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Letter from MLK to Canon Hugh Monteflore

Thursday, January 21, 1965
UNITED KINGDOM

Dr. King declines Canon Hugh Montefiore invitation to speak at the University Church in Cambridge, England due to his pastoral duties at his own church.

Paul's Letter to American Christians Notes

These notes are in reference to a sermon given by Dr. King. The sermon, "Paul's Letter to American Christians," was included in the publishing of Dr. King's second book. Following the popularity of his first narrative, "Stride Toward Freedom," Dr. King was asked to compile some of his sermons into a book entitled "Strength to Love."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. H. Libby

Friday, September 8, 1961
New York (NY)

Dora McDonald sends Mrs. Libby a copy of Dr. King's sermon "Paul's Letter to American Christians." McDonald could not retrieve a copy of the address preached at the Riverside Church that Mrs. Libby requested.

Letter from MLK to Mr. & Mrs. Charles Digioia

Monday, October 24, 1966
Michigan (MI)

Dr. King expresses his sincere gratitude for the sculpture of John Henry that was created and sent to him by Mr. & Mrs. Digioia. As intended by the artist, the art work embodies the magnificence of strength and courage held with in the oppressed. Honored to accept it, Dr. King sees John Henry as an inspirational symbol of will and spirit.

Letter from Mrs. Emma Hines to MLK

Pennsylvania (PA)

Mrs. Emma Hines offers her moral and financial support to Dr. King. As a 78 year old woman, she will not be able to join King in his march, however, states that she has some young people that might be joining.

Preview of the "Dream" at Detroit March

Sunday, June 23, 1963
Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA)

Two months before the famous "I Have a Dream" speech at the March on Washington, King used many of the same words, rhetorical techniques, and themes. King expresses gratitude and inspiration and warns against hatred and separatism at what he thinks is the largest US demonstration to date, a march in Detroit June 23, 1963. The legacy of slavery and segregation induced a false sense of inferiority in Negroes.

March on Washington Transportation Information

New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

This is a form sent to each organization participating in the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, requiring information regarding transportation arrangements.

Progress

Dr. King notes and comments on a quote from James H. Robinson's "The New History" on the eternal law of progress.

Letter from MLK to Gertrude Corbett

Tuesday, January 25, 1966
Brooklyn, NY, New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Dr. King thanks Miss Corbett for her message regarding the SCLC Chicago Campaign. He agrees with Miss Corbett's view that the current Negro dilemma is rooted in multiple causes. He also discusses standards of living, economic conditions and society as a whole.

Autograph Request

GERMANY

German citizen, Reinhold Kohl, requests an autograph of Dr. King for his collection.

Ebenezer Baptist Church. Dr. King with Daughter Bernice (Bonnie). Atlanta, 1967

Atlanta, GA

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Letter from Helen E. Saum to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968
Washington, D.C., New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Ms. Saum applauds the positive attitude and accomplishments of organizations like the National Urban League, which she contrasts with the marches and riots that she feels hinder goodwill and cooperation.

Reason

Dr. King quotes a passage from Karl Barth's "Word of God and the Word of Man," regarding reason.

Miracles

EGYPT, ISRAEL

Dr. King paraphrases the Old Testament scripture of Exodus chapter 13, verse 22, in which God leads the Israelites with a cloud by day and a a pillar of fire by night.

MLK Notes for Speech to the Chicago Headline Club

Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

This is a draft of a speech Dr. King delivered to the Chicago Headline Club. The speech encompasses information regarding the difficulty the media may have covering the SCLC and the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. W. A. Visser't Hooft

Monday, December 20, 1965
SWITZERLAND, Geneva, Switzerland

Dora McDonald writes Dr. Hooft confirming that Dr. King accepts his invitation to speak in Geneva. McDonald inquires about expenses for Dr. King and one of his aids and encloses a photograph and biography for Dr. Hooft to utilize.

MLK's Sermon Outline

Dr. King categorizes different types of Christians.

Telegram from MLK to Robert L. Leggett

Washington, D.C.

In this telegram, King urges the House of Representatives to please vote passage demonstration cities for the sake of civil peace.

Berdyaev

Dr. King quotes a passage from Nikolai Berdyaev's "Slavery and Freedom" about religious, technological and spiritual revolutions.

Man

Dr. King records a quote from Jeremiah 17:9, which discusses the evilness of man.

References (Religion and Philosophy)

Dr. King cites three articles about Borden Parker Bowne. The first, “Personalism and the Influence of Bowne,” was written by Edgar S. Brightman and appeared in the journal The Personalist.

Letter from L. K. Jackson to MLK

Tuesday, January 22, 1963
Indiana (IN), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Reverend L. K. Jackson commends Dr. King on his ongoing efforts in the Civil Rights Movement.

Holiday Letter from the Best Family

In this Christmas Card, the Best Family wishes all of their friends and supporters a Merry Christmas.

The Influence of the Right and Left in the Civil Rights Movement

Sunday, January 31, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, Mississippi (MS), California (CA), FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, HUNGARY, CHINA, CUBA

Activist Bayard Rustin prepared these remarks for the Negro Leadership Conference in New York in January 1965. He discusses the influence of the American right, the traditional Communist left and the unaffiliated left (the Thirties veterans and the spontaneous left of Harlem and Mississippi).

Invitation from the Government of Barbados to MLK

BARBADOS

The Government of Barbados invite Dr. King and Coretta Scott King to the Celebrations to Mark the Independence of Barbados. This event held high historical importance due Barbados' inquiry for independence for many years.

Philosophy

Dr. King describes philosophy as being the "wholes of which sciences describe the parts." He states that the answers to questions will differ depending on the school of philosophy one references.

Address by MLK at SCLC Ministers Conference

Wednesday, September 23, 1959
Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA), Arkansas (AR), Little Rock, AR, Delaware (DE), Maryland (MD), Missouri (MO), Kentucky (KY), Oklahoma (OK), West Virginia (WV), North Carolina (NC), Tennessee (TN), Texas (TX), Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Louisiana (LA), Philadelphia, PA, CANADA, EGYPT, South Carolina (SC)

Dr. King addresses those in attendance at the Southern Christian Ministers Conference. He brings words of encouragement to those working diligently for social change in Mississippi. He speaks words of promise that things will change since the Supreme Court has ruled segregation unconstitutional and he gives examples of how things are slowly changing. However, he acknowledges that there is still much work to be done, especially in the South. Dr. King lists actions that must be at the top of everyone's list to be taken care of.

Scientific Method and God

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman on the knowledge of God being unscientific. The content of this card appears verbatim in King's doctoral dissertation, "A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Letter from Nicholas Katzenbach to MLK

Tuesday, August 30, 1966
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Birmingham, AL

The anonymous author details some of the hardships of his life and expresses his desire to incarcerate Dr. King permanently.