Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"BELGIUM"

The Suffering Servant

Dr. King writes that Isaiah 53 presents a different view of the servant from chapters 42, 49 and 50. The concept of God's servant evolved from that of Israel as a nation, to the spiritual or inner Israel, to an individual who would take up the work that the others would not. King concludes that the prophecy was fulfilled in Jesus of Nazareth.

Evil (Psalm)

Dr. King notes that Psalm 73 raises the question of why the wicked prosper and suggests that the only solution for the mystery of evil is faith.

Statement Upon Return to Montgomery

Dr. King reflects on his near death experience after Izola Ware Curry stabbed him with a letter opener at a book signing in New York City on September 20, 1958. Although Dr. King refers to Curry as a "deranged woman," he has "no bitterness towards her" and sees her actions only as a "reflection on the moral climate." Dr. King further states what he will remember most is the "vast outpouring of sympathy" that was received from all races and creeds.

MLK Cited in Damage Suit

Sunday, September 10, 1967

The New York Times reports that Dr. King is one of the defendants in a $15 Million law suit.

Letter from MLK to Jefferson Poland

Friday, November 16, 1962

Dr. King thanks Mr. Poland for sharing his story and comments that the story shows "that it is possible to grow and change after a long heritage of prejudice."

Memo from Joan Daves to MLK, Clarence Jones and Stanley Levison

Saturday, March 14, 1964

Joan Daves expresses the importance of gaining proper copyright reassignment for Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

Georgia Council on Human Relations

The author informs the readers about the poverty problem in Georgia. They claim that the AFDC or "Aid to Families of Dependent Children" needs improvement. The author also mentions issues such as unemployment, education and voter registration.

Letter from G. Cacciatore to Mr. Ivan Cameron

In this letter, the Chief of Foreign Operation from the United States Department of State, responds to Ivan C. Cameron recent letter rearding voting in foreign political elections by United States citizens.

Text of Speech Delivered at Lincoln Memorial

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

This speech, given by Dr. King at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C, brings attention to the current state of oppression of Negro men and women in 1963.

Letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy from Fred Lofton

Written on SCLC stationary, Fred Lofton addressed this letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy. On behalf of his church, First African Baptist Church, Mr. Lofton pledged to continue to extend support for the work of SCLC.

Harper & Row, Publishers Invoice

Tuesday, June 20, 1967

Harper & Row, Publishers issued this invoice to Dr. King for the shipment of ten copies of Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here."

Science Surpasses the Social Order

Dr. King wrote this essay during his career at Crozer Theological Seminary in 1951. In the paper, he discusses the disproportionate growth of science and technology compared with that of the social order. Referencing the sociological term, Dr. King refers to this predicament as "cultural lag." He attributes this problem to the "lack of world brotherhood" and asserts that the survival of civilization depends on global unity. Drawing on Republican politician Wendall Wilkie and Prime Minister Clement Attlee, Dr.

MLK Address to the United Neighborhood Houses of New York

Tuesday, December 6, 1966

Dr. King delivers this address to the United Neighborhood Houses of New York. He expresses that a lack of job opportunities, education and community economic development contributes to the growing levels of poverty in the United States.

Letter from Walter E. Sanford to MLK

Wednesday, February 19, 1964

Walter Sanford, Labor Adviser for the United States Department of Labor, writes Dora McDonald regarding Mr. John Dube's visit to Atlanta. In Dr. King's absence, Dube will meet with his Executive Assistant, Wyatt T. Walker, to discuss the structure of the SCLC and techniques employed to "promote improved civil rights for the Negroes in the US."

Telegram from Leroy B. Allen to MLK

Wednesday, September 20, 1967

The president of Cheyney State College invites Dr. King to deliver the Founder's Day Address any day in November of 1967.

SCLC Action Committee Meeting

Sunday, February 11, 1968

This critical 2-day strategy meeting of key SCLC staff takes place 2 months prior to the projected start of the Poor People’s Campaign in Washington, DC. Dr. King expresses concern that they have not met their target goals for participation. Debate ensues about whether to call off the campaign or push it to a later date, and also whether SCLC should abandon all of its other commitments to ensure the success of this project. Problems and solutions are discussed. Staff assignments made for recruitment of the poor, materials, organizational structure, tentative plan of action, D.C.

Highlander Folk School April 1961 News Release

Monday, April 3, 1961

The Citizen Education Program efforts and past accomplishments are outlined in this document.

Jesus: Mission

Dr. King notes passages in Matthew and Luke related to Jesus' mission.

SCLC 10th Anniversary Flyer

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

The flyer highlights the 10th anniversary of the SCLC and outlines the speakers and events which will take place.

Sin (Augustine's definition)

Dr. King records a note on St. Augustine's definition sin, referencing passages from Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man: A Christian Interpretation," volume 1: "Human Nature."

Transcript of National Educational Television's For Freedom Now

Tuesday, July 23, 1963

For Freedom Now, with host Dr. Kenneth Clark, is television’s first exchange of ideas by the leaders of five organizations engaged in securing full civil rights for Negroes. Featured guests are Dr. King of SCLC, Whitney Young of the National Urban League, James Farmer of CORE, James Forman of SNCC, and Roy Wilkins of the NAACP.

Testament by Martin A. Watkins

Wednesday, June 14, 1967

Martin Watkins covers an array of topics in his expression of poems entitled "Testament." With great admiration, Watkins presents this book of poetry to Dr. King. In the preface, Watkins explains his purpose of publishing these poems during the Korean War. He further elaborates on his admiration of the Negro, his preoccupation with death, and the identification with Christ.

New Harassment: The Lunacy Test by MLK

Saturday, June 23, 1962

Dr. King identifies events that demonstrate the absurd actions of the racist opposition during the Freedom Movement in the South.

The Evening Star: The Perversion of a Cause

Monday, March 13, 1967

This article describes the effect of James Meredith's withdrawal from the race for Adam Powell's congressional seat. Civil Rights activists such as Dr. King, Mr. Carmichael and Mr. McKissick offer their opinions on how the race was handled.

Spencer, Herbert

Dr. King quotes Herbert Spencer's "First Principles" on the subject of evolution.

Holiday Card from the King Family

This is a holiday card from the King Family.

Three Year Proposal for the Renewal of the Negro Church in America

In this three-year proposal for the renewal of the Negro Church, there are several line items and subfields describing various ways in which this goal may be accomplished.

The World of the Patriarchs

Dr. King records historical and geographical data regarding several countries, such as Egypt, Greece, and Palestine. King places a special emphasis on the "World of the Patriarch," the title of this document, and writes notes on the "age of the Patriarch," which takes place after 2000 B. C.

Letter from A. Dolezalek to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968

A. Dolezaler, director of a German library, requests a copy of a poster published by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He would like to add the poster to a collection about social, political movements.

Letter from Senator Edward V. Long to MLK

Thursday, July 2, 1964

Senator Edward V. Long (D-Missouri) writes Dr. King to thank him for his letter concerning Long's support of the civil rights bill.