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"BAHAMAS"

Letter from Norman Thomas to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Norman Thomas offers his congratulations to Dr. King for being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. Thomas also feels the need to thank the Nobel Committee for recognizing Dr. King's leadership in being the one to receive the coveted award.

Address for the Formation of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights

Thursday, May 17, 1962

This address was delivered by Dr. King at the Formation of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights event on May 17, 1962. Dr. King opens by discussing various anniversaries that coincide with the event and represent similar struggles for justice including the Supreme Court school desegregation ruling, the Emancipation Proclamation, and Henry David Thoreau's death.

Sin

In this set of notecards, Dr. King discusses "sin." Referencing Biblical verses of Psalms 53:2 and 53:3, he says that "these passages seem to be an explicit affirmation of the universality of sin."

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Hasselvander

Dr. King writes Mr. Hasselvander hoping to resolve some issues from recent events of injustice and inequality that occurred in Hasselvander's life.

Letter from Mrs. Emil Singdahlsen to MLK

Friday, March 17, 1967

Mildred Singdahlsen writes to Dr. King concerning the attitude of negro leaders regarding New York Congressman, Adam Clayton Powell. She calls Powell, "not only dishonest, but an opportunist who selfishly advances his own ends," and expresses her hope that Dr. King would speak out about the situation.

Letter from Margaret Horack to MLK

Sunday, March 24, 1968

The Student Government of Salve Regina College requests campaign materials from Dr. King for its participation in "Choice 68," a mock national collegiate presidential primary.

Letter from Robert Powell to MLK

Tuesday, March 21, 1967

In this letter, Robert Powell protests Dr. King's participation in a demonstration against the Vietnam War. He also expresses his thoughts on Dr. King's perspective of the war as a "racist war."

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

Thursday, July 5, 1962

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."

Letter from Leslie Cohen to MLK

Leslie Cohen informs Dr. King that Miss Egnal's eighth grade classes from Great Neck South Junior High School in New York have each elected him their "Man of the Year" over all other world leaders.

Letter from MLK to Ruth Huston

Wednesday, July 17, 1963

Dr. King sends a copy of "Strength to Love" and "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" to his friend Ruth Huston of New York City. Jokingly, Dr. King characterizes what Huston's reaction might be to "Strength to Love," due to Huston's own personal beliefs about religion. He emphasized that she may be disinterested in reading the book of sermons, but "on the other hand they may give you some religion."

Governor Rockefeller Confirms Invitation to Speak at Ebenezer Baptist Church

Wednesday, September 1, 1965

This letter dated September 2, 1965, was sent to Dr. King from Margaret Fowler, calendar Secretary to Gov. Rockefeller. In this letter Ms. Fowler confirms to Dr. King that the governor will be able to speak at the Men's Day Observance at Ebenezer Baptist Church on October 17, 1965.

Notecard on Philosophy

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Herbert Spencer's views on philosophy. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, November 25, 1964

Joan Daves sends Dr. King an issue of Cuadernos, which printed a Spanish version of his Berlin address about President Kennedy. A copy of "Why We Can't Wait" is sold to Figaro Litteraire.

Painting

Dr. King paraphrases Homer's "The Odyssey" and quotes some prose entitled "The Bible."

MLK's Acceptance Sermon, Dexter Avenue Baptist Church

Dr. King accepts his appointment as the new pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. His first time serving as head of a ministry, Dr. King admits that he has no pretense to being an extraordinary preacher and comes only with the claim of "being a servant of Christ."

Letter from Dupree Jordan to MLK about Office of Economic Opportunity

Thursday, November 17, 1966

In this letter, dated November 17, 1966, Jordan is requesting a meeting with King to discuss the efforts of Office of Economic Opportunity (O.E.O.). Jordan is Director of Public Affairs at O.E.O. King attended O.E.O.'s meetings with the Child Development Group of Mississippi a few weeks prior to this letter.

Letter from Bernard Roche to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Mr. Roche asks Dr. King whether he has considered that whites not only intimidate and murder African Americans, but also each other. He argues that whites don't treat anyone any worse than they treat themselves.

Letter from Dr. Earl C. Jackson, Sr. to MLK

Wednesday, August 7, 1963

Earl Jackson writes Dr. King requesting feedback regarding his upcoming speaking engagement as one of three keynote speakers during a large conference in Delaware.

Tenth Annual Institute of the Montgomery Improvement Association

Thursday, December 9, 1965

This program for the Tenth Annual Institute of the Montgomery Improvement Association gives a detailed history of the organization's events from 1955 to 1965. "Highlights At A Glance" include: accounts of violence and community bombings, school integration, freedom rides, The Montgomery Bus Boycott, and the establishment of the SCLC. Photographs of leadership, churches, voter registration, and marches appear throughout. This document also shows Dr. King's handwritten notes, copies of related news articles, and the individual programs for each day of the Institute.

Letter from Helen F. Gallagher to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968

Helen Gallagher is addressing the national issues in the United States as it relates to the war. She suggests to Dr. King a personal tax that could possibly go toward initiatives that Americans feel are important. Gallagher feels that this is a way to for Americans to represent themselves when they are unsatisfied with their congressional representatives.

Test of Address by Vice President Richard M. Nixon

Friday, October 19, 1956

Vice President Nixon discusses the legacy of Alfred E. Smith and how it correlates with the American dream.

Letter from P. M. Smith to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, June 30, 1964

P. M. Smith writes Dora McDonald thanking her on Dr. Ruden's behalf for a letter regarding Dr. King's visit to Amsterdam. Miss Smith references a previous correspondence from Dr. Ruden's informing Miss McDonald of the schedule for Dr. King's visit.

Letter from Mahalia Jackson Foundation Requesting Financial Support

In this letter addressed to "Friend," gospel singer Mahalia Jackson requests financial support for the Mahalia Jackson Foundation, which helps deserving children obtain a higher education.

God

Dr. King quotes Donald M. Baillie's "God Was in Christ."

Telegram from Al C. Hastings to MLK

Tuesday, October 31, 1967

Al Hastings expresses his concern during Dr. King's incarceration in the Jefferson County Jail.

Letter from J. Purcell to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

A "Poor White Texan" sends Dr. King a letter of support and encourages him to run for President. The writer explains that it is not until the people achieve racial unity that the world will be at peace.

To the Gallant Black Man Now Dead

Tuesday, May 17, 1966

This poem titled "To The Gallant Black Men Now Dead" was written by Vincent Harding in dedication to Jimmy L. Williams. Private First Class Williams was an heroic black man killed in Vietnam and was refused burial in his hometown of Wetumpka, Alabama.

Note from Will Dale to MLK

Will Dale writes Dr. King commending him for encouraging Black athletes to boycott the Olympic games.

Letter from MLK to Attorney Bell

Dr. King writes Attorney Bell thanking him for offering his services "to the Freedom Movement and the work of the SCLC."

The World's March Toward Human Rights

Thursday, May 28, 1964

Dr. King addresses the issue of Equal Justice Under the Law at a convocation of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.