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"BAHAMAS"

Lace Laird Affirms his Support for MLK

Sunday, February 11, 1968

Lace Laird wrote to Dr. King acknowledging that he stood with Dr. King at multiple marches in Detroit. He further rendered his services to Dr. King for SCLC's 1968 Poor Peoples March on Washington.

Telephone Log: January 22

This memo from the desk of Dr. King includes several missed telephone calls noted for his later response.

Letter from Joan Daves to Miss Dora MacDonald Regarding MLK's Schedule

Monday, December 12, 1966

Here Joan Daves writes to Dr. King's secretary, Ms. Dora MacDonald, requesting to know when and where Dr. King can be reached while in New York. Joan Daves also informs Miss MacDonald of the availability of Hermine Popper and requests the notes from earlier publishing meetings.

Letter from David J. Dennis to MLK

Wednesday, October 12, 1966

In this letter, David Dennis requests a letter of reference from Dr. King, prior to his draft board meeting, so to challenge an induction into the armed forces.

Program for Mass Meeting with MLK

Friday, September 22, 1967

Dr. King spoke at the Scott High School Field House in Toledo. Mayor John W. Potter opened the program with an official welcome to the city and Rev. Robert Culp welcomed the prticipants on behalf of the Toledo Chapter of the NAACP. Rev. B. F. Wright, the President of the Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance of Toledo and Vicinity, gave the benediction.

Notes on Generational Questions

The document, shown here, was briefly handwritten by Dr. King. Some of the writing in the document says, "One of the most important questions raised in any generation is the question.........." The remaining content of the document is unwritten.

Affidavit of Cleopatra Kennedy

Monday, April 15, 1963

After being arrested in Birmingham for "parading without a permit" in 1963, Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights singer Cleopatra Kennedy gave this notarized affidavit describing the incident.

Abstract of "The Role of the Behavioral Scientist in the Civil Rights Movement"

This document is an abstract entitled "The Role of the Behavioral Scientist in the Civil Rights Movement," with references to Dr. King's viewpoint.

Letter from MLK to S. Dillon Ripley at the Smithsonian Institute

Friday, May 21, 1965

Dr. King informs S. Dillon Ripley, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, that he is unable to attend the bicentennial celebration of the birth of James Smithson.

Letter from Elmer Jordan Admonishing MLK

Monday, February 12, 1968

In this letter dated February 12, 1968, Elmer Jordan writes, "your ideas will cause your death because of your heart" as he advises Dr. King to refrain from his "threatening proposals.".

Letter from Arthur R. Mann to Dora McDonald

Monday, November 1, 1965

Arthur Mann thanks Dora McDonald for her hospitality during a recent visit to Atlanta by New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller.

MLK Delta Flight Itinerary

This is Dr. King's flight itinerary. Included destinations are New York, Nassau, and Buenos Aires, South America.

Letter from Bruce A. King to MLK

Wednesday, October 28, 1964

Bruce King, Secretary of the Baptist Union of New South Wales, congratulates Dr. King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Schleiermacher (Original Sin)

Dr. King records Friedrich Schleiermacher’s views on original sin.

Telegram from Elmer J. Holland to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Congressman Holland assures Dr. King that he will "oppose all crippling amendments" to the Voting Rights Bill of 1965.

Letter from MLK to Beatrice Rosselll

Wednesday, September 23, 1964

Dr. King takes an opportunity to express gratitude for Beatrice Rossell's support to the civil rights movement. He addresses her inquiry regarding his activities with the Highlander Folk School and possible Communist ties. Rossell received a picture of Dr. King at Highlander and the caption addressed him as a Communist.

Barth

Dr. King writes about Karl Barth's theology regarding revelation.

Letter from Dora McDonald to L. H. Horace Perera

Thursday, May 26, 1966

Dora McDonald responds to a letter of recent date from Mr. L. H. Perera regarding an invitation for Dr. King to speak at an event. McDonald states the Dr. King is out of town and will respond once he arrives.

Newspaper Article - South May Hold Best Hope for Martin King

This newspaper article describes efforts of Dr. King in seeking aid for Negroes in Northern cities slum areas and the formation of a third political party to run in the 1968 Presidential Elections.

No, Mr. King: Your Ad in the Times is Not Clear!

This anonymous author writes Dr. King expressing dissent in his viewpoint on riots.

Telegram from President John F. Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, June 12, 1963

President John F. Kennedy invites Dr. King to a meeting of religious leaders to discuss the nation's civil rights problem.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Arvella Gray

Monday, June 3, 1963

Dora McDonald acknowledges receipt of items sent by Arvella Gray. She ensures Mr. Gray that Dr. King will be made aware of the gifts upon his return from Birmingham.

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, January 22, 1964

Attorney General Robert Kennedy invites Dr. King to be interviewed as part of an oral history program on issues and decisions of the Kennedy Administration.

Letter from Kenneth Bells to Floyd McKissick

Friday, September 16, 1966

Kenneth Bells requests to be removed from the Congress of Racial Equality's list of potential contributors due to CORE's support of the Black Power Movement.

Letter from Robert Finley to President Johnson

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

Robert Finley proposes a federal gasoline tax increase of at least fifty cents to relieve the burden of property owners. He enumerates the benefits that would be achieved.

Letter from Janet Somerville to MLK

Janet Somerville writes to Dr. King, expressing how he has been a renewal of hope for her. She also thanks Dr. King, his family and the SCLC for their hospitality during her visit to Atlanta.

Sermon Introductions by MLK

Dr. King frames a series of introductions to sermons that includes such selections as Civilization's Great Need, Life Is What You Make It, and Why Religion?

"Lost Sheep" or "The God of the Lost"

Sunday, September 18, 1966

Dr. King delivers a sermon about the parable of the lost sheep from the book of Luke. In this sermon, Dr. King poses the question that has pondered mankind for ages, "What is God Like?" He declares, "God is like a good shepherd" caring for his sheep. Dr. King commends the good done in America, but compares the nation to "a lost sheep" for failing to maintain equality for all men. He summarizes by describing good as a process, that everyone is significant and God is seeking to find the lost.

Pantheism Versus Living God

Here Dr. King sketches out his views on "...the Biblical idea of the 'Living God,'" and the substitution of Christ for God "as far as piety is concerned."