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"Albany, GA"

Letter from Senator Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1966
Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, ISRAEL, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Chicago, IL, Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL

Senator Robert Kennedy thanks Dr. King for a previous correspondence and expresses his aligned views regarding nonviolent reconciliation. Senator Kennedy believes in the preservation of dignity and freedom internationally without imposing "incessant military conflict" upon those with unaligned views. He references Dr. King's statement regarding the precedence of progress in America to that of other countries. He also wishes to hear Dr. King's reaction to a series of his speeches on "A Program for the Urban Crisis" that he has attached.

Letter from Dudley P. Babcock to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967
Virginia (VA), New York, NY, VIETNAM

Dudley Babcock writes Dr. King to express his views on race relations and Dr. King's leadership role in America. Babcock also discusses the march Dr. King is planning to lead in New York to promote peace in Vietnam.

SCLC Press Release, Poor People's Campaign

Monday, March 4, 1968
Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), VIETNAM, Selma, AL

In this press release intended for the American public and media outlets, Dr. King argues that the country is "splitting into two hostile societies and the chief destructive cutting force is white racism." The SCLC President asserts that the federal government fails to eradicate social ills, like poverty, unless it is "confronted directly and massively." Henceforth, the nonviolent April 1968 Poor People's Campaign is intended to serve as the "final victory over racism and poverty."

Office of Economic Opportunity Community Action Program

This document details a budget for the Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee's Project Administration component.

Press Statement: MLK Agrees to Moscow Trip Regarding Vietnam

NORWAY, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, UNITED KINGDOM, VIETNAM, BELGIUM

This press release announces that Dr. King has agreed to join with other Nobel Peace laureates for a meeting in Moscow in early October [1967] with the Ambassador of North Vietnam and the Ambassador of the National Liberation Front regarding a possible Vietnam peace settlement. Dr. King will go with Fr. Georges Dominique Pire of Belgium, who won the Peace Prize in 1958. The mission is the result of a private Norwegian initiative with financial backing from the Norwegian government.

Letter from T. Jansma to MLK

Monday, July 26, 1965
NETHERLANDS

The General Secretary of the Baptists in the Netherlands praises Dr. King for receiving an honorary degree from Vrije Unversiteit in Amsterdam and inquires if he is available to deliver any speeches in the Netherlands during the same time period.

Letter from Usher Board of Saint Luke Community Church to MLK

Thursday, December 24, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA)

The Usher Board of the Saint Luke Community Christian Church invites Dr. King to be a guest speaker at their church.

Letter from Albert E. Manley to MLK

Tuesday, September 3, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Spelman College President Albert E. Manley congratulates Dr. King for the "highly effective" March on Washington. Manley commends Dr. King for his "I Have A Dream" speech. He found the speech inspirational and considers it to be "one of the greatest speeches of this century." As a result of their continued support to the struggle, the Manleys enclose a financial contribution to assist the work of the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Sara B. Jackson

Friday, April 13, 1956
New York, NY

Dr. King extends gratitude to Mrs. Jackson for her moral and financial support.

Letter from Wilbert McDonald to MLK regarding Scholarship Assistance

Wednesday, June 9, 1965
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Wilber McDonald requests advice about the development of his educational career from Dr. King.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK about a Publication

Monday, May 18, 1964
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Berlin, Germany

Joan Daves informs Dr. King about the German publishers and their inquiry about a special introduction for the German edition of "Why We Can't Wait." Joan Daves also asked for Dr. King's opinion about whether the press conference should be in Berlin or elsewhere.

Letter from New York Third Grader Debbie Bass to MLK

Tuesday, April 6, 1965
New York (NY), Alabama (AL)

Third grade student Debbie Bass chose Dr. King for her writing assignment. Bass feels that Dr. King was the right individual chosen to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. She also conveys her frustration towards Alabama Governor George Wallace for not allowing Negroes to vote.

Letter from Jan A. Hatch & Norman A. Bacon to MLK

Tuesday, February 23, 1965
Massachusetts (MA), Selma, AL

Jan Hatch and Norman Bacon, white citizens of Athol, Massachusetts, write Dr. King inquiring about how they can contribute to the fight for racial equality. They inform him of the non-existent Negro population in Athol and request information on how to join the NAACP if it is conducive to their movement and financial limitations.

Luther

Dr. King references the political philosophy Martin Luther and quotes, "I will side always with him, however unjust, who endures rebellion and against him who rebels, however unjust."

Letter from Robert L. Green to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Illinois (IL), Michigan (MI)

Robert Green requests for Dr. King to write an introduction to the book, "Education and the Urban Poor."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Cantor Mendelson regarding I Have A Dream

Tuesday, November 2, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY

In this letter, Dora McDonald tells Cantor Mendelson that Dr. King is pleased to know that the Men's Club of Beth Sholom is interested in setting to music excerpts from "I Have a Dream." McDonald refers Mendelson to Clarence Jones, an attorney who handles such matters.

Letter from R. Edward Dodge, Jr. to MLK

Saturday, June 19, 1965
Ohio (OH), Baltimore, MD

This letter dated June 19, 1965, was written to Dr. King from R. Edward Dodge, Jr. In this letter Mr. Dodge, a Caucasian man asks Dr.King if he can help him find integrated housing in Baltimore, Maryland. He will be moving there in a year to study at the John Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. He wants to bring his family with him and he wants his children to interact and become friends with other black children. He asks for Dr. King's help without any fanfare.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. Eric N. Gerdeman

Tuesday, October 22, 1963
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Virginia (VA)

Dora McDonald informs Eric N. Gerdeman that Dr. King is unable to provide an article due to his involvement in Birmingham, Alabama, Danville, Virginia, and writing assignments already accepted.

Letter from MLK to Johnnie McKinney

Thursday, May 13, 1965
Wyoming (WY)

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in Cheyenne, Wyoming "under the auspices of the NAACP."

Letter from Isaac Foster Regarding a Scholarship

Tuesday, March 28, 1967
New York, NY

Isaac Foster, a student at Queens College, informs his reader of reasons why he should be awarded a scholarship.

Letter from Rabbi Philip Hiat to MLK

Wednesday, January 30, 1963
New York, NY, New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA

Rabbi Philip Hiat, Executive Vice-President of the Synagogue Council of America, invites Dr. King to meet with Jewish religious leaders.

Irene Dunaway Requests Sermon from SCLC

Thursday, April 6, 1967
California (CA), San Francisco, CA

Irene V. Dunaway of Daly City, California writes the members of SCLC requesting a copy of Dr. King's recent address on the ABC network. She admires the sermon as "one of the greats," and would also like to "brush up" on her knowledge of history pertaining to Vietnam.

Letter from Mrs. Uvee Mdodana-Arbouin to MLK

Friday, August 2, 1963
New York (NY), Birmingham, AL

Mrs. Mdondana-Arbouin, President of the Women's Auxiliary of the Progressive Baptist National Convention, sends Dr. King the lyrics to the poem she delivered at their organization's recent dinner.

MLK's Statement on Endorsing a 1960 Presidential Candidate

Tuesday, November 1, 1960
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King states that the SCLC is a non-partisan organization and that he cannot endorse a political party or candidate. He then goes on to express gratitude for Senator Kennedy and Mayor Hartsfield for their continuous support and leadership.

Jesus' Ethical Character

Dr. King documents biblical passages that highlight Jesus' virtues.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Alfred T. Davies

Monday, October 21, 1963
Ohio (OH)

Dora McDonald informs Rev. Alfred T. Davies that Dr. King will not be able to submit a sermon for "The Church Speaks on Race." Dr. King has just published "Strength to Love," which includes his sermons on many of the aspects of the civil rights movement.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967
MALAYSIA, Atlanta, GA, SINGAPORE

This letter, signed "A Malaysian Citizen," expresses the author's hatred of African Americans. In addition to urging for their genocide, the author states that African Americans ought to be grateful that they are no longer enslaved. The author tasks the recipients of this letter, including Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and President Johnson, to circulate it widely in order to express what he claims are the Malaysian views of the 20th century.

Letter from Anna Hedgeman to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. Hedgeman writes Dr. King to express her support for Dr. King's quality service that he has given America. He then targets Dr. King on a letter he received on the representation of the slogan "Black Power." Dr. Hedgeman feels the slogan relates strongly towards extremists and black supremacy. Lastly, she encloses a small contribution and two letters.

Letter from William F. Grant to MLK

Tuesday, July 6, 1965
Illinois (IL)

After being insulted by a solicitation from the SCLC, William Grant lectures Dr. King on the morality of his methods and strongly disfavors the work of several civil rights groups and the civil rights struggle as a whole.