request for MLK's Autograph

Thursday, October 21, 1965

Thomas Smith, Director of Placement at Saint Peter's College, requests that Dr. King autograph a program for friends of Father McGlinchey.

Letter from Lymell Carter to MLK

Thursday, January 17, 1963

Reverend Lymell Carter, Minister of Wesley Chapel C.M.E. Church, informs Dr. King that the Clarksville community is in need of his appearance. Reverend Carter details the racial demographics of the Tennessee town and the minimal voting capacity of the African American population. He notes the urgency of Dr. King's appearance to assist with the issues of integration and necessary political influence of the black community.

Letter from Angie Elizabeth Shelton to MLK

Mrs. Shelton expresses her gratitude to Dr. King for renewing her faith. After reading one of Dr. King's books, she states that she felt herself beginning to believe. Mrs. Shelton has decided to buy and study "Civil Disobedience" thanks to Dr. King.

Telegram from Andrew Young to the Swedish Ecumenical Council

Andrew Young, Executive Assistant to Dr. King, writes the Swedish Ecumenical Council's Nils Sundholm, informing him that Dr. King can accept his invitation to host a worship service in Sweden in December as part of his trip to Europe.

Sin I and Sin II

Dr. King cites scripture in examining concepts of sin.

WDIX: In Whose Interest Is Changing The Law?

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

This editorial was broadcast on WDIX, a radio station based out of Orangeburg, South Carolina, on March 20, 1968. The piece questions if President Johnson's actions in favor of civil rights were under the pressure of Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael, stating that the Great Society is an danger. The author further argues that the status of African Americans as been largely improved, just "not as quickly" as they would have hoped and that should be good enough.

Letter from MLK to Senator Hiram L. Fong

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King thanks Hawaii Republican Senator Hiram Fong for his role in the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Fong was the first Asian American and Chinese American to become a US Senator.

War- Treitschke

Dr. King quotes Heinrich von Treitschke’s “Politics.”

Letter from Sampson & Sampson to Ms. Dora McDonald

Wednesday, May 1, 1968

Ms. Dora McDonald received this telegram pertaining to Mrs. Coretta Scott King. The sender requests that Mrs. King speak at a political action event in South Carolina. The author of this telegram was running for state senate.

Letter from Saifuddin Ahmed to MLK

Sunday, October 23, 1966

Saifuddin Ahmed writes on behalf of the East Pakistan Student Union inviting Dr. King to speak at their 10th Provincial Conference. The students also express their admiration for Dr. King's dedication and leadership to human rights worldwide.

Outline Written in MLK's Handwriting Entitled: Be Ye Perfect

The document, shown here, is a combination of a handwritten outline and notes for the preparation of a sermon. Under the title, "Be Ye Perfect", Dr. King described Jesus, in relation to rational and moral perfection.

Index Card with Dr. King's Handwritten Theology Notes

This notecard seems to elucidate some of Dr. King's personal insights on the relationship between Christianity and society.This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses. Topics covered include theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches and sermons.

Political Cartoon: Nourishing the Enemy

Thursday, April 20, 1967

This political cartoon satirizes various elements of antiwar protesters regarding Vietnam. The inference is that events and positions originating from those elements are in essence aid and comfort to the enemy. "King Speeches" is prominently displayed.

Funeral Service: Grand Master John Wesley Dobbs

Saturday, September 2, 1961

This program outlines the funeral service of Grand Master John Wesley Dobbs. Mr. Dobbs established a number of civil rights organizations in the Atlanta area and was considered to be a close friend and confidant of Dr. King.

War

Dr. King quotes Napoleon, Gen. Dwight Eisenhower, Gen. Douglas MacArthur, and Gen. Omar Bradley on war as impractical.

Letter from Pastor William A. Lawson to MLK

Sunday, September 25, 1966

Pastor Bill Lawson writes Dr. King seeking his help with spreading the Civil Rights Movement in Houston. He asks King to establish a permanent SCLC office in Houston and engage in nonviolent demonstrations.

Holiday Card from Julius and Gloria

This holiday card was sent in good wishes for the recipient from a Julius and Gloria.

Letter from Taconic Foundation to MLK

Monday, February 4, 1963

Stephen Currier, President of the Taconic Foundation, invites Dr. King to attend a meeting about the development of a new program. Currier lists other individuals who have been invited to serve as consultants and who will provide "an evaluation of Negro gains up to the present."

Letter from student Sue Moranian to MLK

Wednesday, February 22, 1967

Sue Moranian, a fourteen year old white girl, writes Dr. King and encloses a $2.00 contribution to assist in endeavors to help blacks reach racial equality.

Letter from Genevieve Young to Joan Daves

Wednesday, January 4, 1967

Genevieve Young expresses her opinion about the outline for Dr. King's upcoming book "Where Do We Go From Here?" She offers some suggestions and strategies to Joan Daves to help narrow the scope of the manuscript.

"Barnett Says JFK Aids Reds"

Saturday, July 13, 1963

In a testimony before the Senate Commerce Committee, Mississippi Governor Ross R. Barnett expresses his staunch opposition to President Kennedy's recent civil rights legislation. Governor Barnett goes as far as to associate recent Communist Party activities to the recent "racial agitation, strife, and conflict" emerging from the Civil Rights Movement.

OEO Extends Contract with National Council of Negro Women

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

This press release from the Office of Economic Opportunity highlights a technical assistance program designed to stimulate home ownership among poor Negro women in the deep South.

Letter from Dora McDonald to James McKee Concerning Antioch College Visit

Tuesday, June 15, 1965

Dora McDonald writes James McKee regarding the time of Dr. and Mrs. King's arrival and security arrangements for Dr. King's appearance at Antioch College.

Letter to MLK Regarding Opposing Views

Friday, August 18, 1967

The author of this letter expresses opposition towards Dr. King's civil disobedience methodologies, believing that civil disobedience is "contrary to God."

Letter from the National Union of South African Students to MLK

Friday, April 2, 1965

On behalf of the National Union of South African Students at the University of Cape Town and the University Van Kaapstad, Martin West requests Dr. King's contribution concerning race relations to the Nusas Journal. The scholarly journal is the "only real national" organ available to students regardless of "race, religion, or colour" in apartheid South Africa.