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Telegram from Robert Mangum to MLK

Tuesday, October 31, 1961

Mr. Mangum sends his support to Dr. King as he serves his time in Jefferson county jail.

God

Dr. King describes the power of God.

Letter from MLK to Artist Committee for SCLC

Friday, May 5, 1967

This letter expresses Dr. King's regards and deep appreciation to the Artist Committee for their generous contribution. He communicates gratitude on behalf of so many who benefit from the work made possible from their support. Additionally, Dr. King communicates the continued strength and effectiveness of the SCLC in promoting negro-white unity, non-violence, justice and equality.

MLK - Form Letter Draft

Dr. King writes a form letter to acknowledge the "sacrifices, fasting, and prayer" from people throughout the world.

History: Ecclesiastes

Dr. King examines the "author's philosophy of history" recorded in the biblical text Ecclesiastes 1:9. He notes that Ecclesiastes' view of history as "a series of endless cycles which has no underlying theology" is in stark contrast to general Bible philosophy, and is more in line with a Greek view of history.

Man

Dr. King quotes a line from Homer's epic poem "The Iliad."

Letter from Everett C. McKeage to MLK

Thursday, July 15, 1965

Mr. McKeage writes to Dr. King expressing his satisfaction and appreciation for his position on Vietnam relations. He encloses a monetary donation to assist Dr. King's work.

Class Notes: Deuteronomy

Dr. King discusses the theological concepts of God, man, sin, individual ethics, and social ethics. He also outlines the history of the Biblical book, Deuteronomy.

Newsletter Regarding Operation Breadbasket

This letter serves as an informational letter on the efforts of Operation Breadbasket. According to the letter, this organization, has provided over 900 jobs for Negroes, opened up services for Negro businessmen and offered other types of assistance.

Letter from Benjamin Singleteary to MLK

Thursday, December 16, 1965

Benjamin Singleteary, a student at Shortridge Junior High School in Indianapolis, requests Dr. King's autograph and other information for a class project on outstanding people.

Letter From Joan Daves to Clarence B. Jones

Monday, May 18, 1964

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Clarence B. Jones about the carbon of the letter sent to Dr. King regarding an excerpt from "Why We Can't Wait."

Worship

Dr. King notes some attributes and results of worship.

Letter from James R. Herrington to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

James R. Herrington wrote this adverse letter to Dr. King, calling both him and his doctrine of civil disobedience "trash." Herrington ends his letter by saying that President Johnson cared more for Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement than the rest of the country, and therefore, won't be president again.

Class Notes: Joshua

This eleven card series features Biblical verses from the Book of Joshua which Dr. King references under specific subject titles. The section titles range from "Knowledge" to "Passages for Homiletical Use."

Letter from Gloria Kenny to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1966

Mrs. Kenny encloses her monthly contribution of $50 to the SCLC and reports that a recent recruitment letter has resulted in 18 potential new members.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. Benjamin E. Mays

Tuesday, October 19, 1965

Dora McDonald informs Dr. Benjamin E. Mays that Dr. King will attend the Morehouse Board of Trustees luncheon.

Shattered Dreams

In a sermon entitled "Shattered Dreams", Dr. King opens with a passage from Romans 15:24. The Reverend continues with the expansion of hopes and the contrast of shattered dreams. Delivering this message from a theological vantage point, Dr. King closes with "Christian faith makes it possible for us nobly to accept that which cannot be changed, to meet disappointments and sorrow with an inner poise..."

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding "Stride Toward Freedom"

Friday, May 15, 1964

In this letter from Joan Daves, Dr. King is informed that Ballantine Books has the pocket rights to "Stride Toward Freedom" but they did not do much with the title. Harper & Brothers then got the rights back.The letter closes by saying that Harper & Brothers would like Dr. King's approval so the deal can be cleared.

Letter from Franklin H. Williams to MLK

Friday, October 23, 1964

Ambassador Williams congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and invites him to a United Nations reception.

Letter From Donald A. DiNuccio to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1968

Sixteen-year-old Donald DiNuccio writes Dr. King expressing his opinion on the "racial problem" and extends his support.

Dr. King Plans '67 Pilgrimage to Holy Land

This newspaper clipping outlines plans for Dr. King's Pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

Letter from SGH to MLK

SGH inquires about sending money out of the country in order to efficiently donate to Dr. King's causes.

Aquinas, Thomas

Dr. King notes biographical information about Thomas Aquinas.

Letter from Jean Tisdale to MLK

Friday, March 30, 1962

Jean Tisdale, a student at Mills College in Oakland, California, writes Dr. King and requests an account of his personal experiences concerning problems in the South and the Negro's stride toward equality.

Invitation to Dr. King from the Japan Council Against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

Dr. King is invited to take part in the 1967 13th Annual World Conference of the Japan Council against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964

This is a handwritten draft of the Nobel lecture. Dr. King delivered this lecture at the University of Oslo on December 11, 1964, the day after receiving the Peace Prize. Aware of the prestigious nature of the award and the global recognition it brought to the nonviolent struggle for racial justice in the US, King worked nearly a month on his address. He goes beyond his dream for America and articulates a vision of a World House in which a family of different races, religions, ideas, cultures and interests must learn to live together as brothers or perish together as fools.

Notes Regarding Marriage

The handwritten outline conveyed Dr. King's view on marriage and what is required to maintain a happy union.

Letter from Ora Belle Tamm to MLK

Tuesday, March 14, 1967

Ora Belle Tamm objects to the reaction of Negro leaders during the Adam Clayton Powell affair and expresses her disappointment to Dr. King.

Wisdom

Here Dr. King quotes Proverbs 8:22-23 and sketches his view that "Wisdom was created by God before the earth was created, and it aids him [sic] [in] the creative process."

1964 Election

Dr. King explains "a sizable number of Negro voters" will register for the 1964 presidential election, recognizing the significance of political participation.