Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"BELGIUM"

Highlander Folk School 25th Anniversary Seminar

Tennessee (TN)

The Highlander Folk School in Monteagle, Tennessee, hosts the 25th Anniversary Seminar entitled "The South Thinking Ahead." At the program, Dr. King is scheduled to deliver the keynote address and activities have been set up to entertain the children that may be in attendance.

Draft of Dedication Page for "Why We Can't Wait"

This document is a rough draft of the dedication page of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait;" the draft reveals Dr. King's wish for his children.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK about an Invitation

Wednesday, July 20, 1966
Jackson, MS, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

In this letter, Mr. Hubert Humphrey, Vice President of the United States, writes to Dr. King declining his invitation to address the 10th Annual Convention of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Telegram from James Endicott to MLK

Tuesday, December 12, 1967
VIETNAM, CANADA, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

James Endicott writes to Dr. King inviting him to address the mass rally in Toronto with the theme being Vietnam, civil rights and world peace.

Telegram from Rev. Andrew J. Young to Mrs. Rosa M. Mcghee

Monday, August 9, 1965
Birmingham, AL, Tennessee (TN)

Rev. Andrew Young sends this telegram to Mrs. Rosa Mcghee apologizing on behalf of the SCLC for neglecting to invite the officials and members of the American Federation of Teachers.

Telegram from MLK to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach

Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA)

Dr. King writes US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach to inform him of the reports of "known election irregularities" he is receiving concerning the next day's Georgia Democratic primary election.

Man

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man,” noting that modern culture has come to understand more of nature and less of man.

Letter from Maude L. Ballou to Mrs. King about MLK Schedule

Monday, September 22, 1958
Montgomery, AL

The secretary of Dr. King's first pastorate, Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, sent this correspondence to Mrs. Coretta Scott King. The letter addresses Dr. King's itinerary, upon his return to Montgomery, and hopes for his full recovery, following his 1958 stabbing in Harlem.

Letter from Sargent Shriver to MLK

Monday, August 2, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Florida (FL)

Sargent Shriver, Director for the Office of Economic Opportunity, regretfully informs Dr. King that he will not be able to meet with SCLC's delegates in Birmingham for their convention.

Chicago IL The New Crusader: "The World of Books"

Saturday, June 24, 1967
Chicago, IL

Under the heading "The World of Books", the New Crusader newspaper published this review of Dr. King's last book. The review touches on Dr. King's examination of the Black Power movement and its effect on racial tension in America.

Draft Letter from MLK Regarding Grand Freedom March

Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King addresses his "Brother-In-Christ" requesting assistance for an up and coming March for Freedom held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He makes three requests including financial and social support.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Israel M. Augustine

Wednesday, February 20, 1963
Louisiana (LA)

Dora McDonald forwards a letter from Jessie Owens to Attorney Israel M. Augustine concerning potential legal counsel. Owens sought help concerning money and furniture that were taken from him.

"Mrs. Julia Brown To Speak Here On Martin Luther King"

Sunday, March 17, 1968
Virginia (VA)

This article discusses former FBI undercover agent, Julia Brown's plan to expose Dr. King of his affiliation with the Communist party.

Barth

Dr. King notes Karl Barth's views on Jesus.

Negro's Defense Against Acts of Violence

Dr. King describes nonviolent direct action and its effects against oppressors of the movement. He speaks about the undaunted fight and relentlessness even in the face of brutality.

Letter from Sue Jane Mitchell Smock to MLK

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
NIGERIA, New York (NY)

Mrs. Smock writes to Dr. King a "note of appreciation" regarding the Nobel Peace Prize and her artwork. A 1964 issue of Time Magazine featured a photograph of Dr. King's living room which displayed a "woodcut print" of Mrs. Smock's work. She also invites Dr. and Mrs. King to a future exhibition in Atlanta.

Telegram from MLK to Mrs. Lovie M. Lowe

Monday, August 23, 1965
Cincinnati, OH

Dr. King attempts to mediate between Mrs. Lowe and her pastor, the Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth.

Letter from John Askins to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967
Detroit, MI

John Askins requests that Dr. King correct the transcription of an earlier interview for publishing purposes.

Notecard Listing Various Scriptures from Isaiah

Dr. King lists numerous scriptures from the Old Testament book of Isaiah related to the topics of righteous living, anger and sin.

Albany Movement Statement

Sunday, July 1, 1962
Albany, GA

This statement is written on behalf of people of faith who have come to support the Albany Movement. The ills experienced by the Negro community in Albany are rooted in racial separation, it says. The document requests a meeting with the City Commission to review their response to peaceful protest, clarification of the City’s position on an ICC ruling on segregated buses, and establishment of a bi-racial commission to make recommendations on desegregation.

Letter from Wayne Williams to Virgil Jones

Wednesday, August 23, 1967
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Wayne Williams writes to follow up with Virgil Dwight Jones on his recently filed charge with the Chicago Fair Employment Practices Commision Office.

Telegram from Reverend Fred L Shuttlesworth to MLK

Friday, July 20, 1962
Cleveland, OH, Albany, GA, Cincinnati, OH, Ohio (OH), Georgia (GA)

Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy assures Dr. King that the nation extends their congratulations and prayer for his success. Reverend Abernathy asserts that as soldiers of freedom, they must "win this battle" for their country and that there "can be no retreat" in the movement.

Faith

Dr. King agrees with Justin Martyr on faith and rationality.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Lincoln Memorial Program

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

This is the Lincoln Memorial program for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Notable leaders including Dr. King, Walter Reuther, and Whitney M. Young, Jr., will make remarks at the march. Also included is a list of demands, a joint statement from ten organizations and a map.

Letter from Vince Hartke to MLK

Tuesday, May 4, 1965
Atlanta, GA

Democratic Indiana Senator Vance Hartke informs Dr. King that the Senate might not vote on the issue of the Voting Rights Bill due to a recent decision concerning the constitutionality of a poll tax.

Our Struggle

Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA)

Dr. King discusses blacks' struggle for racial equality in America. King explores racist whites' views of "the inferior social, economic, and political position" of the Negro. However, when Negroes begin to reevaluate their position in society and tension in race relations arise, he argues that the Negro begins to "organize and act" against the status quo as evident in the boycotts and sit-in demonstrations occurring throughout the South.

Worship

Dr. King discusses the topic of religion and asserts, "religion is a binding force."

Letter Withdrawing Support From Gordon Delsemer to Dr. King

Thursday, October 19, 1967
Baltimore, MD

This letter dated October 20, 1967, was sent to Dr. King from Gordon H. Delsemer. Mr. Delsemer is withdrawing his support from the SCLC because of the "anti-Semitic" statements he believes were made by certain black leaders.

God

Dr. King quantifies the capabilities of God's will through Job 42:2 and the affirmation that God is able do everything.

Selma Friendship Day Report

Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS)

This document highlights information surrounding "Selma Friendship Day," which was a white-led counter-protest intended to offset the effects of Kingian boycotts. This counter-protest was met with a demonstration, in which 120 pro-Kingian persons were arrested and the local SCLC office was barricaded.