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Letter from Joan Daves to Dora MacDonald

Tuesday, May 12, 1964

Joan Daves informs Dora MacDonald of the details for Dr. King's appearances on the Today Show, the Martha Dean Show, a Press Conference and a Channel 13 interview.

Sin

Dr. King compares the understanding of several philosophers on the subject of sin.

Letter from William Ryan to MLK

Monday, March 1, 1965

William Ryan, member of Congress writes Dr. King after he and other members of Congress were able to visit Selma. After witnessing the conditions at hand, they have been urged to break the barrier on the right to vote.

Letter from Susan Neisuler to MLK

Sunday, August 14, 1966

Susan Neisuler encourages Dr. King to speak out against anti-semitism, for there are many Jews who believe that "black power" means anti-semitism.

Letter from M.J. McGrayle to MLK

Friday, December 30, 1966

M.J. McGrayle from Chicago expresses his or her concerns to Dr. King. McGrayle does not understand some of the actions of African Americans and disagrees with Dr. King's marches. The author believes that many of the events taking place within the Civil Rights Movement are further separating the races, as "black people are afraid of" whites. As a white person, McGrayle states, "I lived in Birmingham, Ala[bama] and took the colored peoples part," though now in disagreement, will "do nothing more for the colored people."

Letter to MLK from Charles Weaver

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

Charles Weaver sends a letter of support to Dr. King for all of his contributions to peace and describes him as the ideal Christian prophet.

Senate Subcommittee on Urban Reorganization Statement

Thursday, December 15, 1966

In a hearing on the plight of inner cities, Dr. King focuses on injustices in the urban ghettoes, stating that the problem is not primarily a race issue but an economic one. He calls for a rebalancing of national priorities and links the plight of America's poor to the squandering of resources on war.

Letter Dated 10/15/62 from D. McDonald to Mel Arnold

Monday, October 15, 1962

Miss. Dora McDonald, at the request of Dr. King, sent a letter to Mr. Mel Arnold acknowledging the enclosure of a sermon by Dr. King. The sermon was entitled, "How Should a Christian View Communism?"

Tenth Annual Convention

Thursday, August 11, 1966

Dr. King addresses the achievements the SCLC has accomplished over the past ten years at the Tenth Annual Convention in Jackson, Mississippi. Dr. King then speaks on the fact that all of the SCLC's achievements are accomplished through nonviolence.

Letter from L. D. Reddick to Colleagues

Monday, November 21, 1966

L. D. Reddick's colleagues received this letter pertaining to the business of Dr. King's papers and where they should be housed.

Letter from J. M. Lawson Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, September 13, 1967

Minister J. M. Lawson Jr. served as director of nonviolent education for SCLC from 1960 to 1967. In this letter to Dr. King he expresses concerns about program efforts for the summer and fall seasons. Mr. Lawson is conscious of the necessary redirection of the project and informs Dr. King that he has recommendations.

Moving to Another Mountain

Wesleyan University publishes an edited transcript of a speech given by Dr. King in 1964. The publication is made in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination.

News Release from Congressman John Conyers Jr.

Sunday, October 1, 1967

Congressman John Conyers, Jr. requests that a conference be held including Negro elected officials to support his thirty billion dollar bill to help the nation's ghettos.

Proposed Nobel Speech

This is a draft for an optional version of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. He notes the importance of viewing the world as a family and with such perception, understands race issues as an international concern. King also speaks of Sir Alfred Bernhard Nobel, the originator of the Nobel Peace Prize. He accepts the award on behalf of those who came before him and those who continue to fight for freedom.

Letter from the Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church to MLK

Wednesday, July 13, 1966

The Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church regrets Dr. King's inability to attend their engagement. The church then requests Dr. King's appearance as the guest speaker for their annual Negro History Obeservance event the following year.

Press Release: MLK Joins Sponsors of April 15 Marches on San Francisco and New York City

Friday, February 24, 1967

In this press release, Dr. King announces his support of a massive mobilization against the Vietnam War. Sponsored by the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, major peace marches are being held in New York City and San Francisco. Mrs. King is also listed as a leader who endorsed the demonstrations.

MLK's Address at the University of the West Indies

Sunday, June 20, 1965

Dr. King spoke at the Valedictory Service of the University of the West Indies in Mona, Jamaica in 1965. On his topic "Facing the Challenge of a New Age," Dr. King addresses the international movement towards peace and equality, stating that "the wind of change is blowing all over the world."

Freedom

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology" on the concept of freedom.

Ritschl, Albrecht

Dr. King provides a biographical sketch of German theologian Albrecht Ritschl.

Black Power: The Politics of Liberation in America

Stokely Carmichael and Dr. Charles Hamilton are in partnership with SNCC to promote the Black Power Movement. SNCC creates "freedom gifts" to provide the community with the expression of the "humanistic spirit" and goal of the movement. These freedom gifts range from posters, poetry, calendars, and more.

Telegram to Dr. Wyatt T Walker

Thursday, November 2, 1967

The Members of the Brotherhood of Faith offer support to Dr. Wyatt T. Walker while in the Jefferson County Jail in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Stanley Singer to MLK

Sunday, August 5, 1962

Stanley Singer replies to Dr. King's article in the NY Times Magazine entitled, "The Case Against 'Tokenism'." Mr. Singer implies that the Negro race is inferior due to their immorality. He highlights the perceived negative attributes of the African American community by the inadequacies within their family structure. Mr. Singer expounds on nonviolent resistance, the Civil War, the U.S. constitution, and more.

Telegram from MLK to the Honorable Carl Sanders

Dr. King invites the Honorable Carl Sanders to share the pulpit with himself and Mayor Ivan Allen at the Annual Layman's Day celebration at Ebenezer Baptist Church. He also invites him to a dinner to honor Governor Nelson Rockefeller at the home of Rev. Martin Luther King Sr.

Letter from Alice Mary Hilton and Kathryn Anne Hilton Hayward to MLK

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

Kathryn, a young American girl, writes a letter to Dr. King expressing her sympathy for a girl in the Vietnam War. Kathryn sends twelve cents to help the girl in the war smile. Kathryn's mother also expresses her concern about the war.

Letter from Apuyva J. Mehta to MLK

Monday, October 2, 1967

Written on the day of Mahatma Gandhi's birthday, Mehta requests Dr. King's autograph.

Telegram from Teamsters Vice President Harold Gibbons to MLK

International Brotherhood of Teamsters Vice President Harold Gibbons conveys his support to Dr. King for a statewide Mississippi boycott. Gibbons congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize.

Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

Tuesday, November 20, 1962

Dr. King expresses his approval of an executive order outlawing discrimination in federally assisted housing. He states that this is a courageous action that is a giant leap towards freedom and democracy.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Public Meeting

Monday, August 10, 1964

Dr. King is listed as the keynote speaker for the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Forty-First Boule on August 10, 1964.

Letter from C. Anderson Davis to MLK

Wednesday, May 13, 1964

C. Anderson Davis, Editor of "The Sphinx" and member of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, requests Dr. King make an appearance and give an address at the traditional Negro Greek Letter fraternity's general convention.

Letter from Berwyn Jones to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

Berwyn Jones offers his gratitude to Dr. King for his strong stance in opposition to the Vietnam War. The letter is written a day after Dr. King makes his famous speech entitled "Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence" at Riverside Church in New York.