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Letter from Rev. Cyril S. Butterfield to MLK

Monday, September 27, 1965
BERMUDA, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Reverend Cyril Butterfield invites Dr. King to come speak in Bermuda at the Allen Temple A.M.E. Church.

Letter from Maurice B. Fagan to MLK

Friday, December 29, 1967
Philadelphia, PA, Indiana (IN)

Maurice Fagan confirms receipt of Dr. King's nomination of Richard Hatcher for1967 National Fellowship Award.

Race

Dr. King references quotations from George-Louis Leclerc (Comte de Buffon) and Jean-Baptiste Lamarck concerning the creation of racial identification.

SCLC's Dr. King Ranked by Negroes as Most Influential Leader

Tuesday, January 9, 1968
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

This 1968 SCLC news release relays that Dr. King has been identified "as the most influential Negro leader in America today." Dr. King had less than a hundred days before that influence would cost him his life.

Anonymous Letter of Support for Reverend Ralph Abernathy

Saturday, April 27, 1968

An unknown author warns Rev. Abernathy to protect himself from those who might try to harm him and other Negro civil rights leaders.

Letter from Sanford Kahn to MLK

Wednesday, December 21, 1966
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Sanford Kahn requests Dr. King's support for an effort to abolish the death penalty at the federal level. If given Dr. King's support, Kahn proposes listing the SCLC as a participating member of the ad hoc committee. If the SCLC cannot be listed, Kahn suggests Dr. King serve as an advisor.

Letter from Mrs. Sammie Adams to MLK

Monday, April 4, 1966
Georgia (GA)

Mrs. Sammie Adams, a 67-year-old widow, writes an emotional appeal to Dr. and Mrs. King in an effort to collect money for Easter clothes for her children. She acknowledges that she previously donated to Dr. King and the cause for civil rights and would benefit from some assistance.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Eugene Patterson

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King addresses Mr. Patterson's editorials discussing "sincere questions and doubts" about Dr. King's stance on the conflict in Vietnam.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Robert Goldwin

Wednesday, March 20, 1963
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dora McDonald informs Dr. Robert A. Goldwin the four essays on "100 Years of Emancipation" have been received and placed on Dr. King's desk for him to read upon his return from out of town.

MLK's Response to Vietnam Criticism

VIETNAM

This is an early draft of Dr. King's response to those who wrote him letters critical of his stance on Vietnam. He says that it would be hypocritical to protest against black oppression in America, but not against Vietnamese colonization. He also cites the ideology of non-violence as an explanation for his stance, and expresses regret that "much of America has failed to understand the full meaning of the non-violent method."

Marx

Dr. King references German philosopher Karl Marx regarding his teachings. King states, "Marx teaching resolves into three principal elements: a philosophy of history, and economic theory, and a practical program for the realization of a new social order."

Letter from MLK to Mrs. J. T. Brent

Friday, August 9, 1963
Michigan (MI)

Dr. King responds to a letter from Mrs. Brent by explaining his views about love and its place in the Civil Rights Movement. He affirms that "it is through love and understanding that we approach the segregationist." He mentions that striking out in any act of violence is not condoned by leaders of the movement.

War- Treitschke

Dr. King quotes Heinrich von Treitschke’s “Politics.”

Telegram from Bob Dillon to MLK

Sunday, September 15, 1963
Alabama (AL)

In this telegram, Bob Dillon requests Dr. King's presence along with Reverend Billy Graham at a revival being held in what he classifies as an "unchristian community" in Birmingham.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald Inquiring about Dr.King's Professional Tour

Tuesday, February 25, 1964
New York, NY

Mrs.Daves has requested that Mrs.McDonald send information pertaining to Dr.King's lectures and personal appearances to her office as soon as possible.

Kansas City Star Drawing

This editorial cartoon from the Kansas City Star depicts Dr. King at a bar with two bottles labeled "Anti-Vietnam" and "100 Proof." A young girl representing the Civil Rights Movement pulls on his coat and asks him to come home.

Letter from John A. McDermott to Chicago Daily News

Friday, June 30, 1967
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

John McDermott anticipates discrimination in housing and job opportunities as a result of a proposed federal project for a nuclear power plant in Illinois. Ideally, The Weston Project should create equal opportunities for both black and white Americans. McDermott expresses concern considering the current conditions of racial injustice that exists in Illinois.

Note Card on Democritus' Metaphysics

In this notecard, Dr. King writes on the subject of Metaphysics, focusing on the works of Democritus.

Letter from MLK to Marguerite Braymer

Tuesday, January 10, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Mrs. Braymer of Questar Corporation for her generous contribution of 25 shares of Standard Oil Company of New Jersey stock to the SCLC.

Acrostic Poem About MLK

California (CA)

Adolf G. H. Kreiss shows his immense support and gratitude for Dr. King's fight for equality with an acrostic poem using the initials of the civil rights leader.

Soap, Brush Help

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Addressing Chicago slums, the focal point of Dr. King's Chicago crusade, the writer of the article calls for all tenants, regardless of race, creed or color, to assume some responsibility for the upkeep of their buildings instead of expecting Dr. King and the landlords of the buildings to solve the issue for them.

Letter from MLK to Maj Palmberg

Thursday, May 12, 1966
SWEDEN, FINLAND

Dr. King's informs Miss Palmberg that he is unable to accept her invitation to visit Finland.

Unitarianism

Dr. King describes the theology of Unitarianism as being a contrast to Trinitarianism.

Challenge on Luther King

Thursday, November 18, 1965
SOUTH AFRICA

The author of this article says that Rev. I. L. de Villiers' letter lacked moderation, reasoned argument and tolerance of a different point of view. He also says that anyone who advocates for racial equality is branded as communist and that Afrikaners are suffering as a result.

Letter from William O. Miller to MLK

Sunday, February 18, 1968
Philadelphia, PA

Mr. Miller expresses gratitude to Dr. King for his recent endorsement of "Teachers Concerned," a local initiative in Philadelphia. He concludes by expressing wishes that Dr. King continues to be blessed in his efforts to "remove all racial lines of demarcation."

Telegram from MLK to Nicholas Biddle

Friday, March 16, 1962

Dr. King apologizes to Nicholas Biddle for being unable to attend the testimonial for Senator Jacob Javits.

Letter from W. David Angus to MLK

Friday, September 20, 1963
CANADA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Atlanta, GA

W. David Angus, Secretary of the Canadian Club of Montreal, extends an invitation to Dr. King to speak at an upcoming luncheon. He concludes by offering to cover any expenses that Dr. King may accumulate if he were to accept the invitation.

Letter From Joan Daves to MLK about Book Review

Monday, August 28, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter, dated August 28, 1967, Joan Daves writes to Dr. King concerning the review of "Where Do We Go From Here?" Daves comments, "It is not my favorite kind of review--when three books are reviewed jointly."

Letter from Edwina Smith to Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth

Wednesday, November 3, 1965
Cincinnati, OH, Atlanta, GA

Ms. Edwina Smith writes Reverend Shuttlesworth regarding a SCLC meeting and encloses a round trip plane ticket.

Letter from Reverend Michael Scott to MLK

Monday, December 3, 1962
London, England, Atlanta, GA

Reverend Michael Scott, of the International Committee for the Study of Group Rights in London, writes Dr. King expressing that the organization would like him to become an Honorary President. Scott explains, "this need not involve more than our being able to use your name."