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"Albany, GA"

Telegram from MLK to Eartha Kitt

Thursday, May 16, 1963

Dr. King thanks singer-actress Eartha Kitt for her generous support and deep concern for the people of Birmingham, Alabama, and elsewhere in the South. He extends his appreciation to those in the Harlem Apollo Theatre who have contributed in response to her example.

Schleiermacher

Dr. King quotes theologian Schleiermacher regarding the meaning of a miracle.

Letter from Rev. Celestine Fernado to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

The Editor of the Ceylon Churchman, Reverend Celestine Fernando, request a copy of Dr. King's letter from jail to publish in the magazine. Reverend Fernando is certain that this publication is a great message and will allow the church to re-evaluate its work.

"Negro Rights: Key Dates"

This image depicts the chronological history of laws passed as it pertains to the life and wellbeing of Negros. The first date of reference is January 1st, 1863, the day when slavery was abolished.

JFK's Executive Order In Housing

Thursday, December 13, 1962

This document is a draft of an article, written by Dr. King, to be placed in the Amsterdam Newspaper. Dr. King breaks down the housing order signed into law by President Kennedy. He makes clear that housing discrimination is a large hurdle to ending segregation.

Note card-Dr.King

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Herbet Spencer's views on religion. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

SCLC Chicago Adult Education Project

Tuesday, September 12, 1967

In this progress report, Robert L. Green and Stoney Cooks outline the education and employment conditions facing African Americans in the Lawndale community of Chicago, Illinois. The two authors further outline the program objectives, procedures, organization, and funding of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Chicago Adult Education Project which seeks to address Lawndale's social issues.

Letter Dated 10/15/62 from D. McDonald to Mel Arnold

Monday, October 15, 1962

Miss. Dora McDonald, at the request of Dr. King, sent a letter to Mr. Mel Arnold acknowledging the enclosure of a sermon by Dr. King. The sermon was entitled, "How Should a Christian View Communism?"

Letter from MLK to Gleason Jackson Regarding Negro National Flag

Thursday, July 13, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Mr. Jackson for designing a flag promoting unity among black people. Although Dr. Kings feels a flag such as this has implications of separatism, he encourages Mr. Jackson to continue publicizing his ideas regarding black unity.

Promotional Article for Why We Can't Wait

This Harper released publication contains a preview of the religious books to be published in the summer and fall of 1964. Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait" is featured with the byline "The 'Man of the Year' writes the 'Book of the Year'."

Letter from Ernest C. Copper to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Ernest Cooper, Executive Director of the Urban League of Cleveland, seeks a meeting with Dr. King to discuss how the two agencies can cooperate on the tentative Cleveland program announced by SCLC.

Letter from Canary McKay to MLK

Friday, February 4, 1966

Canary McKay shows her appreciation to Dr. King for the progress made as a result of the Civil Rights Movement. She also extends an invitation for King to speak at her church.

Minutes for the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights

Wednesday, April 19, 1967

The minutes for this meeting include the Civil Rights act of 1967, the "Freedom Budget," and discrimination in military off-post housing.

Letter from MLK to Roger Boone

Tuesday, August 31, 1965

Dr. King thanks Roger Boone for his financial contribution to the SCLC. He emphasizes the importance of contributions like Boone's to the SCLC's ability to continue its work.

Letter from Wilfred Laurier Husband to John B. Oakes of the New York Times

Friday, April 7, 1967

Wilfred Husband writes John Oakes, Editorial Page Editor of the New York Times, regarding an article. As a consistent reader of the Magazine, Husband expresses his displeasure with an article that refers to the civil right movement's attention to the war in Vietnam as "wasteful and self-defeating." Husband explains how war and civil rights are inseparable and that stating anything in opposition hurts the cause of the movement.

Invitation to 101st Founders' Day of Morehouse College

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

In this letter, Joseph Draper, a former classmate, invites Dr. King to the 101st Founders' Day Inauguration activities at Morehouse College. Draper hopes for Dr. King's attendance, as he feels this will give support to newly instated President Gloster.

Bible 252

This exam from a course entitled "Bible 252" lists forty-eight questions regarding Biblical knowledge.

Letter from Silvio Conte to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Massachusetts Congressman Silvio Conte thanks Dr. King for a previous telegram sent to him regarding the pending 1965 Voting Rights Act. Conte highlights his longtime support of the Civil Rights Movement and pledges his efforts to assist in passing this historic legislation.

Advice for Living

Dr. King addresses questions in the "Advice for Living" column published in Ebony Magazine on February 12, 1958.

Autograph Request

German citizen, Reinhold Kohl, requests an autograph of Dr. King for his collection.

The National Council of Negro Women

This brochure gives a brief overview of the NCNW and the positive results its had on the Negro community.

Telegram from Alexander Edelmann to MLK

Alexander Edelmann, a professor from the University of Nebraska, criticizes Dr. King for not taking a stance against black rioters in Atlanta. Edelmann mentions the he once was a supporter of Dr. King, but now considers him "irresponsible."

Letter from Harry H. Wachtel to Charles W. Englehard

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Harry Wachtel writes Charles Englehard thanking him for his payment of $5,000 toward a $15,000 pledge to The American Foundation On Nonviolence. He states that his initial contribution was extremely helpful in registering African Americans in Mississippi and other southern states.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Saturday, March 23, 1968

An anonymous supporter sends an encouraging letter to Dr. King.

Letter from Grace Newman to Rev. Abernathy

Saturday, April 27, 1968

Ms. Grace Newman, National Chairman of the Fort Hood Three Defense Committee, informs Rev. Abernathy of her support of his leadership in SCLC. In honor of her pledge to Dr. King, she promises to continue working to organize poor communities in Puerto Rico.

Press Release on Voter Registration

Monday, October 12, 1964

The purpose of this press release is to announce Dr. King's nationwide campaign to get individuals to vote in the 1964 presidential election. With sponsorship from the SCLC, Dr. King urges religious leaders to talk to their respective congregations to encourage voter registration. Rev. Walter Fauntroy, who pastored the New Bethel Baptist Church in Washington D.C., will lead the initiative.

SCLC North Carolina Field Report

Golden Frinks, a SCLC field secretary who represented the New Bern, North Carolina chapter, releases a field report. This report discusses the SCLC Action Program in North Carolina, and includes a monthly overview of the SCLC's contributions.

Postcard Sent to MLK

This unsigned postcard sent from Memphis, Tennessee depicts Dr. King and Lyndon B. Johnson pulling down a judge who symbolizes justice.

Educational Conference Program 1967

Tuesday, May 2, 1967

Dr. King serves as a guest speaker at a conference sponsored by The Allied Educational Foundation. This program outlines the itinerary for the event including the presentations of other speakers namely Max Lerner, Harrison E. Salisbury, Senator Gale W. McGee, and Stanley Levey.

Letter from Frank Thompson Jr. to MLK

Monday, February 17, 1964

New Jersey Democratic Congressman Frank Thompson thanks Dr. King for his message regarding the Congressman's part in the fight for civil rights. Thompson mentions that he considers Dr. King to be one of the "great leaders" of their generation.