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Letter from Charles E. Rogers to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

Charles Rogers writes Dr. King expressing his grief because of King's recent "allegiance to the communist cause in Southeast Asia." Rogers states that because of Dr. King's speech, his fame will face a decline and people will ask, "who is Martin Luther King?"

Affidavit of Cleopatra Kennedy

Monday, April 15, 1963

After being arrested in Birmingham for "parading without a permit" in 1963, Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights singer Cleopatra Kennedy gave this notarized affidavit describing the incident.

Letter from Steve Adams to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Steve Adams devotes his support to Dr. King and the nonviolent movement. He mistakenly expresses condolences to Dr. King on the death of his father. However, Dr. King's father "Daddy King" would not pass away until November of 1984.

People in Action: The South -- A Hostile Nation

Saturday, May 11, 1963

In his regular column for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the unfair economic conditions of Negroes in America. He further explains how the employment rate of Negroes in America contribute to economic hardships.

How to Believe in a Good God in the Midst of Glaring Evil

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "How to Believe in a Good God in the Midst of Glaring Evil." In this sermon, King asserts that in many instances the facts of life contradicts a believer's faith, and poses reasons why one should hold firm to their faith.

Press Release from SCLC on New Biography of MLK

Monday, October 19, 1964

This 1964 press release from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference focuses on a new biography of Dr. King "...written especially for children."

Letter from Paul Feldman to MLK About New Publications

Friday, January 26, 1968

In this letter Paul Feldman, the Publications Coordinator for the League for Industrial Democracy, informs Dr. King of the upcoming publication of a new work entitled, "American Power in the Twentieth Century" by Michael Harrington. Feldman also informs Dr. King of the predicted demand for the publication and urges him to place his order early.

Letter From Elaine Kennedy to MLK Regarding the Media

Wednesday, June 30, 1965

In this document Kennedy, a medical secretary, writes to Dr. King expressing her political concern in reference to the use of racial designations in the media.

MLK Interview: The Negro Protest

Kenneth B. Clark conducts a televised interview with Dr. King, James Baldwin, and Malcolm X. Clark discusses with Dr. King his personal history, the relationship between the love ethic and nonviolent direct action, Malcolm X's claim that nonviolence is perceived by white leaders as weakness, and Baldwin's concern that Negroes will not remain nonviolent if met with brutal responses.

Letter from Clark Foreman to MLK

Wednesday, October 21, 1964

Clark Foreman, Director of the Emergency Civil Liberties Committee, congratulates Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize. Mr. Foreman also asks Dr. King to send a message of congratulations to Dr. James A. Dombrowski, who will receive the Tom Paine Award at the 1964 Bill of Rights Dinner. Dombrowski, a Methodist minister, was co-founder of the Highlander Folk School in Tennessee.

94:17 General Correspondence 1966(B)

Thursday, April 21, 1966

Mrs. Burke, a representative of the Wisconsin Council of Teachers of English, requests permission to reprint several exerts from the "I Have a Dream" address. The material will be included in the Johnson publication, entitled "The Day They Marched".

Memo from Dora McDonald to MLK

This document is a memo updating Dr. King of requests, invitations and current SCLC finances.

Letter from MLK to the Grand Textile Corporation

Friday, February 24, 1967

Dr. King thanks the Grand Textile Corporation for their contribution to the SCLC.

Getting Caught in the Negative

Dr. King references the Book of Acts regarding his sermon "Getting Caught in the Negative." King asserts, "Don't get bogged down in the negative. Christianity must forever offer to the world a dynamic positive."

Letter from MLK to Melvin W. Trent

Friday, November 26, 1965

Dr. King recommends that Melvin W. Trent file a complaint with the Civil Rights Commission about the unjust labor situation in Newport News.

Letter from Loretta Dun to the SCLC

Monday, December 16, 1963

Loretta Dunn, secretary for the Providence for Civil Rights, Inc., contributes to the SCLC for their efforts in the field of civil rights.

Lecture Tour Request from David Bilk to MLK

Wednesday, October 5, 1966

David Bilk, representing the British National Union of Students, requests that Dr. King present a lecture series for the larger British Universities explaining the past, present, future of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.

Enclosure to MLK - A Call for a National Fast by CALCAV

This is an enclosure that accompanied a letter dated March 22, 1968 from John C. Bennett to Dr. King. Dr. King spoke often of the need of fasting to repent for the sin of Vietnam, and was closely associated with the Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam (CALCAV). Between the writing of this letter and the event itself, Dr. King would be assassinated.

Temporary Injunction Filed Against Wyatt Tee Walker

Wednesday, April 10, 1963

This is a legal document for a temporary injunction filed by the city of Birmingham against Wyatt Tee Walker.

Dr. King Sermon Outline

Dr. King prepares notes for the sermon "Three Levels of Fellowship" deriving from 1st Corinthians 1:2, 9.

Letter from Michael Hamilton to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967

Rev. Michael Hamilton, Washington Cathedral Canon, thanks Dr. King for contributing a speech to be published in the book "The Vietnam War - Christian Perspectives." Rev. Hamilton informs Dr. King that proceeds from the book will be donated to the Swiss International Committee of the Red Cross. He also invites Dr. King to preach at the Cathedral and use the platform to discuss current Congressional legislation. Dr. King would eventually preach his last sermon at the Washington Cathedral on March 31, 1968, four days before his assassination.

Letter from Harl Douglass to MLK and the SCLC

Wednesday, March 9, 1966

Harl Douglass writes in disgust at the position Dr. King has taken on Vietnam War. As a once full supporter of the civil rights movement, he believes that Dr. King "is somewhat unstable and he has made millions of enemies for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference....." Douglass warns Dr. King and SCLC officials that if they continue to go down the same track they will lose support of white moderates.

Freedom (Of Choice)

Dr. King quotes Thomas Huxley's "Collected Essays" on the freedom to do right and to do wrong.

Psychology

This series of note cards addresses psychology through the means of human unity. The concept of human unity is indicated by the presence of the body and the soul working in conjunction to inform the human experience. Dr. King references the views of St. Augustine and St. Thomas as it pertains to "the close union between body and soul."

Dr. King's Revealing Report On 'Summer of Discontent'

Dr. King's responses to the events in Birmingham, Alabama during the summer of 1963 are reported in this Chicago Sun-Times article.

MLK Draft Notes: Worship

Dr. King preached this sermon at Dexter Avenue Baptist church on August 7, 1955. In this handwritten outline, Dr. King focuses on the practice of worship, claiming that it is an intrinsic part of human culture. After outlining a negative definition of worship, he approaches it from a "positive angle," describing a multitude of experiences he deems worshipful. Ultimately, he asserts that worship is useful on both a private and public level as it "helps us to transcend the hurly-burly of everyday life."

Tillich's Method

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich’s “The Protestant Era.” He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”

Pledge of Support from Thelma Rutherford

Wednesday, March 15, 1967

Thelma Rutherford, Missions Representative for the Church of the Savior in Washington D. C., pledges the churches support for Dr. King and the work of the SCLC. She encloses a check for $500.00 with this letter.

Letter from Daniel B. Brewster to MLK

Monday, July 20, 1964

Senator Brewster thanks Dr. King for his kind letter and encloses a copy of the speech he delivered on the Senate floor before the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was passed.

Perceiving God (Wieman)

Dr. King writes notes on perceiving God using Nelson Henry Wieman's text, "The Source of Human God."