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"Albany, GA"

Letter from L. K. Jackson to MLK

Tuesday, January 22, 1963

Reverend L. K. Jackson commends Dr. King on his ongoing efforts in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to Dorothy O. Bucklin

Thursday, December 5, 1963

Dr. King graciously declines Mrs. Bucklin's invitation to speak in Green Lake, Wisconsin under the "auspices" of the American Baptist Convention. Mrs. Bucklin serves as Associate Executive Secretary of the American Baptist Home Mission Society.

Letter from Congressman James Roosevelt to MLK

Tuesday, February 25, 1964

Representative James Roosevelt thanks Dr. King for his words regarding Roosevelt's contribution to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Background of the Speakers

This document lists speakers for rallies in New York and San Francisco and gives a short biography of each person. The speakers include people such as Dr. Benjamin Spock, Dr. King, Rev. James Bevel, Floyd McKissick, Julian Bond and others. The document also lists folk singers for each rally location, a list that includes Pete Seeger.

MLK Itinerary

This document details the meetings and events set to take place during Dr. King's trip to Europe, Asia, Africa and Hawaii over a 55 day span.

Dr. King Sermon Outline

The document, shown here, contains an outline for a sermon given by Dr. King. The sermon was entitled, "The Fellow Who Stayed at Home." According, to the outline, Dr. King breaks down two types of sin: Sins of Passion and Sins of Disposition.

Letter from Geraldine Jones to MLK

In this letter, Geraldine Jones tells Dr. King about the heightened racial tension in Chicago, and her fear that Chicago will soon have a riot like Los Angeles.

Four Top Rights Leaders Considering Africa Trip

Monday, December 18, 1967

Roy Wilkins, Dr. King, Whitney Young, and A. Philip Randolph, four of America's top civil rights leaders, are considering making a trip to Africa to stop the war in Nigeria. These leaders also serve as members on the call committee of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa.

Letter from Esther Jackson to MLK

Monday, June 28, 1965

Esther Jackson of the New York Shakespeare Festival sends Dr. King a "discussion letter" to raise the issue of desegregating the arts. Nationwide, new arts programs will emerge and existing organizations funded as part of "Great Society" programs. Jackson calls for an effort to prevent discrimination in such programs now rather than attempting to dislodge discrimination after it becomes further entrenched. She outlines the beginning of a response to the issue.

Why Negroes Are Still Angry

Friday, July 1, 1966

American journalist Victor Bernstein details for Redbook why Negroes are still angry in the face of the apparent success of the Civil Rights Movement. He points out that the Movement has enabled many whites to see that integration and equal rights are right, but still knowingly choose to behave as if they are wrong.

Letter from T. M. Benson to MLK

Wednesday, July 10, 1963

A representative from Peak Publications requests Dr. King's permission to use a portion of "Letter from Birmingham Jail" in a tract concerning racial issues and the church. The sender offers a hundred dollars for permission to reprint this section.

Outline on Aristotle

In this outline, Dr. King documents elements of Aristotelian philosophy which deal with ethics and metaphysics. The outline includes a brief biography which chronicles Aristotle's life and a reference to his well known work "Nicomachean Ethics."

Affidavit of Captain G.V. Evans

Wednesday, April 10, 1963

G.V. Evans, a captain in the Police Department of the City of Birmingham, confirms a series of sit-ins and marches that took place in Birmingham. The nonviolent actions, called Project C, was headed by Wyatt Tee Walker. Captain Evans believes that this conduct will result in serious injury to the police department and the demonstrators.

Joint Statement of MLK and SCLC

Friday, April 30, 1965

Dr. King and John Lewis deliver a statement concerning a meeting presided over by Harry Belafonte. The meeting was intended to discover ways that the SCLC and SNCC could cooperate and concluded with an agreement for both organizations to work together but separately towards a voting bill and other goals.

Letter to Mrs. King from Maria Stimma

Friday, April 5, 1968

Maria Stimma wrote this letter to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King's assassination.

No, Mr. King: Your Ad in the Times is Not Clear!

This anonymous author writes Dr. King expressing dissent in his viewpoint on riots.

Letter from Eulah M. Eubank to MLK

Monday, February 19, 1968

In this letter, Eulah Eubank writes Dr. King regarding the Washington, D.C. Camp-In. She states she is "not...opposed" to marches and sit-ins, but feels that the Camp-In would be counter-productive. She believes it "will ad [sic] fuel to fires the extremists are trying build."

MLK's Address About South Africa

Friday, December 10, 1965

Addressing the apartheid situation in South Africa, Dr. King states that white rulers of South Africa, rather than black Africans, are "modern day barbarians." He continues to say that although black South Africans are the majority, they are oppressed by the minority. This is one of many occasions that Dr. King parallels racial injustices and views civil rights as an international issue.

Draft of Speech for SCLC in Nashville

Dr. King is outlining a speech he later presented to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in Nashville.

Letter from MLK to Devorah E. Sherman

Friday, July 31, 1964

Dr. King writes Mrs. Devorah Sherman to thank her for her financial contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from Joan Daves to Miss Dora McDonald

Friday, March 26, 1965

Dr. King's literary agent Joan Daves requests that Dora McDonald send her the full text of Dr. King's speech in Montgomery. She also reports on Dr. King's recent book royalties.

Huge Crowd Hears King Speak

Friday, November 4, 1966

The University of Pittsburgh's campus newspaper, "The Pitt News," reports that Dr. King's speech drew a larger crowd than "John Kennedy, Theodore Sorenson or Herbert Aptheker when these men spoke at the University." Dr. King answers questions about issues such as Vietnam, Black Power, white backlash and Negro anti-Semitism. He also discussed the importance of an anti-poverty effort, particularly when examining what is spent on the war in Vietnam and the nation's space program.

Letter from Mary T. Clark to MLK

Wednesday, November 11, 1964

This letter from the Social Action Secretariat, National Federation of Catholic College Students references an enclosed letter which was issued to all member colleges. The enclosed letter supports student activity in the 1964 Freedom Fast.

Articles Regarding Strides Made in the Civil Rights Movement

This SCLC news bulletin published around 1964, discloses information regarding Dr. King and others staying in the Birmingham jail. Also included are updates on the progress of the Civil Rights Movement in various cities, additions and changes within the SCLC and relationships with familiar and notable personalities.

Two Poems for MLK

The unknown author writes two poems titled, "A Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." and "Time! Time!! Time!!!" One of the poems uses the letters of Dr. King's name for the leading word of each verse.

Letter from Uvee Mdodana Arbouin to MLK

Monday, April 19, 1965

Uvee Arbouin thanks Dr. King for a past letter and encloses a financial contribution. She expresses that he has never received a donation that is "backed with" so much gratitude for his leadership.

Hegel

Dr. King discusses the Hegelian philosophy regarding man and God.

White House Message on Civil Rights

Friday, January 26, 1968

President Johnson's message to Congress explains strides the U.S. has made in the social, educational and economic conditions of minorities in America. It also discusses areas that need improvement such as infant mortality rates and poverty levels among non-whites. The President calls for legislation to prevent violence against those exercising their civil rights, to strengthen enforcement powers of the Equal Employment Opportunities Commission, to prevent discrimination on federal and state juries, and to guarantee fair housing.

Categories

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich’s "Systematic Theology.”

Joshua and Judges

Dr. King cites Biblical scriptures from the books of Joshua, Judges, and 1 Samuel.