Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Arkansas (AR)"

Letter from MLK to William Ericson

Wednesday, March 6, 1968

In this letter, Dr. King states his appreciation for the contribution made by Mr. Ericson to the SCLC Foundation. Dr. King goes on to express how grateful he is to have such support in the promotion of social change through non-violence.

Letter from Chuck Barris to MLK

Tuesday, May 4, 1965

Chuck Barris has received national monetary support for the truck rentals used for the Selma to Montgomery March.

Letter from Edith Green to MLK

Monday, September 20, 1965

Representative Edith Greene writes Dr. King concerning his previous telegram about the Mississippi challenge. Green concludes by agreeing with Dr. King's stance for a delegate vote in Mississippi.

The Martin Luther King Column (1)

Dr. King discusses the accomplishments of the Montgomery bus boycott, the challenges Negros will face, and the leadership skills of Ralph Abernathy.

God

Dr. King quotes St. Thomas Aquinas on the concept of God.

Letter to MLK from Violet Calvert

Thursday, July 1, 1965

Violet Calvert expresses to Dr. King that she has little money but she uses letters to fight for equality. She shows Dr. King a copy of one of her published letters.

L. A. Dotson Attempts to Speak with MLK

Saturday, August 19, 1967

L. A. Dotson has made several attempts to speak with Dr. King on a personal matter. Unfortunately, Dr. King has not responded. L. A. Dotson forwards contact information to Dr. King and has taken residence at the Regency Hyatt room 226.

Tillich's Method

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich’s “The Protestant Era.” He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”

Letter from Dora McDonald to Cantor Solomon Mendelson

Tuesday, December 20, 1966

In this response letter to Cantor Mendelson of Congregation Beth Sholom in New York, Miss McDonald explains that Dr. King will make all efforts to attend the "I Have a Dream" musical performance.

Letter from M. L. Phillips to MLK

Sunday, October 22, 1967

In this letter, Mrs. Phillips writes Dr. King to inform him that she enjoys listening to him speak on the radio.

Letter to MLK

Tuesday, October 4, 1966

Here Mrs. L. Schmidt, acting through the office of Joan Daves, requests that Dr. King write an inscription in his book "Why We Can't Wait" for her son, Joachim.

Letter from US Attorney General Robert Kennedy Forwarded to MLK

Friday, May 8, 1964

John L. Murphy writes Dr. King to forward him a letter for the Reverend from US Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy that his office received in error. In the forwarded letter, Kennedy thanks Dr. King for his willingness to contribute to a series of oral interviews for the John F. Kennedy library.

Integration Details in Wilcox County

Thursday, December 22, 1966

On September 23, 1966, Wilcox County School in Alabama was integrated. However, the amount of "physical acts" and "extreme brutality" directed towards the Negro students was so great that the parents of the students prohibited their children from attending just a few months later. In this report, Robert L. Green, the Education Consultant to the SCLC, outlines the details of this event to Mr. John Doar of the U.S. Justice Department. He tells Mr.

Collage of Tourist Sites in Los Angeles, CA

These are collection of photos that show different tourist sites in Los Angeles, CA.

Nobel Prize Atlanta Dinner Address Outline

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Dr. King outlines his address for the January 27, 1965 recognition dinner honoring him for the Nobel Peace Prize. He intends to speak on topics of racial justice, nonviolence and poverty, while discussing the strides made by the movement and the uphill battles still to be faced. Over 1000 people attended the program, the first integrated dinner in Atlanta's history.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

This note, signed "A white citizen who likes good Negroes," warns that President Johnson is no friend to the Civil Rights Movement, only supporting African American voting rights to earn more votes for his reelection. It is unclear if both sides of this note were written by the same author. Both discuss how they are conscientious objectors, although they object to an integrated society, writing that "[No] high-class, intelligent persons (politicians excepted) will accept the Negro when he has an axe to grind."

Spring Mobilization Committee Information Sheets

These information sheets concern the Spring Mobilization Committee's rally taking place within the United Nations. Topics discussed include meals, housing, and child safety.

Letter from Robert S. Browne to MLK

Monday, April 10, 1967

Robert S. Browne informs Dr. King that he disagrees with the editor the New York Times. Browne conveys his support to Dr. King for his nonviolent philosophy.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, November 20, 1964

In this letter Ms. Daves informs Dr. King that she is working to solve issue of copyright for his Oslo University address, and stresses the importance of copyrighting all of his "writings...and speeches."

Letter from Eunice Johnson to Coretta Scott King

Monday, October 12, 1959

Eunice Johnson, an African woman born in America but now living in Nigeria, writes Mrs. King in hopes of being able to meet her during her visit to America. She hopes that they can discuss Dr. King's nonviolent campaign.

Letter from Joseph Derman to MLK

Tuesday, March 16, 1965

Joseph Derman sends Dr. King a financial contribution to "the great cause." He sends the contribution in memory of the civil rights workers who have passed away.

Letter from Frank Thompson Jr. to MLK

Monday, February 17, 1964

New Jersey Democratic Congressman Frank Thompson thanks Dr. King for his message regarding the Congressman's part in the fight for civil rights. Thompson mentions that he considers Dr. King to be one of the "great leaders" of their generation.

Letter from James Gustafson to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967

James Gustafson, President of 'O KAIROS, writes to Dr. King welcoming him to the University of Minnesota's St. Paul campus. 'O KAIROS is the campus Lutheran community of worship.

NAACP Remembers MLK

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

The NAACP released this comprehensive tribute in Dr. King's memory. The tribute was printed in The New York Post on the day of Dr. King's funeral.

Letter from Joan Daves to Clarence Jones

Friday, October 30, 1964

Joan Daves writes to Dr. King's attorney to discuss her receipt of the Martin Luther King Treasury published by the Educational Heritage. Impressed with the volume, Daves proceeds to give details on its organization and content. Raising the issue of whether certain material is in the public domain, Daves offers to expedite the copyright assignment process.

Congratulations to MLK from Michael Engel

Saturday, December 19, 1964

In this letter dated December 19, 1964, Michael Engel sends his congratulations to Dr.King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize. He also asks for a picture of Dr.King for his scrapbook.

Antioch College Commencement Program

Saturday, June 19, 1965

This is a program for Antioch College's 1965 commencement, at which Dr. King addressed the graduating class.

Index Card with Dr. King's Handwritten Theology Notes

This notecard seems to elucidate some of Dr. King's personal insights on the relationship between Christianity and society.This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses. Topics covered include theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches and sermons.

Letter from Josephine Baker to MLK

Tuesday, November 26, 1963

Josephine Baker offers support and encouragement to Dr. King in the civil rights campaign and asserts "without unity there cannot be a solid victory."

Memorandum from Carole to Dora McDonald

Thursday, June 22, 1967

Carole requests that Ms. McDonald channels several correspondence to Dr. King from those who will participate in a Convention.