Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Atlanta, GA"

Letter from Jessie Jackson to C. L. Franklin

Tuesday, February 21, 1967
Chicago, IL, Detroit, MI, Texas (TX), Atlanta, GA

Reverend Jessie Jackson writes this letter to Reverend C. L. Franklin of the New Bethel Baptist Church in Detroit, Michigan. Jackson expresses his gratitude for Franklin's suggestions and assistance during a recent stay in Detroit. He also appreciates the solidarity exhibited towards the SCLC.

Walk for Freedom

Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

In this article, Dr. King address the issue of racism occurring in Montgomery. It was here that African Americans, including Dr. King, were victims to humiliation and violent acts because of their race. Dr. King further promote nonviolent protest to combat this civil injustice.

Letter from W. Maxfield Garrott

Friday, October 16, 1964
Tennessee (TN), JAPAN, Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA, Richmond, VA

W. Maxfield Garrott, president of the Seinen Jo Gakuin Baptist School in Japan, invites Dr. King to make an appearance if he ever visits Japan. Garrot also congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Emma Kramer to MLK

Wednesday, July 22, 1964
Chicago, IL, South Dakota (SD), Pennsylvania (PA), New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA

The secretary of the Speakers Bureau at The Adult Education Council of Greater Chicago contacts Dr. King regarding a number of new and pending speaking engagements. The two new speaking engagement requests are from Augustana College and Barat College. The list of pending engagements includes Villanova University, Duchess Community College, Barat College and the University of California, Riverside.

Next Steps In The South

Sunday, July 1, 1956
Kansas (KS), Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA), South Carolina (SC), Cincinnati, OH, North Carolina (NC), Tennessee (TN), Georgia (GA)

The Southern Regional Council publishes a pamphlet that addresses the landmark Brown vs. Board of Education Supreme Court Case and what its implications mean for society. The pamphlet goes on to answer several questions concerning school integration and gives background information on the case and the issues of segregation.

Letter from MLK to Peter Mansfield

Wednesday, November 3, 1965
SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. King accepts the invitation extended by Peter Mansfield, Acting President of the National Union of South African Students, to give the opening address for the organization's 41st Annual Congress at the University of Natal in South Africa.

Letter from Dr. J. H. Young to MLK

Tuesday, September 6, 1966
Indiana (IN), SOUTH AFRICA, South Carolina (SC), VIETNAM, Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Arkansas (AR), Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA)

Dr. J. H. Young writes this letter to Dr. King about slavery, the Civil War, and President Lincoln. He reminds Dr. King that the Civil War was fought not over slavery, but succession.

I Wish...

Dr. King writes a nursery rhyme on wishes.

Letter from Flournoy Coles to MLK

Tuesday, October 4, 1966
Tennessee (TN), Nashville, TN, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Flournoy Coles invites Dr. King to come to Fisk University and lead a session of the Honors Program.

The Cultural Crisis

Dr. King quotes Edward Hallett Carr's "Conditions of Peace."

The United States and Eastern Asia: The Report of a Conference of Asian Scholars

Thursday, December 28, 1967
JAPAN, CHINA, INDONESIA, MALAYSIA, VIETNAM, SINGAPORE, THAILAND, New York (NY)

Harry D. Gideonse, President of Freedom House, sends Dr. King two reports concerning international relations between the United States and Asia. The first of the two is a report on the international policies that have been implemented between Western nations and the countries of Asia. The second is a report that tracks the progress of freedom throughout those regions.

Letter from P. Charles to MLK

Friday, November 6, 1964
INDIA

P. Charles, President of the Hyderabad Lutheran Church in India, writes Dr. King to commend him on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and also to congratulate him on the landslide election victory of President Lyndon Johnson.

Letter from Rev. Charles William Butler to MLK

Wednesday, September 20, 1961
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Missouri (MO)

Dr. King writes to Rev. Charles William Butler of the Metropolitan Baptist Church to acknowledge receipt of his kind letter concerning moral support. Dr. King references his shock of reading about a vicious attack made by Dr. Jackson accusing him of conspiracy. Stating that numerous friends have suggested that the Reverend sue Jackson, Dr. King expresses his decision to be adherent to his basic philosophy of non-violence.

Letter from MLK to Ernest Gruening

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Ernest Gruening, a United States Senator from Alaska, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Religion

Dr. King records a quote on religion from William Ernest Hocking's "The Meaning of God in Human Experience."

Telegram from MLK and Coretta King to the McCall Family

Montgomery, AL

In this telegram, Mr. and Mrs. King give their condolences to the McCall family as a result of the death of Walter McCall.

Support Card from Ida White and Jenae Jackson to MLK

Atlanta, GA

Ida Mae White and Jenae Jackson send Dr. King this spiritual card regarding faith in God during his time in jail.

United States Department of State Reprint of Vice President Nixon Speech

Thursday, December 6, 1956
New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

This document contains the text of an address made by Vice President Nixon before the Automobile Manufacturers Association in New York.

Sketch of MLK by Charles Keller

Thursday, May 7, 1959

This document features a 1959 sketch of Dr. King, signed, "In admiration," by Mr. Charles Keller.

Letter from Hubert Reaves to MLK

Tuesday, March 12, 1968
Michigan (MI)

As an inmate in Jackson, Michigan, Hubert Reaves writes Dr. King to express his interest in the SCLC, and inform him of his future education in ministry at the Detroit Bible College. Mr. Reaves also includes a letter to Mr. Goodall inquiring about his inmate account and the sending of his letters.

Epitaph for a First Lady: Eleanor Roosevelt

Saturday, November 24, 1962
New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, Boston, MA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. Kings writes an epitaph discussing Eleanor Roosevelt and what she stood for.

Letter from Clifford Park to MLK

Wednesday, September 18, 1963
CANADA, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The President of the United Church of Canada, London Conference, writes Dr. King attempting to receive a notification of his availability to be the devotional speaker at their annual conference.

Letter from C. B. Olmstead to MLK

Tuesday, July 13, 1965
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Olmstead writes that he is unable to reconcile Dr. King's support of civil disobedience with his plans for peaceful demonstrations. He contends the purpose of King's sustained agitation is to provoke violence. He feels the Civil Rights Act of 1964 should become the mechanism for opposing discrimination, not further boycotts and sit-ins.

Letter from Lenore Aikens to MLK

Thursday, December 31, 1964
CANADA

Lenore Aikens congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She also asks how the Christian Citizenship Committee of United Church Women can be a part of the cause.

Letter from E. L. Gayden to MLK

Tuesday, February 14, 1967
Kansas (KS), ISRAEL

E. L. Gayden writes Dr. King regarding the planning of pilgrimage to the Holy Land. Gayden offers the services of the John Brown Monument and Historical Association for the organization of the tour. He also mentions that he represents a travel agency and extends his assistance to Dr. King.

City of Philadelphia News Release - James H. J. Tate, Mayor

Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Members of the Cabinet of Mayor James H. J. Tate of the City of Philadelphia release a statement following the assassination of Dr. King. The Cabinet pledges to rededicate to the establishment of equality and justice, to eliminate poverty and intolerable housing condition, and to provide adequate educational systems and facilities, for all citizens.

Letter from Mr. Richard V. Healy to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967
Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA, Massachusetts (MA), Georgia (GA)

In this 1967 letter Richard Healy, a student at the Boston University of Law, asks Dr. King for an interview "to conduct research into criminal responsibility of a subculture--the urban Negro."

Letter from John Lazenby to MLK

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
Wisconsin (WI), Atlanta, GA, San Francisco, CA, New York, NY, New York (NY)

John Lazenby, Professor Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, encloses a donation to Dr. King. He further stresses that nonviolence is the prime method to solve problems around the world. Lazenby requests copies of Dr. King's anti-war speech delivered at New York's Riverside Church on April 4, 1967 to distribute to his friends.

The Second Sunday After Easter

Sunday, April 28, 1968

The preacher begins by reminding the audience about various forms of evil, the church's mission to help humans obtain heavenly rights and other topics from the previous week's sermon. After recapping last Sunday's sermon, the preacher uses the Word of God to answer the question, "How should Christians react to the afflictions they suffer in the world?" The three answers to this question are broken up into three different sections and explained in depth by the speaker.

What Martin Luther King Really Has on His Mind

Sunday, July 9, 1967
VIETNAM, Chicago, IL

The Detroit Free Press reviewed Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The review examines Dr. King's stance on the slogan "Black Power," his disappointment with moderation and his views against the Vietnam War. According to Dr. King, "The bombs in Vietnam explode at home; they destroy the hopes and possibilities for a decent America."