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Final Plans for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

Washington, D.C., New York, NY

This final organizing manual for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom details all logistics of the march, including the purpose of the march and accommodations for arriving in Washington, D.C.

Handwritten Notes on Sin

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on sin. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definition, and bible verses.

Letter from MLK to Charles H. Dorr

Friday, January 5, 1968
Wisconsin (WI), New York (NY), SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. King writes Charles Dorr acknowledging his support of the young African American men who are boycotting the Olympic games. King states, "the country must concern itself with the plight of all Negroes and not just the privileged few."

Letter from MLK to Gleason Jackson Regarding Negro National Flag

Thursday, July 13, 1967
New Jersey (NJ)

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Mr. Jackson for designing a flag promoting unity among black people. Although Dr. Kings feels a flag such as this has implications of separatism, he encourages Mr. Jackson to continue publicizing his ideas regarding black unity.

Telegram from Al C. Hastings to MLK

Tuesday, October 31, 1967
Alabama (AL), Florida (FL)

Al Hastings expresses his concern during Dr. King's incarceration in the Jefferson County Jail.

Letter from Michael Williams to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

The Chairman of the Society of African and Afro-American Students, at the University of Pennsylvania, extends an invitation to Dr. King to come speak with students during "Black Week."

Letter from Mrs. Barbara Gonye to MLK

Tuesday, January 2, 1968
Georgia (GA)

This is a handwritten note from Mrs. Barbara Gonye to Dr. King questioning his position as a "Man of God" and a "Man of Peace". She also accuses Dr. King of having hate and being a troublemaker.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman's "Philosophy of Religion."

Invitation From L. Rosenberger to MLK

Thursday, April 2, 1964
BRAZIL, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

The First International Congress of Negro Culture invites Dr. King to their conference in Brazil.

Invitation to President Kennedy's Inaugural Ball

Washington, D.C.

This invitation was sent to Dr. and Mrs. King, inviting them to the Inaugural Ball following the inauguration of President-elect John F. Kennedy and Vice President-elect Lyndon B. Johnson.

Montgomery Improvement Association Press Release About Emergency Conference

Monday, January 7, 1957
Montgomery, AL, New York (NY), Tallahassee, FL, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This press release from the Montgomery Improvement Association discusses an emergency conference called to address strategies for the integrated transportation campaign.

Letter from Norman Edward & Katherine Kowal to SCLC

Sunday, May 14, 1967

Impressed by a sermon delivered by Dr. King, Norman Edward and Katherine Ann Kowal contributes to the SCLC.

Letter from Irwin Heilner to Attorney Clarence Jones

Tuesday, November 26, 1963
New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), New York, NY

Irwin Heilner asks Dr. King's attorney for permission to use the "I Have a Dream" speech in one of his songs. He mentions that he previously used words from Langston Hughes in a song on a 50 percent basis and would like the same agreement for the use of Dr. King's speech.

Dialectical Theology

Dr. King outlines dialectical theology, an approach to theology in Protestantism. King discerns that the "dogmatic arise primarily out of the demands of the religious consciousness."

A New South A-Coming

Alabama (AL), GEORGIA, South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN)

This pamphlet discusses the courageous stand of African American high school students against racial discrimination in the South. The efforts demonstrated by these young people to bring about change of many undemocratic practices were significantly noted in Negro history.

Letter from Paul R. Davis to MLK

Friday, June 23, 1967
Missouri (MO), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Paul R. Davis, Minister at First Congregational Church of Webster Groves, writes Dr. King regarding an interview between Dr. King and Father Daniel Lyons, S. J. about the connection between Vietnam and the need for US federal poverty program funding. Davis requests any material to "clarify critical interpretations" that may have been perceived by the interview.

Letter from Ernestine Comegys to SCLC

Monday, April 5, 1965
New Jersey (NJ), Atlanta, GA

Ernestine Comegys writes the SCLC in hopes of obtaining commemorative plates of Dr. King containing his biography on the back. Comegys plans to sell the plates at her church.

Letter of Support to MLK

Wednesday, January 3, 1962
New York, NY

Mr. Hillyer and his children Nitra, Linda, and Jonathan send a donation of thirty-five dollars to Dr. King, in memory of the late Mrs. Hillyer.

Letter from Rodney H. Clurman to Jayaprakash Narayan

Monday, May 29, 1967
New York (NY), INDIA, Washington, D.C., ISRAEL, EGYPT, CANADA, DENMARK, Geneva, Switzerland

Rodney H. Clurman writes Jayaprakash Narayan about the current state of the Middle East. This letter was written just days before the Six-Day war between Egypt and Israel. It is suggested that the governments of each nation, including the U.S., be prepared for the possibility of increased violence.

Difference of the Transition Period from the Early Scientific Period

Dr. King references Alfred North Whitehead by noting the differences between the Transition Period and the Early Scientific Period.

Essay on Violence and Nonviolence

The impractical and immoral effect of violence and testimony to the moral power and efficiency of nonviolence are discussed in this essay. Violence is recognized as achieving social justice with great results, but not without damage to society. Although a much tougher way of seeking social justice, nonviolence is a more satisfying lasting solution.

Fundamentalism

Dr. King cross-references fundamentalism with authoritarianism.

Robert F. Thorne's Response to the SCLC

Tuesday, July 11, 1967
California (CA), VIETNAM, NORTH KOREA, CONGO / ZAIRE

Robert F. Thorne expresses his commitment to the civil rights cause, but will discontinue his financial contributions to the SCLC due to Dr. King's statements regarding the Vietnam War.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding "Why We Can't Wait"

Wednesday, June 3, 1964
New York, NY

In this letter dated June 3, 1964, Joan Daves sends Dr. King two copies of his contract for for his book entitled "Why We Can't Wait". The terms for the German edition of "Why We Can't Wait" have already been cleared.

Religion and Science

Dr. King writes about the different perspectives of the moralist and scientist, saying a person can be both.

Letter from Lessie Robinson to MLK Regarding Segregation

Florida (FL)

Mrs. Robinson informs Dr. King of the difficulty in finding a good job in segregated Graceville, FL.

Letter from Charles and Leslie Gray to MLK about Contribution

Wednesday, December 13, 1967

In this letter, the Grays send an enclosed contribution to Dr. King in support of his "approach in the civil rights movement."

Letter from Dr. King to Rev. & Mrs. Sargent

Monday, November 8, 1965
FRANCE

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Rev. & Mrs. Sargent for their efforts in getting him to visit Paris and for their support of funding SCLC.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967
New York, NY, NIGERIA

In a letter to Dr. King, Mr. Brown encloses an article pertaining to Nigeria being on the brink of disintegration and civil war.

National Committee to Combat Nazism's Resolution on Civil Rights

Sunday, May 28, 1967
Chicago, IL

The National Committee to Combat Nazism passed this resolution, affirming the Civil Rights Movement and agreeing to send Dr. King and President Johnson a copy of their stance.