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National Conference on Christian Education Brochure

Indiana (IN)

Dr. King was a featured guest speaker of the National Conference on Christian Education. This pamphlet lists the events of the program occurring during August 19-22 of 1958.

Postcard from Friedrich Derz to MLK

Wednesday, March 6, 1963
Berlin, Germany, Birmingham, AL

Friedrich Derz's brief message of "solidarity" illustrates the unity fostered by the international community in the fight for civil rights.

VFW Post 2156 to MLK

Friday, September 30, 1966
Missouri (MO)

The members of George Washington Carver Post VFW Post 2156 voice their support for Dr. King, along with a donation.

Letter from Charles W. Martine to Ohio Senator

Illinois (IL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, SOUTH KOREA, NORTH KOREA, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., South Carolina (SC), Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH

This letter from Dental Technician Charles W. Martin speaks out against the racism in America. He denounces George Wallace as a racist candidate for the 1968 Presidential Election, admonishes members of Congress for not speaking out against Mr. Wallace, and states he will leave the service if Mr. Wallace is elected to the Presidency.

Bold Design for a New South

Saturday, March 30, 1963
Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Mississippi (MS), North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King notes that civil rights has been replaced as the "Number One" domestic issue, dwarfed by the Cuban missile crisis, trade legislation and tax reform. He attributes this to public acceptance of tokenism as well as an overly cautious administration. While acknowledging that the administration has made greater efforts on civil rights than previous ones, Dr. King says the progress is constricted and confined.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Frank Elliott

Monday, February 4, 1963
New York (NY)

Dora McDonald responded to Frank Elliott's letter regarding Dr. King's schedule. Additionally, She requested for Elliott to send out an annoucement to people who had been requesting Dr. King's book "Strength to Love."

Letter from Congressman Marvin Esch to MLK

Monday, November 27, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Congressman Esch expresses appreciation to Dr. King for supporting the anti-poverty program. Attached is a copy of the Congressman's statement regarding the "Economic Opportunity Amendments of 1967."

People in Action: Our New President

Saturday, February 1, 1964
New York (NY)

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes optimistically about the prospects for civil rights in the transition from President Kennedy to President Johnson. He believes that Johnson's Southern-ness may disarm the likes of George Wallace and that the President's proven commitment to civil rights and skills as Majority Leader in the Senate will aid in passing legislation.

Letter from Lillian Mirvus to MLK

Thursday, May 25, 1967
Detroit, MI, Atlanta, GA

Lillian Mirvis writes to Dr. King regarding his invitation to Walter P. Reuther to speak at the 10th Annual Convention of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Value

Dr. King references Ralph Perry's "Present Philosophical Tendencies" and "The Present Conflict of Ideals" in relation to the subject of value.

Invitation from J.G. Kennelly to MLK

Wednesday, April 24, 1963
CANADA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

J.G. Kennelly invites Dr. King to address the Christian Culture Forum during their 1963-1964 season in Hamilton, Canada.

SCLC Sustaining Contributors Annual Card

Vermont (VT)

Frank and Ann Smallwood enclose their annual membership fees for the SCLC. The Smallwoods express that they know Dr. King will experience financial difficulties because of his stand on the Vietnam War and they wish they could contribute more.

When Peace Becomes Obnoxious

Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

This 1956 newspaper column is a re-print of a sermon delivered by Dr. King on segregation and events in Alabama.

Telegram from George Romney to MLK

Friday, August 11, 1967

George Romney telegrams Dr. King to inform him of his inability to attend a conference.

Text of Speech Delivered at Lincoln Memorial

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

This speech, given by Dr. King at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C, brings attention to the current state of oppression of Negro men and women in 1963.

Newspaper Article on MLK

Sunday, August 9, 1964
Florida (FL)

In this article from the Miami Florida Herald, the writer summarizes a portion of the book "Why We Can't Wait", written by Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Herbert Schaltegger

Friday, May 22, 1964
Connecticut (CT)

Dr. King acknowledges Mr. Schaltegger's letter in which he asked for Dr. King's reaction to his theory of equality. Dr. King responds by discussing the injustices committed against Negroes in America and how they have been denied Constitutional rights.

God

Dr. King records a portion of Carl Jung's argument that God is a function of the unconscious.

Dr. King Outlines "If"

Dr. King expounds on the subject "if." He proclaims the word to be primary in the English language.

Funeral

Dr. King quotes Shakespeare's "Hamlet."

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Royalties

Tuesday, December 6, 1966
New York, NY

In this letter, J. Campe, associate of literary agent Joan Daves, encloses royalties for Dr. King's French edition of "Strength to Love".

Social Ethics

EGYPT

Dr. King cites the Old Testament biblical book of Exodus regarding social ethics.

Telegram from MLK and Mrs. King to Dr. Benjamin E. Mays

Atlanta, GA, SWITZERLAND, Georgia (GA), Geneva, Switzerland

Dr. and Mrs. King commend Dr. Benjamin E. Mays for all he has accomplished during his twenty-seven years as President of Morehouse College.

Biographical Sketches of Leaders of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

New Jersey (NJ), Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Missouri (MO), Minnesota (MN), North Carolina (NC), Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA, Little Rock, AR, Jackson, MS, Detroit, MI, Montgomery, AL, Maryland (MD), Chicago, IL, Berlin, Germany

These are biographical sketches of various leaders who were involved in the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedoms. These distinguished individuals were involved in organizations that focused on equality and nonviolence.

Letter from John Coventry Smith to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965
New York (NY), BRAZIL

John Coventry Smith, a member of the United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A., invites Dr. King to Brazil to speak at the Campinas Presbyterian Theological Seminary during his tenure in the South American country. Mr. Smith asserts that Dr. King's appearance is of importance to the young potential leaders of Brazil. Dr. King will further enlighten the Protestants in Brazil of the Christian faith to the racial issues in the United States.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964
Oslo, Norway, EGYPT, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, NORWAY, CHINA

In this lecture delivered the day after he received the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King describes the major evils of the world as racial injustice, poverty and war. He presents a vision of a World House in which people learn to transcend differences in race, culture, ideas and religion and learn to live together in peace.

Telegram from Dow Kirkpatrick to MLK and Mrs. King

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dow Kirkpatrick congratulates Dr. King and apologizes for his absence at the event.

Immortality

In this series of note cards, Dr. King interprets Ecclesiastes 3:18-19 as "a clear explicit rejection of immortality."

Letter from George Graham to MLK

Thursday, September 1, 1966
North Carolina (NC)

Mr. Graham thanks Dr.King for replying to his letter, and expresses how much he enjoyed seeing him when he visited Raleigh.

Letter from C. M. Williams to Ralph David Abernathy

Wednesday, April 24, 1968
California (CA)

In this letter, addressed to Reverend Ralph Abernathy, supporter C.M. Williams references Dr. King's funeral and requests a copy of his last speech. Many sympathizers and mourners wrote letters like this to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference after Dr. King's assassination.