Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Atlanta, GA"

Letter from Joan Kennedy to MLK

Saturday, July 18, 1964

Joan Kennedy thanks Dr. King for his support.

Holy Week Service

Wednesday, April 18, 1962
Denver, CO, Virginia (VA), Richmond, VA

This Holy Week Service program for Augustana Lutheran Church highlights Dr. King as a guest preacher where he delivers a sermon entitled "Remember Who You Are." The program goes on to detail Good Friday and Easter Sunday Services, as well as informing readers of Dr. King's television interview.

Letter from John E. Smylie to MLK

Friday, May 31, 1963
Los Angeles, CA

In this letter, Chaplain Smylie requests for Dr. King to preach at Occidental College. Smylie states, "We would be honored to have you or one of your representatives at Occidental."

Dorothy Cotton telegraphs congratulations

Sunday, January 31, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), New York, NY

Dorothy Cotton, long-time colleague of Dr. King at Southern Christian Leadership Conference, congratulates Dr. King for being nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize. Cotton was one of the only non-family members to subsequently accompany Dr. King to Oslo, Norway, for the prize ceremony.

The Gospel and How We Love Our Enemies

New York (NY)

John C. Heidbrink sets forth the notion that in order to be a disciple of Christ, in any age, one must express unconditional love "toward him who seeks to destroy us," irrespective of differences in personal, national, or religious sentiments.

Letter from Bertha Nichols to MLK

Thursday, February 4, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King is extended an invitation to deliver the keynote address for the 70th birthday of E. Washington Rhodes, Publisher of the Philadelphia Tribune. The Philadelphia Tribune is one of the nation's oldest bi-weekly Negro newspapers and Rhodes is a well-known staunch advocate for justice. Bertha Nichols, Secretary-Treasurer of the newspaper, asks Dr. King to make a special address in honor of Rhodes.

Letter from Clifford Alexander to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968
Washington, D.C., New York, NY, New York (NY), Connecticut (CT), Detroit, MI

Clifford Alexander, Chair of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, sends Dr. King a report involving discrimination against Jews in the workplace. According to the report, numerous members of the Jewish community face prejudice from receiving management level jobs in the white collar sector.

Letter from Viola Burrell to MLK

Monday, January 31, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Mrs. Burrell writes to Dr. King, expressing her concern for black people in the work environment.

Chicago Housing Discrimination Complaint

Friday, April 29, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This official complaint to the Illinois Department of Registration and Education references a particular instance of housing discrimination that took place at the Houser Real Estate office.

Letter from Hano Bailey to MLK

Friday, December 22, 1967
Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Hano Bailey praises Dr. King for asking black athletes "to sit out of the Olympics." He informs Dr. King that there are 15 teachers at his University writing letters to their relatives in support of Dr. King's campaign.

American Negro Concert Pianist Undertakes 100 Cites Tour in Support of Haiti's Pan American Festival of the New World

HAITI, Washington, D.C., SENEGAL

Ambassador Bonhomme announces the Pan American Festival of the New World, proposed and implemented by Negro-American Concert Pianist Robert Pritchard. The festival's inauguration was held in Haiti in the summer of 1969. The event attracted students in the "Pan American hemisphere." The festival's main features focused on the establishment of three summer schools.

"In a Word-Now" by MLK

Sunday, September 29, 1963
Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

In the attainment of civil rights, Dr. King stresses the importance and urgency of "NOW". He further expounds on the immediate and effective actions that should be exercised by the Federal government to better the society.

MLK Address at the University of Chicago

Thursday, January 27, 1966
Chicago, IL, Los Angeles, CA, Virginia (VA), Massachusetts (MA), New York, NY

Dr. King delivers this speech at the University of Chicago on January 27, 1966. He expounds upon the struggles of the Negro family in America, explaining the social and economic challenges the Negro faces along with the affects of slavery.

Telegram from L. M. McCoy to MLK

Friday, May 12, 1967
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, BRAZIL, New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

L. M. McCoy telegrams Dr. King expressing the urgency that the Methodist Church of Brazil receive a reply to their invitation for him to speak at their Centennial celebration in Brazil.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Monday, February 27, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Pennsylvania (PA)

Mr. Schaefer writes Dora McDonald seeking confirmation for Dr. King's scheduled appearance at Kennett Square.

Telegram from MLK to Bluford Jackson Extending Congratulations

Friday, January 26, 1968
New York (NY)

In this telegram dated 1/26/68 addressed to Mr. Jackson, Dr. King extends congratulations to Dr. Richard Francis on his appointment as Director of the Sunmount State School.

Letter from Robert M. Steornson to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967
Florida (FL), New York, NY, New York (NY)

Robert Steornson commends Dr. King for taking a stand against the Vietnam war and his efforts to promote peace.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Robinson to Rev. Abernathy

Thursday, April 25, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Michigan (MI)

Mr. and Mrs. Robinson send a sermon to Reverend Abernathy and his followers hoping to encourage them on their difficult days ahead.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Babcock

Saturday, April 9, 1966
New York (NY), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King expresses his most sincere gratitude for Mrs. Elizabeth T. Babcock's support of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Bacon

Dr. King notes Alexander Pope's characterization of Francis Bacon.

The Martin Luther King Column - No. 3

In the 3rd installment of "The Martin Luther King Column," Dr. King praises the Jewish people for seeking freedom for all. Dr. King discusses their contributions to "philanthropy and social organization."

Letter from George Overton to MLK

Wednesday, August 4, 1954
Connecticut (CT)

George Overton sends Dora McDonald a letter thanking her for the calendar of Dr. King's family. He also requests some photographs and expresses his support of Dr. King.

Letter from Eunice Janousek to MLK

Saturday, June 1, 1963
Washington, D.C., South Dakota (SD), Missouri (MO)

Eunice Janousek requests that Dr. King review materials in the matter of the Blakey case with the hope that he can provide assistance to those who are being oppressed in South Dakota.

Worship

Dr. King critiques the Protestant Church worship services.

Letter from The Canadian Council of Christians and Jews to MLK

Tuesday, November 22, 1966
CANADA

National Executive Director Richard Jones invites Dr. King to speak in Toronto during the celebration of Canada's centennial birthday. Jones describes current racial relations and acknowledges that the centennial events could be used to spur "advances toward complete equality."

Man's Dilemma

Dr. King states that man’s dilemma results from “the divorce of nature from the supernatural.”

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Parker

Dr. King sympathizes with the unfortunate plight of Mrs. Parker's financial situation and encourages her to remain steadfast.

Telegram from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Questioning and Paper Proofs

New York, NY, New York (NY)

In this telegram Joan Daves is asking Dr. King to telephone regarding questioning on paper proofs that need to go back to the printer the next day.

MLK Style Sheet: Why We Can't Wait

Here we see what is known as a style sheet for Dr. King's third book, "Why We Can't Wait." Dr. King's book was published in 1964 following the success of the infamous SCLC Birmingham desegregation campaign.

Invitation to President Kennedy's Inauguration

Washington, D.C.

This invitation was sent to Dr. and Mrs. King, inviting them to the inauguration ceremony of President-elect John F. Kennedy and Vice President-elect Lyndon B. Johnson.