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Black is Beautiful, and It's So Beautiful To Be Black

Sunday, October 1, 1967

This staff newsletter "Black Is Beautiful, and It's So Beautiful," published by the SCLC, explains the upcoming events that the organization has in store. The newsletter communicates as to who acquired new positions within the SCLC and speaks to how the SCLC wishes to continue with projects based in Chicago, Cleveland, and Washington through Operation Breadbasket.

Letter from William R. Rice to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1966

William Rice, editorial director for WLS radio in Chicago, offers Dr. King suggestions for Operation Dropout. Also enclosed in the letter is a statement on the reasons to stay in school.

Letter from Dora McDonald to H. L. Wynter

Tuesday, May 18, 1965

Ms. McDonald writes a representative of the University of the West Indies to outline details regarding Dr. King's trip to the school. She confirms that Mrs. King will be traveling with Dr. King, provides their arrival times, and requests that the university does not schedule Dr. King for any additional engagements outside of the Valedictory Sermon.

Loving Your Enemies

Sunday, November 17, 1957

Dr. King interprets Jesus' command to "love your enemies" and outlines how to accomplish this goal. He closes this sermon by relating the philosophy of love to the use of nonviolence as a means to overcome oppression.

I Wish...

Dr. King writes a nursery rhyme on wishes.

Letter from Cornell Talley to MLK

Tuesday, April 17, 1962

Cornell Talley, Pastor of New Light Baptist Church, writes Dr. King as a reminder of his interest in the Reverend's cause and inquires about the SCLC's fundraising efforts.

MLK Handwritten Signature

This note contains handwriting that says "Best Wishes-Martin Luther King, Jr."

Around The World Pilgrimage Proposal

Tuesday, December 31, 1963

Mr. W Emerson Smith appoints Dr. King and Mr. Abernathy as leaders of a proposed pilgrimage around the world. Mr. Smith outlines the estimated costs and planned itinerary along with profits for the SCLC.

Telegram from Charles Webber to MLK

Charles Webber, the AFL-CIO's representative for religious relations, sends this telegram of support to Dr. King during his incarceration.

Handwritten Notecard Regarding Sin

On this note card, Dr. King discusses the repercussions of sin according to Albrecht Ritschl.

NAACP Presents to the City Commission

This list was presented by the St. Augustine branch of the NAACP to the City Commission.

Substance

Dr. King records some thoughts on the topic "substance," "a term used to signify that which is sought when philosophers investigate the primary being of things."

God (Niebuhr Conception)

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man" on the transcendence of God and His intimate relation to the world.

Letter from Frieda E. Isenberg to MLK

Monday, March 19, 1962

Frieda Isenberg collected money from various friends and co-workers to support the cause of freedom in the South. The total contribution given was $22.00.

Telegram from the SCLC to Rev. John Golden

Tuesday, August 17, 1965

Staff from the SCLC and Citizenship Education Program telegram Reverend John Golden informing him that all expenses will be paid for the trip to Georgia.

Letter from Peggy Hutter to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

A white college student writes to Mrs. King, expressing her condolences and shock after the death of Dr. King.

Letter from Clair Callan to MLK

Thursday, January 7, 1965

Representative Callan of Nebraska writes Dr. King to thank him for his recent telegram regarding the Mississippi Congressional Delegation. After giving serious consideration to Dr. King's recommendation to vote against seating the Mississippi Congressman, Callan states that he came to the conclusion that "a refusal to seat the Delegation in question would not further the cause of the Negro in that state," and consequently voted for the seating.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Thursday, April 9, 1964

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General, writes Dr. King acknowledging his previous telegram about racism in St. Augustine, Florida. In addition, Marshall refers a copy of the telegram to the attention of George B. Hartzog, Jr.

Manichaeism

Dr. King describes Manichaeism, a religion and philosophical doctrine that originated in Persia.

The Massachusetts Review: A Legacy of Creative Protest

Friday, September 7, 1962

Dr. King writes of the influence of Henry David Thoreau's essay on the duty of civil disobedience in forming his belief that non-cooperation with evil is a moral obligation. He cites lunch-counter sit-ins, freedom rides, and the bus boycott as evidence that Thoreau’s thinking is still alive. This article appeared in a special 1962 issue of The Massachusetts Review commemorating the centennial of Thoreau’s death.

Laughable Comics Postcard from Johnny B.

The author Johnny B. provides his best wishes to the recipient of this post card, stating "God created everybody equal."

Letter from Henry Morgenthau to MLK

Thursday, July 18, 1963

In this letter Mr. Morgenthau of WGBH Radio thanks Dr. King for his for participation in "For Freedom Now."

Letter from Herman E. Talmadge to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

Senator Herman E. Talmadge expresses his views on the poll tax with reference to the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Letter from John C. Hall to MLK about a March

Thursday, February 8, 1968

In this letter John C. Hall informs Dr. King of his desire to participate in the upcoming march to Washington D.C. and requests any information regarding such.

Letter from Richard Dannenfelser to MLK

Friday, July 1, 1966

The acting chaplain of Ohio Wesleyan University inquires of Dr. King's availability to speak at their college during his trip to Columbus. Dr. King is scheduled to address the Ohio Council of Churches Pastors' Convention.

Letter from Nancy Childs to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Nancy Childs, a junior in high school, writes Dr. King to convey support in the fight for equality and civil rights in America. Childs is a student at an integrated high school in Detroit, Michigan and expresses her delight that Dr. King has the ability to stand up for his beliefs. This letter was drafted following the bloody assault against demonstrators during the first attempt to march from Selma to Montgomery on March 7, 1965.

Paul's Letter to American Christians

Sunday, November 4, 1956

Dr. King shares "Paul's Letter to American Christians" with the congregation of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. In this contemporary letter revised by Dr. King, Apostle Paul writes concerning the "responsibilities of Americans to live as Christians." He discusses his appreciation for America, the danger of capitalism, communism, segregation in churches, and the many denominations of Protestantism. But above all things, Apostle Paul believes that love is the most "durable power in the world."

Congressional Record: The President's Housing Bill, or, How To Succeed in Politics Without Really Trying

Senator Charles Percy forwarded this article, published in the Congressional Record, to Dr. King. The article discusses President Johnson's attempted housing referendum, known as the Fair Housing Bill, in March of 1968.

Letter from Tom Offenburger to MLK

Wednesday, October 18, 1967

Tom Offenburger and Stan Levison plan to do a story on the Cleveland project and justify the expenses involved as necessary in the process of field research.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Gates to MLK

Sunday, June 30, 1963

Bob and Betty Gates write Dr. King enclosing a contribution toward his work for freedom and better opportunities for African Americans. The Gates also ask Dr. King's opinion regarding the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund.