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Letter from Jack Delano to MLK

Tuesday, July 20, 1965
PUERTO RICO

Jack Delano expresses how pleased the radio and television service of Puerto Rico is to learn that Dr. King has agreed to appear on their press interview program.

Letter from Harry G. Boyte to Coretta Scott King

Tuesday, October 20, 1964

In this letter, Harry G. Boyte offers his personal admiration to Mrs. King for the "strength [she has] provided Dr. King."

Chapter II - The Methodologies of Tillich and Wieman

This is the third chapter of Dr. King's dissertation "A Comparison of the Conception of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Letter to MLK from Paul Anderson

Berkeley, CA, San Francisco, CA, California (CA)

Paul Anderson expressed concern about what he perceived as Dr. King's move toward the "new left." With a sense of immediacy he urged Dr. King to plan to meet with Robert Pickus on his next visit to northern California. Anderson posited that Pickus' plan concerning the Vietnam War is more worthy to be aligned with the non-violent tradition, "unlike the movement toward which Dr. King is leaning."

Letter from L. M. McCoy to MLK

Thursday, February 23, 1967
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, New York, NY, BRAZIL

The Board of Missions of the Methodist Church, on behalf of the Methodist Church of Brazil, invites Dr. King to speak at the centennial celebration of Methodist missionary work in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. McCoy also provides a brief history of the Methodist Church of Brazil.

Family Planning-A Special and Urgent Concern

Thursday, May 5, 1966
Washington, D.C., New York, NY

This document contains Dr. King's response on receiving the Margaret Sanger Award in Human Rights at the Fiftieth Anniversary Banquet of Planned Parenthood-World Population. Margaret Sanger is famous for opening the first birth control clinic in the USA and establishing Planned Parenthood. Dr. King discusses the benefits of family planning for the Negro family, as well as similarities between his and Margaret' Sanger's efforts for equality. Also featured is a photograph of Coretta Scott King accepting the award on Dr. King's behalf.

Bread at Midnight

Tuesday, December 13, 1966
Georgia (GA), SOUTH AFRICA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION

"The Mennonite," issued by The Board of Education and Publication of the General Conference Mennonite Church, features an article by Dr. King entitled "Bread at Night." Dr. King begins with a parable that demonstrates not only the power of prayer, but provides metaphors for the state of America and thinking material for the role of the church during that time period.

Response Letter from Miss D. McDonald to Professor Paul Kurt Ackerman

Thursday, July 13, 1967
Boston, MA

This letter is in response to Professor Paul Kurt Ackermann from Miss. D. McDonald, c/o MLK, referencing a request for submission of Dr. King's manuscript.

Letter Regarding the Distribution of Pilgrimage Folders

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Sandy F. Ray thanks Andrew Young for speaking to his parishioners. Reverend Ray also requests information regarding the distribution of the Pilgrimage Folders, in preparation for the mass pilgrimage Dr. King was planning to lead to Israel and Jordan.

Statement from MLK Returning from Receiving Nobel Prize

Friday, December 18, 1964
New York, NY

Upon returning from receiving the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King issued this statement on segregation, calling it "nothing but a new form of slavery."

Draft of I Have a Dream

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

This version of Dr. King's famous "I Have a Dream" speech reveals important changes to ideas and phrases that Dr. King chose either to alter or omit completely the day he addressed the throng gathered before the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. Dr. King's argument against the "normalcy" of bigotry remained a key message on the day he took the podium.

Letter from Mrs. S. M. Brock to MLK about an Inheritance

Monday, May 29, 1967
Virginia (VA)

In this letter Mrs. S.M. Brock pleads with Dr. King for assistance in recovering her mother's inheritance. The inheritance was allegedly squandered by the mother's attorney. For the assistance, Mrs. Brock offers $50,000.

Remember Who You Are!

Thursday, December 6, 1956
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King addresses the student body and officials of Howard University with a poignant sermon entitled, "Remember Who You Are." The content of the sermon makes various references between Jesus, Shakespeare and Greek philosophers who sought to identify the mechanisms that made man important to society.

Letter from Aileen B. Armstrong to MLK

Saturday, May 18, 1963
Berkeley, CA, California (CA), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

Mrs. Armstrong writes Dr. King to express her regard and deep appreciation for his work.

Royalty Statement re: Why We Can't Wait

Thursday, December 31, 1964
New York, NY

This royalty statement for the German edition of "Why We Can't Wait" has an itemization of royalties earned.

Letter from Sonja Lid Larssen and Lars Andr. Larssen to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964
NORWAY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, FRANCE

The Fredskontoret (Peace Bureau) of Norway congratulates Dr. King on his being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize and requests that he presents for the inhabitants of Stavanger. The authors detail four reasons why he should accept this invitation, with one including a public meeting concerning nonviolence.

Letter from Mary Hart to MLK

Maryland (MD), Baltimore, MD, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

In one of three letters Mary Hart sends Dr. King, she thanks him for his efforts in assisting poor people in America. Hart says that she is representing all poor people and sends apologies that she will not be present for the March of Poor People to Washington.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

Friday, December 3, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Vice President Humphrey thanks Dr. King for participating in a recent White House Conference, "To Fulfill These Rights," which focused on jobs, jobs training and economic security.

Letter from Ann Pooney to MLK

Chicago, IL

Ann Pooney expresses her sentiments regarding Dr. King's teachings and the state of African Americans. Pooney feels that most blacks have not proven to be good Christians or citizens of the US.

Letter from Ralph Turnidge to MLK

Friday, January 24, 1964
Washington (WA)

The Reverend Ralph Turnidge, General Secretary of the Washington-Northern Idaho Council of Churches, invites Dr. King to be the featured leader at a conference on the Church and Human Rights.

Conference on Social Statistics Resolutions

Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), New Jersey (NJ)

This document lists a number of solutions for improving the acknowledgement of minorities in America. These solutions were drafted during the Conference on Social Statistics held in Washington D.C.

Letter from Margie Edmondson to MLK Regaring a Speaking Engagement

Thursday, February 10, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

In this letter, Margie Edmondson of Chicago, Illinois invites Dr. King to speak to local youth at a bi-monthly meeting of the Junior Christian Inter-Racial Commission.

Letters from Irvine I. Turner to MLK

Tuesday, April 17, 1962
New Jersey (NJ)

Irvine I. Turner requests, in three different letters, Dr. King provide an endorsement for reelection to the Newark Municipal Council.

Telegram to Dr. King about Vietnam

Monday, April 10, 1967
California (CA), Georgia (GA)

The Magee Volunteers for International Developement have communicated with Dr. King regarding the international projects within Vietnam.

Letter from Morris Kight to MLK Regarding March on Washington

Thursday, November 16, 1967
Los Angeles, CA

This document is a letter from Morris Kight to Dr. King in which Kight expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's efforts and offers his assistance in mobilizing individuals for the planned March on Washington February 1968.

Memo from Edwin Berry and Melville Hosch to Freedom Government Conference Members

Wednesday, March 8, 1967
Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C.

The United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare details the purpose of the Freedom-Government Conference and outlines the objectives for the scheduled meetings in the spring.

Letter from Dr. King to W. Daniels

Tuesday, March 12, 1968
CANADA

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. responds to W. Daniels letter regarding a speaking invitation, March 12, 1968. Dr. King regrettably informs him that his intensive schedule restricts his ability to accept speaking engagements, for the next eight or nine months.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Wisconsin (WI), Selma, AL, Mississippi (MS), Tennessee (TN), Memphis, TN, Jackson, MS, MARTINIQUE, ALGERIA, VIETNAM, Missouri (MO)

Joan Daves, Literary Agent to Dr. King, addresses the correspondence, to Dr. King. The letter includes photostats of reviews for Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The Chicago Tribune, New York Times Daily and Washington Star are just a couple of the newspapers that published reviews for the book.

Walter Reuther Remarks at the March on Washington

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Walter P. Reuther, President of the International Union, UAW, expounds upon the cause of freedom and democracy in America from the perception of the external world. Reuther highlights the rights guaranteed by the United States Constitution and how they have been denied to African Americas living as "second-class" citizens. He further discusses the necessary duties of the United States Congress to recognize and initiate civil rights programs.

Telegram from C. C. Shell to MLK

Georgia (GA)

C. C. Shells writes Dr. King suggesting that segregationist Lester Maddox run for President of the United State with Dr. King as Vice President.