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"Albany, GA"

Letter from L. H. Stibbards to MLK

Thursday, April 1, 1965

Mr. Stibbards sends a donation and words of encouragement from the McMaster Divinity Student's Association. He assures Dr. King that their members are at Dr. King's service.

Letter from Clara Sturges Johnson to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1963

Ms. Johnson informs Dr. King of her efforts promoting the passing of the "Kennedy Civil Rights Memorial Act." The United States Congress would go on to pass this act in 1964.

Letter from Esther Jackson to MLK

Monday, June 28, 1965

Esther Jackson of the New York Shakespeare Festival sends Dr. King a "discussion letter" to raise the issue of desegregating the arts. Nationwide, new arts programs will emerge and existing organizations funded as part of "Great Society" programs. Jackson calls for an effort to prevent discrimination in such programs now rather than attempting to dislodge discrimination after it becomes further entrenched. She outlines the beginning of a response to the issue.

Letter from the Chairman of the Martin Luther King Fund to MLK

Thursday, August 1, 1963

The Chairman of the Martin Luther King Fund informs Dr. King that they have distributed copies of the Letter from Birmingham Jail. Those who read the letter were impressed and described it as a "masterful job." The organization contributes to the SCLC for lobbying the passage of the President's Civil Rights Bill.

Address by MLK at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

Wednesday, April 19, 1961

In his address to the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Dr. King discusses the subject of the "Church on the Frontier of Racial Tension." King describes the crisis state of the US as it passes from an old order of segregation to a new order of integration, proclaiming that this is both a moral issues as well as a political issues. King implores the church to open the channels of communication between races and institute social reform, especially economic justice. Lastly, he invites all people to step into the new age with understanding and creative good will in their hearts.

Draft of a Letter from MLK to Dr. Lawrence Alex Whitfield

This is a draft of a letter written by Dr. King to Dr. Lawrence Alex Whitfield. Dr. King indicates that he recieved a letter from Barbara Payne which suggested that Dr. Whitfield had expressed a desire to support the Freedom Movement and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from MLK to Reverend David A. Gibbons

Wednesday, June 19, 1963

Dr. King writes this letter of appreciation to Reverend David A. Gibbons, Executive Secretary of the Denison Christian Association at Denison University. King is overjoyed to accept the $255 donation from several students and faculty members of the university. He explains the importance of the contribution and how it supports SCLC's voter registration work in Birmingham.

Letter from MLK to Griffin R. Simmons

Wednesday, September 5, 1962

Dr. King informs Mr. Simmons, President of the Consolidate Association, that he will not be able to travel to New York to accept an award from the association due to the struggle in the South.

Letter from Anne Jewett to MLK

In this letter dated May 5, 1967, Jewett informs King of her song. Let There Be Peace. Jewett believes that this simple song is what churches and peace marchers need, so that they can be heard. She has given the song to King in hopes that the people everywhere will be able to sing out.

Nobel Prize Atlanta Dinner Address Outline

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Dr. King outlines his address for the January 27, 1965 recognition dinner honoring him for the Nobel Peace Prize. He intends to speak on topics of racial justice, nonviolence and poverty, while discussing the strides made by the movement and the uphill battles still to be faced. Over 1000 people attended the program, the first integrated dinner in Atlanta's history.

Speech at NAACP World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964

Dr. King links the quest for individual civil rights to the global struggle for human rights and states that the nation that will achieve preeminence in the world is the one that both guarantees human rights for all and provides for basic needs.

Letter from MLK to Madame Bremond

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

Dr. King writes Madame Bremond to send his heartfelt thanks regarding his visit to Lyons, France. The Reverend follows with expressing his appreciation for Bremond's hospitality and wonderful reception.

Letter from Harry G. Boyte to Coretta Scott King

Tuesday, October 20, 1964

In this letter, Harry G. Boyte offers his personal admiration to Mrs. King for the "strength [she has] provided Dr. King."

Letter from Rev. Pavel Titera to MLK

Saturday, December 11, 1965

Pavel Titera responds to a letter from Dr. King, in which he expressed his hope for a coming to visit. Titera sends well wishes for Dr. King and his family, and encloses a photograph of his family "as a token of the brotherly love."

Letter from James Shaffer and James Barfield

Friday, July 29, 1966

Mr. Shaffer and Mr. Barfield both thank Dr. King and the SCLC for thier works for humanity.

Telegram from Dorothy Height to MLK

Saturday, December 5, 1964

Dorothy Height, President of the National Council of Negro Women, sends Dr. King well wishes.

Legal Petition Made by Karl Von Key Against Selective Service System

Wednesday, June 15, 1966

Karl Von Key petitions the United States District Court of California about his draft into the armed forces. He contends that, as a person of color, he is a colonial subject, not a citizen of the United States. As a colonial subject, he should not be forced to serve in the military. He also writes that he is a conscientious objector and that he believes he was targeted by the local induction station because of his social and political views.

Telegram from Zaira Singh to Pope Paul VI

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

Mrs. Singh, a Roman Catholic, requests that Pope Paul VI becomes a hostage in Hanoi, in order to end "barbarous American bombardment."

Letter from Thomas H. Rogers to MLK

Saturday, February 11, 1967

On Race Relations Sunday, Thomas H. Rogers writes this letter to express his brotherhood and prayers for Dr. King. Emphasizing that one live a life acceptable to God, Rogers believes that God, not man, makes the only judgement. Though of a different race than Dr. King, Rogers sees Dr. King as his brother in Christ and encourages him to do God's biding.

Letter from Ben Carper to MLK

Tuesday, December 12, 1967

Ben Carper expresses his opinion in regards to Dr. King's position on Communism. Mr. Carper states that Dr. King is, "playing hand in glove with Godless Communists."

Letter from Rev. John B. Morris to MLK

Wednesday, October 19, 1960

Rev. John B. Morris writes Dr. King while he is in the city jail in Atlanta, Georgia. Morris asserts that Dr. King's stay in jail will "renew strength to the student movement."

MLK Statement about the New York Riots

Monday, July 27, 1964

Dr. Kind addresses the press' claim that civil rights leaders are involved in the outbreak of riots in New York. He says that violence creates more social problems than it solves. He says that government officials need to take responsibility and help all American citizens gain justice and equality.

Biographical Sketch of James Bevel

This one page biography summarizes the achievements of James Bevel, one of the founding members of SNCC. The biography highlights Bevel's involvement with civil rights drives in Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi, including the Freedom Rides and numerous SCLC action programs.

Telegram from Tina McDonald to MLK

Tina McDonald wishes Dr. King a happy birthday and is pleased to send God's blessings of courage and strength.

Letter from Steve Addams to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Steve Addams writes Dr. King expressing his gratitude for Dr. King's work. Addams also offers his condolences for the death of Martin Luther King, Sr.

Memorandum to MLK about Black Power and the Marks of Slavery

This memorandum to Dr. King addresses the significance of black power and the marks of slavery. It also references excerpts from "The Peculiar Institution" by Kenneth Stampp.

Letter from MLK to Robert McDougal, Jr.

Tuesday, December 14, 1965

Dr. King thanks Robert McDougal, Jr. for his contribution and support to SCLC and the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.

Letter to MLK from Paul Kennedy

Saturday, March 16, 1968

Paul Kennedy writes Dr. King to state that since Robert Kennedy announced his bid for the presidency, he believes hat an appreciative, token march on Washington would be more effective than a force march this year.

Index Card with Dr. King's Handwritten Theology Notes

This notecard seems to elucidate some of Dr. King's personal insights on the relationship between Christianity and society.This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses. Topics covered include theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches and sermons.

Hegel

Dr. King discusses the Hegelian philosophy regarding man and God.