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Letter from J. M. Lawson Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, September 13, 1967

Minister J. M. Lawson Jr. served as director of nonviolent education for SCLC from 1960 to 1967. In this letter to Dr. King he expresses concerns about program efforts for the summer and fall seasons. Mr. Lawson is conscious of the necessary redirection of the project and informs Dr. King that he has recommendations.

Appeal to Billy Graham Regarding Religion

Matakichi Saito questions Billy Graham about his views on religion as it relates to discrimination.

Letter from Walter Mondale to MLK

Wednesday, July 26, 1967

In this letter Congressman Mondale writes to Dr. King asking for feedback on the bill he's trying to pass, which is intended to provide government assistance for home ownership.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eartha Kitt

Wednesday, January 24, 1968

Dr. King's secretary Dora McDonald commends actress Eartha Kitt for speaking "as a woman, among women.” Responding to a question by the First Lady at a White House luncheon hosted by Lady Bird Johnson, Kitt linked youth violence to the Vietnam War.

Showdown for Nonviolence

Tuesday, April 16, 1968

Dr. King discusses the rationale and strategy for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C. He explains that the SCLC hopes to avoid a national holocaust by promoting massive nonviolent demonstrations.

Letter from Herbert Coulton to Friends

Herbert Coulton, SCLC Director of Affiliates, encourages more supporters to become church affiliates. Mr. Coulton informs readers that the "SCLC is commonly considered as the Social Action Arm of the Christian Churches in America."

Letter from Edmond G. Jeffries to MLK

Sunday, January 27, 1963

Edmond G. Jeffries writes Dr. King after hearing him speak at the Chicago Sunday Evening Club. Jeffries states, "The injustices that the white man has visited on the colored man for hundreds of years burns my soul." Jeffries expresses that he only wants to be a Christian.

Letter from Israel Goldstein to MLK

Friday, October 23, 1964

Israel Goldstein congratulates Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize and extends an invitation to the King family to visit his home in Jerusalem.

Letter to Mr. Otwell from Dr. King Regarding the Request for an Article for the Chicago Sun-Times

Monday, March 30, 1964

Dr. King informs Mr. Otwell that, due to prior obligations, he will not be able to write the article for the Sunday edition as requested. However, he assures Mr. Otwell that he will look into the possibility of editing a section of "Why We Can't Wait" to be published instead.

Letter from MLK to FDR III

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the contribution of $1,000.00 made by Franklin D. Roosevelt III to the SCLC.

Letter from Doug Dodge to MLK

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

Mr. Doug Dodge writes Dr. King to request his help in identifying an appropriate role in the Civil Rights Movement for a young white male who is seeking to get involved.

Albany Manifesto

Sunday, July 15, 1962

In support of the Albany Movement, the Albany Manifesto was drafted to make clear what the proponents of the cause sought to resolve.

Sin in Psalms

Dr. King writes notes on the topic of sin, quoting Psalm 51:5.

Congress of Racial Equality Proposal: Recommended Program for School Desegregation

The Congress of Racial Equality recommends a program to end school segregation that includes forming race-neutral curricula and allowing open enrollment in schools.

Clarence Jordan's Open letter to to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta

Tuesday, September 24, 1963

Clarence Jordan writes to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta to voice his opinion on the Ashton Jones affair. Ashton Jones, a white Methodist minister, was jailed for "disturbing divine worship" when he and two African American associates attempted to take part in a segregated church service. Jordan attempts to parallel this event to biblical accounts where Judeo-Christian leaders disrupted services involved with idol worship. Jordan further asserts that while the state of Georgia may permit the worshipping of a "segregated god," "God himself does not."

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Philip S. McConnell

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Mrs. McConnell for her support of his work. He also comments on the importance of adopting nonviolence principle to resolve conflicts internationally among nations, as well as to resolve social problems at home.

Telegram from Donna Jean Stancliff to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1967

Donna Jean Stancliff informs Dr. King of Mrs. Zelma G. Proctor's funeral.

Letter from 'Hardworking People' to MLK

A white American recommends a different approach to Civil Rights demonstrations. He believes that if celebrities are placed at the fore front of the marches that the black community would then be motivated to work.

January Program of the Emancipation Celebration

Monday, January 2, 1961

This program of the Emancipation Celebration in Savannah, Georgia features Dr. King as the guest speaker.

Letter Regarding the Distribution of Pilgrimage Folders

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

Sandy F. Ray thanks Andrew Young for speaking to his parishioners. Reverend Ray also requests information regarding the distribution of the Pilgrimage Folders, in preparation for the mass pilgrimage Dr. King was planning to lead to Israel and Jordan.

Letter from Kate Krautheimer to MLK

Friday, September 10, 1965

Kate Krautheimer informs Dr. King of an invitation from the University of Pennsylvania requesting that he address the undergraduate student body.

Letter from MLK to Richard V. Grulich

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Dr. King expresses his agreement with Mr. Grulich regarding U.S. foreign policy, asserting that the federal government needs to develop the "moral courage" to admit past mistakes.

Descartes

Dr. King references a theological concept by the French philosopher Rene Descartes.

Letter from John O. Killens to MLK About a Book Party

Sunday, September 14, 1958

In this letter, Killens discusses the possibility of a book party in Dr. King's honor. Killens, Ruby Dee, Lofton Mitchell, Ossie Davis, and Harry Belafonte are exploring this idea and believe that at this event many books would be sold and the message of civil rights could be communicated to thousands.

Letter to Ralph David Abernathy from Allen L. Johnson

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

Southern Christian Leadership Conference board member Allen L. Johnson wrote this letter to Rev. Abernathy shortly after Dr. King's death. Johnson expressed his support of Rev. Abernathy's leadership of the organization.

Is Nonviolence Effective

Rev. P. R. Regamey writes a paper that discusses whether or not nonviolence is effective. He uses Gandhi's methods as a basis for the paper. Rev. Regamey also addresses the broader theory and practice of nonviolence.

The Negro Family: A Challenge to National Action

Thursday, January 27, 1966

Dr. King addresses the topic of the Negro family. He emphasizes the importance of discussing the Negro family in comparison to other races.

Letter from Aggie Smith to MLK

Tuesday, January 25, 1966

Aggie Smith invites Dr. King and his children to visit her school in Chicago, Illinois.

Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech Draft

Thursday, December 10, 1964

In 1964, Dr. King became the first African-American to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. At age 35, he was also the youngest recipient of the award to date. Emphasizing a philosophy of nonviolence, Dr. King writes this acceptance speech commemorating the courageous work of the Civil Rights Movement. He highlights the brutality faced throughout the United States and addresses the irony of accepting a peace prize on behalf of a movement that has yet to obtain peace.

Operation Breadbasket Cost Breakdown

Operation Breadbasket was a division of the SCLC founded in 1962 and operated by Reverend Fred C. Bennett. The project was dedicated to improving the economic conditions of black communities across the United States. This is an estimated cost breakdown for the operation. It includes expected wages, salaries, transportation, insurance, and office supplies for running the project for one year.