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Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding "A Stride to Freedom"

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

In this letter, J. Campe encloses the German royalties, received from J.G. Onken, for Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom" German language edition.

Letter from Irene M. Koch to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

Irene M. Koch uses a Native American legend of a man walking in the moccasins of his enemy to gain understanding of his enemy. She relates this legend to the current civil rights movement and specifically the civil rights movement in Chicago, Illinois.

Telegram from F. M. Horton to MLK

F. M. Horton relays Norwegian ambassador True Davis' congratulations to Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from L. Martinez to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Mrs. L. Martinez describes to Dr. King what she has observed about the Lawndale area in Chicago, Illinois. She suggests that instead of relocating to other neighborhoods, the tenants of Lawndale initiate a clean up of the area themselves.

Letter from John Coventry Smith to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965

John Coventry Smith, a member of the United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A., invites Dr. King to Brazil to speak at the Campinas Presbyterian Theological Seminary during his tenure in the South American country. Mr. Smith asserts that Dr. King's appearance is of importance to the young potential leaders of Brazil. Dr. King will further enlighten the Protestants in Brazil of the Christian faith to the racial issues in the United States.

Letter from Roy M. Green to MLK

Monday, September 18, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Green wants Dr. King to read and give an opinion on the three views of the "Black Ghetto" in the October issue of the Atlantic Monthly. Mr. Green states to Dr. King, "Our editors would be most interested in your opinions and comments".

Letter from Mrs. Catherine Hartman to MLK about a New Publication

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

In this letter Mrs. Catherine Hartman of Atheneum Publishers sends Dr. King a new publication, asking that Dr. King read it and offer any comments.

Telegram from Sen. Edward Kennedy to MLK

Saturday, October 17, 1964

Senator and Mrs. Edward M. Kennedy congratulate Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Gloria Cantor to Dora McDonald

Monday, April 17, 1967

Gloria Cantor, of Belafonte Enterprises, wrote to Dora McDonald requesting copies of Dr. King's speech at the Spring Mobilization.

Letter from Lucille Banta to MLK

Thursday, October 27, 1966

In addition to a financial contribution, Lucille Banta sends Dr. King a proposal for the civil rights and peace movements to oppose the Vietnam War. She suggests that they work together to "plan and organize a nationwide United Peace and Freedom Parade to Washington."

Post Card from Archie Brest to MLK

A supporter of the Vietnam War expresses his conflicting views regarding the struggle for democracy in Southeast Asia. In order to combat the brutality of North Vietnamese forces, he insists that American military presence will ultimately prove that "terror cannot succeed as a weapon in Vietnam, we shall discourage it's use anywhere."

NAIRO Supports March for Freedom

The National Association of Intergroup Relations Officials declares their support of the March for Freedom in Washington, D.C. NAIRO urges its members to support the march for the integration of over "20,000,000 Americans of minority identity."

Address Before the United Packinghouse Workers of America

At their Thirteenth Constitutional Convention in Minneapolis on May 21, 1962, Dr. King praises the United Packinghouse Workers Union of America for their dedication to civil rights. He states that the civil rights and labor movements share in common a concern for minimum wages, social security, health benefits, decent housing, job security and retirement security. He thanks them for the aid that they have provided and encourages them to continue fighting for equality.

Dr. King's Revealing Report On 'Summer of Discontent'

Dr. King's responses to the events in Birmingham, Alabama during the summer of 1963 are reported in this Chicago Sun-Times article.

Letter from MLK to Herschel McGee about a Corporation

Monday, October 4, 1965

In this letter Dr. King thanks Mr. McGee for his $50.00 check for the starting of a corporation for Negroes, but he lets McGee know that he is unable to concentrate on the devlopment and is returning his check.

K.O. Mbadiwe Contacts MLK

Friday, February 16, 1968

Kingsley Ozuomba Mbadiwe, Nigerian nationalist and politician, informs Dr. King of his travels to the United States. Mbadiwe ensures that he will contact King upon arrival. Dr. King and Mbadiwe were working on a proposal for a solution to the Nigerian-Biafran civil war. A peace mission to Nigeria was planned for April 1968.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Monica Wilson

Saturday, April 3, 1965

Dora McDonald, on behalf of Dr. King, responds to Monica Wilson at the University of Cape Town in acceptance of her invitation to speak at the institution. McDonald closes requesting confirmation of a date for Dr. King, as well as accommodation information.

Letter from MLK to Chris Folker of Sweden

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

Dr. King expresses gratitude for Chris Folcker's support and hospitality during his trip to Sweden. He also shares his satisfaction with the unique reaction of Mr. Folcker's organization.

SNCC - SCLC Alabama Staff Meeting

Friday, January 28, 1966

Randolph Blackwell updates Andrew Young of the recent SCLC and SNCC joint meeting intended to resolve any conflicts between the two organizations and their initiatives within the state of Alabama. The mounting tension between the two civil rights organizations is attributed to the rise of Black Panther Party chapters throughout the South, a phenomenon from which SCLC intends to distance itself.

Letter from Elaine Hinde to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968

Elaine Hinde inquires about materials and information from Dr. King in regards to Choice '68.

Letter From William S. Minor to MLK

Tuesday, June 22, 1965

William S. Minor writes Dr. King thanking him for responding to a personal invite regarding research on racial revolution.

Letter from Nathan Green to Ralph David Abernathy

Sunday, April 28, 1968

Here, Nathan Green requests to meet with Rev. Abernathy to discuss a plan that Green believes will be of "tremendous value" to their cause.

Letter from Mrs. Fenner to MLK

Mrs. Fenner, on behalf of the Faculty of P. S. 155, sends a contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference for use in the fight for African American Civil Rights.

Letter from MLK to Robert Lewis Jr.

Wednesday, July 19, 1967

Dr. King expounds on Mr. Lewis' experiences and how they directly correlate with the effects of the racial divide. Dr. King further explicates the emotional stress that one faces as a child of both Africa and America.

Addition to "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence"

This augmentation was intended to be included in Dr. King's "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence" essay published in the Christian Century on April 13, 1960. In the appendage, Dr. King discusses the personal afflictions he has endured as a result of his civil rights work including death threats, bombings of his home, and a near fatal stabbing. He states that suffering has a "redemptive quality" and discusses how he transformed his personal suffering into a "creative force" instead of reacting with bitterness.

Cities and Dates Suggested For Harry Belafonte's Tour

These notes compile a list of suggested cities and possible dates for Harry Belafonte's tour.

Justice

Dr. King provides his views regarding the concept of justice.

God (Niebuhr Conception)

Dr. King outlines Reinhold Niebuhr's views on God as outlined in "The Nature and Destiny of Man."

Mysticism

Dr. King cites Psalms 17:15, surmising that the vision of God is a mystical union with God.

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

Wednesday, May 10, 1967

Dr. King's address to the Hungry Club highlights an array of issues that relate to America's "Moral Dilemma." Dr. King explains the three major evil dilemmas that face the nation: war, poverty, and racism.